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According to research done by SHRM, it can cost the equivalent of 50-60% of an employee’s annual salary to find a direct replacement. One of the most difficult parts of being a manager is putting the right people in the right seats. So, how do you know how to hire the best sales reps that will deliver results?

1. Be sure you’re in the position to hire

Before you dive into the process of hiring a good sales rep, make sure that you are ready to hire. You must have a good onboarding system, have sales rep development procedures in place, and have the agreement of important stakeholders that a new hire is the correct decision. If you are not prepared, you risk losing a great candidate and wasting your company’s time and resources.

2. Evaluate the candidate’s Coachability

Your are evaluating each candidate’s experience, knowledge, and coachability. Out of the three, coachability is arguably the most important characteristic to screen for during interviews. You can gain insight into a candidate’s coachability by asking questions such as “How did you learn to do that in your previous job?” The idea is to recognize when someone is able to learn through listening and take direction well so that you can successfully coach them later on.

3. Know how to interview for the right qualities

Although there are many qualities specific to a top performing sales rep, there are a few important characteristics to look for. The difficulty is being able to recognize when a candidate has what it takes to be successful from just an interview.

High EQ (Emotional Intelligence)

People who are able to comprehend and manage both their own and other’s emotions are good sales reps to hire. Interviewing for emotional intelligence is important but difficult. You must ask behavioral-based and situational questions, then dive into how they responded in a previous situation, the reasoning behind the actions they took, and how they felt during the process. You can get some insight on their EQ based on the answers you receive. Employees can continually develop their EQ, so your evaluation of their coachability is relevant as well.

Self awareness

People who have good self awareness understand what motivates them, and what motivates the decision making of other people. They are able to recognize what type of work causes them to burnout and what skills they lack so they can focus on activities they are best at to gain the most return on their invested time.

Efficiency

Sales reps who have experience and self awareness tend to be more efficient. They know what behaviors to focus on in order to see results due to trial and error and an understanding of their own skills. Be straightforward – ask what actions the candidate has taken to make their job more efficient.

Perseverance

Great sales reps will persevere but will not be overbearing or pushy. Does the person you are considering hiring follow up politely but persistently? Are they able to answer direct and straightforward questions in the interview regarding their status and the hiring timeline? Take into account how they interact with you and the hiring manager – these actions can speak volumes.

Make your decision quickly

This may go without saying, but when you recognize the qualities of a great candidate, you are not the only one who will see this. You can also usually be certain that a driven person will be courted by more than just one company at a time. Act fast to have the best chance at securing a top performing sales person before another company capitalizes on your hesitation.

Knowing how to hire the best sales reps is a skill that often takes time and experience, but when you think you have the right candidate, keep them motivated, focused on the right behaviors, and coach them to be their best.

The post How to Hire the Best Sales Reps in 2019 appeared first on LevelEleven.

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We are officially in the second half of 2019. If your numbers aren’t where you want them to be, this can be scary. It also offers an opportunity to switch gears and start the second half of the year with a renewed focus, new technique, and fresh perspective.

Here at LevelEleven, we believe that focusing on the best KPIs for sales can make a huge impact on reaching your organizational goals. Calls, emails, and voicemails are not always going to cut it. Although these activities are necessary, sometimes your SDR team will have to try a different approach. A great way to switch up your strategy is to start measuring KPIs that aren’t normally focused on but have an impact on building pipeline.

To accompany the last six months of 2019, here are six best KPIs for Sales Development Reps to focus on to finish out 2019 strong.

Contacts Added

As the second half of the year begins, conference season comes to a close and leads are not flowing in as fast as they were. Kickstart H2 by making sure your pipeline stays full of ripe prospects, using technologies such as ZoomInfo or LinkedIn Navigator. This is especially useful if your team is having trouble penetrating an account via the contacts you already have. Finding and adding fresh prospects will keep your pipeline full and the deals flowing throughout the second half of the year.

Live Connects or Conversations

Are your reps making 100s of calls a day to meet a quota but not getting through? Calls are only as effective as the number of times they are answered. A large volume of calls to your entire database may not be as effective as focusing on a smaller list of more promising prospects.

Instead of giving your reps large call quotas to meet, try having them build focus lists of 50-100 prospects. This will result in a much more manageable list for your sales reps to call 2-3 times a day, raising their chances of catching someone and having a valuable conversation. Using “live connects” as a metric will ensure your reps are focused on adding value for prospects instead of blindly calling in the name of quota.

Meeting or Demo Scheduled

After a live connect, the next logical step is to schedule a meeting. Depending on your organization, this may be a more in-depth discovery call or a demo with an account executive. “Meetings scheduled” is a useful metric to track during H2 because it adds value to the prospect.

Like live connects above, meetings scheduled is not an automated activity such as sending out email blasts. Emails can add value and catch interest, but sometimes they seem like a shot in the dark. On the other hand, meetings scheduled is zeroed in on a promising opportunity.

Meeting or Demo Completed

The third best KPI for sales that SDRs can benefit from focusing on is demos completed. This is a simple but very important KPI. Often, demos will be scheduled but not followed through with. Prospects will call last minute or email the day before trying to reschedule, or worse, cancel. This metric ensures that prospects are being followed up with, and the demos are actually happening.

Sales Accepted Opportunities

Your sales department could deem a prospect a “sales accepted opportunity,” or SAO at the point when an opportunity is accepted and pursuit is owned by an account executive (AE). This measures the quality of leads the SDRs are bringing to the sales team. To be accepted, a deal will be deemed as able to move on through the sales cycle. Examples of opportunities not accepted include those with budget constrictions, bad timing, etc.

This is a fantastic metric to focus on during H2 because it directly relates to a deal moving down the funnel.

Wins

Surprising? Although this is not a very common metric for SDRs to focus on, doing so can help drive the deal to close. Normally, after an opportunity is taken out of the SDRs hands, the AE runs with this new potential deal and the SDR starts their prospecting journey again in new accounts. Some companies, especially those where many people are involved in the buying process, structure their sales strategy whereby the SDR continues to identify and engage contacts within an account. This allows the AE to focus on his/her contacts while strengthening the sales team’s position and coverage of the account.

Using wins, or a deal closing, as a metric for your SDR team creates an opportunity for the AE to continue using them to add value throughout the sales cycle. SDRs are great resources, their skills in this area can be a compliment to the AEs sales process.

Although SDRs should continue their normal activities such as emails and dials, focusing solely on those will not be effective in helping your organization reach its 2019 goals. Having your SDR team focus on the behaviors and KPIs above will help propel your team to finish 2019 strong.

Looking for more information on what the best KPIs for Sales are? Download out Sales KPI Report for more!

The post Best KPIs for Sales Development Reps to Focus on in the Second Half of 2019 appeared first on LevelEleven.

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Management is time-consuming and difficult, but it can also be greatly rewarding to play a role in the professional development of your team. Not only do managers have a lot on their plate, but the effectiveness of the people they manage is often a direct reflection on their performance. With so much responsibility as a manager, one of the most important things you must master are your time management skills. Time is one of your greatest resources, and to be successful you must use it wisely. Here are some time management tips for managers on running your team efficiently so that both you and your employees can be most effective. 

Foster Self-Sufficiency

Create an environment that gives your employees the autonomy and support they need, but makes it clear when they should ask for advice or guidance. Some people you manage may need more of your time than others, but it’s important that they make mistakes on their own and learn from them. Foster self-sufficiency within your team so that you can focus on the larger picture as well as the multitude of tasks you already have. 

Structure Meetings

The larger your team, the less time you have for individual check-ins. Condense your weekly meetings to quickly review highlights, issues, and prioritize your employees’ workloads. Use an agenda and keep your meetings action-focused. Focus on committing to your original schedule as much as possible, and you will find yourself with much less wasted time.

Create Guidelines

Each person should know exactly what activities they must complete to achieve the goals you set for them. Defining this guideline is imperative to saving you time and keeping employees productive without you having to hold their hand. Your productivity will depend on the thoroughness of their activity goals that will lead to the numbers they must ultimately reach.

Block Time

Delegate specific times each day to check your email. Constant email notifications can destroy your concentration and productivity. Try not to self-interupt yourself either. When you think of something you must do or tell someone, quickly jot it down in a planner or notes in your computer, then continue with the current task. When those tasks have built up, switch your focus then and complete them. 

Leverage Technology

Use tech to make sure that the processes you oversee are automatic. For example, use a messaging app for you and your employees to communicate, or use “coaching” technology with pre-made forms for your employees to contact you, saving the coaching sessions for future reference. Leverage technology to automatically see your employee’s performance compared to their goals and KPIs so that you can gather actionable information at a glance. 

Figuring out which time-management skills work best for you is important to your success. Keep these time management tips for managers in mind as you communicate with your team, and continue trying out new ways to work smarter, not harder. 

The post Time Management Tips for Managers appeared first on LevelEleven.

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In today’s digital age, many sales reps stick to what they know; using email, social media, and even texts to prospect and converse with potential customers. The days of cold calling have been left behind, and leaving a sales call voicemail? Not a chance. Although technology has opened new channels of communication, don’t forget about the power of phone calls and voicemails.

I can hear the objections already, “Even if I leave a voicemail I never hear back!” Just as the great Wayne Gretzky said, “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take”. You can cold call all day but if you don’t leave a voicemail, you’re guaranteed a 0% response rate. In fact, certain studies show that well-crafted voicemails can improve response rates anywhere from 3 percent to 22 percent (source).

InsideSales.com recent research shows that 32 percent of respondents use email as a preferred method to communicate with prospects and only 6 percent of sales reps use a single call and voicemail in their sales cadence.

Yes, cold calling and voicemails may seem like a thing of the past but it’s important to think about where your message will stand out more ⁠— mixed in with hundreds of other sales emails or alongside the 6 percent of reps who’ve left a voicemail? One study shows that 57 percent of people who receive a cold email think it is spam without even opening it, and the average office worker gets 121 emails a day. It’s time to master the art of the voicemail and get your prospect’s attention with our carefully curated sales voicemail tips below!

Keep it under 30 seconds

There are many articles out there claiming to know the perfect voicemail length but the truth is there is no solid research backing those claims. As a rule of thumb, try and keep your messages under 30 seconds. Leaving something too short can cause a prospect to think it was a misdial, while a message over 30 seconds is expected to be a pitch and thus ignored. Keeping your message around 30 seconds allows you to add value, leave contact information, and leave them wanting more without boring them.

Clearly state your value proposition

Although the real reason you’re calling is to make a sale, a voicemail is not the place to do so. The goal of a sales call voicemail is to get a call back which won’t happen unless you give them a reason to. Instead of talking about how great your product is, provide specific business applications and success metrics. This value statement is the hook that catches a prospect’s interest and makes them eager to learn more.

Repeat your contact information

This seems simple but is often forgotten. Repeating your contact information allows the prospect to note the information without having to replay the message. As a rep, you should always want to make things as easy as possible for your prospects, so think of repeating your information as a courtesy to them.

Don’t start with your name and title

A successful voicemail stands out to your prospect. Almost every sales call voicemail I have received starts with, “Hi my name is John Smith from ABC company…”. This not only blends in with every other sales voicemail, it can also potentially set you up for disaster. Many people will hear this sentence and have either heard of your company and have preconceived notions or they haven’t heard of you and therefore don’t care. Instead, start with stating the reason for your call, adding in a value proposition, and finishing with your name and contact information.

Speak calmly and slowly in your normal voice

We get it, cold calling can be nerve-wracking and leaving voicemails can cause you to freeze like a deer in the headlights. Avoid this by preparing your pitch beforehand so you know what to say even when you’re flustered. Make a concentrated effort to speak slower and in an even tone (often your voice will change in times of stress). Additionally, salespeople are often trained to speak in an excited tone, resulting in an unnaturally high pitched voice. Sales voicemails that get callbacks will sound casual and authentic, like you’re speaking with an old friend.

When keeping busy with texts, emails, and LinkedIn messages, it’s easy to make the mistake of letting phone calls and voicemails fall by the wayside. Voicemails are a crucial tool in a salesperson’s toolkit and should therefore be included in a rep’s overall contact strategy. Even if a prospect doesn’t call back, the combination of voicemails, emails, and messages can build brand recognition and familiarity with a prospect, resulting in more deals closed.

Still having trouble encouraging your reps to make calls? Enjoy these 5 Sales Contest Ideas for Motivating Calls to reinforce this important prospecting activity.

The post Tips to Leave Sales Voicemails that get Callbacks appeared first on LevelEleven.

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The burning question that countless sales managers face: How do we keep remote employees engaged and motivated? There are many factors that may drive you or your company to hire remote employees. Skilled employees are located all over the world where telecommuting may be the only option. According to a report by Gartner, companies see a 10% increase in employee retention by providing the opportunity to work remotely.

Unfortunately, the benefits of working remotely come with a fair amount of challenges including a lack of remote employee engagement and difficulty tracking behavior. The good news is, there are many actions you can take to keep your remote employees connected and driven no matter the distance. So, what can you do to keep remote workers engaged and focused on the behaviors that matter?

1. Set Goals:

When managing remote teams, effective goal setting can make or break the performance of your remote employees. Focus on creating both short and long time goals, involving employees throughout the process, and adapting goals as the environment changes. When your workforce is given tangible targets and objectives they must meet, they will have something to work towards, and better recognize areas that need work. This is one of the simplest ways to drive your team’s performance and engagement.

2. Create Competition:

Many people are inherently competitive, and all it may take is a few contests and some transparency into other’s team members’ performance to drive more action. Sales gamification is a great way to set up automated contests with visible scorecards, encouragement, and prizes to motivate and engage your remote teams.

3. Maintain Relationships:

With the technology we have access to today, distance is no longer an excuse for lack of communication. Hold one-on-ones regularly, build a rapport, and get to know employees both personally and professionally. You must have the desire to understand your remote employee’s needs and show that you care. Good relationships will go a long way in motivating your team and keeping employees connected.

With the right tools and the right leadership approach, you can be successful in managing your remote employees and guiding them to success. For more information on tools that can help you motivate remote workers through performance management, request a sales gamification demo below.

The post 3 Tips on Successfully Managing Remote Teams appeared first on LevelEleven.

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Did you know that according to a survey by the American Society for Training and Development, 75% of executives say that mentoring has been critical to their career development? Mentoring isn’t only good for personal benefit, it can also help coworkers and your organization as a whole. Mentoring is different than managing or coaching. It takes into account more than sales performance management and therefore complements sales coaching.

A study done by Bellevue University on Sun Microsystems found that mentors were promoted six times more often than those not in the program, while mentees were promoted five times more often than those not in the program. In addition, retention rates were much higher for mentees (72%) and mentors (69%) than for employees who did not participate in the mentoring program (49%).

Implementing a mentorship program can help your organization reap rewards in the form of improved employee retention and job performance:  71% of Fortune 500 companies initiate mentoring programs for their employees. When employees are challenged to learn and grow, they feel that management and mentors are invested in their success.

Why Mentor?

There are many reasons why becoming a mentor is important for personal career growth. Mentorship allows you to become a better leader, while networking with the next generation of leaders. On top of that, it’s gratifying to watch less experienced employees grow into their role. You can directly impact a mentee’s sense of his or her capabilities and strengthens that person’s loyalty to the company.

Kara Goldin, founder and CEO of Hint, says it best, “[mentoring] doesn’t need to be an ongoing formal arrangement. I get around 30 new mentoring requests a week and pick the ones where I feel I can genuinely offer value.”

How to Mentor 

What a mentor’s role supposed to include? Mentors pick up where managers leave off. They aren’t there to supervise and coach daily activities. Mentorship should be a mutually beneficial relationship for both parties where situations, skills, and experience can be shared.

Mentors should be willing to be open and honest about their experiences so their mentees can truly learn from them. Contrary to popular belief, a great mentor isn’t just the most successful individual in an organization. A good mentor needs to have the desire to help others and a willingness to reflect on their own experiences, including failures.

Looking to become a mentor? Here are a few tips to be the best mentor you can be.

Listen

Although you are the tenured employee, it’s important to listen to what your mentee has to say. You may know what to say and want to get straight to the point, but this is your mentee’s time to have a safe place to get their thoughts out where they won’t be judged. Listening to understand, not to reply is arguably one of the most important skills a mentor can have.

Give honest feedback

Having a fresh-faced employee looking up to you can be scary, you don’t want to hurt their feelings or set them on the wrong track. Although this is a valid concern, false platitudes or avoiding honest feedback will cause more trouble for your mentee in the long run. It’s important to establish an honest relationship fueled by open communication. As long as you’re respectful, honest feedback is a vital part of a less tenured employees’ journey towards success.

Let them make decisions

Going back to the importance of listening, you can even go a step further by letting your mentee make their own decisions. Although you may be tempted to tell them they’re doing something poorly (you’ve been there before and know better), it’s important to learn from one’s own mistakes. Help your mentee along the way with advice and experience but remember that they should learn from their own mistakes as well.

Foster mutual respect

A quote from John William Gardner, former Secretary of Health, Education, and Welfare, reads, ”If you have some respect for people as they are, you can be more effective in helping them to become better than they are.” This is the definition of what a successful mentorship should look like. If you’re participating in a mentorship program simply because it looks good on your resume or you feel like you have to, don’t. Mentorship should come from a willingness to help others develop their professional skills and progress in their careers.

Whatever it may look like, make time for mentoring as a complement to company performance management and coaching systems. It’s a small time commitment that can have a big impact on you and the next generation of leaders. For the love of sales, be a mentor!

The post For the Love of Sales – Be a Mentor! appeared first on LevelEleven.

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According to HubSpot,Sales and marketing are two business functions within an organization — they both impact lead generation and revenue. The term, sales, refers to all activities that lead to the selling of goods and services. And marketing is the process of getting people interested in the goods and services being sold.”

Although both functions have the same end goal, revenue growth, they are not always tightly aligned. In fact, a study done by Sirius Decisions found that B2B organizations with tightly aligned sales and marketing operations achieved 24% faster growth and 27% faster profit growth over a three year period.

There is strength in numbers, aligning these two departments is crucial to overall business success and continued growth. The average prospect needs to touch five pieces of content and involve 6.8 different people before they’re ready to purchase. But only 20% of sales reps share content during the decision making the process and are often focused on a single person for their pursuit.

The problem is, at many organizations, there is a disconnect between these highly interdependent business functions, leading to the loss of prospects, revenue, and productivity.

Why this is happening? It starts with understanding the numbers.  

When sales and marketing understand how marketing inquiries flow through the proverbial funnel to become marketing qualified leads, sales qualified leads, and eventually qualified deals and contracts, the teams have a common language and understanding of how each group contributes to the sale.  How often do we hear “Sales is squandering our leads” from marketing. Or “these leads are terrible” from sales. It’s likely this is a siloed organization lacking sales and marketing alignment.

We also need a feedback loop.

Although sales and marketing are separate business functions, it’s crucial that they share the same targets and communicate effectively about their current projects and processes. Marketing departments are capable of making an array of materials to promote your brand. However, this means nothing if the sales team doesn’t find the content applicable to their current sales cycle and challenges. This can lead to situations such as…

  • Sales reps using old content or making their own that is off-brand and has incorrect messaging.
  • Marketing getting frustrated when confusing or incorrect messaging is influencing the marketplace.

Lack of cross-functional communication between sales and marketing will leave all parties feeling frustrated. No marketer wants to spend time making content that won’t be used, and no sales rep want to sift through a mound of irrelevant content while trying to add value for a prospect. Aligning these two functions is a companies best hope for success.

The bottom line? Both departments need to work together toward their common goal.

Here are three recommendations on ways to get your marketing and sales departments aligned with one another…

1. Be transparent about how the funnel flows

It’s not about finger-pointing.  It’s about collaboration. When marketing sees conversion rates are low or dropping, they’ll naturally want to improve the quality of content and programs.  When sales see the volume of leads, they’ll want to see what’s in that volume. And any lead is warmer than a cold call!

2. Communicate about what content is needed and what already exists

Although both sales and marketing functions revolve around effective communication with prospects and customers, communication between the two functions can improve. As a marketer, I’m often asked for specific content by the sales team to help them inform prospects and close deals. Usually, the things being asked for already exist. The issue is the sales team either doesn’t know where to find it, or that it exists at all. This is one reason why it’s important to empower your sales team to find the content that they’re looking for on their own. This not only gives back the marketing team their time, but it also allows the sales team to find what they need, quickly, and get on with their sale.

Making a concentrated effort to keep each other in the loop on current initiatives is a simple step that can go a long way towards improving the sales process. Companies with dynamic, adaptable sales and marketing processes had an average of 10% more of their salespeople on quota (CSO Insights). Some ways our marketing team at LevelEleven keeps sales in the loop is through:

    1. A searchable content repository that is open and available to all
    2. Marketing content calendars to inform the team of what’s coming
    3. Weekly sales and marketing meetings for progress updates
    4. Brainstorm sessions with the sales team to discover what content would be most beneficial
    5. Guest blog posts by the sales team on topics they find relevant
    6. An open door policy with the sales team, making them comfortable to offer suggestions whenever they think of them

When marketing works with sales to empower them to locate content on their own, the sales cycle will go smoother for everyone. In fact, a study done by MarketingProfs found that organizations with tightly-aligned sales and marketing had 36% higher customer retention rates and achieved 38% higher sales win rates.

3. Get to know each other and have fun

Often overlooked, cross-team bonding is another way to foster teamwork between sales and marketing. Although these functions are usually separate teams within an organization, positive relationships between departments can go a long way to align sales and marketing initiatives.

Team building builds trust, mitigates conflict, encourages communication, and increases collaboration, resulting in more tightly aligned teams. Forrester Research found that aligned organizations achieved an average of 32% annual revenue growth while less aligned companies reported an average 7% decline in revenue. Cross-team bonding offers sales and marketing departments a jumping off point to build stronger relationships in and out of the office.

Although aligning your sales and marketing teams can seem like a challenge, it will go a long way to improve the quality or your team’s conversations with prospects and customers. When both functions are on the same page, marketing content will be created with prospects and customers in mind, and used to its fullest potential by sales, resulting in increased revenue for the organization, that can be tied back to the content itself.

Looking for more ways to enhance your sales team’s performance? Register for our webinar, Supercharge Your Sales Engine, to see how to manage, motivate, and automate with a modern tech stack!

The post How to Align Your Sales and Marketing Teams to Close More Deals appeared first on LevelEleven.

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There are 5 stages of technology adoption that have proven true for most new emerging technology.

Innovators make up 2.5% of the population. They’re willing to take risks and are the first to adopt new technologies.

Early Adopters make up 13.5% of the population. They’re not at the forefront of innovation, but they’re not far behind either. This group will influence the following groups to adopt new technology.

Early Majority make up 34% of the population. They have been exposed to the early adopter’s influence and soon follow suit.

Late Majority also make up 34% of the population. They are adopting the technology later than the average person and are often skeptical even then.

Laggards make up 16% of the population. These people have an aversion to change and are the last to adopt any new innovation, often waiting until they’re forced to do so.

Think of the iPhone which first emerged on the market in 2007. In the beginning, they were expensive and very different from the “norm”. Over the last 12 years, adoption has risen significantly and now it’s not uncommon to see an iPhone everywhere you look.

The point is, smartphones have seen near full adoption and have become the norm. In fact, you may even be reading this from a phone screen. We can’t imagine our lives without our phones in hand, this new technology is impossible to live without – even for laggards.

So why aren’t you utilizing sales technology? CRM is not enough. Just as smartphones have revolutionized how we communicate, sales technology allows us to bridge the gap between a CRM and a team’s daily activities. Don’t believe us? See how sales tech can improve processes within the different aspects of the sales landscape below.

Sales Intelligence

According to G2 Crowd, “Sales intelligence software helps companies use internal and external data to increase sales and improve sales processes.” There is no use in having data if it’s bad data. In the times of data overload, sales intelligence software like LinkedIn Sales Navigator or ZoomInfo improve data quality.

Sales Engagement

According to G2 Crowd, “Sales engagement software streamlines the sales process through integrations with sales communication channels and tools, management of sales messaging and materials, and automation of tasks, messages, and workflows.” Technologies such as SalesLoft,  Outreach, and DialSource allow sales teams to create personalized, automated sales journies and scale their activity at least tenfold

Sales Performance Management  

According to G2 Crowd, “The purpose of sales performance management tools is to monitor sales progress to determine and recognize success, or proactively respond to processes and employees that need to improve.” Performance Management Systems such as LevelEleven help leaders of customer-facing teams drive the key behaviors that lead to increased productivity and results.

Sales Analytics

According to G2 Crowd, “Sales analytics software reports on CRM data to reveal sales insights and forecast future performance.” Business Intelligence (BI) tools like – Salesforce’s Sales Analytics or even Salesforce’s basic reporting and dashboards help teams and managers gain visibility into sales activities and get an idea of future sales numbers.

There are thousands of sales technologies out there, creating endless possibilities when building a tech stack. Using resources such as G2 Crowd or the Salesforce AppExchange is a great way to evaluate which tools would work best for your organization.

Learn more about how sales tech and best practices can improve your sales team’s performance. Register for our webinar, Transform Your Sales Engine – The Modern Sales Tech Stack to Manage and Motivate Teams!

Register Now!

The post You Didn’t Ignore The Evolution of Tech then, why do it now? appeared first on LevelEleven.

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If you’re in sales, asking questions is a large part of your daily duties. Questions are arguably the most important tool in a salesperson’s arsenal. Asking questions in the right way can compel a prospect to act, open their mind to new possibilities, and even secure buy-in for the next step in the sales cycle.

But are all questions created equal? No. One of the most important things to consider when asking prospects’ questions is if you’re being assertive or aggressive.

The Difference Between Assertive & Aggressive Salespeople

Aggressive: According to HubSpot, aggressiveness is characterized as relentlessly pursuing your desired outcome while ignoring or attacking the opinions or desires of others.

Example Question: “This process will take less time if I speak directly to the manager. Who should I contact?”

Assertive: HubSpot defines being assertive involves pursuing a desired outcome or stating and standing by an opinion while still being mindful and respectful of the desired outcomes and opinions of others.

Example Question: “Which manager is assigned to this area?”

The key difference here begins with the length of the question. In general, longer questions come off more aggressive to prospects. The reasoning behind this is longer questions involve the speaker inserting their own context and intent, leaving the prospect little room to answer truthfully. Assertive questioning involves shorter questions that get right to the point, making the prospect more comfortable with answering however they like.

When starting to formulate questions, try sticking to the “one sentence rule” which forces you to cut out your own context and opinions and get straight to the point. Of course, after the initial question, you can then provide more context if the prospect asks

Don’t let the fear of aggression make you lose the sale

Although it’s important to avoid turning off a prospect with an aggressive attitude, don’t let the fear of doing so harm your pitch. Focusing too much on not being aggressive can lead reps to do the opposite and become passive with their prospects, resulting in the loss of a potential deal.

Passive questioning is ineffective because, instead of moving the process forward, it adds unnecessary steps by putting the ball in the prospects’ court. Passive questions to avoid are usually formulated around an open-ended question such as, “Give me a call when you make a decision.” This gives all the power to the prospect, which will most likely result in them going dark on you.

Tips to Practice Assertive Questioning

Before starting your journey into assertive selling, remember that the goal is to create an open discussion that will foster mutual understanding with a prospect. The better your understanding of a prospects’ pain points, the easier it is to help the decision-making process along. Some tips to remember while practicing assertive selling skills include:

  • Firmly state your opinions without attacking the prospects’
  • Allow a prospect to share their ideas and thoughts without interruption
  • State your understanding of what was communicated  to confirm what you heard instead of accusing and judging
  • Set expectations early by starting with “hard” questions from the beginning
  • Accept the answers you get even if you don’t like them, take no gracefully

Don’t let the fear of coming off aggressive stop you from being assertive enough to get the sale. According to Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion by Robert Cialdini, the challenge in a sales situation is to gauge the correct level of assertiveness that’s most likely to move the sale forward, without slipping into an aggressive stance that might cause the prospect to go dark.

There is a fine line between assertiveness and aggression. The manner in which you ask questions is just one aspect. With practice, any salesperson can master the art of assertiveness and close more deals!

LevelEleven is here to help bring your team’s performance to the next level! Request a free, personalized demo today to see how we can help motivate and coach your team towards success!

The post Assertive Versus Aggressive: Perfect Your Sales Pitch appeared first on LevelEleven.

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According to a survey conducted by CSO Insights, 80% of employees are not actively engaged at work.

Shocking? Maybe. True? Definitely. In fact, the same study found that organizations, where more than half of reps report feeling engaged, are nearly twice as likely to meet their quotas. In fact, the difference in quota achievement between engaged and disengaged teams is $1.3M annually.

Beyond lost revenue, disengaged employees can be doing more harm than you think. Teams that are actively disengaged are unhappy at work, which may even lead to destructive behavior like undermining projects. This is obviously a problem. The first step to resolving it is to address what causes your employees to be disengaged.

Unclear goals and systems

Nothing dulls engagement more than having no direction. “What am I supposed to do?” and “how do I do it?” are a cause of frustration for your team, causing them to “check out”. Making sure your employees have clear, measurable goals and an understanding of the behaviors required to achieve those goals. This will go a long way towards boosting engagement and in turn, productivity.

Lack of performance management

You may be conducting quarterly or yearly reviews but that is far from effective performance management. According to UC Berkeley, performance management is an ongoing process of communication between a supervisor and an employee that occurs throughout the year, in support of accomplishing the strategic objectives of the organization. If your employees are less engaged, they may be lacking the reassurance, direction, and coaching provided by a performance management system or program.

Management by (only) numbers

Some sales leaders assign their team quotas and manage based upon spreadsheets and forecast reports. Although this may be “the way it’s always been”, it’s not the best method to boost engagement. Most sales reps are money-motivated, so quota makes sense. But as humans, we have other drivers, like competition and recognition. Create motivation to reach quotas and goals to keep your team engaged. This can be done via gamification of your sales process, contests between team members, a celebration of wins, and recognition of non-quota positive behaviors that lead to results.

Lack of meaningful measurement

Promotion to sales manager is a big accomplishment but it doesn’t mean your time on the front-line is over. Great sales managers will continue being present on the floor, showing reps that they’re invested in their work and available to help them grow and succeed. As a manager, it is important to know how each member of the team is doing at the behaviors that lead to the close – prospecting, new accounts, first meetings, demos, proposals, proposals, and whatever are the key behaviors at your company. A scorecard to know how each rep is pacing against these behaviors helps. One great way to stay on top of your team’s performance is through the usage of LevelEleven’s Manager Scorecard to track the team’s progress from one dashboard within Salesforce.com.

Although unengaged employees can seriously hinder your organization from reaching its goals, there are many little things a manager can do to ensure their team is fully engaged. Setting clear and measurable goals, providing extra motivation, and monitoring team performance are a few ways a manager can ensure organizational success.

Looking for more ideas on how to engage your team? Check out our report, “The Complete Sales KPI Strategy Guide for Inside Sales” to get ideas on what behaviors to measure to reach success.

The post You Employees are Less Engaged – Here’s Why appeared first on LevelEleven.

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