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Desmos and Statistics! Resources from the AP Statistics Reading “Techstravaganza” – June 2019 in Kansas City, Bob Lochel and Leigh Nataro

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I am proud to be the program chair for the 2019 PCTM Conference in August, with my good friend Sue Negro.

The preliminary lineup of speakers appears in the file below. With Keynotes by Dan Meyer and Robert Berry, a Desmos pre-conference the day before, and our first ever trivia night, it’s going to be a great 2 days in Harrisburg!

Register today and get all the details:
https://www.eventbrite.com/e/pctm-annual-conference-registration-52503521446

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For the first time in many years, I am teaching a College Prep Algebra 1 class with a fantastic group of 9th graders. Nearing the end of our linear functions unit, my colleagues and I discussed a desire to have some sort of culminating activity. And while I have used drawing projects often in some courses, in algebra 1 such tasks have often left me feeling unfulfilled. Too many horizontal and vertical lines for my liking I suppose.

I recalled reading about a potential golf-related task on twitter. To be honest, I don’t recall whose exact post provided the inspiration here (note – I am thinking it was Robert Kaplinsky or John Stevens, but I may be wrong. If anyone locates a source, I’ll edit this and provide ample credit), but it felt like a game-related task could provide by the strategy and fun elements which tend to be missed by drawing tasks.

HOW THE GOLF CHALLENGE WORKS:

The goal – write equations of lines which connect the “tee” to the “hole”. Use domain and/or range restrictions to connect your “shots”. Try to reach each hole in a minimal number of shots. Leaving the course (the green area) or hitting “water” are forbidden. All vertical or horizontal likes incur a one-stroke penalty.

On the day before the task, the class worked through a practice hole. Besides understanding the math task, there are also a few Desmos items for students to understand:

  • Syntax for domain / range restrictions
  • Placing items into folders
  • Turning folders on /off

For the actual task, a shared a link to a Desmos file with 5 golf holes. I tried to build tasks which increased in their difficulty. In practice, the task took an entire class period (75 minutes), and students worked in pairs to discuss, plan, and complete the holes. All students then uploaded their graphs to Canvas for my review, and filled out a “scorecard” which included “par” for each hole.  It became quite competitive and fun!

In the end, there is not too much I would change here. Perhaps add some more complex holes. I’d also like to provide opportunity for students to design and share their own golf holes, and study the “engine” which built mine.  I hope your class has fun with it! Please share your suggestions, questions and adaptations.

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Today the New York Times Learning Network dropped the first “What’s Going On in This Graph?” (WGOITG) of the new school year. This feature started last year as a monthly piece, but now expands to a weekly release. In WGOITG, an infographic from a previous NYT article is shown with the title, and perhaps some other salient details, stripped away – like this week’s graph…

Challenge your students to list some things they notice and wonder about the graph, and visit the NYT August post to discover how teachers use WGOITG in their classrooms. Here are some ideas I have used before with my 9th graders:

  • Have groups work in pairs to write a title and lede (brief introduction) to accompany the graph.
  • Ask tables to develop a short list of bullet points facts which are supported by the graph, and share out on note cards.
  • Have students consider how color, sizing, scaling are used in effective ways to support the story (note how the size of the arrows play a role in the graph shown here). This is a wonderful opportunity to think of statistics beyond traditional graphs and measures.

Invite your students to join in the moderated conversation, which drops on Thursday. Have your own favorite way to use WGOITG? Share it in the comments!

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Today I am in Cleveland for 2018 Twitter Math Camp! It’s the Desmos Pre-Conference Day, and I am facilitating a session on using Desmos in Statistics classes. Below are many of the links and resources I plan to use – even if you are not in Cleveland with us, feel free to borrow from these resources.

Baseball Data Set

Comparing Data Sets and Summary Statistics

Regression Facts (Mean/mean point and slope)

Teaching the meaning of r-squared

“Release the Hounds” – my first attempt at random sampling

Participate as a student, Steal and Share

“Backpack Weights” – thinking about scatterplots (AP Stats)

Participate as a student, Steal and Share

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