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This statement raffia tassel earring DIY is a quick and simple make, perfect for spring and summer!

Straw and raffia has been all over the shops, with bags, hats, jewellery and footwear all joining in the party. Big statement earrings with fans and tassels of raffia have been particularly prominent so i couldn’t resist creating a DIY version.

You can get natural raffia, paper raffia or synthetic like mine from Rico. They all work, but I did find that the synthetic was easier to tighten and came in such lovely colours. I am using my beloved Quicklinks for this projects, but if you can’t get hold of then, any wire component will work, or you can make your own from wire (I would recommend using 1mm/18 gauge wire with the ends joined in a wrapped loop).

You will need:

1.Start by cutting 10 lengths of raffia, each 8-10cm/3″ long. We are going to trim them down after they are all attached, so the lengths don’t need to be exact.

2.Each length is going to be attached to the link using a larks head knot. To do this, place your link onto your work surface, fold the raffia in half and tuck the now folded mid section under the link to form a loop

3.Then pull both the ends through the loop to knot around the link.

4.To tighten the knot neatly, hold the two ends together and pull.

5.Repeat this with the other lengths of raffia until they are all attached. Make sure you tie the knots the same way- although there isn’t a right or wrong side, the back and front do look different, so just make sure you are consistent.

6.Repeat all the steps for the the second earring

7.Use sharp scissors to trim the lengths

8.Use a pair of chain nose pliers to twist open the loop on the bottom of your earrings finding

9.Add on your link and twist the loop closed. Do the same for the other earring to finish!

Please share this Raffia Tassel Earring DIY tutorial if you enjoyed it, and if you have any questions, leave a comment below or come and find me on Instagram ! 

Want even more modern craft, creative inspiration and behind the scenes of my life as a jewellery maker? Sign up to my monthly ‘Making, Creating and Little Adventures’ email! Happy Making!

The post Raffia Tassel Earring DIY appeared first on Make and Fable.

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This pearl hair clip DIY uses beads and clear thread to make beautiful accessories! Perfect for breezy spring days.

I am such a bead geek. As soon as I saw all the pearl bead hair clips and bags that are are around in the shops at the moment, I recognised they were all made made with my favourite bead weaving technique, right angle weave! Regular readers will be familiar with my love of this stitch as it has featured in many a DIY here at Make and Fable. Now, I don’t have the patience to bead an entire bag. But a hair clip? Oh yes.

You Will Need: Top Tips

Any beads can be used, as long as they are the right size. As a bead geek, I’m using Swarovski pearl beads in Lavender. But Czech glass pearls are also a good choice.

The hair clip needs to have those three little holes at the top to secure the beads to. And if the clip is a different size, you might need to alter the number and size of the beads used so they fit.

How to make:

1.Cut a 1 metre length of supplemax. Because the thread is quite sturdy, we don’t need to use a needle. So to make it a bit easier to see what we are doing with the clear thread, use a permanent marker pen to colour in both of the ends.

2. The hair clip has three holes at the widest end that we are going to secure our thread too. Take the ends of the thread through the lower two holes; so, one end through one hole, and the other thread through the hole next to it. going from front to back.

3.Tie the ends together, making sure the ends are of equal length, then push both ends together through the single hole at the top. Both threads should now be coming out of the top hole on the top of the clip.

4.Take an 8mm bead and take one end of the thread through the hole from right to left, and the the other end from left to right. This is known as a crossover bead.

5.Pull the threads until the bead sits on top of the hair clip. Then add a single 8mm on to each thread.

6.Add another 8mm crossover bead as we did in step 4 and pull the threads until it forms a square. This is one unit of right angle weave.

7.To secure the beading, after each unit of right angle weave we are going to secure the threads around the sides of the clip. To do this, open up the clip and take each thread around the outside and up through the centre of the clip. Make sure you are just going around the top part of the clip (so the part that sits on top of your hair) or you won’t be able to open and close the clip! Finally, crossover the threads again through the last bead added.

8.Add a single 8mm on each thread, followed by another 8mm crossover bead. Secure the thread in the same way as before, by going around the outside of the clip, up through the centre and crossing over in the last bead.

9.This time add a single 6mm bead on each thread, followed by a 6mm crossover. Secure as before.

10.Repeat step 9 with another round using 6mm beads.

11.For the last round, add a single 5mm bead on each thread, followed by a 5mm crossover bead.

12.To secure the beads, take the threads around the outside and up through the small hole at the tip of the clip. Tie them together to hold.

13.To finish off, knot each end around one of the thread coming out of the last bead, take the thread through the next bead and cut off the excess. Repeat with the other thread.

Once you have got the hang of making these, you will want to make them in more colours! I went for classic cream, using Swarovski Light Creamrose pearls and multi coloured option, using Swarovski Coral, Pink Coral and Iridescent White!

Please share this Pearl Hair Clip DIY tutorial if you enjoyed it, and if you have any questions, leave a comment below or come and find me on Instagram ! 

Want even more modern craft, creative inspiration and behind the scenes of my life as a jewellery maker? Sign up to my monthly ‘Making, Creating and Little Adventures’ email! Happy Making!

The post Pearl Hair Clip DIY appeared first on Make and Fable.

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This DIY Triangle Necklace uses just 15 beads and a length of cord to make a fun and geometric design!

January weather can be exceptionally gloomy here in the UK, so who wants a DIY Triangle Necklace that you can make in in whatever cheery colours you like? Grab some beads and cord and lets get making!

You will need:

-15 beads

-1.5 metres of thread or cord that is thin enough to go through the holes in the beads TWICE. Top Tip on this in a moment!

-Super glue, the thin runny kind.

-Sharp scissors

–Optional jewellery findings appropriate to the cord size and thickness.

How to make

Top Tip! First off, lets works out the right cord and beads combo. The thread or cord needs to go through the hole in the beads twice. A lot of beads have quite small holes, as they are designed to thread onto thin wire or thread. Sometimes you might think a cord isn’t going to fit through the hole (or in our case, fit through twice) only going to fit through once but if you dip the end into thin superglue, let it dry and then cut the tip into a point it acts like a built in needle and magically threads through!

In this example, I am using 1mm satin cord and 8mm wooden beads.

1.Cut a 1.5 metre length of cord and dip BOTH ends into superglue. Leave to dry, then cut the ends at an angle with sharp scissors.

2.Thread on one bead.

3.Then take the other end of cord through the bead in the opposite direction.

4.Pull the threads tightly and you should see the bead with the loop of cord around the outside. Make sure the bead is reasonably central on the cord- there is more than enough cord to work with so don’t worry if its slightly out. This is the point of our triangle!

5.Now thread two beads onto one of the cords (it doesn’t matter which) then take the other cord through in the opposite direction.

6.Pull the cords so they sit on top of the first bead, but not so tightly that it starts to curl up.

7.Repeat with three beads for the next row.

8.Then with four beads. At this point, if your triangle is wanting to curl up, loosen the tension on your cord and get each row to sit flat next to the previous.

9.Lastly, add five beads.

10. To finish your DIY Triangle necklace the simplest method is to tie the ends together in a knot – great if you want the necklace long enough to go over your head.

11. If you want to add a clasp, first choose the right end for the cord of thread you are using- so for this 1mm cord I would use a fold over end. If you are using a thinner thread such as s-lon or c-lon, I would use a necklace end. You can then use jump rings to attach your preferred style of clasp!

You can play around with different bead and cord combinations as well as with the pattern of beads. Round and faceted beads both work well, larger seed beads that are more doughnut in shape tend to want to curl up.

In this example, I have used 6mm fire polished Czech glass beads and c-lon cord. To get the pattern, just add a different colour bead in the middle of row three, and two in the middle of row four.

Please share this DIY Triangle Necklace tutorial if you enjoy it and if you have any questions, leave a comment below or come and find me on Instagram ! Want even more modern craft, creative inspiration and behind the scenes of my life as a jewellery maker? Sign up to my monthly ‘Making, Creating and Little Adventures’ email! Happy Making!

The post DIY Triangle Necklace appeared first on Make and Fable.

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My last post about how to wire wrap a stone using a spiral cage proved to be super popular, so I’m back with another technique! This method creates a netted effect and is really great for crystal points, but also works well on smooth, tumbled stones and sea glass.

This is slightly more complex technique, that creates a netted effect that looks like a fisherman’s net or chain link fence. It is made by twisting alternate pairs of wires together around the stone to create a net or basket that holds the stone.

You will need:

-0.6mm/22ga jewellery wire

– A stone or crystal (mine is a 35mm x 15mm crystal point)

-Chain nose pliers

-Round nose pliers

-Wire cutters

-Washi tape / low tack tape

How to Make:

1. Tear off a couple of pieces of washi tape ready for step 3, then cut two lengths of your jewellery wire, each about 40cm long. Hold the middle of the two wires in a X shape.

2.Twist the two wires together about 3 times. The wires will want to un-twist, so help prevent this, bend the wires out slightly and keep hold of them.

3.Use the washi tape to stick the twisted section onto your crystal, near the point (or whichever bit of your stone is narrowest).

4.Bring the two ends of wire that are at the point or base of you crystal around the point itself to the other side of the crystal. Even with the washi tape, try to use your thumb to keep that first twist in place as it will want to move!

5.Twist the two wires together on the opposite side of the crystal.  Don’t worry about the washi tape still being there, we will still be able to remove it after all the wire work is done.

6.Take one wire from the 1st twist and one from the 2nd and bring them together on the side of the crystal and twist them together. If this sounds a bit confusing, think of the twists as being on points of a compass; If the 1st twist was north, the 2nd south, this is either west or east on our compass!

7.Twist the other two wires together on the opposite side of the crystal

8.Continue twisting pairs of wire together in opposite pairs until you reach the top of the crystal.

9.Take one of the wire and bend it so it sits flat accross the top of the crystal.

10.Bend the wire up halfway across. Use chain nose pliers to get a nice sharp bend.

11.Create a wire wrapped loop and cut off the excess. You might find it helps to push the other three wires down out of the way!


12.Take one of the wires from the opposite side and making sure it is snug against the crystal, wrap that around too.

13.Repeat with the other two wire, trimming off any excess and  using your chain nose pliers to gently squash down any remaining wire. You can now safely remove the washi tape!

14.You can now put a chain or cord through the loop or use a jump ring to attach to a keyring.

If you have any questions about how to wire wrap a stone, let me know in the comments below.  You can also follow me on TwitterInstagram or Facebook.

Want even more modern craft, creative inspiration and lovely ready-made jewellery? Sign up to my monthly ‘Making, Creating and Little Adventures’ email! Happy Making!

The post Wire Wrapping a Stone – Netting appeared first on Make and Fable.

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Bold and bright statement earrings are everywhere at the moment, and this colourful thread and bead earrings DIY has a summery, tropical vibe that is perfect to craft your own! I’ve gone all out with the colours, but you could easily use different shades of the same colour for a more subtle version.

You will need:

-2x round links, like these 25mm Quicklinks

-2x Fishhook earrings

-2x Jump rings

-Headpins

-Selection of colourful beads, like these

-Embroidery Thread

-Chainnose and roundnose pliers

-Cutters

-Superglue or GS-Hypo Cement

How to make:

1. Tie one end of a 75cm length of embroidery thread to one of the Quicklinks, leaving the tail to tie off at the end.

2.Start wrapping the long end of thread around the link. Try to keep your tension tight and the wraps neat.

3.Keep going until you have covered the whole link then tie the ends together.

4.Put a tiny bit of glue (something that will sink in, like superglue or GS-Hypo cement) on the knot and allow to dry.

5.Trim off the ends close to the knot.

6. Choose your beads; odd numbers work best as does using beads with slightly different shapes. Put each bead on a headpin.

7.Make a plain loop in each headpin. If you aren’t sure how to do this, or would just like a bit of a refresher, then pop over to this post that goes through it step by step!

8.Open up a loop, hook onto the thread covered link and close it back up. The best way to to do this is to treat them just like you would open and close a jump ring

9.Repeat with the other headpins until the are all attached.

10.Add on a fishhook with a jump ring to finish the first earring!

11.Repeat all steps to make the second earrings, making sure that you add the beads in the same order as you did for the first earring in step 9.

If you have any questions about making this colourful thread and bead earrings DIY leave a comment below or you can also chat to me on TwitterInstagram or Facebook. Want even more modern craft, creative inspiration and lovely ready-made jewellery? Sign up to my monthly ‘Making, Creating and Little Adventures’ email! Happy Making!

The post Colourful Thread and Bead Earrings DIY appeared first on Make and Fable.

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Learning how to make loops in headpins enables you to attach beads onto earrings, necklaces and bracelets and is the main way of creating beaded jewellery other than threading. I will show you how to make both open and wrapped loops and explain why you might use one over the other.  This tutorial will take you step by step how to make both plain and wrapped loops and we will finish up with a troubleshooting Q&A at the end!

I though this would be a quick post to help everyone getting loops right, but it has turned into a masterpost of loop knowledge! I have tried to take this step by step for those who have never made a loop before as well as cover all the things that people on my workshops struggle with. Lets get started!

First off, what is the difference between a plain loop and a wrapped loop? And when would you use one rather than the other? A plain loop can be twisted open like a jump ring. I use plain loops when I am attaching it to something that can’t be opened, such as chain. Plain loops are versatile and neat, but you have to be aware that they can accidentally get caught and be pulled open. You can see an example on the left hand, blue bead above.

Wrapped loops are fixed closed by wrapping the end of the headpin around itself to finish. This mean they cannot be opened, which offers extra security when adding beads to earrings and charm bracelets for example. But also means you need to use jump rings to attach them to chain or open the loop on the bottom of the earring itself to make earrings. An example is on the right hand, red bead in the photo above.

Generally, my personal reference is to use wrapped loops, unless I know that having plain loops is the only way I have of attaching. I just find them more secure, and I prefer the look. Both the plain and wrapped loops start in the same way, its only how they are finished that is different.

You will need:

-round nose pliers

-cutters

-chainnose pliers

-headpins

-beads

How to make a plain loop in a headpin

1.Add a bead or beads onto a headpin and slide down to the head.

2.Grip the wire right above the bead with round nose pliers and bend the wire away from you at a right angle. See the bottom of the post for a top tip!

3.Readjust your pliers to grip the top of the wire, so the jaws of the pliers go from being side by side to on top of each other, no wire is moved or bent in this stage.

4.Put your finger underneath the wire and push it up towards you, bending the wire over the top of the pliers to create the first half of your loop.

6.Time to readjust your pliers again- this time just swivel the pliers around to grip the top of the loop. No wire is bent or moved.

7.Complete the loops by pushing the wire under the pliers and away from you, finishing with the end facing away from you in a right angle again.

8.This is what you should have! The aim is to get a centralised loop, like a lollipop.

9.All that is left to do for a plain loop is to cut off the excess. The trick to this is to cut on the inside of the loop! The temptation is to cut the wire from the left, after it has crossed over itself, but this will always leave a bit of wire sticking out. Make sure you have the flat side of the pliers (see below for tips!) right up against where the wire cross at the base of the loop.

10.This what your should end up with! This loop can be opened and closed like a jump ring.

How to make a wrapped loop

1.Follow steps 1 – 8 above, then take your chain nose pliers and hold the loop as shown. You need to be able to see where the wire crosses itself, and that the wire is at a right angle to part with the bead.

2.Push the wire down and wrap it around itself, working down towards the bead.

3.Aim to get about three wraps, but even one wrap will be secure, three just looks neater!

4.To trim off the excess wire, you might find id easier to push the wire up away from the bead so you can get the cutters nearer.

5.Come in with the flat side of the cutters right up against the wrapped section and cut.

6.If there is any wire still left sticking out, squash it down with the chain nose pliers, holding the wire as shown to stop it twirling around!

You can see the difference between the plain loop on the left, and the wrapped loop on the right.

Practice really does make perfect when it comes to loops, so please don’t worry if your first few are a bit wonky; you will get there! The less you have to think about the steps the smoother you will be and neater the loop.

Having problems making loops in headpins?

Lets troubleshoot any issues!

My loops are all different sizes! Use a marker pen to put lines on your round nose pliers, one for a small loop and another for a larger loop. Now you will know where to grip your wire to create consistently sized loops!

My loops aren’t really round! You might be gripping the wire at a different part of the plier in step 6; marking your pliers as in the above tip will help with this!

My loop is off-centre, like the letter ‘P’ You forgot to make the right angle bend away with the wire in step 2!

I’m finding it tricky to bend the bend around, especially when making the wraps You will find it easier to move the wire the more of it you have, so if you only leave yourself a small end of wire to work with, it with be tough to bend. I recommend having the bead (or beads) going no more than two-thirds for a plain loop and halfway for a wrapped. Basically, the more wire you have left, the easier it will be!

I’m struggling to hold the loop still when making the wraps! Try gripping the loop down the side of the chain nose pliers- it is tempting to use the very tips, but this doesn’t give you a good grip.

There is a huge gap in my plain loop after cutting! Be careful which side of the cutters you are using. The ‘flat’ side will always cut closer as this is where the sharp jaws are – so you want to get this side right in up against the inside of the loop. The flat side of the pliers is on the left and the top side on the right. The top side is indented and its quite a way down to where the cutting jaw is.

If you have any questions about making plain or wrapped loops, or have any problems I haven’t mentioned, let me know in the comments below and I will do my best to help you out! You can also follow me on TwitterInstagram or Facebook. Want even more modern craft, creative inspiration and lovely ready-made jewellery? Sign up to my monthly ‘Making, Creating and Little Adventures’ email! Happy Making!

The post How to make a loop on a headpin appeared first on Make and Fable.

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