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In February I got a really cheap plane ticket from Hilo to Milan, Italy. I wasn’t planning on traveling this year. But somehow I found my credit card out and a confirmation email from United in my inbox five minutes later. Huh.

So I contacted my friend, Annette. I met her a while back when she was visiting the Big Island and wanted some ‘ukulele lessons. She said to be in touch if I ever got to Southwest Germany; maybe she could pull some strings and set some things up for me.

Almost instantly I had a place to stay for a week, activities to do (hiking, picking grapes, driving on the autobahn, going over the Rhine to France) – not to mention a weekend ‘ukulele workshop in Freiburg!

One of Freiburg’s main walking streets.

This bit of business in Deutschland fell almost in the middle of the trip. It was a nice break from the craziness of navigating foreign places. All of a sudden, in a time zone perfectly opposite my home, I was doing something familiar – teaching ‘ukulele!

The Freiburg minster.

Freiburg is a lovely university city. It also happens to have a thriving uke scene. Our host, Martin Walter, teaches regular ‘ukulele lessons in the city. He said there’s more interest than he can keep up with, even as a full-time music teacher. Martin was kind enough to make his room-with-a-view teaching space available for my workshop.

Martin’s lovely teaching space.

And the view wasn’t bad either!

My German students were excited to learn Hawaiian style ‘ukulele. Believe it or not, they don’t get many Hawai’i-based artists coming through town due to the commute! So we spent six hours over the course of two days jamming away on some fun tunes like Henehene Kou ‘Aka, Ka Uluwehi o Ke Kai, and Koke’e. They were quick studies and we were able to get through a lot of material.

It’s amazing how hard it is a to get a good picture of me teaching. This is one of the best out of 30.

Here’s another good one.

I guess I’m international now.

Martin has an ‘ukulele festival in the works for 2020. Sounds like a good excuse to return to Europe.

Read this post in its original form: Teaching ‘Ukulele in Freiburg, Germany

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Live Ukulele by Brad Bordessa - 5M ago

I spent the weekend on O’ahu for an old friend’s wedding and, while there, cruised by the Hawai’i Music Supply warehouse. I got to meet some of the setup crew and had some personal assistance from Joel, the head tech, with a troublesome pickup. Great guys doing great work.

I’ve known head-boss-man and workaholic-mastermind, Andrew Kitakis, for a handful of years and when I told him I was going to be on island he invited me to be on The Ukulele Review podcast. We had a fun time talking ‘ukuleles and playing a few tunes. Check it out and go subscribe to the HawaiiMusicSupply youtube channel for some of the best ‘ukulele video content on the web.

#30 The Ukulele Review - Brad Bordessa - YouTube

Read this post in its original form: The Ukulele Review Podcast #30

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Live Ukulele by Brad Bordessa - 10M ago

I’ve put off writing reviews of my own ‘ukuleles for a decade now. Part of me just felt weird about putting that opinion on the site. It would be like writing a public review for a spouse. You can have an opinion, but it doesn’t really matter because for all the quirks and imperfections you still find a way to love the person – or not.

What my outlook on an instrument is doesn’t really matter as much as the fact that I’ve created a connection with each over the years. Certainly if things played out differently, I would have a different set of instruments that I loved just as much as my current stable. It’s hard to say which would be better because there isn’t always a “better.” Just different.

So, as opposed to a review, let’s take a walk down the path of my musical journey as seen by my main instruments. Instead of bombing you with a 5000 word dissertation on my ukes, I’ll divide their stories up instrument-by-instrument.

The Choice:

After playing a Hula Ukes tenor for a little more than a year, I began researching the next instrument I wanted to buy. This was way before internet reviews so I spent my time at music shops. I played lots of instruments, asked lots of questions, and absorbed as much as I could. I think there’s a lot to be said for feeling an instrument and hearing it in person as opposed to all of the window shopping that people can do online these days.

I narrowed my search down to a tenor from one of the three big Ks: Kamaka, Koaloha, and Kanile’a. Hilo Guitars and ‘Ukuleles was my main haunt and they carried most of the ‘ukulele brands available in those days. I played all of their relevant instruments again and again. Lots of “cool” people played KoAlohas at the time and I really felt like I wanted to go that route if I could. But there was hardly a KoAloha tenor to be found anywhere (I searched all across the island for months). When I finally tracked one down, it wasn’t any more special than the Kamakas or Kanile’as I had been playing.

Fast forward a couple visits to the shop and I was ready to buy. It was the day before Easter, 2007. I had enough money saved up and had decided on the HF-3. I can’t remember the main reason I decided to bypass the Kanile’a models in favor of Kamaka. But there I was. Brian, the very patient Hilo Guitars employee, must’ve been relieved that I had finally made a decision after so many visits and brought out four HF-3 Kamakas from the back of the shop. I felt like Harry Potter getting his wand at Olivander’s. I strummed each instrument and eliminated the ones that didn’t speak to me. Finally it came down to two favorites: an ugly one (so it seemed compared to the others) that sounded amazing and a pretty one that sounded alright.

I chose the ugly one.

$670-something later (I can’t believe prices have double since then!) I walked out with a shiny new uke in a case and an appointment to have a pickup put in. I spent the next six years honing my chops solely on that instrument and put those 11 cuts of wood through all kinds of hell.

Bonding:

We played in front of Herb and James and Keoki and Uncle Kimo and David and Uncle Dennis and Uncle George and Uncle Sonny and Brittni and countless other heroes, we wrote stupid little angsty songs, we took lessons from anybody we could and went to countless jams, we met Kunia at Hapuna beach one day and couldn’t believe what he could play, we went to college together, we wrote a grand-slam instrumental to win the heart of a girl who was way out of our league, we played good gigs, we played bad gigs, we missed home together, we dreamed of touring the world, we played reggae in sketchy neighborhoods with great people, we played Hawaiian in rich neighborhoods with sketchy people, we made ourselves money, we made other people money, we made mistakes, we made happy accidents, we recorded a single, we won top honors, we island hopped on tiny-ass planes, we hopped the Pacific on 767s, and we made countless hours and hours of music and not-music. We have the connection that any two things have after ten years of near-constant companionship.

My friend said off-handedly the other day that relationships are a lot about who you spend time with and, if you spend enough time with someone you enjoy, you’ll fall in love with them. Whether that’s true or not for people is beyond me, but I think it’s certainly true for instruments.

Even if a uke isn’t perfect (or even close to it), you learn to appreciate the weirdness because it’s yours to appreciate. It even becomes an asset as you learn to work with it instead of against it. I don’t understand how people buy an ‘ukulele every month and then wonder why it’s not _____, like the old one, or why they don’t feel a “connection” to it. There IS no connection! A month is years short of the familiar place you get to with an instrument when you can start making music without any reservations.

This is, of course, all just my opinion. But while I’m on my soapbox I’ll try and give some advice: Get a decent instrument and spend time with it. There’s no such thing as perfect – the missing element is human connection. You have to put in effort to extract the last 5% that would otherwise make it a perfect ‘ukulele. That’s a lot of work. I’ve done my best with two instruments. I can’t imagine how hard it would be to feel comfortable on more in the same amount of time.

The Uke:

My HF-3 itself is made from solid koa on the top, back, sides, and headstock cap. The neck is mahogany and the fingerboard and bridge are rosewood. Schaller tuners are a joy to tune, even though their location on the headstock is a tad disproportionate and goofy-looking. I had the G-string nut slot filed bigger to accommodate a low-G string in the first couple weeks and have never put a high-g on it since. The big frets have taken a beating over the years. Most people can’t believe how pitted and flat they are. They still intonate pretty well, but it’s beginning to get to the point that you can feel the gouges in the frets as you play.

The build quality of the instrument has always seemed solid to me. Ten years later and there haven’t been any significant structural movements. The top is still pretty flat and the action is about as good as the day I bought it – even after using heavy strings for most of the years.

The only damages it’s suffered are two minor little pieces that broke away from their home. One was a chip out of the bottom of the fretboard where the edge of the fret slot (the 10th, I think) gave way. The exposed fret edge was sharp for a while until I just took a file to it and accepted the flaw for what it was. The second missing piece is the bottom bit of the bridge binding where pressure from the A-string cracked the material loose from its slot. Both happened many years ago and I’m convinced that they were just freak occurrences that couldn’t really have been prevented at the factory.

I’ve used Worth strings on this uke since probably 2008. They sound gorgeous with the koa and are clear and full without being woofy. CH-LGHD has ben my go-to set for all those years. They are heavy and unforgiving, but really keep the instrument “sitting up straight,” if you will.

Pickup:

When I first got the Kamaka I had a pickup put in right away. I chose a K&K Big Spot soundboard transducer for simplicity’s sake (and probably to save a buck). Having it allowed me to goof around and make stupid noises with my Micro Cube as well as getting to be plugged in as a featured kani ka pila-er.

Problem was, the pickup was always feeding back and sounded boomy – on top of the piezo quack. $280 later I was the proud owner of a Fishman Pre-EQ Platinum preamp. It made a world of difference in the sound and I was able to notch out the offending frequencies. But it wasn’t until I took it to the shop that the guy there said, “Huh. Yeah, if I moved the transducer around a bit it would probably sound better.” It was night and day after his fix and restored my faith in SBT style pickups.

But as I got better, the gigs became bigger and the stages got louder. It was finally time to move on from feedback city. I emailed my buddy Chuck Moore and he suggested I bring the Kamaka down to his shop in ‘Opihikao and we put a MISI Acoustic Trio in it.

I had been to Chuck’s shop a bunch of time and seen the boneyard of parts that is a luthiers workplace, but when it came to my own instrument going under the drill I was a bit nervous! It didn’t help that he kept joking about messing up. The process was pretty simple: rout the saddle slot down as much as possible, drill a hole for the pickup wire, make a new saddle and put it all back together. In the end, my Kamaka was finer than ever and sounded like a pro uke plugged in. As exciting as the new chargeable pickup was, it was the camel bone saddle that really got me fired up. Even unplugged the instrument sounded better and felt more alive!

The last episode in the search for pickup nirvana took place at Mele ‘Ukuleles in Wailuku. I was having issues with the consistency of string-to-string volume and their tech guy crafted me a new semi-segmented bridge. The separation between the saddle pieces allowed the strings to maintain a more even pressure on the transducer and fixed the problem.

‘Til Death Do Us Part

Because the frets have gotten so worn down in recent years, I don’t play the Kamaka too much any more. That was the only reason for upgrading in 2013. It’s been the most faithful instrument I could have ever hoped for and I plan on keeping it until the day I die, even if it’s in pieces by then.

She came out of the case for a handful of tracks on my new album where I needed some songs in a higher key to fit my voice. Instead of using a capo, I decided to put light strings on the Kamaka and tune it up to D6. The tuning definitely doesn’t suit the instrument, but it got the job done and really helped differentiate the sounds of the recordings.

After 10 years of walking the music scene and playing ‘ukuleles, I haven’t seen a single thing that has made me regret selecting a Kamaka to be my main battle axe for my formative years. If you have the money and connections, you can get a better instrument than a stock HF-3 – no doubt. But before putting in all those hours of playing the HF-3, I’m not sure I would have appreciated a better instrument. It’s been a blessing to have spent so much time with such a nice instrument in my hands.

Read this post in its original form: My ‘Ukuleles: Kamaka HF-3 Tenor

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It’s that time of year again when my site gets flooded with excited new players who got their first uke for Christmas. Welcome one and all! Several years ago I put together a Christmas-specific guide for newbies. I’ve been revisiting it every year since it published and once again, here it is.

If you’re not sure what to do with your new ‘ukulele, this lesson will point you in all the right directions.

Read More >>>

Read this post in its original form: Did You Get a Uke For Xmas? Start Here!

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Live Ukulele by Brad Bordessa - 1y ago

A player’s most important piece of foundational knowledge is, without a doubt, the notes on an ‘ukulele fretboard. They hold the key to everything and yet, these 48 little destinations get pushed aside by almost everybody! They are like the times tables of your uke – not fun, but useful and necessary.

This post includes full note maps of the main ‘ukulele tunings.

Read More >>>

Read this post in its original form: ‘Ukulele Fretboard Charts

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December is here! The prepared gift givers have already wrapped their Christmas goodies and you… Well, if you’re like me you need a few ideas to get you started.

Here are the things I feel most ‘ukulele players would be excited to get their hands on this holiday season. Some are new releases, some are tried and true accessories that stand the test of time. Share your own ideas in the comments!

Some of these items are linked to Amazon via affiliate links. This doesn’t cost you any extra, but helps support the site via a small commission.
Arpeggio Meditations For Ukulele Book

By Daniel Ward

One of the coolest new books on the block, Arpeggio Meditations For Ukulele is a collection of 16 ingenious studies to build hand coordination, strength, and musicianship. Daniel has done a fabulous job covering a wide range of skill levels, moods, chord changes, picking patterns and more in this 30-page book.

$19.99

Uke Stand

When you need to put an ‘ukulele down for a second, laying it on a bed or couch works in a pinch, but probably isn’t as safe as a dedicated stand.

I had a Kala stand at one point and really liked it for a smaller uke on a tabletop.

For bigger ukes, I like a guitar stand or even a wall mount stand for storage and display.

Planet Waves NS Micro Tuner

Tiny, accurate tuning that’s bright enough to see in the daylight. Pick from two versions that can live on a headstock or in a soundhole. The headstock version also includes a built-in metronome and reference pitch shift (430-450hz).

$14

‘Ukulele Strap

A strap helps support the uke while playing. There are several types that help hold the instrument in various ways.

I’m a big fan of the non-invasive Mobius Strap design. Read more about it here.

If the uke in question has strap buttons, any guitar strap will work. Ernie Ball makes a classic, cheap, and light one that comes in many color options. There are also high-end leather straps and hand knitted versions you can find on Etsy. The sky is the limit.

$5-100+

‘Ukulele Chord Shapes Book

By Brad Bordessa

My own contribution to this list. In ‘Ukulele Chord Shapes I explore a seldom-discussed method of approaching the fretboard. Included are more shapes, easy-to-understand theory, and chord knowledge than you can shake an ‘ukulele at!

$12.99 – PDF Download
$19.99 – Physical book

Lessons – The Gift That Keeps Giving

‘Ukulele lessons are a hard thing to justify spending money on when you have access to free content on the internet. But the structure and discipline that a good teacher can give to a player’s musical journey can be very important.

The best lessons are in-person. The physical learning space is, without a doubt, the most beneficial environment for acquiring new skills. Teachers often work in 4-week chunks of time – a great gift certificate timeframe, depending on cost. Be sure to get referrals and solicit recommendations before you commit.

If you can’t find a local teacher, Matt Dahlberg, Aaron Crowell, Phil Doleman, Bryan Tolentino, and others all do lessons via Skype/Facetime.

There are also several ‘ukulele courses you can join for a modest access fee. This is mostly unpersonalized, but also much more affordable. Each has its focus and unique presentation.

  • I work for James Hill as an admin for The Ukulele Way, which I feel is one of the best courses available – though I’m probably pretty biased. There’s a community page and great support from myself and the crew (including James) for any of the lesson content or technical troubles you might have.
  • The guys at Ukulele Underground have probably been doing video courses the longest and have a large collection. Probably the most “hip” operation you’ll find with lot of popular songs and flashy techniques.
  • The new kid on the block is Artistworks, in which Craig Chee & Sarah Maisel are the instructors. It has opportunities for video feedback as part of the curriculum.
‘Ukulele Capo

Instantly change the key of chords you already know. Great for singers and playing with other instruments. It can also help with the understanding of transposing and keys.

I use a Kyser banjo capo, but there are some slick ‘ukulele options these days like this one from Planet Waves.

$5-20

New Strings

People get bent out of shape looking for the perfect strings, but only a very stubborn person isn’t going to appreciate the chance to try a new set. And you never know, it might be their next favorite thing!

I recommend brands like: Worth, Southcoast, Aquila, D’addario, and Savarez, to name a few. Each has their own flavor. Make sure to get a set that will fit the player’s ‘ukulele.

$5-20

Anytune Slow-Downer/Pitch Shift App

I’m pretty low-tech when it comes to music, but I find myself using Anytune quite often these days when learning songs. It’s fabulous for slowing down the tempo of a recording or even changing the pitch (invaluable for singing the song in “your key”).

The free version does all that, but Anytune Pro also gives you advanced EQ options and REFRAME which allows you to isolate instruments based on their place in the mix (how does listening to just the uke without the band sound?).

Free/$15

A New ‘Ukulele

If you really want to go all-out this year, the folks at your local music store would love to send you home with a new uke for your loved one.

Should accessing a brick and mortar store prove to be a challenge, The Ukulele Site and Mim’s Ukes are highly recommended for ordering online. Though they might be backlogged past Christmas!

At the end of the day, it’s important to remember that human connection is the most important thing about the holiday season. It’s a privilege to express affection with gifts.

Consider writing a song. Consider hosting a sing-along. Consider cooking dinner for the less fortunate. Always remember to appreciate the little things. And have a very merry Christmas, Hanukkkah, Winter Solstice, or whatever you and yours celebrate. Let’s celebrate!

Read this post in its original form: Top 10 Gifts for ‘Ukulele Players

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