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This article is sponsored by Healthline. Thoughts and opinions are my own.

Dating is complicated. Dating can be stressful. Dating can force you to get out of your comfort zone.

One of my first photos with my husband, Bobby.

When you live with a chronic illness, dating can be downright daunting. When should you bring up your IBD with a significant other? How can you navigate the ups and downs that come along with your illness? How can you reach a sense of comfort when you need to run to the bathroom or cancel plans?

There’s not only one correct answer to any of those questions. But, as a woman who was diagnosed at age 21, who is now 35 and married with kids, I’m happy to share what worked for me. I recently led a Live Chat on Healthline’s IBD app about this topic. The main areas of concern revolved around significant others failing to grasp the severity of the disease. It’s difficult to fault what can sound like shortcomings, but being a caretaker isn’t easy. Not everyone is cut out for it.

Celebratory post- colonoscopy cheesecake!

And that is ok.

Here are my top 10 tips for educating significant others—whether it’s dating or marriage about what your experience as a patient is like.

  1. Bring your loved one along to doctor’s appointments.

Oftentimes, people have no clue how severe and debilitating IBD is. Let your partner hear it from the horse’s mouth (i.e. the doctor). By sitting in on appointments, not only is it a source of support for you, but a chance for them to ask questions, listen to the discussion, and hear about all that goes into managing your chronic illness.

  1. Have a social worker or counselor speak with you both so that you’re on the same page.

Oftentimes a loved one isn’t acting maliciously; they just don’t know how to cope with what life with IBD entails. Talking with a professional gives you a safe space and an even playing field to ‘air your dirty laundry’ and gather advice about actionable ways you can improve your relationship.

  1. Communicate when you’re in pain—don’t sugarcoat or downplay your symptoms.
    If you’re hurting, say it. If you’re struggling, tell them. The more you keep your mask on and your wall up, the more your partner will think you have everything under control and that your IBD isn’t much of a “big deal” in your life.
  2. If your feelings are hurt—articulate why. Resentment leads to stress and can activate symptoms. Be brutally honest and open. You can’t expect your lover to be a mind reader. By bottling up your frustration you may take out your anger in a big way, when an issue could be solved and nipped in the bud before it becomes bigger than it needs to be.
  1. Connect with fellow IBD patients on Healthline’s IBD app.

Whether it’s a live chat, reading articles, or matching up with fellow patients, Healthline’s new IBD app is a space where we all get you. We’ve all been there. We’re all standing ready. Ready to lift you up. Ready to answer your questions. Ready to listen to you vent and share advice. Advice that can make a major impact in your most personal and important relationships. Because at the end of the day, you want someone who loves you for all of you, and that includes your IBD.

  1. Share blog articles and social media posts from fellow IBD advocates that may be able to articulate what you’re going through.

Sometimes as patients, we’re going through so much but it can be difficult to put into words. While each person’s disease presents uniquely, chances are we’ve gone through similar experiences. If you read an article that resonates or see a post on social media that hits close to home for you—share it. This is an easy way to casually show the person you love that this is what you’re going through. A simple email with a link to an article—works wonders.

  1. If you want your person by your side at procedures and during hospitalizations, say it.

During the live chat, there was some discussion about fiancés and husbands not going to procedures or being by the bedside during the hospitalization. That a put a lot in perspective for me, as my husband has never left my side when I’ve been hospitalized (not even for an hour) and has gone to every colonoscopy.

Photo cred: J. Elizabeth Photography

I’ve never had to ask. Bobby just does that because he wants to. If your want your significant other there, tell them. The disease is isolating enough, the last thing you need is to be lying alone in the middle of the night with your racing thoughts and the beeping machines.

  1. Be with someone who you can be vulnerable with.

IBD isn’t pretty. There are days where we’re cooped up in the bathroom. There are times we’re in the fetal position for hours. If you feel at ease at your worst with your person, that’s a good sign. Recognize how you feel when you’re at your lowest point and at your best. Pay attention to how they respond when the going gets tough.

  1. When the red flags are waving feverishly in front of your face, don’t be afraid to walk away.

Listen to you gut. You know deep down if you constantly feel like a second thought or if your partner repeatedly lets you down. If they make you feel guilty, less than, or put off by your patient experience, time to say buh-bye. Trust me, you will count your blessings in the future.

  1. Take them along to local Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation events.

By attending local events you’ll be able to connect face-to-face with fellow couples and families living your same reality. You’ll discover how much you have in common right away. This also enables your partner to have someone who “gets” what it’s like to be a caretaker. Set up a double date or a time to hang out outside of public events.

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This article is sponsored by WEGO Health, opinions and thoughts are my own.

Accountability can be a tough pill to swallow when you battle chronic illness. Often times it feels as though the only person who can improve our overall wellbeing, is the person you see looking back in the mirror. But, Pack Health and CME Outfitters is looking to offer support to patients like you and me every step of the way to make our journeys less lonesome and isolating. Pack Health in partnership with CME Outfitters does this by providing one-on-one support, over the phone and online, to help people regain control over their health.

Right now, Pack Health’s work spans across more than 20 chronic conditions, including inflammatory bowel disease. Not everyone has a support network. Not everyone has a spouse or a significant other they can lean on. Not everyone feels like they can take on the beast that is chronic illness alone. Get this—the average patient is only with their doctor 1 of the 6,000 hours that they’re awake each year! Pack Health works to fill in those gaps.

Here’s how it works—the service is more than just a health coach. By teaming up with an IBD coach, you can have someone texting you when you need a reminder, helping your find ways to make healthy living easier and more enjoyable, and someone who has your best interest at heart, every step of the way.

Finding Your Motivation
You’ll map out your goals for the months ahead. Where do you want to be in 3 months? 6 months? One year? Your personal IBD Health Coach will bring this goal into focus so it’s attainable and less overwhelming.

Setting Weekly Goals
It’s not always the big goals, it’s getting through the day-to-day. Your IBD Health Coach will help you stick to weekly goals through calls, texts, and emails, based on how you like to communicate. Support will be right at your fingertips.

A Network of Resources
Rather than wasting hours on the internet trying to find dietary information or drug discount cards, the IBD coach will get you what you need to succeed.

By working with an IBD Health Coach patients are more likely to take their medications, stay on top of recognizing symptoms and improving their overall health and well-being. As a chronic illness patient, myself, even though I try and manage my Crohn’s the same each day, sometimes life and being a mom gets in the way. I tend to put my needs and my care at the bottom of the totem pole. As a parent, I know I’m not alone in that. Having a Health Coach standing by ready to listen, educate and inspire me, is a reminder that I’m not in this alone.

Click here to learn more and try it for yourself.

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This post was sponsored by AbbVie Inc. Personal opinions and thoughts are my own.

I recently attended Digestive Disease Week (DDW) in San Diego, California as a patient advocate. The experience was much more than a conference—it opened my eyes to all the work being done on a global level to understand this disease, ease the burden on patients, and improve quality of life.

At DDW, I had the opportunity to sit down with Dr. Miguel Regueiro, Chair of the Department of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition and Vice Chair of the Digestive Disease and Surgery Institute at Cleveland Clinic, to discuss our respective points-of-view on clinician-patient communication. I share more about our conversation below, along with a video of part of our discussion. You can also find resources to guide your conversation with your own doctor here.

There’s something special about being a Crohn’s patient and witnessing firsthand all the research, advancement and dedication for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). While the exact cause of Crohn’s disease is unknown, it is believed to be caused by an overreaction of the immune system. As a result, damaging, chronic inflammation can occur along the GI tract and lead to symptoms. Crohn’s isn’t contagious, and, as far as we know, it isn’t caused by anything a person has done or eaten.

During my time at DDW, Dr. Regueiro and I had a chance to discuss the importance of patients and their physicians creating an ongoing, healthy dialogue about everything the patient is going through physically, mentally, emotionally, and financially.

We talked about the importance of goal setting. In this age of personalized medicine, treatment plans are tailored uniquely to each person’s needs, which often go beyond the inflammation in our bodies or our latest symptoms.

“When I meet a patient initially, I sometimes ask ‘what are three things you want out of this visit? What are the three problems that you’ve had?’ Some of it may be related to their IBD, but a lot of it might be related to ‘I’m feeling depressed,’ or issues with sexual activity and intimacy. As a physician, and as a healthcare team, we not only want to treat your IBD, we want to treat the whole person,” said Dr. Regueiro.

One of the biggest stresses associated with IBD can be the unpredictability factor and the progressive nature of the disease. As patients, we never know what the next hour or the next day will bring. Symptoms might worsen or change altogether. Physicians want to hear about changes. Changes in our symptoms. Changes in something that may be related to our medication. And changes in our health beyond our digestive tracts that help our care teams treat us and not just our IBD. By recognizing these changes, your doctor can address them and make sure there’s not a bigger problem festering.

Crohn’s is a lifelong disease, it’s not just about thinking about tomorrow or the next few weeks, it’s really looking at the long-term. If you live with IBD, it’s important to be open about all your symptoms and meet routinely with your doctor to ensure active monitoring of your disease, regardless of symptom severity. Create a proactive treatment plan and set goals that are right for you.

The narrative you choose to share with your care team can truly shape the type of care you receive and your ability to improve your quality of life. Prepare for your next trip to the doctor by visiting CrohnsandColitis.com for tips on managing your appointments and working closely with your gastroenterologist.

Disclosure: This post was sponsored by AbbVie Inc., a biopharmaceutical company, and should not be construed to constitute medical advice. Personal opinions and thoughts are my own. I am not a medical professional and am not qualified to give medical advice. Please talk with your doctor about your individual medical situation.

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Raise your hand if you’ve considered switching physicians. Raise your hand if you’ve driven more than an hour to seek care. While attending IBD Social Circle at Digestive Disease Week in San Diego, I listened to a panel with Dr. Neilanjan Nandi, MD, FACP and Dr. Aline Charabaty, MD about the patient and health care practitioner dynamic.

It was an enthralling discussion that opened my eyes to the medical care available to the IBD family. They talked about how physician and patient relationships should not feel like speed dating. Seek a physician who truly cares about how IBD is impacting your life, someone who wants the context behind your symptoms. Rather than a physician wearing a white coat and sitting in front of you, look for one who sits next to you and leaves the white coat off.

If you’re constantly feeling like your GI is being complacent with your care or that you are just a number, you may want to consider finding a physician who’s a better fit. When doing so, it will take some effort on your part. Here are some tips to make the transition a bit less stressful.

  1. Look for a GI who specializes in IBD. Not every GI is passionate about Crohn’s or ulcerative colitis, it may not be their specialty. Finding an IBD specialist will put you in the hands of a care provider who knows the ins and outs of your disease.
  2. If you’re making a road trip to attend the appointment, let the office know. Before you drive hours for an appointment, let the nurses in the practice know that this isn’t a run-of-the-mill appointment. Maybe they can allot more time.
  3. Have your records sent over before you go. Provide the new physician with your back story, so they can familiarize themselves with your patient journey before your first face-to-face.
  4. If tests will be needed, see if they can all be arranged in one day. Save yourself a trip (or two) and check with your physician to see about them getting preauthorization for any tests or procedures ahead of time. This way insurance is notified and it’s one less headache to deal with down the road.
  5. Build a rapport with the nurses in the office. Don’t be afraid to lean on nurses for support. They are often the “middleman” between you and the physician. I rely heavily on the nurses in my GI office. Nurse Penny and I are buds!
  6. BONUS TIP: See if a family member or friend can attend the appointment with you. As the patient, sometimes it can feel as though the teacher from Charlie Brown is talking while we’re sitting in an appointment. So much is being thrown at us, so much is being said—but we’re not comprehending what it means for the present and the long term. By having a loved one by your side, they can take notes—so you can focus on asking the questions you need answered. That extra set of ears and eyes works wonders.

Switching physicians and entrusting someone new with your well-being is not easy. Trust your gut (for once!) and advocate for care that makes you feel like you have a voice. Think about how you feel leading up to an appointment, while you’re face to face with the physician and the emotions you may experience on that drive home. If anything makes you feel less than or not heard, connect with fellow patients in your area to see who makes up their care team. Do research about IBD specialists within drivable distance and take the steps you need to feel like you have your best ally against this disease.

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This article is sponsored by Healthline. Thoughts and opinions are my own.

I met my husband thanks to a dating site nearly six years ago. I never dreamed I would one day be able to connect with fellow IBD warriors through an app, but hey thanks to Healthline, it’s now possible! Over the next month, I’ll be partnering with IBD Healthline. I am so excited to share my journey using the app and explain how you too can benefit from all its invaluable features.

When I was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease at age 21 in 2005, I felt incredibly isolated, alone and scared. Like anyone with chronic illness, it can be difficult to not only articulate theses stresses but find people who genuinely care and empathize. The IBD Healthline app addresses this by providing a safe space to conversate with those who live your reality. By communicating with others in the IBD community, it empowers us and is a reminder that there’s a huge network of support right at our fingertips, 24 hours a day.

My favorite functions of the app

One of my favorite parts of Healthline’s IBD app is how it connects you with one new member each day, based on your disease, age, and lifestyle interests. You can check out fellow member profiles and request to connect, too! I don’t know about you, but the more people I know with IBD, the stronger it makes me feel as I take on the disease.

Healthline’s IBD app is a great gathering place for our community to share experiences, learn from one another and offer support. Many of us tend to sugarcoat our day-to-day experiences, here you can be honest and trust that you won’t be judged for your struggles or setbacks. It’s intuitive and easy to use, whether you’re a patient or a caregiver.

Along with the personal connections, there are medically approved wellness articles and podcasts shared each week on everything from diagnosis to nutrition and self-care tips. The more educated we are about our illness, the better advocates we can be for our care.

Check out the Live Chats

Another great aspect of the app is the “Live Chat” function. Each Healthline Ambassador will be hosting chats in the coming weeks. Save the date—I’ll be hosting a live chat Monday, June 3 about dating, relationships and marriage with IBD. I’m thrilled to have the opportunity to share my personal insight on this subject matter with you and lead the discussion. It’s my hope my words and patient journey will comfort you and give you hope as you navigate life with IBD.

This free app is brand new and was just launched this month. You can download it onto Apple and Android devices by searching for “IBD Healthline”. As patients we are up against so many unknowns, this app is a great constant to have as you deal with the feel-good days and the not so good days. I look forward to connecting with you all!

You can access the free IBD Healthline app here: https://go.onelink.me/LOC7/6dae5800.

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The theme of World IBD Day (which was yesterday, May 19) was to make the invisible, visible. Here’s my tribute to my fellow IBD warriors and their caregivers.

To the newly diagnosed…

To the person going through their first procedure whether it’s a CT scan or a colonoscopy…

To the parent of a child battling this disease…

To the person being wheeled in for their first surgery…

To the person taking their first steps out of the hospital bed while on the road to recovery…

To the person glancing at their incision for the first time…

To the person looking in the mirror and not recognizing the reflection looking back…

To the person on a liquid diet because it’s too painful to eat actual food…

To the person on a steroid feeling unattractive, irritable and high strung…

To the woman wondering if her body is strong enough to carry a baby…

To the man who’s concerned about being able to be a source of strength for his family…

To the pregnant woman worried about flaring and how it will impact her unborn child…

To the person beginning a biologic or a new medication, who’s petrified of the laundry list of side effects…

To the person crying themselves to sleep because they feel alone in their struggles…

To the mom who feels like she’s waging a never-ending war against her fatigue…

To the teen wondering if they’ll be able to go to college…

To the college student embarrassed of going to the bathroom in the dorms…

To the person nervous to open up in a relationship and disclose they have this disease…

To the person who had to get out of a relationship or was left because the support was lacking…

To the bride or the groom worried about having disease symptoms on their wedding day…

To the person shaking with fear in the parking lot of their doctor’s office, nervous to walk in and face the music…

To the person boarding an airplane nervous about symptoms and being around germs…

To the person who’s just been told another medication has failed them…

To the person lacking a genuine support system…

To the person who feels misunderstood, frustrated, and judged…

To the person sitting on the toilet contemplating whether a flare is starting to strike…

To the person in the passenger seat being rushed to the emergency room, yet again…

To the person getting their blood drawn staring at a focal point on the wall…

To the person who is constantly approached with the latest and greatest “fix”, “cure”, or way to “heal” …

To the person worried about passing this dreadful disease onto their children…

To the person with the bad veins dealing with their eighth IV poke…

To the person who feels lost and misses who they were prior to being diagnosed…

To the person lying in the fetal position trying to get through this moment…

To the community who feels like home to me.

I see you. I hear you. I believe in you. I’m here for you. I love you.

We’ve all been these people. We all know this is the reality of life with IBD. It’s not easy. It’s scary. It can be overwhelming. The emotional pain can oftentimes be worse than the physical pain. Living with a chronic illness, no matter what your age or circumstance is tough. There’s no sugar coating it.

At the same time, I want you to whole-heartedly believe that while this disease can rob you of joy, it can also provide you with perspective, strength, empathy, understanding, gratitude, patience, and clarity. You my friends, are far from invisible.

I see you. I hear you. I believe in you. I’m here for you. I love you.

Thank you for helping me to see the light on the dark days, inspiring me when I need it most, and showing me that there’s much more to life than being a patient. I hope I do the same for you, always. Use your journey. Use your story. Use your setbacks. Use all that you are, to inform, educate, and implore others to want to better understand your reality. I promise, you won’t be disappointed.

XOXO-Natalie

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When a family member is diagnosed with IBD the same week as you, it can be sort of a saving grace.

One month post diagnosis–dealing with the side effects of prednisone.

My cousin’s wife, Alisa DeMarco, was told she had Crohn’s disease a matter of days before I was in July 2005. At the time, she was one of the only people I knew who had the condition—one of the only people I could confide in who could genuinely understand my reality. At the time of diagnosis and throughout your patient journey—these bonds and relationships are the glue that keeps you together.

Now, nearly 14 years later—her and I have come a LONG way. She’s on Remicade. I’m on Humira. We are both mothers. We are both wives. Alisa didn’t allow her disease to stop her from following her personal or professional dreams. In 2013, she left corporate America and founded Tekhni Wovens. As an IBD mom and successful business owner, her perspective and ability to overcome the odds is something we can all admire and look up to. This week—an interview with a woman I’m lucky to call family.

NH: What inspired you to create Tekhni Wovens?

AD: As a full-time working mother who enjoyed caring for my children with the help of wraps and slings, I quickly found myself as part of the babywearing community.  Over time I shifted from consumer to manufacturer, designing textiles when I didn’t find what I was looking for— a fashion-forward aesthetic in easy-to-wear blends at accessible prices.

NH: As a woman with IBD, a mom of four, and a wife–how do you balance leading a successful business and keeping your disease symptoms under control?

AD: Balance is a hard ideal to maintain– and I am not always successful! I multi-task everything, stay on top of my biologic infusions, rest when possible and, plan my diet loosely around a mix of SCD and low gluten eating. Getting help is difficult, but I feel lucky to have a supportive husband and local family network. My travel schedule wears me down– but thankfully most of my disease symptoms are well controlled.

NH: What advice do you have for fellow IBD’ers who have big dreams but are hesitant to go after them because of their disease?

AD: Your dreams don’t have to be an all or nothing pursuit!  Tekhni started as an idea to make a better product and help support my family… and evolved into multifaceted business with accounts worldwide.  However, it took years, and many winding paths to get there. Know that there’s no deadline or requirement for any passion you want to pursue.  Start with an idea, and break it down into bite-sized pieces. Your disease is only one small part of your identity, and cannot prevent you from planning and dreaming and accomplishing daily tasks on your own timeline.

NH: Why are you passionate about babywearing?

AD: Babywearing and attachment parenting are very close to my heart– they are natural extensions of our mothering instincts. They help me care for my young, closely-spaced children while working full-time and managing a household with a husband who is often away for work. Babywearing helps me effectively multi-task and meet my all children’s needs at the same time. It also helps address postpartum depression, by syncing mother and baby, and raising oxytocin levels.  I believe babywearing is a necessity that should be taught to every single expecting parent and caregiver!

NH: Why is babywearing so beneficial for those with IBD in particular?

AD: Babywearing is a perfect fit for people with autoimmune diseases– it helps you hold, carry, and comfort your baby while taking weight and strain off of your back and hips. For difficult days, it can literally be another set of hands.  And keeping baby in proximity leads to less crying, less stress, and more rest for both baby and mother. As a bonus, a variety of baby carriers can be adjusted to accommodate an ostomy or j-pouch.

Stay tuned to my Instagram account (@nataliannhayden) for a giveaway on Friday, May 17. We’ll be giving away a Studio Tekhni Ring Sling! The winner will be announced on World IBD Day (May 19). Good luck!

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Hey IBD mamas and moms-to-be—this article is for you! With Mother’s Day this Sunday, I wanted to share 5 of my “life hacks” for taking on motherhood while living with IBD.
As a mom of a 2-year-old and an almost 4 month old, I’m in the thick of motherhood right now. While it’s an amazing season of life, it definitely has its challenges. A toddler, a baby, and a chronic illness. Ah, I’m exhausted just reading that myself! While it’s far from easy—I’ve found some ways to help embrace the ups and downs and everything in between.
Here are my 5 helpful tips for IBD moms: 
1.  Don’t be afraid to ask for help.
By verbalizing your pain and communicating openly with family and friends, you open yourself up to a network of support. Don’t try and be a martyr or a superhero. In the end the only person you are hurting is yourself. A few hours to yourself will do wonders for your psyche, you’ll feel rejuvenated and refreshed and you’ll be a better mom because of it.
2. Stay on top of daily disease maintenance: your medication, your doctor appointments, blood tests, and annual scopes. 
Moms have a reputation for putting themselves on the bottom of the totem pole. When it comes to chronic illness, lapse in taking medication and managing your illness can set you up for a flare up. No one wants to be hospitalized or deal with pain. Give yourself the best chance for having feel good days and make your disease management a priority. If you feel symptoms presenting and you’re concerned, alert your GI immediately. Be proactive, nip each flare in the bud as best you can.
3. Busy boxes for the win!
Once you have a toddler—or more than one child, these are lifesavers! Look up ideas on Pinterest and create boxes to keep your little one busy when your fatigue is overwhelming or when you’re in a lot of pain. I went to Hobby Lobby, Michaels and Target and created fun boxes for Reid filled with everything from puzzles to coloring books to sensory activities with noodles. I made a busy box for each day of the week. You can do so very economically!
4. Practice self care as often as possible.
Yes, I know. Self care. We hear it all the time. It’s something that’s constantly talked about, that seems unattainable. But try and do something each day for yourself, whether it’s taking a shower, eating a meal sitting down, going for a walk outdoors with your little one and keeping your phone on silent, reading a book before bed, you name it. Try and find the moments in your day when you can unplug and relax. Practice yoga and meditate during nap time instead of doing the dishes or laundry. You owe it to yourself!
5. Give yourself grace. 
Motherhood is an incredible experience, but it’s not easy. Add chronic illness to the mix and it becomes even more difficult. Don’t beat yourself up on the days you aren’t feeling well and need to stay indoors and lay low. Stop comparing yourself to the mom who seems to have it all together on social media. We all know we have hot mess moments, that’s life. Focus on all the happiness and joy you bring to your little ones life. You are their world. You were given this role and this family because you were meant to have it and you were destined to live this life.
Bonus Tip!: Wear your baby. Baby wearing will do wonders for your joints and your wellbeing. Not only does baby love being close to you, it helps give you a bit of a break whether you’re out and about or at home.
On this upcoming Mother’s Day and always, I commend every woman for their efforts. You are remarkable. You are a warrior. You are a guiding light for your loved ones. And you deserve to be celebrated for all that you do, day in and day out.
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This post was sponsored by Onegevity. All thoughts and opinions are my own.

When you live with IBD, the term ‘gut health’ sounds like an oxymoron. But, a group of researchers recently created a cutting-edge at-home test that paints a clear picture of what’s going on within your digestive system. Onegevity’s GutBio was developed to monitor bacteria related to inflammation, constipation, and diarrhea, as well as pathogens and micronutrients. The microbiome sequencing examines the abundance, type and balance of more than 39 trillion microbial cells in your body. The result—you receive an artificial intelligence-powered pattern analysis that is reviewed by a board-certified physician.

“Quite simply, GI conditions are costly diseases with limited preventive care available, explains Chief Scientific Officer, Dr. Bodi Zhang. “For example, IBS has an average incremental healthcare cost of more than $4,000 annually. By putting simple solutions in front of consumers, we empower them to avoid expensive and costly rounds of medical testing and extreme diet changes that are not precisely matched, but also drastically decrease quality of life.”

As someone who was diagnosed with Crohn’s disease nearly 14 years ago, the GutBio test intrigued me. Even though I’ve been verbally told that I am in “remission” and haven’t been hospitalized with a flare up since August 2015, at times, I still experience disease symptoms.

The GutBio test is simple to do. Here’s how it works. Once you order your test kit, it’s shipped to your home with easy instructions. You send in a swab of your stool (which can be shipped at room temperature, no need for dry ice)—and within 3-4 weeks, you receive a detailed explanation of your genetic profiles.

“This test can help you monitor the bacteria related to your inflammation. Plus, we give specific recommendations that can combat the bacteria we have found, while helping to proliferate the commensal bacteria that mitigate the inflammatory response,” said Dr. Zhang.

Honestly, the findings of my test shocked me—in a good way. Not only did the results provide me with peace of mind, they painted a clear picture of why I have been having minimal Crohn’s symptoms. Here’s a cliff notes version of my results (the findings shared are a lot more in depth and helpful and include infographics):

Good news! Based on the levels of more than 100 inflammation-associated bacterial species examined, your test result shows a low Inflammation Potential in your gut. This means the balance of inflammation-associated bacteria is optimized in your microbiome. 

Our test results have revealed that you have low risk for constipation. We have calculated your constipation score by examining the pattern of hundreds of bacterial species that are known to positively correlate with constipation.

Based on the specific microbial composition of your stool, your test results reveal a low risk for diarrhea. Many bacterial species are known to protect against the development of diarrhea, which means that that having more of these protective microbial species in your gut will help lower the likelihood you will experience diarrhea (absent other influences, such as infection, food intolerance, and medication use). On the other hand, some bacterial species are known to contribute to diarrhea. We have calculated your diarrhea score by examining the pattern of hundreds of bacterial species that are known to positively correlate with diarrhea.

You are in the 85 percentile in microbial diversity, which indicates your gut microbiome is highly diverse. You are likely eating a varied diet. Studies show that individuals with low gut microbiome diversity are at greater risk for certain adverse conditions ‐ ranging from allergies to obesity. Healthy individuals tend to have high gut microbial diversity, while less healthy individuals tend to show reduced microbial diversity.

What does this mean for you? With diverse gut microbial content, you can respond to nutritional changes and you can digest many different types of food. And the good news is that your lifestyle choices will directly influence the microbial diversity in your gut. When you choose what to eat for dinner, you are choosing which bacteria in your gut get fed. For example, if you eat a diet high in fiber, then your fiber-loving beneficial bacteria will thrive, while other non-beneficial species are likely to starve and die.

Your test results indicate that your gut microbial population is not contributing significantly to your daily need of one or more of the B vitamins. Certain gut bacteria produce the B vitamins that support your dietary contribution to the recommended daily intake of folate (B9), B6, B12, and niacin (B3). It is important that you make sure to get adequate amounts of these B vitamins, with particular attention to those B vitamins from which your gut microbial population is estimated to be less than optimal.

Your test results indicate low or suboptimal levels of one or more key beneficial microbes in your gut. Our test analyzes specific beneficial microbes in the stool that are linked with commonly consumed probiotics. When you realize that the number of microbes that comprise the human microbiome is fixed ‐ there can only be so many troops on the battlefield ‐ then the more good microbes you can introduce, the stronger the front line gets. The good news is that you can increase the numbers of these beneficial microbes by consuming probiotics.

Good news! No known pathogens were found in your sample. Pathogens are the bacteria, viruses, and parasites that can cause disease. Pathogens can wreak havoc in the gut by contributing to inflammation that can result in symptoms like pain and diarrhea. In addition, pathogens can damage the intestinal lining, making it more prone to leaking, which in turn can result in food allergies and other adverse conditions.

The personalized diet recommendation is the whole food diet. The basic concept of a whole food diet is to eat foods in their most natural, least processed state. A whole food diet encompasses eating fresh vegetables, legumes, fruits, and unprocessed whole grains. All convenience food, processed food, and fast food are avoided.

Along with the findings and recommendations, recipes and specific probiotic supplements were listed.

After receiving your GutBio results you have the knowledge of what you can do to shift and improve your gut health. For me, I’m going to try and get more Vitamin B12 and possibly start a probiotic. This is also information I plan to share with my gastroenterologist. Interested in decoding your gut? Click this link and use the promo code: NATALIE2019 at check out for $20 off! (The test costs $349 before the promo code).

To recap: Onegivity’s GutBio includes:

  • Simple at-home fecal sample collection kit
  • Gut profile and results that compare you to other individuals
  • Core gut metrics aggregated and calculated to reveal levels of gut irritation
  • AI-driven personalized interventions on diet, exercise, and supplementation that are scientifically based and reviewed by medical professionals.
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I stood before a room of strangers last week and shared some sentiments about my friend Jenna who was marrying the love of her life the next morning. Chances are—you’ve been at a rehearsal dinner and participated in the ‘open mic’ opportunities.

Jenna’s birthday, 2009

As a former TV newsie, I always enjoy a chance to speak and articulate my feelings! I started out talking about how we knew one another and the type of friend she was—and then I went for it. I broke out the “C” card…the “Crohn’s” talk. Most of the people in the room were strangers to me until that night, some probably had no idea what Crohn’s was.

In that moment, I tearfully thanked my friend of more than 12 years in front of a roomful of people for always being present, always genuinely caring and for always being there not only in life’s amazing moments—but also through every flare up I’ve experienced along the way. When you are diagnosed with a chronic illness, you don’t stop and think twice about which friends are going to be there, you just expect it. Unfortunately, you’ll find many ‘friends’ tend to fade to the background and will continue to do so throughout your patient journey.

This friend—is the opposite. This friend has sent me countless snail mail letters on adorable stationary—some with Ryan Gosling’s face plastered all over it, others with an inspirational girl gang type quote. Each time I’ve been hospitalized, she’s been my constant ray of sunshine. Always texting. Always calling. Always checking in on me. Her efforts seem effortless. And that my friends, is priceless. Rather than feeling guilt for being “that friend” she makes me feel empowered and loved.

When you live with IBD (or any chronic illness for that matter)—seek out your Jenna(s). Find the people who lift you up. Trust in the bonds you create with those who are there for you because they want to be out of the goodness in their heart, not as an obligation. Hold on closely to the relationships that spark joy and don’t extinguish your flame. Lean on those who are willing to give you their hand to lift you up, even when you don’t ask for it.

At Jenna’s rehearsal dinner, I wanted her to know. I wanted her to know how her compassion and empathy meant the world to me. I wanted her to know how much I appreciate all the effort she continually puts into our friendship, despite living out of state from one another for the past decade. I wanted her friends and family members, and her now husband to see the impact she’s made on my life and how her efforts to be there, make her who she is.

My hope for the IBD family is friendships like this. The ones that stand the test of time. The ones that ground you. The ones that show you the beauty of another’s heart. The ones that remind you that you aren’t ever going into battle alone. The ones that serve as your light when the days are dark. They exist. They are possible. You just need to find them.

Wedding photo cred: Savannah Kay Photography

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