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Why follow your bliss?

Last August I flew to Bali to escape the Sydney Winter, and stayed at a yoga retreat aptly named Bliss.

After a week of daily beauty treatments, shopping, sightseeing, meditation, yoga, and delicious Balinese dishes, I returned home feeling relaxed and peaceful.

So I followed my bliss, and am back to feeling a more “balanced” life balance coach.

Have you heard of the term, “follow your bliss?”

Whilst I knew the definition of bliss is to find happiness, I was curious about the actual term, follow your bliss.

Not knowing its origins, I thought I’d investigate and share my findings with you.

In 1985, mythologist and writer Joseph Campbell sat down with Bill Moyer to discuss his philosophy on life in a ground breaking 6 part TV series, The Power of Myth (released on Netflix).

Campbell saw as the greatest human transgression “the sin of inadvertence, of not being alert, not quite awake.” This, perhaps, is why the most rewarding part of his interview with Bill Moyer deals with the dictum that has come to encapsulate Campbell’s philosophy on life: “Follow your bliss.”

Campbell meant something very specific by the phrase. It comes from one of the last interviews he did, in which he said:

“If you follow your bliss, you put yourself on a kind of track that has been there all the while, waiting for you, and the life that you ought to be living is the one you are living. Wherever you are — if you are following your bliss, you are enjoying that refreshment, that life within you, all the time.”

In other words, if you do things you are passionate about, you’ll feel fully alive and doors will begin to open for you.

Would you agree?

Following your bliss means to spend time doing those things that bring you happiness and closer to your true nature, and aligned with your authentic self. It’s what I often say to clients, “find what makes your heart sing.” This is the importance of following your bliss particularly in relation to choosing a career.

Have you found career bliss?

Coincidently, around the time of Campbell’s documentary, it was the start of my bliss journey.

In my family, I was the one everyone felt comfortable confiding in me. I was trusted with their secrets, dreams, yearnings and fears. I don’t know how I acquired it, but I seemed to have the ability to listen with empathy and without judgment. I had a peacefulness within me that made me a good counsellor/negotiator, and as I hit my late teens, I became more confident in helping repair ruptured relationships and resolving conflict. My mum used to call me “the little psychologist”.

It seemed like destiny that I would help others for a living, working in fields like psychology, counselling and psychotherapy. That was what made my heart sing. However, I was also blessed with beauty. Some people may find this alarming to say but, in my twenties and thirties, I looked like Michelle Pfeiffer. I’m half Ukrainian with high cheekbones and clear skin.

Family members said I should be a model and/or have a career in TV. So, thinking that would be fun and that they knew what was best for me, I went down that path but was disappointed. I tried modelling, but hated the focus on my looks. I then ended up working in advertising during the “Extravagant Eighties”, but still felt like a fish out of water.

Casting and attending TV commercials might sound glamorous, but I was lost because I wasn’t connecting with my passion for helping others. Deep down, it conflicted with my core values of nurturing, empowerment and connection. I pursued jewellery design – another glamour career suggested by my family – but it wasn’t until (a few years later) I developed chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and became bedridden for a good part of a year, that I started to rethink the course my life had taken.

My CFS recovery took five years, and during that time I worked hard to change my mindset, heal my physical body, and then change my career from Jewellery design to social work. I remember my aunt lamenting that I wasted my father’s money, but retail equipped me with good customer and communication skills, teamwork, time management, initiative and responsibility.

As my focus shifted to social care, doors did open for me in terms of meeting the right people to graduate with a Bachelor of Applied Social Science, spent time as a social worker in London, and further studies in Gestalt psychotherapy, which have all led to creating Life Balance Coach.

Goodness! I’ve just realised that I have been coaching, counselling and mentoring women for twenty years to create a life that feels balanced and more meaningful.

Would you like to find your career bliss?

Life Balance Coaching has a career coaching pack called Find Your Dream Career. These sessions are all about finding career direction through uncovering the real you through psychometric testing and personality profiles. Plus self discovery i.e. exploring your unique strengths, talents and knowing your purpose to assist in career exploration and identification and lead to personal and professional satisfaction.

Fiona Craig is a life coach, psychotherapist and published author of the award winning book, “Stuck in a Rut – How to rescue yourself & live your truth” helping women get unstuck from their job rut and onto finding their dream career. Her transformational career coaching package helps her clients remove the fear, worry and guilt to confidently take the steps towards creating the life they want to live.

Fiona has been interviewed by The Australian Women’s Weekly, and The New Daily, and written articles for I Am Woman Magazine, Women’s Fitness magazine, Girlfriend Magazine, Career One, Sunday Life Magazine (Fairfax), Collective Magazine, Herald Sun Melbourne, plus several blogs and online publications. You can learn more about working with Fiona at lifebalancecoach.com.au or call 0405 433 217.

Photo by Artem Bali on Unsplash

The post Why Follow Your Bliss? appeared first on Life Coach And Business Coaching Sydney.

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Have you ever noticed yourself over apologising or saying sorry for something that’s not your fault?

During the Christmas sales, a young man bumped into me at the payment counter as I reached for my credit card. He looked tired and annoyed so I said sorry. Satisfied with my apology he nodded and walked away.

Why did I do that? It was so natural for me to take the blame, like an instant reflex. I decided to do some investigation around it.

Why do women say sorry so much?

Whilst I can’t give you one specific reason, because there can be a number of factors; I can say for certain it’s due to our family of origin, cultural or societal expectations.

As young girls we can feel obliged to being more accommodating, polite and helpful to others. That’s because saying sorry can keep the peace, and diffuse a potential disagreement into an argument.

That’s my reason! I was trying to keep the peace, avoid an altercation in the middle of David Jones department store.

Women that overuse the word “sorry” tend to have similar personality traits. They may suffer from physical or emotional abuse, anxiety, or have a desire to please people due to their low self-esteem and submissiveness in personal relationships.

However, Karina Schumann, Social Psychology doctoral student, at the University of Waterloo in Ontario, Canada, found that women do not apologise more than men. It’s just that women have a lower threshold for what requires an apology. Many women would agree with her findings that we are more concerned with the emotional experiences of others and want to prevent disharmony in their relationships.

What do you think?

Do you find yourself apologising for things that aren’t even offensive or noticed to be offensive?

If you’ve noticed yourself saying sorry because you’re late, you don’t understand, or you have to ask for something then in all honesty you’re lowering your self worth.

Mandy (not her real name), a coaching client of mine, was in her thirties and had very low self-esteem and self-worth. I noticed in our first session that she said sorry an exorbitant number of times. She was very sweet and nice, but was so fearful of hurting my feelings that she lacked any range of personality. She wanted to be good and needed to control herself.

Mandy had suffered anxiety attacks for ten years. Although she said she felt okay, she came to see me because she was lost in her career and unsure about what she was meant to do with her life.

She had what she thought was a good business idea, but felt inadequate. Consequently, procrastination and a fear of success had debilitated her. She experienced constant guilt for not being as successful as she felt she ought to be and said sometimes friends took her ideas and made successful businesses out of them. She wanted to feel worthy.

To help Mandy increase her feelings of self-worth, we did a little experiment around saying sorry. I suggested she become mindful about saying it, encouraging her to notice the number of times she said it and to look at her thoughts and feelings behind it. Mandy noted that she would say sorry to avoid getting hurt whenever she felt uncomfortable. She had a very controlling mother whom apologising seemed to appease. Mandy said she felt rejected by her mother and considered herself a burden. She wasn’t the favourite daughter and could never match the success of her sibling, who was a lawyer.

I suggested Mandy try gently tapping her trolley into another while shopping and not apologise for it. This was tough for her because she felt at fault, but she still gave it a go.

In order to create these trolley collections, she had to scheme and plan. What surprised Mandy was the sheer delight from being mischievous. She then thought of ways she could not say sorry, like bumping into someone or dropping cans off the shelf. She thought of many silly scenarios. It was naughty and playful at the same time. She wondered how many people she could annoy by making a mess and getting away with it.

Mandy said her big moment came when she realised at the checkout that she’d forgotten butter and so held up the entire queue to go and find it. She said that upon returning, she smiled sweetly but didn’t say sorry. Mandy said it brought back happy memories of playing practical jokes on her dad. As she spoke, I could see tears rolling down her cheeks. Mandy’s “aha” moment came when she stopped trying to be like her sister and gave herself permission to be herself.

How you can stop over apologising?

To get out of the habit of apologising start by making a note of the number of times you’ve apologised in a day. My client Mandy found it easy to use my habit chart with columns for what situation triggered it, what she was thinking, feeling and what she could say instead.

Becoming aware of certain people or situations that cause you to apologise compulsively will greatly assist you in coming up with alternative responses to practice.

So next time you find yourself in a common “sorry” situation try using “excuse me”, “I’m not following”, “I don’t understand” or “thank you”.

Remember, an unnecessary stream of “sorry” for this and that throughout the day has the potential to undermine how you assert yourself and how others view you in the world.

Fiona Craig is a life coach, psychotherapist and published author of the award winning book, “Stuck in a Rut – How to rescue yourself & live your truth” helping women get unstuck from their job rut and onto finding their dream career. Her transformational career coaching package helps her clients remove the fear, worry and guilt to confidently take the steps towards creating the life they want to live.

Fiona has been interviewed by The Australian Women’s Weekly, and The New Daily, and written articles for I Am Woman Magazine, Women’s Fitness magazine, Girlfriend Magazine, Career One, Sunday Life Magazine (Fairfax), Collective Magazine, Herald Sun Melbourne, plus several blogs and online publications. You can learn more about working with Fiona at lifebalancecoach.com.au or call 0405 433 217.

Photo by bobby hendry on Unsplash

The post Stop the habit of over apologising appeared first on Life Coach And Business Coaching Sydney.

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Do you think about the way you think?

I do.

Because the way you think can be helpful in solving problems.

Maybe you’ve heard of the term, “Thinking Outside of the Box!”

“Thinking outside of the box” is a metaphor that means to think differently, unconventionally, or from a new perspective.

The origins of the phrase are unclear, but reference is given to John Adair’s puzzle created in 1969. He introduced a traditional topographical puzzle called the nine dots puzzle.

I’ve personally experienced the need to think outside of the box when my health took a nose dive. Only my closest friends know that I have been unwell.

We’d all agree that our wellbeing is strongly linked to happiness and life satisfaction. I’ve always said that if you don’t have your health, you don’t have any … any enjoyment of life.

Twenty eighteen was my annus horribilis.

Now before you spit out your coffee, that’s not a rude word.

It’s Latin for horrible year.

Last year I experienced bouts of extreme fatigue. I’d literally spend four hours a day resting in my bedroom. I could barely manage to see clients and struggled with domestic/mum duties.

I wasn’t an unbalanced Life Balance Coach, but a Life Balance Coach with NO life!

So to cut a long year short, the diagnosis came back Anaemia and Hypothyroidism.

Very treatable right?

Yes and no. I was a good patient. I took the vitamins, rested, medication, but I still felt exhausted.

According to my final blood test I was back to normal, but yet little changed?

Whilst there’s no teaching manual to think outside the box, I believe that Edward De Bono, the inventor and psychologist paved the way when he coined the phrase Lateral Thinking. He encouraged us to look beyond our predictable thought habits i.e. outside our usual thinking patterns (something I talk further in 5 Keys to Breaking Bad Habits) and think creatively.

So I started to think creatively looking holistically at the 7 key areas of my life i.e. home, money, life purpose, work, friends, romance and health. Beyond the physical to the mental, social and emotional factors. I bought a contour pillow, turned off the WI-FI at night, ate less at dinner and drank herb tea.

What could be contributing to my fatigue?

Ummm just as my clients have blind spots, I felt there was a contributing factor out of my awareness.

Then it hit me at 2am!!!

No not an idea, but 9 kgs of dog on my thigh. Buddy’s tossing and turning was regularly waking me from a deep sleep.

FYI – Dogs are pack animals. They are use to sleeping on top of each other because that’s when they feel most secure and comfortable – snuggled up against their littermates.

Now comes the thinking outside of the box …

So after some creative thinking, I built a wall, not of Trump steel, but 5 pillows placed down my bed as a buffer to his flops, snuggles and wriggles.

It’s day three and sadly only a slight improvement, but I remain optimistic that thinking outside of the box will bring me closer to ending my tiredness.

So my invitation is this, next time you encounter a problem, look at it from all angles and relationships. It’s important to keep calm and don’t discount anything as unrelated or unconnected.

Productivity, innovation and creativity start to happen when we stop thinking in one direction, and that’s because solving problems requires you to think widely, deeply, and differently.

Fiona Craig is an NLP practitioner & life coach, psychotherapist, business mentor, and published author of the award winning self-help book, “Stuck in a Rut – How to rescue yourself & live your truth” helping women remove the fear, worry and guilt to confidently take the steps towards creating the life they want to live.

Fiona has been interviewed by The Australian Women’s Weekly, Women’s Fitness Magazine and The New Daily and written articles for Collective Magazine, Herald Sun Melbourne, Sunday Life Magazine, Career One, I Am Woman Magazine, plus Mouths Of Mums and other online publications. You can learn more about working with Fiona at www.lifebalancecoach.com.au or call 0405 433 217.

Blog Image:Can Stock Photo / faithie

The post Try thinking outside of the box appeared first on Life Coach And Business Coaching Sydney.

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As adults, have we forgotten to have fun?

We’ve become all serious and focussed on other things. As we grow up, play gives way to study, career progression, mortgage, babies, relationships and many, many more “adult” commitments and responsibilities. We’ve lost our creative spirit, which is what engages us in rejuvenate play.

Adult play is a time to forget about work and responsibilities, and to socialise in a less structured way. Focus your play on the actual experience, not on accomplishing any goal.

Did you know that the connection between creativity and innovation is play? And it’s no surprise because, somewhere between childhood and adulthood, we stopped being playful and having fun.

So it makes sense that adult play is about forgetting about our work worries and enjoying ourselves. Play shapes and structures the brain, especially imaginative play, which children are marvellous at. When we are at play, it activates neural pathways and promotes memory skills. So if adults were to engage in more play, I believe they too could share ideas, experiences and feelings, and learn to explore and experiment with their lifestyle.

Play has great benefits. It relieves stress by triggering the release of endorphins, the body’s natural feel-good chemicals. Play stimulates brain function so puzzles and games like chess are great brain stimulators. But just what kind of play am I talking about?

My work is strongly influenced by Gestalt, a type of therapy that encourages clients to be more aware of their thoughts, feelings, behaviours, self, environmental supports, authentic self- expressions and to be more responsible for their actions. They do this through playful engagement with themselves and/or their environment. They are called experiments because we are testing and trying other ways.

Can you imagine yourself being playful?

My client, Iris, was invited to do just that. Iris was in her late fifties and had been divorced for over ten years. The kids were now independent adults, and when her daughter married and moved out of home, Iris found her thoughts turning to finding a partner. Iris longed for male companionship, someone who would share her love for opera and fine dining. However, she felt uncomfortable initiating friendships.

After a few sessions together, Iris realised she had shut down her playfulness to appease her ex-husband based on what she thought were the cultural norms of her workplace. In other words, that part of herself – her fun, bubbly, flirty self – was not welcome. Her strong Catholic upbringing – particularly her mother’s influence – created a belief that women who were flirty were loose, tarts or homewreckers.

Iris and I set about creating an experiment around flirting. We found a way that Iris could flirt with men without risk or consequences. It involved her winking to fellow drivers at the traffic lights from her car. The experiment allowed a gradual awakening of that part of her without any serious consequences. Iris loved the idea. She thought it was bold and cheeky, and for a week, used any opportunity to wink, flirt and drive off.

When Iris saw me next session, she was more upbeat and alive. I noticed she wasn’t editing herself. She was a little more outspoken. Iris also reflected on the relationship her parents had and how their divorce strongly affected her beliefs about men. She realised that experience of the family unit dissolving still held a lot of power over her, causing her to distrust men. She felt men would let her down, as she her father, mother and ex-husband had.

As a result, Iris used our flirting experiments to gradually awaken her real, authentic self. She did not need to be edited, only regulated for appropriate social setting. Iris then became comfortable exhibiting her best authentic self to a greater variety of people, including her work colleagues.

So, in Iris’s example, it’s through these experiments with playful engagement that a client can increase their self-awareness. I help individuals find and become more aware of their authentic self and stop always acting like who they’re expected to be.

I think I’m more playful in my fifties than I was in my thirties because I’m not so worried about ridicule or the rejection of my peers. However, this doesn’t mean age should determine your ability to take risks and develop your playful side. Sometimes being playful means doing something spontaneous. You may prefer setting aside an afternoon or evening to try something new or different.

Let’s start a adult play action plan. First, we need some great play ideas. I have twelve here. Some are quirky, kooky, but they are, above all, creative.

  • If you have a pet, organise a party. I held a Saint Valentine’s Day party with my doggy friends. All dogs had to come dressed in pink. It was a hilarious afternoon and an excuse to laugh and be playful.
  • Try a day at a theme park.
  • Try playing card games, pool, or having bowling nights with friends.
  • Fly a kite or model airplane with the kids.
  • Play family games like Twister, Jenga, Pictionary and charades.
  • Host a murder mystery night. Have a night out at a comedy club for a good belly laugh.
  • Attend acting, singing or dancing classes.
  • If you have a dog, try dressing it up for Halloween. Last year, our dog was Bat Dog, my son was Doctor Who and I went as River Song.
  • Join a musical, or a local theatre or charity production for children.

You may notice that all these great play ideas involve being with others. It’s so much more fun to engage in play with a family member, friend or pet. Above all, don’t forget to give yourself permission to play with the joyful abandon of a child. Let go of your responsibilities and be fully present.

It’s time to play! Play adds joy to your life. It will boost creative thinking and learning, and relieves stress while you’re feeling stuck.

Fiona Craig is an NLP practitioner & life coach, psychotherapist, business mentor, and published author of the award winning self-help book, “Stuck in a Rut – How to rescue yourself & live your truth” helping women remove the fear, worry and guilt to confidently take the steps towards creating the life they want to live.

Fiona has been interviewed by The Australian Women’s Weekly, Women’s Fitness Magazine and The New Daily and written articles for Collective Magazine, Herald Sun Melbourne, Sunday Life Magazine, Career One, I Am Woman Magazine, plus Mouths Of Mums and other online publications. You can learn more about working with Fiona at www.lifebalancecoach.com.au or call 0405 433 217.

The post Why Play Is Essential To Your Health appeared first on Life Coach And Business Coaching Sydney.

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We’d all like the secret to living a successful life. No matter your age, where you were born or what you do for a living, it seems society places a lot of pressure on us to be successful.

What does success mean to you? I find that definitions differ greatly from person to person, so maybe I should check in to see if we are all on the same page.

Most people equate success with the Big Three: money, status and influence. Yet a majority of people are unable to obtain success – say through fame, wealth or power – because they are floating aimlessly through life.

If you want to be successful, you need to have some clear direction of where you want to go. You also need passion and purpose to really live your life.

You’ve probably noticed success brings the comforts of life, like a new car, house, financial freedom and travel. Success improves your physical, emotional and mental wellbeing.

Successful people are happier and thought leaders, like Tony Robbins, Oprah Winfrey and Richard Branson, are our greatest teachers for those who wish to overcome adversity and make the impossible seem possible.

In my work, nothing is more painful to watch than a client who is desperate to achieve their goal, but who can’t get started. The most common barriers to success that clients share with me are:

  • An inability to tap into their intuition to make positive changes in their lives.
  • Frozen with fear and at crossroads in life.
  • Paralysed with fear and confused with what decision to make.
  • And behind most of this is the same big old problem: a fear of failure.

It’s time to let go the fear of failure and start seeing that it’s actually the key to success, because when we let go of this fear, we can achieve our goals, embrace change and make life-changing decisions. We’re also more trusting of ourselves and others, more comfortable in our vulnerability, and better able to take risks.

If you want success more than anything, you have to risk the embarrassment of failure.

Success isn’t a science or secret formula. You don’t have to be a certain type of person to excel, so it doesn’t matter what field you are in; success comes to those that are prepared to change.

Would you like a formula for success?

Here’s a terrific quote I found on Daring to Live Fully website:

Double your rate of failure. You are thinking of failure as the enemy of success. But it isn’t at all. You can be discouraged by failure or you can learn from it, so go ahead and make mistakes. Make all you can. Because remember that’s where you will find success. Thomas J. Watson

So what is one “fear of failure” strategy I use on clients?

During my sessions, I’m always listening to the client’s dialogue to hear how they speak about their topic. I pay close attention to their tone of voice, their energy level, their congruence with emotions, strengths, passions, and values; essentially, I listen for the “who” of the client.

Jane Benston wrote an article for Focus Leadership about how we can disempower ourselves through words. She writes that some words come with an emotional charge, but if we eliminate these words we can notice the difference in how we feel and the response we receive from those around us. Benston suggests noticing the sense of hopelessness and impossibility the next time you say something like “I feel overwhelmed”.

Now imagine replacing “overwhelmed” with the phrase “I’m a bit busy”, “I have a challenging schedule” or even “I am prioritising a heavy workload right now”. Notice the energy surrounding the statement is lighter and thus filled with more possibility.

  • It’s hard. Saying something is hard gives the impression that it is almost impossible to achieve. Replacing it with the word “challenging” gives the task or situation a greater sense of possibility and even a sense of excitement.
  • I’ll try. When you try to do something you have already assumed failure and you are simply making an attempt. In my view, it’s a bit of a cop-out! In the words of Yoda: “Do or do not. There is no try.”
  • I’m okay. When someone asks how you are doing, instead of saying “fine” or “okay”, ramp up the emotional dial and say something like “I feel fabulous” or “I’m sensational!” As simplistic as this sounds, it creates a new pattern in your neurology and you will receive a quick injection of happy hormones.
Do one thing everyday that scares you. Eleanor Roosevelt

Are you willing to become a slayer of self-doubt?

If so, you are ready to go and grab success.

Do you have a clear vision?

Do you have a burning desire?

Are you willing to fail?

If you are, you are well on your way to achieving success.

Excerpt taken from Fiona Craig’s award-winning book, Stuck in a Rut: How to rescue yourself and live your truth available on Amazon, Angus & Robbinson, Collins, Dymocks and independent bookstores throughout Australia.

A paperback copy can also be purchased through Fiona Craig’s website, Life Balance Coach.

Fiona Craig is an NLP practitioner & life coach, psychotherapist, business mentor, and published author of the award winning self-help book, “Stuck in a Rut – How to rescue yourself & live your truth” helping women remove the fear, worry and guilt to confidently take the steps towards creating the life they want to live.

Fiona has been interviewed by The Australian Women’s Weekly, Women’s Fitness Magazine and The New Daily and written articles for Collective Magazine, Herald Sun Melbourne, Sunday Life Magazine, Career One, I Am Woman Magazine, plus Mouths Of Mums and other online publications. You can learn more about working with Fiona at www.lifebalancecoach.com.au or call 0405 433 217.

Picjumbo BY VIKTOR HANACEK

The post The Secret To Living a Successful Life appeared first on Life Coach And Business Coaching Sydney.

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Grace Niu from Feng Shui Serenity has written specially for Life Balance Coach on activating your abundance using Chinese astrology.

Grace says, in order to truly see the miracles of the world, we must break with our familiar acceptance of it. In order to truly see the brilliance of ourselves, we must gain new sight, and have the courage to take a leap into the unknown.

Did you know that your Destiny Chart contains the secret to unlocking your abundance? This is because the unboundedness and abundance are part of our underlying natural state. It is always there for us to access, we just need to re-remember the secret password.

Knowing your Destiny Chart and your Wealth potential is the very first step to accessing the abundance in your life.

When I turned 39, I knew I was about to step into a brand new 10-year luck cycle. My Destiny chart revealed that the dominating theme would be how I created wealth: it would be very different from the past decade. Sure enough, soon afterwards, I quit my safe corporate job of 15 years and followed my calling to set up Feng Shui Serenity.

Your Four Pillars of Destiny chart (https://fengshuiserenity.com.au/resources/four-pillars-of-destiny-bazi/ ) not only reveals the secret code to unlocking your abundance, it can also revel the path that leads to your abundance.

Each of us has a special element that represents our abundance – the Wealth Element.

HOW TO FIND YOUR “WEALTH ELEMENT

If your Self Element is WATER, your Wealth Element is FIRE

If your Self Element is WOOD, your Wealth Element is EARTH

If your Self Element is FIRE, your Wealth Element is METAL

If your Self Element is EARTH, your Wealth Element is WATER

If your Self Element is METAL, your Wealth Element is WOOD

If you don’t know what your self-element is, you can get your FREE Four Pillars of Destiny chart HERE

 

As a Feng Shui consultant, I am often being asked to activate the wealth corner of a home or property. However, it is your own beliefs that you hold in your hearts around the theme of prosperity and abundance that set the tone on how easily you can manifest your wealth in life.

Wealth energy is associated with the Yang energy in nature. However, when the Yin energy, which is feminine energy in nature is honoured and nurtured, wealth luck is being generated. This is because Yang is born in Yin.

When we are calm, grounded and happy in every moment in our life – feminine energy, we provide a solid foundation for the Yang energy (carrying wealth) to be generated. There is no need to fight in order to receive abundance, the Universe has the infinite amount. So if you have an ‘abundant mindset’ instead of a poverty one, stay authentic, tune into your intuition (i.e. feminine energy) and be true to yourself, your creativity, wealth and money will find you.

When people pursue their passion with dedication, they feel fulfilment in life and in most cases money falls into their lap without any specific effort of chasing it. Wealth is simply a by-product.

Understanding this on an energetic level can profoundly affect your attitude and thinking pattern towards wealth.

When your personal Wealth Element appears in your 10-year or 5-year luck pillar, it signals that changes or opportunities are emerging. Knowing the exact meaning behind it is crucial so you don’t miss any golden opportunities to make money, at the same time, it can also save you from hasty investment disasters.

I will be speaking at the Women’s Success Circle event on 21st October at the Raddison Blu Hotel in Sydney, if you are interested in joining us for an informative, inspiring and relaxing afternoon. Details CLICK HERE

The post Activating Your Abundance Via Your Destiny Chart appeared first on Life Coach And Business Coaching Sydney.

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Women spend huge amounts of time nurturing others. We listen to our partners’ bad days, kids’ disappointments, and girlfriends’ woes. I’m not saying our efforts go unreciprocated but am just making a point. If it wasn’t for us, the plants would die, our dogs would starve, the phone would get unanswered and there’d be no Christmas lunch.

So women need to balance stress and activities, errands and meetings, and nurture themselves as they nurture others. The way I see it, women hold a tank of love in their hearts. We need to refill our own tanks otherwise the tank will run dry and we will collapse, running on empty. If we ask others to refill our love tanks for us we can become needy, co-dependent or chronically ill. We have to look after ours.

Do you feel guilty about nurturing yourself?

Alleviating guilt over self-care starts with developing a supportive muscle to soothe our inner anxiety, grief or anger. We need to be able to handle the detrimental parts of ourselves. It’s through self nurturing that children learn to accept the parts of themselves they loathe or hate to find the path to their self-acceptance and self-forgiveness.

Self-care starts with taking care of the emotional side of your being and sitting with your inner-child to comfort, soothe and reassure her. Self-nurturing starts with self-compassion, which will reduce the feelings of guilt because you know you, are the most important person in your life.

My client Ronda (not her real name) was in her early thirties and anxious about work, her forthcoming marriage and living in a foreign country. She came to me to get back to balance, find out what makes her happy, and to get back her energy, dreams and passion. She told me her job burdens and wrote to me:

“I constantly feel under pressure, having to satisfy the team and my boss. I am constantly afraid of failing or not appealing or pleasing. If I finally have free time I can only enjoy it when I’ve had some really tough days beforehand. I always feel that I have to punish myself first, so that I’ve earned the right to have fun. This is a vicious circle. I feel that I am so blessed with all I have. That’s why I think I don’t deserve to have fun or relaxing free time. As long as I suffered enough at work, I can have fantastic weekends. This is very exhausting …”

Ronda’s mother was absent, and for a portion of her life, her grandmother raised her. As a result, Ronda’s emotional needs were not met. When her mother returned home from her illness, Ronda took on a carer’s role instead of being cared for. This resulted in habits like taking care of others’ needs at the expense of her own. Nowadays she lives in a very co-dependent relationship, heightened by the fact she’s a foreigner.

Getting Ronda back to balance required an inner journey of self discovery and self-acceptance. Finding passion and joy without guilt meant acknowledging her family upbringing and the role she played. She could now de-role and let go of the guilt around feeling responsible for her mother’s illness. Rhonda had a few self-discovery sessions and did some inner-child work through affirmations and guided meditations. These were coupled with some Australian Bush Flower Essences, yoga and meditation classes, and resolutions to eat well and listen to her own needs.

Every day Rhonda spoke to her inner-child, made it feel heard and validated its feelings. She listened to statements inspired by “Love Your Inner Child” by Louise Hay:

“It wasn’t your fault. You didn’t do anything wrong. You are good. You were just a child and doing what children do. I love you exactly like you are and I will never leave you.”

Through the guided meditation, Ronda was able to hug her inner child and become better at meeting her own health and emotional needs instead of seeking assurance from others. As we learn better self-care, we can then reach out more effectively to others and show bountiful love and empathy.

Over a period of three months, Ronda made self-care a priority and began to pamper herself. She resolved to be less dependent on her fiancé. Ronda started to feel like a newborn person. She found her way back to herself and her self-esteem improved drastically. She still had expectations and drive, but could see everything much less seriously and treated herself with kindness. If we are filling our own emotional love tanks with self-respect and loving care, we will have much more to give to our families, friends and work colleagues.

Self-care means giving ourselves the treatment we need because we are worthwhile human beings. Some practical solutions you can start today include getting a good night’s sleep on a regular basis, eating healthy foods, exercising regularly, meditating, making time for relaxation and seeing friends.

Self-care doesn’t work if you are a people-pleaser who bends over backwards for others. You need to desensitize yourself from the fear of conflict, of disappointing others and of being confronted by their anger and disappointment. It’s about managing your own emotions as you break patterns of martyrdom and self-sacrifice by setting boundaries, limits, rules and simply saying no.

What if self-care is not on your priority list?

I would suggest, after reading this that you welcome one relaxation activity a week and see how you feel. Choose from one of the following 12 ways to totally pamper yourself, surveyed by women as being the best:

  • Coffee with a girlfriend
  • Sleep in
  • Meditate
  • Organise a child-free day
  • Pamper day at a spa
  • Hot bath
  • Music
  • Good book and glass of wine
  • Dance around the house
  • Walk in nature
  • Aromatherapy
  • Hobbies

Excerpt taken from Fiona Craig’s award-winning book, Stuck in a Rut: How to rescue yourself and live your truth available on Amazon, Angus & Robbinson, Collins, Dymocks and independent bookstores throughout Australia.

A paperback copy can also be purchased through Fiona Craig’s website, Life Balance Coach.

Fiona Craig is an NLP practitioner & life coach, psychotherapist, business mentor, and published author of the award winning self-help book, “Stuck in a Rut – How to rescue yourself & live your truth” helping women remove the fear, worry and guilt to confidently take the steps towards creating the life they want to live.

Fiona has been interviewed by The Australian Women’s Weekly, Women’s Fitness Magazine and The New Daily and written articles for Collective Magazine, Herald Sun Melbourne, Sunday Life Magazine, Career One, I Am Woman Magazine, plus Mouths Of Mums and other online publications. You can learn more about working with Fiona at www.lifebalancecoach.com.au or call 0405 433 217.

Photo by Rune Enstad on Unsplash

The post 12 Ways To Totally Pamper Yourself appeared first on Life Coach And Business Coaching Sydney.

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Time to tame your inner critic!

It is often said that the most difficult relationship you have is the one you have with yourself.

I’d like to help you become aware of the dialogue you have with yourself, and to listen for the ways your negative self-talk sabotages your ability to make big decisions and try new things.

We are bully-busting the numerous tricks and ways your inner critic interferes with your dreams, business, career and life. But first, we need to understand just what our inner critic is and where it came from.

Where did it all start?  

Our inner critic is part of our ego structure and personality. We all have an inner bully or inner critic. If you haven’t met yours, maybe you get more of a feeling, or a physical sensation, when your bully is around. It’s common not to notice the presence of a voice speaking inside our heads. We may not be aware of its constant criticisms and judgments.

The inner critic has been with us since childhood so we think it’s a natural part of ourselves. It’s true; it is a part of ourselves, but it’s not us. We are its hosts. The inner critic has been living inside us, absorbing all of society’s expectations and ideals about what we should be doing, how we should be living up to our perfect selves. It’s been yelling this information back into our ears.

It’s amazing how universal the inner critic is. No one is immune to the constant chitchat of their negative self-speak. Every person on the planet will hear the criticisms of the inner-critic, but what it has to say will vary from person to person and country to country based on cultural ideals.

The inner critic comes from messages given to us since birth. It is born, just like us, into a family. Your inner critic takes on his or her role from birth. He or she is really the voice of your primary caregivers. They want you to grow into responsible adults and the inner critic is really a manifestation of their concern. Your primary caregivers mean well. They want you to excel out in the wide world, so they make comments to set you on the right path.

Just stop and think for a moment. Maybe you can remember scenarios where your mum made comments about your weight or looks; or you crashed your car or lost your new watch and were grilled about being irresponsible.

As children we absorb these negative, sometimes contradictory, messages. We don’t know how to process this information, to question it, until we reach our teens. What I mean by this is, as toddlers, we didn’t turn to our dad and say, “Hey, I’m not clumsy. That’s ridiculous. I’m just a little kid developing my fine motor skills.” Or, as a young child having just received an award, “Why can’t I stand up and receive all the accolades? It won’t go to my head.”

A child’s inability to critically analyse comments means they can internalise even the smallest flippant remark from a parent or teacher, and then create a story around it, giving it meaning and making it about themselves.

So what’s the critic’s role?

The critic exists to protect us from being shamed or hurt. Ironically, the critic wants us to succeed in life, to be accepted by our family, friends and peers, and to be loved and liked by others. However, the critic’s methods towards achieving this are often harsh, desperate and driven by anxiety. A full-blown alert to our waywardness, it chooses to magnify all our shortcomings and faults to keep us out of humiliation and harm’s way.

It modifies our behaviour by repeating what it saw and heard, teaching us how to stay safe, do well and avoid displeasing those who are crucial to our survival. If the critic feels we are too much, it will cut us down; if we are not enough, it will try to motivate us to excel. It functions just like our primary caregivers, fulfilling all their expectations. However, we have now grown up, but our inner critic has not; it keeps spewing the same outdated judgments, advice and criticisms in an attempt to keep us safe.

Is it all starting to make sense?

It’s the origin of our self-sabotaging behaviours and our fear of making mistakes. Self-sabotage is an intrapsychic conflict, a part of our personality that acts in conflict with another part. One side wants one thing; the other wants something completely different.

The inner critic creates this conflict because we become conflicted with the values and beliefs of our parents and our own natural desires and tendencies as adults. So, whilst the critic stops us, curbs our natural inclinations, and harshly instructs us to avoid hurt or shame, we feel conflicted because, although our behaviour is more acceptable to the eyes of our critic, we’ve abandoned our needs in the process.

Think about it. No baby is born lazy, clumsy or stupid. If I’ve brought to your attention the fact that you have picked up these messages along the way, I imagine there is already some relief at the prospect of diffusing them.

How To Tame Your Inner Critic

Get a sense of your critic. Notice what happens as the bully speaks.To start taming your inner critic, write down all his/her statements.

Start with an inner critic journal. Write down each day and at various times, and in different situations, the things your critic is saying to you. Note, too, what was happening at that time. Then think about what your inner bully is trying to achieve by talking to you. Do you notice any themes, such as a fear of failure, or patterns of behaviour, such as procrastination?

The critic is powerful, but only if you buy into its silly speak. That’s because your inner critic dates back to when adults always knew best. Adults were right and children were wrong. Even when the adults were wrong, they still had power over kids simply because they were older so knew better.

Last month, my Peter Perfect bully popped into my head while I was engrossed in my favourite TV show, Homeland. My lazy bully said: “Why haven’t you cleaned the bathroom?”

I said to my Bully: “Look, I’ve walked the dog, vacuumed downstairs, been to the supermarket, cooked a curry, but now I need to rest. Don’t bully me. I ended up with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome for five years when I kept listening to you. We don’t want that again.”

The trick is to dialogue with the inner critic and negotiate a peaceful truce. In a sarcastic tone, I replied to my bully: “Thanks for caring about me so I don’t turn into a fat slob or die from bathroom mould, but I’ve heard enough and can assure you the task will get done sometime tomorrow.”

The trick to beating your bully is to argue against its extreme and distorted logic, but I also encourage you to acknowledge the pain and suffering the bully is causing you. Acknowledge it’s doing its job to protect you, but remember that its efforts are useless because you’re an adult now and have the message.

It’s time to start talking back to your bully.

  • What’s your bully saying to you?
  • What stories are they telling you?
  • As a result, what are you afraid of?
  • What’s stopping you in your tracks?

All about developing an awareness of your negative self-talk and devising strategies to incorporate into your life so that every time you hear the voice of the inner critic, you can recognise it and untangle yourself from it. You’re an adult with your own values, beliefs and ways of doing things – and you can think, decide for and protect yourself.

If you can improve your relationship with your inner critic, its voice will drown out. In its place, you’ll hear the voice of your authentic self and have the clarity and direction to move forward.

A paperback copy can also be purchased through Fiona Craig’s website, Life Balance Coach.

Fiona Craig is an NLP practitioner & life coach, psychotherapist, business mentor, and published author of the award winning self-help book, “Stuck in a Rut – How to rescue yourself & live your truth” helping women remove the fear, worry and guilt to confidently take the steps towards creating the life they want to live.

Fiona has been interviewed by The Australian Women’s Weekly, Women’s Fitness Magazine and The New Daily and written articles for Collective Magazine, Herald Sun Melbourne, Sunday Life Magazine, Career One, I Am Woman Magazine, plus Mouths Of Mums and other online publications. You can learn more about working with Fiona at www.lifebalancecoach.com.au or call 0405 433 217.

Blog Photo by Zohre Nemati on Unsplash

The post Tame Your Inner Critic appeared first on Life Coach And Business Coaching Sydney.

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Will I ever feel good enough?

How many years of your life have you wasted feeling that you are not good enough?

Not good enough for a guy

Not good enough for that promotion

Not good enough as a mother

When working with clients, I repeatedly hear, I’m not good enough, smart enough, wealthy enough, fast enough, but enough of enough.

It gets me all fired up!

Why do we believe we’re not good enough?

The root cause of feeling “not good enough” is shame. It lies in the accompanying beliefs that a person is unworthy and basically unlovable. Shame is a fear-based primary emotion that conjures up intense feelings of emotional pain with a sense of inadequacy.

It is through shameful experiences that we form the beliefs of “I am a failure” and “I am bad”, which are threats to the integrity of the self. When we carry shame we also carry fears of being found out that we are vulnerable, and pull back from company for fear of being found out, exposed and further humiliated. But where does it come from?

Shame is a result of early developmental loss for closeness with the mother and father.

Let me share part of a client’s session to demonstrate.

When Samantha (not her real name) wrote not feeling good enough, procrastination and fear of success on her client intake sheet, I knew that she was struggling with shame.

Samantha was in her early thirties and wanted to leave the corporate world to start a business. Yet, she struggled to make any decisions about her career or life. She had difficulty deciding whether she’d work with me, and for awhile, our emails went back and forth in her indecision.

After our first session, I was able to get a sense of her difficult childhood, which was filled with harsh, loveless experiences. A deeply critical, controlling mother was at the root of her embedded shame. Criticism, cruel teasing and ridicule further reinforced her feelings of unworthiness.

Harsh parental discipline of a coercive nature created fears of abandonment in Samantha. Her default position was to let her boyfriend make decisions for her and she would attempt to protect herself from further pain by collapsing in anxiety. She couldn’t tap into her own power and find her voice.

Samantha’s shame was deeply embedded because of her experiences of rejection and the withdrawal of love from her mother. She internalised the belief that she was unlovable, allowing it to develop and build, causing Samantha to pull back into silent withdrawal. This is why she couldn’t make decisions: making slight mistakes sent her into a head spin of inadequacy.

Samantha’s negative messages had already become a part of her whole being. This negativity is supported by her two needs: the need to be loved and the need to be capable. To help Samantha remove her shame binds, our face-to-face session involved reconnecting with the original feeling of shame. This helped Samantha accept her imperfections and gain mastery over them.

We did some empty chair work where I got Samantha to sit in a chair and close her eyes. I invited her to locate where shame was held in her body. Samantha was able to describe the feelings of hurt, sadness and anger she held towards her mum.

We tracked back to some painful memories and explored the reason for her mother’s cruelty: her mental illness and the overwhelming feelings she would have experienced as a single mum. Then we talked about feelings of unworthiness and how these messages stuck in her psyche. I asked her to bring forth a kind and loving mum, a part of herself, and gave her compassionate responses to her statements (i.e. refute negative beliefs, like “I am bad” or “I am unlovable”).

Samantha was then encouraged to assign herself new statements and to imagine a future version of herself with more positive beliefs, one who would act differently in both comfortable and uncomfortable situations, and one who would finally feel good enough.

Shame affects us all differently. It can permeate through relationships, career aspirations and affect how we feel about ourselves.

If you are feeling taken for granted, unhappy or dissatisfied with life, could it be that your boundaries are being violated and need firming up?

Here are a few tips to get you out of shame binds and onto feeling like you are enough:

  • Change your beliefs about yourself.
  • What physical, emotional and intellectual boundaries need fine-tuning?
  • Be assertive and not aggressive when expressing your feelings to others.
  • Be kind to and patient with yourself.
  • Seek support from trusted friends or professionals if struggling.

To move towards feeling good enough starts with attending to the part of yourself that is yearning for connection, love and support.

Ask yourself, “How can I get this need met?”

Each day work on explore your feelings, maintaining clear boundaries, and change your state (listen to music, walk, sing or dance) when you start to spiral into negative mindsets.

These are the essential first steps to valuing yourself more highly, which will ultimately have you feeling good enough about yourself.

Fiona Craig is an NLP practitioner & life coach, psychotherapist, business mentor, and published author of the award winning self-help book, “Stuck in a Rut – How to rescue yourself & live your truth” helping women remove the fear, worry and guilt to confidently take the steps towards creating the life they want to live.

Fiona has been interviewed by The Australian Women’s Weekly, Women’s Fitness Magazine and The New Daily and written articles for Collective Magazine, Herald Sun Melbourne, Sunday Life Magazine, Career One, I Am Woman Magazine, plus Mouths Of Mums and other online publications. You can learn more about working with Fiona at www.lifebalancecoach.com.au or call 0405 433 217.

Image by freestocks.org/StockSnapjo

The post Will I ever feel good enough? appeared first on Life Coach And Business Coaching Sydney.

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Do you feel like you’re stuck in a rut?

Maybe you feel like your having the same day over and over again, stamping out fires or feeling lost in some dense fog?

You are not alone but one of millions who feel completely trapped in lives that haven’t turned out quite the way they expected.

If you are feeling dissatisfied with life, have lost your mojo, or if your life seems of such little significance that you’re not inspired to bounce out of bed, then chances are you’re stuck in a rut.

We’ve all found ourselves stuck at some point. It’s endless and soul destroying and no matter how many nights we lie in bed awake, trying to figure it all out, we can’t seem to see a way out.

It’s no fun being stuck in a rut, or asking ourselves questions like, Why can’t I lose weight? Why can’t I find my soulmate? Why can’t I find a job that I love? Or why do I keep putting this off?

Being stuck in a rut is a figurative term to describe a boring, habitual behavioural pattern. It’s doing the same thing over again, and over a period of time. You can seem to be digging yourself into a deep trench because you tread the same old ground again and again, until you sink yourself down into a deep hole and have difficulty getting out.

Ruts make us feel extremely frustrated and unhappy. We feel like we’re missing out on life and often feel embarrassed or ashamed if we’re unable to fix it. Because of this, we tend to lie to those around us about being unhappy.

Whilst being stuck is truly painful, frustrating and draining on the body, there is wisdom in staying in a rut.

Our ruts keep us safe and secure. We remain wrapped in a cocoon and well within our comfort zone. In fact, change and growth are painful things and we may not be ready to take that leap. Immediate change may not be in our best interests. Staying in a rut for a period can bring us a new awareness about ourselves, an understanding of our habits, or clarify an assumption or a belief about ourselves. It can also keep at bay unresolved feelings that are not ready to be processed.

A rut provides a life balance between routine and spontaneity. But there is a difference between a helpful routine and the sense of being trapped in a life we don’t want to live.

Why Do We Get Stuck in Ruts?

The reason you’re stuck in rut is because you have not resolved your unfinished business. We carry our unresolved childhood experiences and traumas into our present-day lives. Coupled with being continually misguided by listening to our inner critic, we buy into the negative self-talk so do not live our lives authentically and to our fullest.

What is Unfinished Business?

Your unfinished business is any difficult situation or traumatic experience of the past that has remained unresolved until now. Unfinished business gives you no closure or satisfactory resolution. For example, a person may hold underlying feelings of rage, resentment, hatred, anxiety, grief, pain, guilt or abandonment that have not been fully expressed and experienced. The person is completely unaware of these feelings lingering in the background, giving rise to present-day self-sabotaging behaviours, negative mindsets and compulsions.

We can all tolerate a level of unfinished business, but if these disturbances haunt our adult lives, preventing us from making the decisions to live authentically, we remain stuck. It’s not until the person deals with their issues and begins to makes sense of these alienated feelings that the unfinished business is resolved.

How Do I Get Out of My Rut?

There are three steps to getting out of your rut: challenging your childhood beliefs, which create a childlike mindset; living by your high priority or core values; and ridding “shoulds” from your vocabulary.

To get out of your childlike mindset you must look over your childhood parenting and experiences. This is where your first beliefs – the principles and convictions that we generally hold true and do not question – were formed.

Our beliefs about ourselves grow from birth based on what we see, hear, experience, read and think about. As we mature into adults, we take on board all the ideas and suggestions from our authority figures, carers, and culture without much processing, and subsequently absorb covert and overt messages about ourselves.

From our childhood experiences, we develop suggestions and opinions that we continue to hold true. Our self-belief has been repeated and confirmed in our minds so it strengthens. Eventually, the emotions underlying the suggestions and opinions we have about ourselves become beliefs.

How Do We Carry Negative Beliefs about Ourselves?

Our unconscious mind receives twenty million bits of information per second, but we can only consciously process seven, plus or minus two, bits of information at a time. Our filtering system is very weak as an early infant. We absorb, filter and process information from many different sources without really analysing it. It’s sort of like swallowing without chewing it over and we do this without question because we trust our caregivers. As we get older, from the age of twelve onwards, we question who we are. The filter becomes stronger, so less and less suggestions are allowed in, hence the teenage years of identity struggle. However, although we get older and begin questioning things, there is still enough emotional memory to accept some beliefs so strongly that we don’t think of them as beliefs, but as knowledge and truths.

These beliefs stay with us as negative voices, like faint echoes of the past. It’s these words or experiences with parents that shape and influence our present-day reactions, perspectives, behaviours and choices.

What are some of the common beliefs, scripts or messages we carry around? Messages you may have adopted from your family system or society are:

“You must always work hard.”

“All men are liars.”

“Fat girls don’t get dates.”

“Good girls don’t get angry.”

Or individual messages like:

“I’m too old to start a business.”

“I’m so selfish.”

“I am not good enough.”

“I must please people.”

“I must be perfect.”

“I don’t need help.”

Can you think of some family, society or personal statements that you’ve carried with you from childhood?

When carrying these negative beliefs around in our heads, we hear the critical voice, which gives rise to the term “inner critic”, and don’t listen to our own.

Our negative beliefs, scripts or messages (pertaining to ourselves) give rise to self-limiting beliefs. This is because we operate out of old beliefs about ourselves, which conflict with present-day values and priorities. They are limiting because we believe them and create excuses as to why we can’t move forward.

Our old ways of being and relating hold us back and become the blocks, resistances, habits, excuses, patterns and obstacles that keep us stuck.

Unsure if you have any self-limiting beliefs? Look at the list below for clues.

Self-limiting beliefs can manifest in your life:

  • When you have negative thoughts
  • When you complain about things
  • When you talk to yourself in unkind ways
  • When you make excuses
  • When you worry about making mistakes
  • When you procrastinate a lot
  • When you worry a lot
  • When you have perfectionist traits

By letting go of old patterns and old truths about yourself you can wake up to who you really are, and not who you think you ought to be.

So, in order to lead a successful, integrated and fulfilled life, you need to revisit childhood beliefs, your unvoiced feelings that are leading to self-sabotaging behaviours, because if these are not fully acknowledged, the unfinished business will linger in the background. The key is to become aware of your old belief systems, and form new ones, in order to make choices that don’t conflict with your high-priority values.

Excerpt taken from Fiona Craig’s award-winning book, Stuck in a Rut: How to rescue yourself and live your truth available on Amazon, Angus & Robbinson, Collins, Dymocks and independent bookstores throughout Australia.

A paperback copy can also be purchased through Fiona Craig’s website, Life Balance Coach.

Fiona Craig is an NLP practitioner & life coach, psychotherapist, business mentor, and published author of the award winning self-help book, “Stuck in a Rut – How to rescue yourself & live your truth” helping women remove the fear, worry and guilt to confidently take the steps towards creating the life they want to live.

Fiona has been interviewed by The Australian Women’s Weekly, Women’s Fitness Magazine and The New Daily and written articles for Collective Magazine, Herald Sun Melbourne, Sunday Life Magazine, Career One, I Am Woman Magazine, plus Mouths Of Mums and other online publications. You can learn more about working with Fiona at www.lifebalancecoach.com.au or call 0405 433 217.

The post The Reason You’re Stuck In A Rut appeared first on Life Coach And Business Coaching Sydney.

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