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Constructed by: Ross Trudeau
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: Elimination

Themed answer are common phrases from which “EL” has been ELIMINATED:

  • 22A Cracked river barriers? : DAMS IN DISTRESS (from “Damsels in distress”)
  • 40A What a generous mechanic might do after a wreck? : THROW IN THE TOW (from “throw in the towel”)
  • 50A David or Saul? : JEW IN THE CROWN (from “jewel in the crown”)
  • 68A Request to the local marriage oath writer? : CAN I BUY A VOW (from “can I buy a vowel?”)
  • 89A Variety headline for director Lee’s U.S. debut? : ANG’S IN AMERICA (from “Angels in America”)
  • 97A Magician’s tote? : EVERYTHING BAG (from “everything bagel”)
  • 118A Talks about woks? : PAN DISCUSSIONS (from “panel discussion”)

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Want to discuss the puzzle? Then …
… leave a comment

Bill’s time: 19m 28s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies Across 1 __ vu : DEJA

“Déjà vu” is French for “already seen”.

5 Command from Kirk : BEAM ME UP!

There’s a story (not sure if it’s really true) about an Irishman who was being sentenced in the dock in a Dublin courtroom years ago. When asked by the judge, “Do you have anything to say before I pass sentence?”, the convicted man took out a pack of cigarettes from his pocket, flipped open the cardboard lid and brought the pack to his lips. He then said, “Beam me up, Scotty”.

13 Drink word for “strained” : COLADA

“Piña colada” is a Spanish term that translates into “strained pineapple”. The piña colada cocktail was introduced in the Caribe Hilton San Juan in 1954, and since 1978 it has been the official beverage of Puerto Rico. Yum …

22 Cracked river barriers? : DAMS IN DISTRESS (from “damsels in distress”)

A damsel is a young woman, and often a lady of noble birth. The term “damsel” came into English from the Old French “dameisele”, which had the same meaning. The modern French term is “demoiselle”, which in turn is related to the term of address “mademoiselle”.

28 “Yesterday!” : STAT!

The exact etymology of “stat”, a term meaning “immediately” in the medical profession, seems to have been lost in the mists of time. It probably comes from the Latin “statim” meaning “to a standstill, immediately”. A blog reader has helpfully suggested that the term may also come from the world of laboratory analysis, where the acronym STAT stands for “short turn-around time”.

33 Org. with quarantine authority : CDC

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is based in Atlanta, Georgia. The CDC started out life during WWII as the Office of National Defense Malaria Control Activities. The CDC worries about much more than malaria these days …

35 Western alliances : POSSES

Our word “posse” comes from an Anglo-Latin term from the early 15th century “posse comitatus” meaning “the force of the county”.

37 How the satisfied stand : PAT

To stand pat is to resist change. The term comes from the game of poker, in which one stands pat if one keeps one’s hand as is, not drawing any extra cards.

40 What a generous mechanic might do after a wreck? : THROW IN THE TOW (from “throw in the towel”)

The expression “to throw in the towel” means “to give up”, and of course comes from the world of boxing. In boxing, when someone in the corner feels that a fight needs to be stopped, he or she throws a towel into the ring and accepts the loss. Back in the 1700s, it wasn’t a towel that was thrown into the ring, but rather a sponge.

53 “Sunday Morning” channel : CBS

“CBS News Sunday Morning” has been on air since 1979, when it was anchored by journalist Charles Kuralt. Charles Osgood took over as host in 1994, and he was replaced by Jane Pauley in 2016.

55 __-de-sac : CUL

Even though “cul-de-sac” can indeed mean “bottom of the bag” in French, the term cul-de-sac is of English origin (the use of “cul” in French is actually quite rude). The term was introduced in aristocratic circles at a time when it was considered very fashionable to speak French. Dead-end streets in France are usually signposted with just a symbol and no accompanying words, but if words are included they are “voie sans issue”, meaning “way without exit”.

57 Greek X : CHI

The Greek letter “chi” is the one that looks like our letter X.

62 Chipotle alternative : QDOBA

Qdoba is a chain of casual restaurants specializing in Mexican cuisine. The chain started out in 1995 with the name Zuma Fresh Mexican Grill, then Z-Teca Mexican Grill in 1997. Both “Zuma” and “Z-Teca” were challenged by establishments that already had similar names, and so the company settled on Qdoba Mexican Grill in 1999, a completely invented moniker.

Chipotle Mexican Grill is a chain of casual dining restaurants that was founded and is now headquartered in Denver, Colorado. For several years, the major investor in Chipotle was McDonald’s. The chain is named for the smoke-dried jalapeño called a “chipotle”.

65 DNC chair Tom : PEREZ

Tom Perez was elected chairman of the Democratic National Committee in 2017, after having served as Secretary of Labor for four years in the Obama administration.

66 Pittance : SOU

A sou is an old French coin. We use the term “sou” to mean “an almost worthless amount”.

72 Some dishwashers : GES

The General Electric Company is usually referred to simply as “GE”. One of the precursor companies to GE was Edison General Electric, founded in 1890 by the inventor Thomas Edison. What we know today as GE was formed two years later when Edison merged his company with Charles Coffin’s Thomson-Houston Electric Company. In 1896, GE was selected as one of the 12 companies listed on the newly formed Dow Jones Industrial Average. GE was the last the original 12 to survive on that list, being replaced by Walgreens in 2018. I spent over ten years with GE at the beginning of my working career, and in fact it was GE that asked me to transfer to the US from Ireland back in the 1980s …

73 Gap rival : J.CREW

J.Crew is a clothing and accessory retailer. Never been there, but I’ve seen the name turn up on credit card statements somehow …

76 Odist’s inspiration : ERATO

In Greek mythology, Erato was the Muse of lyric poetry. She is often depicted with a wreath of myrtle and roses, and playing a lyre.

79 Best Female Athlete, e.g. : ESPY

The ESPY Awards are a creation of the ESPN sports television network. One difference with similarly named awards in the entertainment industry is that ESPY winners are chosen solely based on viewer votes.

80 Eur. country in the Olympics since 1992 : CRO

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) uses its own set of three-letter abbreviations for country names, e.g. HUN (Hungary) and CRO (Croatia).

82 Dulles alternative : REAGAN

Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport (DCA) is located in Arlington, Virginia. It is one of the two main airports serving the nation’s capital, along with Washington Dulles. Washington National opened for business in 1941, and was dedicated to President Ronald Reagan in 1998.

Washington Dulles International Airport (IAD) opened for business in 1962. It was named for John Foster Dulles, who served as Secretary of State in the Eisenhower administration. When it opened, Dulles used the airport code “DIA”, standing for Dulles International Airport. However, “IAD” was often confused with “DCA” when handwritten, with the latter being the code for nearby Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport. So, Dulles adopted the IAD code letters in 1968.

89 Variety headline for director Lee’s U.S. debut? : ANG’S IN AMERICA (from “Angels in America”)

Taiwanese director Ang Lee sure has directed a mixed bag of films, mixed in terms of genre but not in terms of quality. He was at the helm for such classics as “Sense & Sensibility” (my personal favorite), “Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon”, “Hulk”, “Brokeback Mountain” and “Life of Pi”.

“Angels in America” is a two-part play by Tony Kushner, part one of which premiered in 1991. The play explores AIDS and homosexuality in the context of America in the 1980s. “Angels in America” was adapted into a miniseries of the same name in 2003 by HBO.

93 With 66-Down, when Lady Macbeth says, “Leave all the rest to me” : ACT I …
(66D See 93-Across : … SCENE V)

Lady Macbeth is an evil and treacherous woman in William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth”. The most famous line uttered by Lady Macbeth has to be:

Out, damned spot! Out, I say!

In this line, Lady Macbeth is frantically rubbing at her hand trying to get rid of an imaginary bloodstain left there after she committed four murders.

95 Nonprofit reporting app : AP NEWS

The Associated Press (AP) is a news agency based in New York City. AP is a non-profit cooperative that was set up by five New York newspapers in 1846 to share the cost of transmitting news. Nowadays, AP recoups most of its cost by selling news stories and related materials to newspapers all around the world, mostly outside of the US.

97 Magician’s tote? : EVERYTHING BAG (from “everything bagel”)

An everything bagel has everything on it, i.e. a variety of traditional seasonings like poppy seeds, salt, and sesame seeds.

101 Clancy’s “The __ of All Fears” : SUM

“The Sum of All Fears” is a 1991 Tom Clancy novel that features his hero Jack Ryan. It’s all about Ryan battling East German terrorists who are intent on bringing the US and USSR into a nuclear war. The title is inspired by a quotation from Winston Churchill:

Why, you may take the most gallant sailor, the most intrepid airman or the most audacious soldier, put them at a table together—what do you get? The sum of their fears.

104 “The Yodeling Cowgirl” in “Toy Story” films : JESSIE

Jessie the Yodeling Cowgirl” is a character in the “Toy Story” series of films who is voiced by Joan Cusack. Jessie develops a romantic relationship with Buzz Lightyear.

105 Novelist Rand : AYN

Ayn Rand was a Russian-American novelist born Alisa Rosenbaum. Her two best known works are her novels “The Fountainhead” published in 1943 and “Atlas Shrugged” from 1957. Back in 1951, Rand moved from Los Angeles to New York City. Soon after, she gathered a group of admirers around her with whom she discussed philosophy and shared drafts of her magnum opus, “Atlas Shrugged”. This group called itself “The Collective”, and one of the founding members was none other than future Federal Reserve chairman, Alan Greenspan. Rand described herself as “right-wing” politically, and both she and her novel “Atlas Shrugged” have become inspirations for the American conservatives, and the Tea Party in particular.

106 Rodeo contestants, at times : ROPERS

“Rodeo” is a Spanish word that is usually translated into English as “round up”.

112 It’s dropped for emphasis : MIC

A mic drop takes place when a performer has done particularly well and decides to celebrate by throwing or dropping the microphone to the floor. That doesn’t seem to happen at the performances I tend to frequent …

116 Pioneer 35mm cameras : LEICAS

Leica is a German optics company that is famous for production of lenses and cameras. The 1913 Leica was the first practical camera that could use 35mm film, a size chosen because it was already the standard for film used in motion pictures.

118 Talks about woks? : PAN DISCUSSIONS (from “panel discussion”)

“Wok” is a Cantonese word, and the name for the frying pan now used in many Asian cuisines.

122 Shmoo creator : AL CAPP

The Shmoo is a cartoon creature who first appeared in the Al Capp comic strip “Li’l Abner” in 1948. Apparently, shmoos are delicious to eat, and love to be eaten. They’ll even jump into the frying pan themselves!

123 Tapered cigar : PERFECTO

A perfecto is an irregularly shaped cigar. It is narrow at the ends and bulges in the middle.

124 __ Brasi, “The Godfather” enforcer : LUCA

Luca Brasi is one of Don Corleone’s most loyal “enforcers” in Mario Puzo’s novel “The Godfather”. Brasi comes to a violent end, garroted while his hand is pinned to a wooden bar with a knife. Famously, the Corleone family learn of his demise when they receive Brasi’s bulletproof vest wrapped around dead fish. The message is that he “sleeps with the fishes”. In the big screen adaptation of “The Godfather”, Luca Brasi is played by ex-wrestler and professional bodyguard Lenny Montana. The role launched a very successful television character-acting career for Montana.

125 Frank : WIENER

What we call a wiener in this country is known as a Vienna sausage in Germany. It was first produced by a butcher from Frankfurt who was living in Vienna, hence the name “Wiener”, which is German for “of Vienna”. Paradoxically, the same sausage is called a Frankfurter in Vienna, as it was created by someone from Frankfurt. It’s all very confusing …

The frankfurter sausage that is typically used in a North American hot dog get its name from Frankfurter Würstchen. The latter is a German sausage that is prepared by boiling in water, just like a hot dog frank.

Down 1 Some diaper changers : DADS

“Diaper” is another word that I had to learn when I moved to America. What are called “diapers” over here, we call “nappies” back in Ireland. The term “diaper” is actually the original term that was used in England for the garment, where “diaper” referred to the cloth that was used. The term “diaper” was brought to the New World where it stuck. Back in Britain, “diaper” was displaced by the word “nappy”, a diminutive of “napkin”.

2 Panache : ELAN

Our word “élan” was imported from French, in which language the word has a similar meaning to ours, i.e “style, flair”.

Someone exhibiting panache is showing dash and verve, and perhaps has a swagger. “Panache” is a French word used for a plume of feathers, especially one in a hat.

3 1607 settlement : JAMESTOWN

Jamestown in the Colony of Virginia was the first English settlement in what was to become the United States. The settlement was established as James Fort in 1607, and served as capital of the colony from 1616 to 1699. Jamestown started to decline after a fire in the statehouse in 1698 that caused the capital to relocate to Williamsburg. The town was eventually abandoned and today exists as a heritage site.

6 Spooky : ELDRITCH

Something described as eldritch is wierd or ghastly. The term “eldritch” dates back to about 1500, with some saying that it is somehow related to “elf”.

7 Like about 25% of Russia’s population : ASIAN

Over 75% of Russia’s land mass lies in Asia, but the area is home to less than 25% of Russia’s population. The vast majority of Russia’s people reside in the European part of the country.

8 Part of MVP : MOST

MVP (most valuable player)

9 “The A-Team” muscle : MR T

“The A-Team” is an action television series that originally ran in the eighties. The A-Team was a group of ex-US special forces personnel who became mercenaries. Star of the show was Hollywood actor George Peppard (as “Hannibal” Smith), ably assisted by Mr. T (as “B.A.” Baracus) and Robert Vaughn (as Hunt Stockwell).

11 World Heritage Site org. : UNESCO

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization is better known by the acronym “UNESCO”. UNESCO’s mission is help build peace in the world using programs focused on education, the sciences, culture, communication and information. The organization’s work is aimed in particular at Africa, and gender equalization. UNESCO also administers a World Heritage Site program that designates and helps conserve sites of outstanding cultural or natural importance to humanity across the world.

16 College Bd. result using a 1-to-5 scale : AP-TEST SCORE

The Advanced Placement (AP) program offers college-level courses to kids who are still in high school. After being tested at the end of the courses, successful students receive credits that count towards a college degree.

24 Delicious : SAPID

Something that is “sapid” is “tasty, savory”. The opposite to “sapid” is “insipid”, meaning “without taste, bland”.

29 Musical timbre : TONE COLOR

The timbre of a sound is its distinguishing quality above and beyond its volume and pitch. “Timbre” was used in Old French to mean “sound of a bell”.

33 French sweetie : CHERI

“Chéri” is a form of familiar address in French, meaning “dear”. “Chéri” is the form used when talking to a male, and “chérie” when addressing a female.

34 Crab Key villain : DR NO

“Dr. No” may have been the first film in the wildly successful James Bond franchise, but it was the sixth novel in the series of books penned by Ian Fleming. Fleming was inspired to write the story after reading the Fu Manchu tales by Sax Rohmer. If you’ve read the Rohmer books or seen the films, you’ll recognize the similarities between the characters Dr. Julius No and Fu Manchu.

37 Lunchbox staples, initially : PBJS

Peanut butter and jelly (PB&J or PBJ)

38 Protected while sailing : ALEE

Alee is the direction away from the wind. If a sailor points into the wind, he or she is pointing aweather.

40 Silicon Valley field : TECH

The Santa Clara Valley, located just a few miles from me at the south of San Francisco Bay, is better known as “Silicon Valley”. The term “Silicon Valley” dates back to 1971 when it was apparently first used in a weekly trade newspaper called “Electronic News” in articles written by journalist Don Hoefler.

41 Ryder of “Stranger Things” : WINONA

The Hollywood actress Winona Ryder’s real name is Winona Horowitz. Ryder was born near the town of Winona in Minnesota, from which she got her name. Her success on the screen has garnered as much media attention as her life off the screen. The papers had a field day when she was arrested in 2001 on a shoplifting charge followed by a very public court appearance. Her engagement with Johnny Depp in the early nineties was another media frenzy. Depp had “Winona Forever” tattooed on his arm, which he had changed after the breakup to “Wino Forever”. A man with a sense of humor …

“Stranger Things” is a sci-fi horror TV show made for Netflix that aired its first season in 2016. I don’t do horror, and so haven’t seen it …

42 Works : OPUSES

The Latin for “work” is “opus”, with the plural being “opera”. We sometimes also use the plural “opuses” in English.

43 Chopin work : WALTZ

Frédéric Chopin was a Polish composer who spent most of his life in France. He was most famous for his piano works in the Romantic style. Chopin was a sickly man and died quite young, at 39. For many of his final years he had a celebrated and tempestuous relationship with the French author George Sand (the nom de plume of the Baroness Dudevant). Those years with Sand may have been turbulent, but they were very productive in terms of musical composition.

45 Creamy soups : BISQUES

A traditional bisque is a creamy soup made from crustaceans such as lobster, crab or shrimp. The term “bisque” probably comes from the Bay of “Biscay” off the west coast of France, a nod to the French origin of the soup and its seafood content. So, if you see a vegetable “bisque” in a restaurant, you’ll know that the term is being misused …

47 Mends, as a rattan chair : RECANES

Rattan is the name of a large number of species of palms, all of which look less like trees and more like vines. The woody stems are used for making cane furniture.

51 Stark in “Game of Thrones” : NED

Ned Stark is the protagonist in George R. R. Martin’s fantasy novel “A Game of Thrones”, although his character doesn’t exactly come out on top by the end of the story. Stark is played by actor Sean Bean in the HBO television adaptation of the novel.

52 Muffet fare : WHEY

“Little Miss Muffet sat on a tuffet eating her curds and whey”, in the popular nursery rhyme. A tuffet is a low seat or a footstool, another word for a pouffe or a hassock. When milk curdles it separates into two parts, the solid curds and the liquid whey. Then “along came a spider and sat down beside her”.

61 Creations with colorful blocks : LEGO ART

Lego produces some wonderful specialized sets with which you can build models of celebrated structures, including:

  • The Statue of Liberty (2,882 pieces)
  • The Sydney Opera House (2,989 pieces)
  • The Eiffel Tower (3,428 pieces)
  • Tower Bridge (4,295 pieces)
  • The Taj Mahal (5,922 pieces)
70 __ Mawr College : BRYN

Bryn Mawr College in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania is a women’s liberal arts school that was founded in 1885. Bryn Mawr was the first women’s university in the nation to offer graduate education through to a PhD. While the undergraduate program is open only to females, the school opened up the postgraduate program to males in 1931.

73 Scrabble 8-pointer : J TILE

The game of Scrabble has been produced in many international versions, and each of these editions has its own tile distribution to suit the local language. For example, in English we have two tiles worth ten points: one “Q” and one “Z”. If you play the game in French then there are five tiles worth ten points: one “K”, one “W”, one “X”, one “Y” and one “Z”.

77 Driving aid : TEE

That would be golf.

80 It covers the House : C-SPAN

C-SPAN is a privately-funded, nonprofit cable channel that broadcasts continuous coverage of government proceedings.

83 Thin Mints seller : GIRL SCOUT

Depending on which bakery makes the particular variety of Girl Scout cookie, the name can vary. For example, Little Brownie Bakers makes the Samoa cookies, while ABC Bakers uses the same recipe and calls the cookies Caramel deLites. The assumption is that these cookies have the exotic name of “Samoa” because they contain the tropical ingredients of coconut and cocoa. The most popular variety of Girl Scout cookie sold are Thin Mints.

84 Trendy berry : ACAI

Açaí (pronounced “ass-aye-ee”) is a palm tree native to Central and South America. The fruit has become very popular in recent years and its juice is a very fashionable addition to juice mixes and smoothies.

90 “Girls” Emmy nominee Hoffmann :..
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Constructed by: Ed Sessa
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: None

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Want to discuss the puzzle? Then …
… leave a comment

Bill’s time: 11m 37s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies Across 1 Noble : ARISTOCRAT

An aristocracy is a state in which the power of government is placed in the hands of a privileged few. The term “aristocracy” ultimately comes from the Greek “aristos” meaning “excellent” and “kratos” meaning “rule”. In Ancient Greece, aristocracy was compared favorably with a monarchy, the idea being that the best-qualified few would serve better that an individual who inherited power. More recently, particularly during the French Revolution, aristocracy has been compared unfavorably with democracy.

11 Tic __: mints : TACS

Tic Tacs aren’t American candies (as I always mistakenly believed). Tic Tacs are made by the Italian company Ferrero, and were introduced in 1969.

15 Play with unseen players : RADIO DRAMA

I think it’s so sad that the wonderful tradition of making and broadcasting radio drama has been all but lost in the US. Fortunately, the UK’s BBC still produces radio plays on a regular basis. They also rebroadcast many of the terrific American radio plays from the 1940s, and so you can still hear works that feature Hollywood stars like Frank Sinatra, Judy Garland, Orson Welles and Basil Rathbone.

16 Buck heroine : O-LAN

Pearl S. Buck’s novel “The Good Earth” won a Pulitzer in 1932, and helped Buck win the Nobel Prize for literature a few years later. The novel tells of life in a Chinese village and follows the fortunes of Wang Lung and his wife O-Lan. Although “The Good Earth” has been around for decades, it hit the bestseller list again in 2004 when it was a pick for Oprah’s Book Club.

17 Certain clinic contributor : SPERM DONOR

The first really successful fertility clinic was the Barton Clinic in London, which was founded by British obstetrician Mary Barton. Barton pioneered Artificial Insemination by Donor, a protocol for use by couples unable to conceive a child due to male infertility. About 1,500 babies, nicknamed the “Barton Brood”, were born as the result of the program. It is estimated that Mary Barton’s husband, Austrian psychologist Bertold Wiesner, was the biological father to about 600 of the “Brood”.

18 Hall of Fame quarterback Graham : OTTO

Not only was Otto Graham a professional football player for the Cleveland Browns, but he also played professional basketball for the Rochester Royals (now the Sacramento Kings).

22 Homework shirker’s comeuppance : NO TV

To receive one’s comeuppance is to get one’s just deserts, to experience an unpleasant consequence for one’s actions. The term “comeuppance” likely derives from the concept of being told to “come up” to a higher authority for judgment.

26 Frozen beverages : ICEES

Slush Puppie and ICEE are brands of frozen, slushy drinks. Ostensibly competing brands, ICEE company now owns the Slush Puppie brand.

28 Source of blowups : TNT

“TNT” is an abbreviation for “trinitrotoluene”. Trinitrotoluene was first produced in 1863 by the German chemist Joseph Wilbrand, who developed it for use as a yellow dye. TNT is relatively difficult to detonate so it was on the market as a dye for some years before its more explosive properties were discovered.

30 Olympic figure skating gold medalist after Kristi : OKSANA

Oksana Baiul is a Ukrainian figure skater, and the 1994 Olympic champion. Baiul had a rough start to her life as her father deserted her and her mother when she was just two years old, and then her mother died when she was thirteen. Her grandparents had died earlier so she was left as an orphan, sleeping on a cot in her hometown ice rink.

Kristi Yamaguchi is a figure skater, an Olympic champion in 1992. She is quite the dancer too, having won “Dancing with the Stars” in 2008. Yamaguchi started skating and taking ballet as a young child as physical therapy, as she had club feet …

34 Many an Irish song : LILT

Lilting is a form of singing heard in Ireland and Scotland that sort of resembles scat singing. The singer uses no words, but produces melodious sounds from the mouth.

44 Mystical views : AURAE

An aura (plural “aurae”) is an intangible quality that surrounds a person or thing, a “je ne sais quoi”. “Je ne sais quoi” is French for “I don’t know what”.

45 Saddle-making tool : AWL

An awl is a pointed tool used for marking a surface or for piercing small holes. The earliest “awls” were used to pierce ears, apparently. The tool then became very much associated with shoemakers.

47 Muesli brand : ALPEN

Alpen is a British brand of muesli. I grew up on Alpen in Ireland …

“Muesli” is a Swiss-German term describing a breakfast serving of oats, nuts, fruit and milk. “Muesli” is a diminutive of the German word “Mues” meaning “puree”. Delicious …

48 Constellation points : STARS

A constellation is a collection of stars that forms the imaginary outline of a creature or god from mythology, or perhaps an object. There are 48 traditional Western constellations, and these were all defined in Claudius Ptolemy’s 2nd-century treatise called the “Almagest”. Today, there are 88 modern constellations with contiguous boundaries that together cover the entire night sky.

49 Musician Lennon : SEAN

Sean Lennon is the only child of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, and godson of Elton John. Sean is a musician and composer, and has a band called the Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger.

51 Banjo bar : FRET

A fret is a metal strip embedded in the neck of a stringed instrument, like a guitar perhaps. The fingers press on the frets, shortening a string and hence changing the note played. The note increases by one semitone as a finger shortens a string by one fret.

The instrument that we know today as the banjo is a derivative of instruments that were used in Africa.

52 Barbarian horde : HUNS

The Huns were a nomadic people who originated in Eastern Europe in the 4th century. Under the command of Attila the Hun they developed a unified empire that stretched from modern-day Germany across to the steppes of Central Asia. The whole of the Hunnic Empire collapsed within a year of Attila’s death in 453 AD.

53 It includes AAPL and MSFT : THE DOW

Dow Jones & Company was founded as a publishing house in 1882 by three newspaper reporters, Charles Dow, Edward Jones and Charles Bergstresser. Today, the company’s most famous publication has to be “The Wall Street Journal”. In 1884, Charles Dow started reporting the average dollar value of the stock of eleven companies, an index which spawned a whole host of metrics that carry the Dow Jones name to this day. The most famous of these metrics is the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA), also known as the “Dow 30” or simply the “Dow”.

The NASDAQ ticker symbol for Apple is AAPL, and for Microsoft is MSFT.

56 Thrill from Sills : ARIA

Beverly Sills was an operatic soprano from Brooklyn, New York. Sills retired from singing in 1980 to become the general manager of the New York City Opera. She later became Chairman of the Lincoln Center and the Metropolitan opera.

59 Steal, perhaps : DEAL

It’s a great deal, a bargain, a steal.

61 Mrs. Krabappel of “The Simpsons” : EDNA

In “the Simpsons” television show, Bart Simpson’s teacher is one Edna Krabappel. Edna marries Ned Flanders, who is the next-door neighbor to the Simpson family.

62 Giovanni Ribisi title con man : SNEAKY PETE

Giovanni Ribisi is the actor who played Frank Jr., Phoebe’s brother on “Friends”. He also had a supporting role in the wonderful movie “Saving Private Ryan”, and a starring spot in “Lost in Translation”. More recently, Ribisi played the title role in the excellent crime drama “Sneaky Pete”.

“Sneaky Pete” is a really clever crime drama series about a con man who adopts the identity of his cellmate “Pete”, as the former gets out of prison. The title character is played by Giovanni Ribisi. The show was co-created by Bryan Cranston of “Breaking Bad” fame.

Down 1 Former late-night talk star, familiarly : ARSENIO

Arsenio Hall got his big break with his role in the movie “Coming to America” with Eddie Murphy in 1988. The following year he started hosting “The Arsenio Hall Show”, which ran until 1994. He had a loyal group of fans in the audience that had the habit of almost “barking” while pumping their fists in the air. The raucous move became so popular it extended far beyond the influences of Arsenio, and to this day it is still used as a mark of appreciation in some arenas. Not by me, mind you …

2 Limp Bizkit genre : RAP ROCK

Limp Bizkit is described as a nu metal band, with “nu metal” being a subgenre of “heavy metal”. Limp Bizkit has been around since 1994, and that’s all I know …

5 Farm males : TOMS

A male turkey is called a “tom”, taking its name from a “tomcat”. The inference is that like a tomcat, the male turkey is relatively wild and undomesticated, sexually promiscuous and frequently gets into fights. A female turkey is called a “hen”.

6 More kooky : ODDER

“Kooky” is a slang word meaning “out there, crazy”. The term has been around since the beatnik era, and it may be a shortened version of the word “cuckoo”.

7 Pastry portmanteau : CRONUT

A cronut is a pastry that resembles a doughnut but is made using a croissant-like dough. It is filled with cream and deep-fried in grapeseed oil. It is a relatively new pastry, having been invented by New York bakery owner Dominique Ansel in 2013. The term “cronut” is a portmanteau of “croissant” and “doughnut”.

10 One may be rolled out in the park : TARP

Originally, tarpaulins were made from canvas covered in tar that rendered the material waterproof. The word “tarpaulin” comes from “tar” and “palling”, with “pall” meaning “heavy cloth covering”.

11 “Macbeth” brew ingredient before “Witches’ mummy” : TOOTH OF WOLF

The Three Witches in William Shakespeare’s “Macbeth” cook up an ugly brew in their cauldron:

Scale of dragon, tooth of wolf,
Witches’ mummy, maw and gulf
Of the ravined salt-sea shark,
Root of hemlock digged i’ th’ dark,
Liver of blaspheming Jew,
Gall of goat and slips of yew
Slivered in the moon’s eclipse,
Nose of Turk and Tartar’s lips,
Finger of birth-strangled babe
Ditch-delivered by a drab,
Make the gruel thick and slab.
Add thereto a tiger’s chaudron,
For the ingredients of our cauldron.

12 City with a Penn State campus : ALTOONA

Altoona is in central Pennsylvania, and is home to the Ivyside Park Campus of Pennsylvania State University. Altoona is also home to Lakemont Park and Leap-The-Dips, the world’s oldest operating wooden roller coaster. Altoona was founded in 1849 by the Pennsylvania Railroad as the site of a large maintenance facility. Railroad enthusiasts flock to Altoona to stand at the center of Horseshoe Curve, a tightly curved section of track that allows trains to achieve the elevation necessary to cross the Allegheny Ridge.

13 Persian passageway : CAT DOOR

The Persian is that long-haired cat with a squashed muzzle. The breed takes its name from its place of origin, namely Persia (Iran).

14 Pompous sorts : SNOOTS

“Snoot” is a variant of “snout” and is a word that originated in Scotland. The idea is that someone who is snooty, or “snouty”, tends to look down his or her nose at the rest of the world.

23 Trattoria entrée : VEAL MARSALA

Veal Marsala is a French-Italian dish made from veal cooked with mushrooms in Marsala wine.

“Entrée” means “entry” in French. An entrée can be something that helps one get “a way in”, an interview for example perhaps helped along by a recommendation letter. In Europe, even in English-speaking countries, the entrée is the name for the “entry” to the meal, the first course. I found the ordering of meals to be very confusing when I first came to America!

A trattoria is an Italian restaurant. In Italian, a “trattore” is the keeper of said eating house.

25 Cochise player of early TV : ANSARA

Michael Ansara played the character Cochise in the fifties Western TV series “Broken Arrow”.

27 Wading birds with camouflage plumage : SNIPES

Snipes are wading birds with very long and thin bills that they use to search for small invertebrates in mud. In bygone days, a shot taken by a hunter at one of these wading birds became known as a “snipe”. This usage evolved into the word “sniper” applying to anyone shooting from a hidden position.

35 Domicile in front of 123 Sesame Street : TRASH CAN

The central location in “Sesame Street” is a three-story row house with the address 123 Sesame Street. The first floor of the house is home to Robinson family, and the second story is occupied by the Rodriguez family. Bert and Ernie live in the basement, and Oscar lives in a trash can outside the house’s fence.

38 Khamenei or Khatami : IRANIAN

Ali Khamenei became the 2nd Supreme Leader of Iran in 1989, after serving for almost eight years as the 3rd President of Iran.

Mohammad Khatami was President of Iran from 1987 until 2005.

43 Agreement between states : ENTENTE

An entente cordiale (sometimes just “entente”) is a friendly understanding, usually between two nations. The term, which translates from French as “cordial agreement”, was first used to describe a set of agreements between the UK and France that were put in place 1904.

50 B.J. of “The Office” : NOVAK

B. J. Novak is an actor and write who is perhaps best known for playing Ryan Howard on “The Office”, a sitcom for which he wrote and also served as one of the executive producers.

Read on, or …
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Complete List of Clues/Answers Across

1 Noble : ARISTOCRAT
11 Tic __: mints : TACS
15 Play with unseen players : RADIO DRAMA
16 Buck heroine : O-LAN
17 Certain clinic contributor : SPERM DONOR
18 Hall of Fame quarterback Graham : OTTO
19 Significant span : ERA
20 Satirized : SENT UP
21 Kind of list : TO-DO
22 Homework shirker’s comeuppance : NO TV
24 It may hold broken pottery : RUIN
25 Hilarious : A HOOT
26 Frozen beverages : ICEES
28 Source of blowups : TNT
29 They’re off-limits : NO-NOS
30 Olympic figure skating gold medalist after Kristi : OKSANA
32 Makes a lot of progress : GETS FAR
34 Many an Irish song : LILT
36 Try for a better hand : DRAW
37 Smirks : SIMPERS
40 Stir to action : AROUSE
44 Mystical views : AURAE
45 Saddle-making tool : AWL
47 Muesli brand : ALPEN
48 Constellation points : STARS
49 Musician Lennon : SEAN
51 Banjo bar : FRET
52 Barbarian horde : HUNS
53 It includes AAPL and MSFT : THE DOW
55 Devoured, with “up” : ATE
56 Thrill from Sills : ARIA
57 Start : ACTIVATION
59 Steal, perhaps : DEAL
60 Dropped in on : PAID A VISIT
61 Mrs. Krabappel of “The Simpsons” : EDNA
62 Giovanni Ribisi title con man : SNEAKY PETE

Down

1 Former late-night talk star, familiarly : ARSENIO
2 Limp Bizkit genre : RAP ROCK
3 Has a thought : IDEATES
4 Address for a 1-Across, perhaps : SIR
5 Farm males : TOMS
6 More kooky : ODDER
7 Pastry portmanteau : CRONUT
8 Sounding off : RANTING
9 Came (to) : AMOUNTED
10 One may be rolled out in the park : TARP
11 “Macbeth” brew ingredient before “Witches’ mummy” : TOOTH OF WOLF
12 City with a Penn State campus : ALTOONA
13 Persian passageway : CAT DOOR
14 Pompous sorts : SNOOTS
23 Trattoria entrée : VEAL MARSALA
25 Cochise player of early TV : ANSARA
27 Wading birds with camouflage plumage : SNIPES
31 Tavern offering : ALE
33 Refrain opener : TRA-
35 Domicile in front of 123 Sesame Street : TRASH CAN
37 Medically closed up : SUTURED
38 Khamenei or Khatami : IRANIAN
39 What often comes before pie : SWEETIE …
41 Hoist : UPRAISE
42 Take care of business : SEE TO IT
43 Agreement between states : ENTENTE
44 Barely : A SHADE
46 Uppity : LA-DI-DA
50 B.J. of “The Office” : NOVAK
53 Light touches : TAPS
54 Rippled, like chips : WAVY
58 Point or pointer : TIP

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Constructed by: Mike Peluso
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme (according to Bill): Chippers

Themed clues are all the same, namely “Chipper”:

  • 17A Chipper : JONES OF BASEBALL
  • 27A Chipper : GREEN-SIDE IRON
  • 46A Chipper : IN A JAUNTY MOOD
  • 56A Chipper : MULCH-MAKING TOOL

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

Want to discuss the puzzle? Then …
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Bill’s time: 9m 50s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies Across 1 VMI program : ROTC

The Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program for officers based in colleges all around the US. The ROTC program was established in 1862 when as a condition of receiving a land-grant to create colleges, the federal government required that military tactics be part of a new school’s curriculum.

The Virginia Military Institute (VMI) is one of the six senior military colleges in the country, and is located in Lexington, Virginia. The sports teams of VMI are known as the Keydets, southern slang for “cadets”.

5 ’80s-’90s courtroom drama : LA LAW

“L.A. Law” ran on NBC from 1986 to 1994, and was one of the network’s most successful drama series. It took over from the equally successful “Hill Street Blues” in the Thursday night 10 p.m. slot until, after a six-year run, it was itself replaced by yet another respected drama, “E.R.” The opening credits showed that famous California licence plate. The plate was on a Jaguar XJ for most of the series, but moved onto a Bentley towards the end of the run. For each series the registration sticker was updated, so no laws were being broken.

15 Three-time A.L. batting champ Tony : OLIVA

Tony Oliva is a former Major League Baseball player who played his whole career for the Minnesota Twins. Oliva suffered from severe knee problems due to multiple injuries, forcing him to play the last four years of his career as a designated hitter (DH). On the bright side, he went into the history books in 1973 when became the first DH to hit a MLB home run.

16 Pupil’s place : UVEA

The uvea is the middle of the three layers that make up the eyeball. The outer layer is called the fibrous tunic, and the inner layer is the retina.

The pupil of the eye is the hole located in the center of the iris through which light enters the retina. The term “pupil” came into English via French from the latin “pupilla”, which is the diminutive form of “pupa” meaning “girl, doll”. The term came about due to the tiny doll-like image that one can see of oneself when looking into the center of another’s eyes.

17 Chipper : JONES OF BASEBALL

Former baseball star Chipper Jones was born Larry Jones, Jr. He earned the nickname “Chipper” as a child, because his family viewed the younger Larry as a “chip off the old block”.

25 Wrigley brand : ORBIT

Orbit is a sugarless gum made by Wrigley’s. Orbit was first introduced during WWII, but was taken off the shelves in the 1980s when there was a concern that the gum’s sweetener was carcinogenic. Orbit was relaunched in 2001.

27 Chipper : GREEN-SIDE IRON

A chip might follow a drive on a golf course.

31 Geological time span : EON

Geological time is divided into a number of units of varying lengths. These are, starting from the largest:

  • supereon
  • eon (also “aeon”)
  • era
  • period
  • epoch
  • age
32 Carpenter’s joint element : TENON

One simple type of joint used in carpentry is a mortise and tenon. It is basically a projection carved at the end of one piece of wood that fits into a hole cut into the end of another. In the related dovetail joint, the projecting tenon is not rectangular but is cut at a bias, so that when the dovetails are joined they resist being pulled apart. You’ll see dovetail joints in drawers around the house.

33 Hiccup cause : SPASM

Hiccups is a series of forced intakes of breath, caused by spasms in the muscles of the chest and throat. The most common cause of hiccups is some sort of irritation to the stomach or oesophagus, usually taking place while eating. Apparently, we don’t really understand the reason why we hiccup, but a favored suggestion is that it may be something that we inherited from our ancestors of long ago who didn’t stand up quite as straight as we do. Gravity helps us swallow our food, but animals who walk on all fours don’t have that advantage as the food moves horizontally down the throat and into the stomach. Such beasts are in greater need of an involuntary hiccup should some food get stuck. Just a theory …

36 Genesis voyager : NOAH

According to the Book of Genesis, Noah lived to a ripe old age. Noah fathered his three sons Shem, Ham and Japheth when he was 500 years old, and the Great Flood took place when he was 600.

40 Mlle., across the Pyrenees : SRTA

“Señorita” (Srta.) is Spanish, and “Mademoiselle” (Mlle.) is French, for “Miss”.

The Pyrénées is a mountain range that runs along the border between Spain and France. Nestled between the two countries, high in the mountains, is the lovely country of Andorra, an old haunt of my family during skiing season …

41 God of Islam : ALLAH

The name “Allah” comes from the Arabic “al-” and “ilah”, meaning “the” and “deity”. So, “Allah” can be translated as “God”.

45 Bordeaux vineyard : CRU

“Cru” is a term used in the French wine industry that means “growth place”. So, “cru” is the name of the location where the grapes are grown, as opposed to the name of a specific vineyard. The terms “premier cru” and “grand cru” are also used, but the usage depends on the specific wine region. Generally it is a classification awarded to specific vineyards denoting their potential for producing great wines. “Grand cru” is reserved for the very best vineyards, with “premier cru” the level just below.

49 Rural wagons : DRAYS

A dray is a sideless 4-wheeled cart that is used for hauling goods.

56 Chipper : MULCH-MAKING TOOL

Mulch is a layer of material applied by gardeners over the top of soil. The intent can be to retain moisture, to add nutrients, to reduce weed growth, or just to improve the look of the garden.

62 Tierra en el mar : ISLA

In Spanish, an “isla” (island) is “tierra en el mar” (land in the sea).

64 Personification of victory : NIKE

Nike was the Greek goddess of victory, and was often referred to as “the Winged Goddess of Victory”. The athletic shoe company Nike uses the “Nike swoosh” as its logo, a logo that is inspired by the goddess’ wing.

66 Shemar’s longtime “Criminal Minds” role : DEREK

Shemar Moore is an actor and former fashion model. Moore played Malcolm Winters on the soap opera “The Young and the Restless” for many years. More recently, he took on the lead role of Sergeant Hondo Harrelson on the TV show “S.W.A.T”.

“Criminal Minds” is a police drama that has aired on CBS since 2005. The stories revolve around the FBI’s Behavioral Analysis Unit in Quantico, Virginia.

Down 1 One of five characters on “The Big Bang Theory” to appear in every episode : RAJ

Raj Koothrappali is a character on the sitcom “The Big Bang Theory” who is played by British-Indian actor Kunal Nayyar. Nayyar is married to Neha Kapur, a former Miss India.

2 Ab __: from the start : OVO

“Ab ovo” translates literally from Latin as “from the egg”, and is used in English to mean “from the beginning”.

3 Cube root of 1,000 : TEN

10 x 10 x 10 = 1,000

4 Spicy cuisine : CREOLE

In the US, the term “Creole” is most usually a reference to the people descended from the colonial French and colonial Spanish people who settled in the Louisiana region before it became part of the United States with the Louisiana Purchase of 1803.

The great explorer Verrazzano gave the name “Arcadia” to the coastal land that stretched from north of present day Virginia right up the North American continent to Nova Scotia. The name Arcadia was chosen as it was also the name for a part of Greece that had been viewed as idyllic from the days of classical antiquity. The “Arcadia” name quickly evolved into the word “Acadia” that was used locally here in North America. Much of Acadia was settled by the French in the 1600s, and then in 1710 Acadia was conquered by the British. There followed the French and Indian War after which there was a mass migration of French Acadians, often via the French colony of Saint-Domingue (present-day Haiti) to the French colony of Louisiana. The local dialectic pronunciation of the word “Acadian” was “Cajun”, giving the name to the ethnic group for which Louisiana has been home for about 300 years.

6 Italian wheels, briefly : ALFA

The “Alfa” in Alfa Romeo is actually an acronym, one standing for Anonima Lombarda Fabbrica Automobili (“Lombard Automobile Factory, Public Company”). ALFA was an enterprise founded in 1909 and which was taken over by Nicola Romeo in 1915. In 1920 the company name was changed to Alfa Romeo.

7 Ad-__ : LIB

“Ad libitum” is a Latin phrase meaning “at one’s pleasure”. In common usage, the phrase is usually shortened to “ad lib”. On the stage, the concept of an ad lib is very familiar.

8 Director DuVernay : AVA

Ava DuVernay is a filmmaker who became the first African-American woman to win the Best Director Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, a feat she achieved in 2012 for her feature film “Middle of Nowhere”. “Middle of Nowhere” tells the story of a woman who drops out of medical school to focus on husband when he is sentenced to 8 years in prison. DuVernay also directed the 2014 film “Selma” about the 1965 voting rights marches from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama.

9 Horseradish relative : WASABI

Sometimes called “Japanese horseradish”, wasabi is a root used as a condiment in Japanese cooking. The taste of wasabi is more like mustard than a hot pepper in that the vapors that create the “hotness” stimulate the nasal passages rather than the tongue. Personally, I love the stuff …

11 Former Indiana governor Bayh : EVAN

Evan Bayh is the son of Birch Bayh, and like his father was US Senator for the state of Indiana. Prior to serving in the Senate, Evan Bayh was State Governor.

12 Amalgamate : MELD

Amalgam is an alloy of mercury with some other metal. Many dental fillings are made of an amalgam of silver and mercury. We started using “amalgam” to mean “blend of different things” around 1790.

13 Chums : PALS

A chum is a friend. The term “chum” originated in the late 1600s as an alternative spelling for “cham”. In turn, “cham” was a shortened form of “chambermate”, a roommate at university.

19 Arab bigwigs : EMIRS

A bigwig is someone important. The use of the term “bigwig” harks back to the days when men of authority and rank wore … big wigs.

22 Gemini rocket stage : AGENA

The RM-81 Agena was an upper-stage rocket designed and built by Lockheed, and first used in 1959. After 365 launches, it was retired in 1987.

President Kennedy famously launched the Apollo space program in 1961. The Mercury program had been the project that put Americans into space, and NASA decided that more development work was need to bridge the gap in capabilities needed between what was known from Mercury and what was needed to land a man on the moon, the objective of the Apollo program. So, the Gemini program was born, in which astronauts learned to spend extended periods in orbit, rendezvous and dock spacecraft, walk in space, and improve the reentry and landing stage of a space flight.

23 Eagerly anticipate, with “over” : DROOL 24 North America’s highest peak : DENALI

“Denali” means “the high one” in the native Athabaskan language, and is now the name used for Mount McKinley. Denali’s summit stands at 20,237 feet, making it the highest mountain peak in North America. I was surprised to learn that there is a Denali State Park, as well as the Denali National Park. The two are located adjacent to each other (which makes sense!). The State Park is undeveloped for all practical purposes, with just a few campgrounds and trailheads.

30 Busters : NARCOS

“Narc” and “narco” are slang terms describing a law enforcement officer who tracks down criminals associated with illegal drugs. Both words are short for “narcotics officer”. Narcs might work for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA).

34 Four-decades-plus first name in the Senate : STROM

Strom Thurmond was a US Senator for the state of South Carolina for 48 years, until he stepped down in 2003. Thurmond was the oldest-serving senator in US history (a record later surpassed). He retired from his office at the age of 100-years-old, and passed away just a few months after leaving Washington.

35 Title role for Bea : MAUDE

The seventies sitcom “Maude” stars Bea Arthur as the title character Maude Findlay. “Maude” is a spin-off of “All in the Family”, as Findlay is a cousin of Edith Bunker.

37 Links equalizer : HANDICAP

The oldest type of golf course is a links course. The name “links” comes from the Old English word “hlinc” meaning “rising ground”. “Hlinc” was used to describe areas with coastal sand dunes or open parkland. As a result, we use the term “links course” to mean a golf course that is located at or on the coast, often amid sand dunes. The British Open is always played on a links course.

48 Medit. tourist attraction : MT ETNA

Mount Etna on the island of Sicily is the largest of three active volcanoes in Italy, and indeed the largest of all active volcano in Europe. Etna is about 2 1/2 times the height of its equally famous sister, Mt. Vesuvius. Mt. Etna is home to a 110-km long narrow-gauge railway, and two ski resorts. It is sometimes referred to as “Mongibello” in Italian, and as “Mungibeddu” in Sicilian. The English name “Etna” comes from the Greek “aitho” meaning “I eat”.

51 Author Martin : AMIS

I suppose the successful English novelist Martin Amis must have writing in his blood. He is the son of the respected author Kingsley Amis, a Booker Prize winner. Martin Amis’s best-known novels comprise his so-called “London Trilogy” consisting of “Money” (1984), “London Fields” (1989) and “The Information” (1995).

53 Couture monthly : ELLE

“Elle” magazine was founded in 1945 in France and today has the highest circulation of any fashion magazine in the world. “Elle” is the French word for “she”. “Elle” is published monthly worldwide, although you can pick up a weekly edition if you live in France.

“Haute couture”, literally “high dressmaking” in French, is a name given to the creation of exclusive fashions. A couturier is someone who creates or sells such fashions.

55 Fraction of a meg : ONE K

In the world of computing, one kilobyte (“1k) is one thousandth of a megabyte (“a meg”).

57 Men’s grooming brand : AXE

Axe is a brand of male grooming products. Axe is sold under the name Lynx in some parts of the world.

58 Aperitif named for a former Dijon mayor : KIR

Kir is a French cocktail made by adding a teaspoon or so of crème de cassis (blackcurrant liqueur) to a glass, and then topping it off with white wine. The drink is named after Felix Kir, the Mayor of Dijon in Burgundy, who used to offer the drink to his guests. My wife is particularly fond of a variant called a Kir Royale, in which the white wine is replaced with champagne.

61 Sign of summer : LEO

Leo is the fifth astrological sign of the Zodiac. People born from July 23 to August 22 are Leos.

Read on, or …
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Complete List of Clues/Answers Across

1 VMI program : ROTC
5 ’80s-’90s courtroom drama : LA LAW
10 On-call worker : TEMP
14 Assert as true : AVER
15 Three-time A.L. batting champ Tony : OLIVA
16 Pupil’s place : UVEA
17 Chipper : JONES OF BASEBALL
20 Tetra- doubled : OCTA-
21 Atonement : AMENDS
22 Confuse : ADDLE
25 Wrigley brand : ORBIT
27 Chipper : GREEN-SIDE IRON
31 Geological time span : EON
32 Carpenter’s joint element : TENON
33 Hiccup cause : SPASM
36 Genesis voyager : NOAH
38 Protector with strings : APRON
40 Mlle., across the Pyrenees : SRTA
41 God of Islam : ALLAH
43 Called from the field : LOWED
45 Bordeaux vineyard : CRU
46 Chipper : IN A JAUNTY MOOD
49 Rural wagons : DRAYS
50 Response at the door : IT’S ME
51 Fair-hiring problem : AGEISM
54 “I don’t like your __” : TONE
56 Chipper : MULCH-MAKING TOOL
62 Tierra en el mar : ISLA
63 Force to leave : EXILE
64 Personification of victory : NIKE
65 Dance basic : STEP
66 Shemar’s longtime “Criminal Minds” role : DEREK
67 Plus : ALSO

Down

1 One of five characters on “The Big Bang Theory” to appear in every episode : RAJ
2 Ab __: from the start : OVO
3 Cube root of 1,000 : TEN
4 Spicy cuisine : CREOLE
5 Plunder : LOOT
6 Italian wheels, briefly : ALFA
7 Ad-__ : LIB
8 Director DuVernay : AVA
9 Horseradish relative : WASABI
10 Casual summer garments : TUBE TOPS
11 Former Indiana governor Bayh : EVAN
12 Amalgamate : MELD
13 Chums : PALS
18 Crime scene clue, maybe : SCENT
19 Arab bigwigs : EMIRS
22 Gemini rocket stage : AGENA
23 Eagerly anticipate, with “over” : DROOL
24 North America’s highest peak : DENALI
25 Fragrant : ODOROUS
26 Fame : RENOWN
28 Large expanse : SEA
29 Part of the picture : IN PLAY
30 Busters : NARCOS
34 Four-decades-plus first name in the Senate : STROM
35 Title role for Bea : MAUDE
37 Links equalizer : HANDICAP
39 Take-home : NET
42 Tough to hear, as criticism : HARSH
44 Like embers : DYING
47 Stuck : JAMMED
48 Medit. tourist attraction : MT ETNA
51 Author Martin : AMIS
52 Unexpected blow : GUST
53 Couture monthly : ELLE
54 Roof piece : TILE
55 Fraction of a meg : ONE K
57 Men’s grooming brand : AXE
58 Aperitif named for a former Dijon mayor : KIR
59 Good thing to strike : OIL
60 Signs off on : OKS
61 Sign of summer : LEO

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Constructed by: Jeffrey Wechsler
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer(s): Frankenstein

Themed answers all relate to the 1818 novel “Frankenstein”:

  • 17A Classic 1818 novel : FRANKENSTEIN
  • 20A Unnamed character in 17-Across : THE MONSTER
  • 35A Author of 17-Across : MARY SHELLEY
  • 47A 1974 portrayer of 17-Across : GENE WILDER
  • 53A 1931 portrayer of 20-Across : BORIS KARLOFF

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Bill’s time: 9m 55s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies Across 1 Expert in Islamic law : MUFTI

A mufti is jurist who interprets Islamic law. A nonbinding opinion issued by a mufti is a fatwa.

12 Nation partly in the Arctic Circle : FINLAND

The Nordic country of Finland is the most sparsely populated nation in the European Union. The relatively modest population of 5.5 million people live in the eighth largest country on the continent.

17 Classic 1818 novel : FRANKENSTEIN

Mary Shelley’s Gothic novel has the full title of “Frankenstein; or, The Modern Prometheus”. The subtitle underscores one of the themes of the book, i.e. a warning about the expansion into the Industrial Revolution.

19 Otoscope target : EAR

An otoscope is that instrument that an ear, nose and throat specialist (ENT) uses to look into the interior of one’s ears.

27 Antipoverty agcy. : OEO

The Office of Economic Opportunity (OEO) was created during the Lyndon Johnson administration. The agency was responsible for administering the War on Poverty programs that were part of the President Johnson’s Great Society agenda. The OEO was shut down by President Nixon, although some of the office’s programs were transferred to other agencies. A few of the OEO’s programs are still around today, e.g. Head Start.

28 Actor Stephen : REA

Stephen Rea is an Irish actor from Belfast. Rea’s most successful role was Fergus in 1992’s “The Crying Game”, for which performance he was nominated for the Best Actor Oscar. In “The Crying Game”, Fergus was a member of the IRA. In real life, Rea was married to IRA bomber and hunger striker Dolours Price at the time he made the movie.

35 Author of 17-Across : MARY SHELLEY
(17A Classic 1818 novel : FRANKENSTEIN)

Not only did Mary Shelley pen the famous novel “Frankenstein”, she also edited the works of the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, who was her husband.

37 Slapstick reaction : SPIT TAKE

The comic maneuver in which someone spits out a drink in response to a joke or a surprising statement, that’s called a “spit take”.

43 Namely : TO WIT

The verb “to wit” means “to know”. The verb really isn’t used anymore except in the phrase “to wit” meaning “that is to say, namely”.

47 1974 portrayer of 17-Across : GENE WILDER

Gene Wilder was an actor noted for his comedic roles. Wilder had a successful collaboration with Mel Brooks on three great films: “The Producers”, “Blazing Saddles” and my favorite, “Young Frankenstein”. For a while, Wilder dated his “Young Frankenstein” co-star Teri Garr, but he was married most famously to “Saturday Night Live” star Gilda Radner.

I am not really a big fan of movies by Mel Brooks, but 1974’s “Young Frankenstein” is the exception. I think the cast has a lot to do with me liking the film, as it includes Gene Wilder (Dr. Frankenstein), Teri Garr (Inga), Marty Feldman (Igor) and Gene Hackman (Harold, the blind man).

53 1931 portrayer of 20-Across : BORIS KARLOFF

The classic 1931 film “Frankenstein” is based on the Mary Shelley novel of the same name, and stars Colin Clive as Henry Frankenstein and Boris Karloff as the Monster. Bela Lugosi was offered the role of Henry Frankenstein first, and then was recast as the Monster. Lugosi tried working with the Monster role but eventually bowed out. Many say that the decision to leave was one of the worst of Lugosi’s career.

56 King in 1 Kings : SOLOMON

According to the Bible, Solomon was the son of David and a king of Israel. Notably, Solomon is described as being very wise. In the story known as “the Judgment of Solomon”, Solomon was asked to decide who of two quarreling women was the mother of a baby. He suggested that they cut the baby in two with a sword, forcing one of the women to surrender the child rather than see it die. Solomon gave the child to the woman who showed compassion.

59 Shoulder piece : EPAULET

An epaulet (also “epaulette”) is an ornamental shoulder pad, particularly one worn with a military uniform. The term “epaulet”comes from French, and translates literally as “little shoulder”.

61 July 4, 1776, notables : SIGNERS

On 11 June 1776, the Continental Congress appointed a committee of five people to draft a declaration of independence. Included in the five were John Adams and Thomas Jefferson. Adams persuaded the other committee members to give Jefferson the task of writing the first draft. A resolution of independence was passed by the Congress on 2 July 1776. The final draft of the declaration was approved by the Congress two days later, on July 4th. John Adams wrote a letter to his wife that included an assertion that July 2nd (the date of the resolution of independence) would become a great American holiday. Of course Adams was wrong, and it was actually the date the Declaration of Independence was finalized that came to be celebrated annually.

Down 1 Kind of heart valve : MITRAL

The mitral valve lies between the left atrium and left ventricle in the heart.

6 “Did my heart love till now?” speaker : ROMEO

Here are some passionate lines from William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” that are spoken by Romeo:

Did my heart love till now? forswear it, sight! For I ne’er saw true beauty till this night.

11 Mo. town : STL

The city of St. Louis, Missouri was settled by French explorers in 1763. Sitting on the Mississippi River, it grew into a very busy port. By the 1850s, it was the second busiest port in the country, with only New York moving more freight. St. Louis was named for Louis IX of France. Louis was canonized in 1297 by Pope Boniface VIII, and was the only French king to be declared a saint.

12 High winds : FIFES

A fife is a small flute that is often used in military and marching bands. The name “fife” comes from the German “Pfeife” meaning “pipe”.

13 Honolulu-born singer : DON HO

The singer and entertainer Don Ho apparently had a pretty liberal arrangement with his wife. When Ho was touring with his two backing singers, Patti Swallie and Elizabeth Guevara, all three of them shared a room together. He had two children with each of his roommates, giving a total of ten kids including the six he had with his wife. The arrangement was quite open, it seems, with all ten kids visiting each other regularly. To each his own …

18 A dandelion’s are called blowballs : SEED HEADS

The name “dandelion” comes from the French “dent de lion” meaning “lion’s tooth”. The name is a reference to the coarse, tooth-like edges of dandelion leaves.

21 Fox NFL analyst Aikman : TROY

Troy Aikman is a former quarterback for the Dallas Cowboys. Now that he is retired from football, Aikman works as a sportscaster on the Fox network.

25 Future JD’s exam : LSAT

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

The law degree that is abbreviated to J.D. stands for “Juris Doctor” or “Doctor of Jurisprudence”.

26 Mongolian tent : YURT

A yurt is a wood-framed dwelling that is used by nomads in the steppes of Central Asia. Although a yurt is a substantial structure, it is also extremely portable.

30 Shaggy rug from 12-Across : RYA
(12A Nation partly in the Arctic Circle : FINLAND)

A rya is a traditional Scandinavian rug that was originally used as heavy covers by mariners as an alternative to furs. The name “rya” comes from a village in southwest Sweden.

32 Kosovo neighbor: Abbr. : ALB

The Republic of Albania is a country in the Balkans in southeastern Europe. Albania was made a communist state after WWII but became independent again with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1990. Albania has been a member of NATO since 2009, and was accepted as an official candidate to join the European Union in 2014. The nation’s capital and largest city is Tirana.

The country name “Kosovo” is an adjectival form of the Serbian word “kos” meaning “blackbird”. The name commemorates the “field of the blackbirds” the site of a 1389 battle between Serbia and the Ottoman Empire. The dispute over Kosovo technically dates back to the implosion of Yugoslavia in the 1990s. The capital of Kosovo is Pristina.

35 Bearing : MIEN

One’s mien is one’s bearing or manner. “Mien” shares the same etymological root as our word “demeanor”.

42 Short dogs, for short : PEKES

The pekingese (“peke”) breed originated in China, as one might suspect from the name. Breeding practices have resulted in the the dog having many health problems, including breathing issues related to the “desirable” flat face. Standards have been changed in recent years, demanding an “evident muzzle” in an attempt to breed healthier “pekes”.

46 Last family to keep a White House cow : TAFTS

A house cow is a cow that is kept by a household primarily to provide milk for the home kitchen, but also manure for the garden. President William Taft kept a house cow at the White House, a Holstein Friesian named “Pauline Wayne” that was gifted to him by a US senator from Wisconsin.

48 Dangerous virus : EBOLA

The Ebola virus causes a very nasty form of hemorrhagic fever. The name of the virus comes from the site of the first known outbreak, in a mission hospital in the Ebola River Valley in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (then known as Zaire). The disease is transmitted from human to human by exposure to bodily fluids. In nature, the main carrier of Ebola is the fruit bat.

49 Lennon love song : WOMAN

“Woman” is a lovely song written by John Lennon that he recorded in 1980. The song was released in 1981, just a month or so after Lennon was murdered outside his New York apartment building. Lennon wrote the song as an ode to his wife Yoko Ono, and to women in general. He also stated that “Woman” was a grown-up version of “Girl”, a song that he wrote for the Beatles in 1965.

55 Large green moth : LUNA

The lime-green luna moth is one of the largest moths found in North America, growing to a wingspan of up to 4½ inches.

57 Dedicatee of 49-Down : ONO
(49D Lennon love song : WOMAN)

Yoko Ono is an avant-garde artist. Ono actually met her future husband John Lennon for the first time while she was preparing her conceptual art exhibit called “Hammer a Nail”. Visitors were encouraged to hammer in a nail into a wooden board, creating the artwork. Lennon wanted to hammer in the first nail, but Ono stopped him as the exhibition had not yet opened. Apparently Ono relented when Lennon paid her an imaginary five shillings to hammer an imaginary nail into the wood.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers Across

1 Expert in Islamic law : MUFTI
6 Classroom tools : RULERS
12 Nation partly in the Arctic Circle : FINLAND
14 Left : GONE OUT
15 “I didn’t lie!” : IT WAS SO!
16 Select, as a jury : EMPANEL
17 Classic 1818 novel : FRANKENSTEIN
19 Otoscope target : EAR
20 Unnamed character in 17-Across : THE MONSTER
24 In a calculating way : SLYLY
27 Antipoverty agcy. : OEO
28 Actor Stephen : REA
29 Prefix with plus : SUR-
31 Reduce in status : DRAG DOWN
35 Author of 17-Across : MARY SHELLEY
37 Slapstick reaction : SPIT TAKE
39 Borrow, but not really : BUM
40 “__ you serious?” : ARE
41 Talk and talk : YAP
43 Namely : TO WIT
47 1974 portrayer of 17-Across : GENE WILDER
52 “__ scale of 1 to 10 … ” : ON A
53 1931 portrayer of 20-Across : BORIS KARLOFF
56 King in 1 Kings : SOLOMON
59 Shoulder piece : EPAULET
60 Like some rural bridges : ONE-LANE
61 July 4, 1776, notables : SIGNERS
62 Green field? : BOTANY
63 Campus figures : DEANS

Down

1 Kind of heart valve : MITRAL
2 Easily led astray : UNWARY
3 Rich dessert : FLAN
4 Something to do : TASK
5 Map box : INSET
6 “Did my heart love till now?” speaker : ROMEO
7 Detach, as a dress pattern : UNPIN
8 Isn’t straight : LEANS
9 Big stretch : EON
10 Deeply regret : RUE
11 Mo. town : STL
12 High winds : FIFES
13 Honolulu-born singer : DON HO
14 Go back for a second helping : GET MORE
18 A dandelion’s are called blowballs : SEED HEADS
21 Fox NFL analyst Aikman : TROY
22 “Ick!” : EEW!
23 Fled : RAN
25 Future JD’s exam : LSAT
26 Mongolian tent : YURT
30 Shaggy rug from 12-Across : RYA
32 Kosovo neighbor: Abbr. : ALB
33 Surfeit : GLUT
34 How-to presentation : DEMO
35 Bearing : MIEN
36 Prominent New York City feature : SKYLINE
37 Give a little : SAG
38 Not post- : PRE-
42 Short dogs, for short : PEKES
44 Like some scarves : WOOLEN
45 Works out : INFERS
46 Last family to keep a White House cow : TAFTS
48 Dangerous virus : EBOLA
49 Lennon love song : WOMAN
50 Twist : IRONY
51 Fleet : RAPID
54 Heated state : RAGE
55 Large green moth : LUNA
56 One may be choked back : SOB
57 Dedicatee of 49-Down : ONO
58 __ alone: not to mention : LET

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Constructed by: Chuck Deodene
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Today’s Reveal Answer(s): Guest Appearance

The hidden word “GUEST” APPEARS in each of the themed answers:

  • 57A Talk show drop-by … and a literal feature of 17-, 25-, 37- and 49-Across : GUEST APPEARANCE
  • 17A Sports page table : LEAGUE STANDINGS
  • 25A Dissociative condition : FUGUE STATE
  • 37A Makes a case for, with “of” : ARGUES THE MERITS
  • 49A Intraoral piercing : TONGUE STUD

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… a complete list of answers

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Bill’s time: 8m 11s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies Across 1 Passport stamps : VISAS

A visa is a usually a stamp in one’s passport, an indication that one is authorized to enter (and less often, to exit) a particular country. The word “visa” comes into English, via French, from the Latin expression “charta visa” meaning “paper that has been seen”, or “verified paper”.

6 Improvised knife : SHIV

“Shiv” is a slang term describing a weapon crudely fashioned to resemble a knife. Mostly we hear of shivs that have been fashioned by prison inmates to do harm to others.

10 MRI output : SCAN

An MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) machine uses powerful magnetic fields to generate its images so there is no exposure to ionizing radiation (such as X-rays). We used MRI equipment in our chemistry labs at school, way back in the days when the technology was still called Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI). Apparently the marketing folks didn’t like the term “nuclear” because of its association with atomic bombs, so now it’s just called MRI.

14 Capital of Ghana : ACCRA

Accra sits on Ghana’s coast and is a major seaport as well as the country’s capital city. The name “Accra” comes from a local word “Nkran” meaning “ants”, a name chosen because of the large number of anthills found in the area when the city was founded.

The country name “Ghana” translates as “warrior king” in the local language. The British established a colony they called Gold Coast in 1874, later to become Ghana, as part of the scramble by Europeans to settle as much of Africa as they could. One of Ghana’s most famous sons is Kofi Annan, the diplomat who served as General Secretary of the UN for ten years until the beginning of 2007.

15 “Say Anything…” actress Skye : IONE

Ione Skye is an American actress born in Hertfordshire in England. She is best known for portraying the character Diane Court in the 1989 high school romance movie “Say Anything…”, starring opposite John Cusack. Skye is the daughter of the Scottish folk singer Donovan.

16 “__ and Abel”: Jeffrey Archer novel : KANE

“Kane and Abel” is an extremely popular 1979 novel by English author Jeffrey Archer. It is so popular that it has sold about as many copies as classics like “Gone with the Wind” and “To Kill a Mockingbird”.

Jeffrey Archer is a former politician, novelist and much-ridiculed celebrity in his native Britain. HIs is an exemplar of an up-and-down career. He was elected Member of Parliament in 1969, went almost bankrupt due to a financial scandal, became a best-selling novelist, became deputy chairman of the Conservative Party, resigned after being accused of paying a prostitute, won a libel case, was made a Member of the House of Lords, resigned when it came out that he’d lied in the libel case, served two years in prison for perverting the course of justice. Despite all that, he is still officially “Lord” Archer.

22 Winter hrs. in St. Louis : CST

Central Standard Time (CST)

23 Blog entry : POST

Many folks who visit this website regard it as just that, a website. That is true, but more specifically it is referred to as a blog, as I make regular posts (actually daily posts) that then occupy the “front page” of the site. The blog entries are in reverse chronological order, and one can just look back day-by-day, reading older and older posts. “Blog” is a contraction of the term “web log”.

25 Dissociative condition : FUGUE STATE

A fugue state is a rare dissociative disorder in which a person wanders away from his or her usual environment, possibly with the establishment of a new identity. The state can last for hours, days or months, and on return, the person retains past memories, but does not recall events while in the fugue state.

30 Woman college basketball coach Summitt with an NCAA record 1,098 career wins : PAT

Pat Summitt was a college basketball head coach. She coached the Tennessee Lady Vols team for 38 years starting in 1974. Sadly, Summitt stepped down in 2012 following a diagnosis of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease, and passed away in 2016.

31 Nairobi’s country : KENYA

Nairobi is the capital and largest city in the African nation of Kenya. The city is named for the Nairobi River, which in turn takes its name from the Maasai “Enkare Nairobi” meaning “Cool Water”. Nairobi was founded in 1899 as a stop on the Kenya-Uganda railroad, at a time when the country was a British colony.

32 Insulin-producing gland : PANCREAS

The hormone insulin is secreted by structures in the pancreas called the islets of Langerhans, which are named for their island-like appearance under a microscope and for their discoverer Paul Langerhans. The hormone is named for the “islets”, as the Latin for island is “insula”.

36 Left or right ending : -IST

The concept of left-right politics started in France during the French Revolution. When members of France’s National Assembly convened in 1789, supporters of the King sat to the President’s right, and supporters of the revolution to the President’s left. The political terms “left” and “right” were then coined in the local media and have been used ever since.

44 __ pad : STENO

Stenography is the process of writing in shorthand. The term comes from the Greek “steno” (narrow) and “graphe” (writing).

47 Old Mideast org. : UAR

The United Arab Republic (UAR) was a union between Egypt and Syria established in 1958. The UAR dissolved in 1961 when Syria pulled out of the arrangement.

48 Reggae precursor : SKA

Reggae is a genre of music that developed in the late sixties, evolving out of the genres of ska and rocksteady.

53 Brightness nos. : IQS

Although it is correct these days to say that the abbreviation IQ stands for “intelligence quotient”, the term was actually coined by German psychologist William Stern, and so is actually an abbreviation for the German “Intelligenz-Quotient”.

63 Repast : MEAL

Our word “repast”, meaning “meal”. came to us via French (in which language “repas” is “meal”). Ultimately the term comes from the Latin “repascere” meaning “to repeatedly graze”.

65 Popular Google service : GMAIL

Gmail is a free webmail service provided by Google, and my favorite of the free email services. Gmail made a big splash when it was introduced in 2007 because it offered a whopping 1GB of storage whereas other services offered a measly 2-4MB on average.

67 Singer from County Donegal : ENYA

The Irish singer Enya co-wrote and performed two songs for the 2001 film “The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring”. Her song “May It Be” was nominated to that season’s Best Original Song Academy Award. The second number, called “Aniron”, was sung in Tolkien’s Elvish language called Sindarin.

Donegal is the name of the most northerly county in Ireland, and is also the name of the town that gave the county its name. “Donegal” is the anglicized form of the Irish “Dún na nGall” meaning “fort of the foreigners”. County Donegal is a really beautiful part of the country …

68 Leaf under a petal : SEPAL

In a flower, the sepals are the green, leaf-like structures that are “interleaved” with the petals, providing support. Prior to acting as support for the petals, the sepals protect the flower in bud.

Down 1 Actor Kilmer : VAL

Val Kilmer’s first big leading role in a movie was playing Jim Morrison in Oliver Stone’s 1991 biopic “The Doors”. A few years later, Kilmer was chosen for the lead in another big production, “Batman Forever”. Things haven’t really gone as well for Kilmer since then, I’d say. Off the screen, he flirted with the idea of running for Governor of New Mexico in 2010. A Hollywood actor as a governor? Would never happen …

2 Floe makeup : ICE

An ice floe is a sheet of ice that has separated from an ice field and is floating freely on the ocean.

3 Perform like Ella : SCAT-SING

Scat singing is a vocal improvisation found in the world of jazz. There aren’t any words as such in scat singing, just random nonsense syllables made up on the spot.

Ella Fitzgerald, the “First Lady of Song”, had a hard and tough upbringing. She was raised by her mother alone in Yonkers, New York. Her mother died while Ella was still a schoolgirl, and around that time the young girl became less interested in her education. She fell in with a bad crowd, even working as a lookout for a bordello and as a Mafia numbers runner. She ended up in reform school, from which she escaped, and found herself homeless and living on the streets for a while. Somehow Fitzgerald managed to get herself a spot singing in the Apollo Theater in Harlem. From there her career took off and as they say, the rest is history.

4 Insider lingo : ARGOT

“Argot” is a French term. It is the name given in the 17th century to “the jargon of the Paris underworld”. Nowadays argot is a set of idioms used by any particular group, the “lingo” of that group.

Lingo is specialized vocabulary. “Journalese” and “legalese” would be good examples.

5 TV lawyer Goodman : SAUL

“Better Call Saul” is a spin-off drama series from the hit show “Breaking Bad”. The main character is small-time lawyer Saul Goodman, played by Bob Odenkirk, who featured in the original series. “Better Call Saul” is set six years before Goodman makes an appearance in the “Breaking Bad” storyline. The lawyer’s real name is James Morgan McGill, and his pseudonym is a play on the words “S’all good, man!”

7 Trending : HOT

In the world of Twitter for example, a phrase that is getting “tagged” by users more than other phrases is said to be “trending”.

11 High-kicking dance : CAN-CAN

The Moulin Rouge cabaret is located right in the middle of one of the red light districts of Paris, the district of Pigalle. You can’t miss the Moulin Rouge as it has a huge red windmill on its roof (“moulin rouge” is French for “red windmill”). The nightclub opened its doors in 1889 and soon after, the working girls of the cabaret adopted a “respectable” party dance and used it to entice their clients. That was the birth of the can-can. Nowadays, the Moulin Rouge is home to a lavish, Las Vegas-style show that costs millions of euros to stage. It features showgirls, dancers and acrobats, a whole host of entertainers in fact. And I am sure the can-can features as well …

13 Snapple rival : NESTEA

Nestea is a brand of iced tea made by Nestlé. The name is a portmanteau of “Nestlé” and “tea”.

Originally “Snapple” was the name of just one type of juice made by a company called Unadulterated Food Products. The drink’s name was a contraction of “snappy apple”. The company’s name was changed to the Snapple Beverage Corporation in the early 1980s. Snapple was sold in 1994, and is now a brand name owned by Dr Pepper Snapple Group.

24 Shortstop Vizquel with 11 Gold Glove Awards : OMAR

Omar Vizquel is a former MLB shortstop who has the nickname “Little O”. Among his many achievements on the field, Vizquel became the oldest person to play shortstop in an MLB game. He retired from the game in 2007 at 40 years old.

28 Aquarium beauty : TETRA

The neon tetra is a freshwater fish that is native to parts of South America. The tetra is a very popular aquarium fish and millions are imported into the US every year. Almost all of the imported tetras are farm-raised in Asia and very few come from their native continent.

34 Stronghold : REDOUBT

A redoubt is a system of fortifications that surround a larger fort. The redoubt is used to protect soldiers stationed outside the main fort, and to provide additional defenses. The term “redoubt” (originally “redout”) means “place of retreat”.

35 That, in Toledo : ESO

Toledo is a city in central Spain that is located just over 40 miles south of the capital Madrid. Toledo is sometimes called the “City of Three Cultures”, due to the historical co-existence of Christian, Muslim and Jewish traditions.

36 Online chats, briefly : IMS

Even though instant messaging (sending and receiving IMs) has been around since the 1960s, it was AOL who popularized the term “instant message” in the eighties and nineties. The “AOL Instant Message” service was known as AIM.

38 Subdued hue : ECRU

The color ecru is a grayish, yellowish brown. The word “ecru” comes from French and means “raw, unbleached”. “Ecru” has the same roots as our word “crude”.

40 __ torch: luau light : TIKI

A tiki torch is a bamboo torch that’s commonly used in Tiki culture. Tiki culture is a relatively modern invention dating from the 20th century, and is the experience created in Polynesian-style restaurants. The word “Tiki” is borrowed from Polynesia.

44 Mark of shame : STIGMA

A stigma (plural “stigmata), in a social sense, is a distinguishing mark of disgrace. For example, one might have to suffer the stigma of being in prison. The term derives from the Greek “stigma” meaning “mark, brand”.

45 Kitchen toppers : TOQUES

A toque was a brimless style of hat that was very fashionable in Europe in the 13th to 16th centuries. Nowadays we associate toques with chefs, as it is the name given to a chef’s hat (called a “toque blanche” in French, a “white hat”). A chef’s toque is quite interesting. Many toques have exactly 100 pleats, often said to signify the number of ways that an egg can be cooked.

47 2019 Pebble Beach event : US OPEN

Pebble Beach Golf Links, located just south of Monterey, California, is a public course. It was the first public golf course to be chosen as the top course in the country by “Golf Digest”.

51 “Weeds” law org. : DEA

Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA)

“Weeds” is a Showtime television series that originally aired from 2005 to 2012. “Weeds” is a comedy-drama about a mother of two who has to turn to growing and selling marijuana to support her family after her husband dies. Mary-Louise Parker plays the lead, and does an excellent job …

52 Moth attractor : FLAME

It isn’t really understood why moths are attracted to artificial lights. There is one theory that sounds plausible to me though. It is suggested that moths navigate at night by maintaining the moon (the brightest celestial object) at a fixed angle. When a moth finds a brighter light source, like an artificial light, it gets confused.

56 Units of energy : ERGS

An erg is a unit of mechanical work or energy. It is a small unit, with one joule comprising 10 million ergs. it has been suggested that an erg is about the amount of energy required for a mosquito to take off. The term comes from “ergon”, the Greek word for work.

58 __ Poke: retro candy : SLO

Slo Poke ia a brand of candy, one described as caramel on a stick. It is produced by the Gilliam Candy Company.

61 “Homeland” org. : CIA

“Homeland” is a psychological drama on Showtime about a CIA officer who is convinced that a certain US Marine is a threat to the security of the United States. The show is based on a series from Israeli television called “Hatufim” (Prisoners of War”). I saw the first season of this show and highly recommend it …

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Complete List of Clues/Answers Across

1 Passport stamps : VISAS
6 Improvised knife : SHIV
10 MRI output : SCAN
14 Capital of Ghana : ACCRA
15 “Say Anything…” actress Skye : IONE
16 “__ and Abel”: Jeffrey Archer novel : KANE
17 Sports page table : LEAGUE STANDINGS
20 Plaza payment : TOLL
21 Feel remorse over : RUE
22 Winter hrs. in St. Louis : CST
23 Blog entry : POST
25 Dissociative condition : FUGUE STATE
29 “Who __ to complain?” : AM I
30 Woman college basketball coach Summitt with an NCAA record 1,098 career wins : PAT
31 Nairobi’s country : KENYA
32 Insulin-producing gland : PANCREAS
36 Left or right ending : -IST
37 Makes a case for, with “of” : ARGUES THE MERITS
42 Knot-tying vow : I DO
43 Like big lottery winners, presumably : ECSTATIC
44 __ pad : STENO
47 Old Mideast org. : UAR
48 Reggae precursor : SKA
49 Intraoral piercing : TONGUE STUD
52 Carnival : FAIR
53 Brightness nos. : IQS
54 6-Down’s sib : BRO
55 River swimmers : EELS
57 Talk show drop-by … and a literal feature of 17-, 25-, 37- and 49-Across : GUEST APPEARANCE
63 Repast : MEAL
64 Char on a grill : SEAR
65 Popular Google service : GMAIL
66 About : AS TO
67 Singer from County Donegal : ENYA
68 Leaf under a petal : SEPAL

Down

1 Actor Kilmer : VAL
2 Floe makeup : ICE
3 Perform like Ella : SCAT-SING
4 Insider lingo : ARGOT
5 TV lawyer Goodman : SAUL
6 54-Across’ sib : SIS
7 Trending : HOT
8 Going nowhere, career-wise : IN A RUT
9 Playhouse, say : VENUE
10 Navigate slopes : SKI
11 High-kicking dance : CAN-CAN
12 Showing insecurity : ANGSTY
13 Snapple rival : NESTEA
18 Wee toymaker : ELF
19 Matching office accessories : DESK SET
23 Dad : PAPA
24 Shortstop Vizquel with 11 Gold Glove Awards : OMAR
26 __ the crack of dawn : UP AT
27 House-warming option : GAS HEAT
28 Aquarium beauty : TETRA
33 Stage prompting : CUING
34 Stronghold : REDOUBT
35 That, in Toledo : ESO
36 Online chats, briefly : IMS
38 Subdued hue : ECRU
39 “Simple as can be” : IT’S A SNAP
40 __ torch: luau light : TIKI
41 What a tattoo may cover : SCAR
44 Mark of shame : STIGMA
45 Kitchen toppers : TOQUES
46 Put into power : ENSEAT
47 2019 Pebble Beach event : US OPEN
50 Wipe : ERASE
51 “Weeds” law org. : DEA
52 Moth attractor : FLAME
56 Units of energy : ERGS
58 __ Poke: retro candy : SLO
59 Settle : PAY
60 Time to remember : ERA
61 “Homeland” org. : CIA
62 Turn in the plumbing : ELL

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Constructed by: Craig Stowe
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer(s): After-Party

Themed answers each comprise two words, the second of which is often seen AFTER PARTY:

  • 56A Oscar night celebration … and where to find the ends of the answers to starred clues : AFTER-PARTY
  • 17A *Ingratiate oneself (with) : CURRY FAVOR (giving “party favor”)
  • 24A *Hardly cutting-edge : OLD SCHOOL (giving “party school”)
  • 36A *Last stage of a chess match : END GAME (giving “party game”)
  • 46A *Joke payoff : PUNCHLINE (giving “party line”)

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Bill’s time: 6m 38s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies Across 1 Car cam spot : DASH

Back in the 1800s, “dashboard” was the name given to a board placed at the front of a carriage to stop mud from “dashing” against the passengers in the carriage, mud that was kicked up by the hoofs of the horses. Quite interesting …

5 Sacred Judaic scroll : TORAH

The Torah, the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, are traditionally believed to have been written by Moses. As such, they are sometimes referred to as the Law of Moses, or Mosaic Law.

16 Pop in a bottle : COLA

The first cola drink to become a commercial success was Coca-Cola, soon after it was invented by a druggist in 1886. That original Coca-Cola was flavored mainly with kola nuts and vanilla. The formulation was based on an alcoholic drink called Coca Wine that had been on sale for over twenty years.

17 *Ingratiate oneself (with) : CURRY FAVOR (giving “party favor”)

To curry is to seek, at least when it is used in the phrase “to curry favor”.

28 Latin American dances : TANGOS

The dramatic dance called the tango originated in the late 1800s in the area along the border between Argentina and Uruguay. Dancers and orchestras from Buenos Aires in particular traveled to Europe and beyond in the early twentieth century and brought the tango with them. The tango craze first struck Europe in Paris in the 1910s, and from there spread to London and Berlin, crossing the Atlantic to New York in 1913.

33 “__ light is not daylight”: Juliet : YON

William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” doesn’t end well for the title characters. Juliet takes a potion as a ruse to fool her parents, to trick them into thinking she is dead. The potion puts her in a death-like coma for 24 hours, after which Juliet plans to awaken and run off with Romeo. Juliet’s sends a message to Romeo apprising him of the plan, but the message fails to arrive. Romeo hears of Juliet’s “death”, and grief-stricken he takes his own life by drinking poison. Juliet awakens from the coma, only to find her lover dead beside her. She picks up a dagger and commits suicide. And nobody lives happily ever after …

35 Good name for a cook : STU

“Stu” sounds like “stew”.

38 Sun. speech : SER

Our word “sermon” comes from the Latin “sermonem” meaning “discourse, talk”. The literal translation of “sermonem” is “a stringing together of words”, from the Latin “serere” meaning “to join”, as in the related word “series”.

43 Armenian’s neighbor : IRANI

Armenia is a landlocked country found east of Turkey, and is a former Soviet Socialist Republic (SSR). Back in the year 301 CE, the ancient Kingdom of Armenia became the first nation in the world to adopt Christianity as its national religion.

48 Type of pie popular in Southern cuisine : PECAN

The pecan is the state nut of Alabama, Arkansas and California. Also, the pecan is the state tree of Texas.

52 Lecherous sorts : ROUES

“Roue” is a lovely word, I think, but one used to describe a less than lovely man, someone of loose morals. “Roue” comes from the French word “rouer” meaning “to break on a wheel”. This describes the ancient form of capital punishment where a poor soul was lashed to a wheel and then beaten to death with cudgels and bars. I guess the suggestion is that a roue, with his loose morals, deserves such a punishment.

60 Brahms played it : PIANO

Johannes Brahms was a leading German composer during the Romantic period. Brahms is one of the “Three Bs”, often grouped with Johann Sebastian Bach and Ludwig van Beethoven.

61 Element with the symbol “Fe” : IRON

The Latin word for “iron” is “ferrum”, which gives us “Fe” as the metal’s chemical symbol.

62 Mister Rogers : FRED

The “Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood” TV show starred Fred Rogers. It was the second-longest running series on PBS television after that other iconic children’s show “Sesame Street”.

64 Part of DVD : DISC

The abbreviation “DVD” doesn’t actually stand for anything these days, although it was originally short for “digital video disk”. The use of the word “video” was dropped as DVDs started to be used for storing a lot more than video. As a result, some folks assign the phrase “digital versatile disk” to “DVD”.

Down 1 Brew for an early night : DECAF

The first successful process for removing caffeine from coffee involved steaming the beans in salt water, and then extracting the caffeine using benzene (a potent carcinogen) as a solvent. Coffee processed this way was sold as Sanka here in the US. There are other processes used these days, and let’s hope they are safer …

2 High-end Honda : ACURA

Acura is the luxury brand of the Honda Motor Company. As an aside, Infiniti is the equivalent luxury brand for the Nissan Motor Company, and Lexus is the more luxurious version of Toyota’s models.

3 Princess Fiona’s love : SHREK

Princess Fiona is the title character’s love interest in the “Shrek” series of films.

4 Charlotte NBA team : HORNETS

The Hornets are the NBA team based in Charlotte, North Carolina. The Hornets were established as an expansion team in Charlotte in 1988, but moved and became the New Orleans Hornets in 2002. The NBA returned to North Carolina in 2004 with the establishment of the Charlotte Bobcats. The New Orleans franchise rebranded itself in 2013, becoming the Pelicans. As a result, the Charlotte Bobcats were able to change their name to the Hornets in 2014.

6 Mama bear, in Madrid : OSA

Madrid is the largest city in Spain, and is the nation’s capital. Madrid is located very close to the geographical center of the country. It is the third-largest city in the European Union (after London and Paris). People from Madrid called themselves Madrileños.

9 Falcon-headed son of Osiris : HORUS

Horus was one of the oldest gods in Ancient Egyptian religion. Usually, Horus was depicted as a falcon or a man with a falcon head. The Eye of Horus was a common symbol used in Ancient Egypt, a symbol of protection and royal power.

Osiris was the Egyptian god of the underworld. Osiris was the son of Geb the Earth god, and Nut the sky goddess. His wife Isis was also his sister. Osiris was killed and mutilated by Set, his own brother. Isis reassembled Osiris and revived him, just long enough that they could conceive their son Horus.

11 Name in Japanese WWII propaganda : TOKYO ROSE

“Tokyo Rose” was the nickname given to several English-speaking female propaganda broadcasters who supported the Japanese cause during WWII. The person most associated with “Tokyo Rose” was Iva Toguri D’Aquino, an American citizen from Los Angeles who earned a degree in zoology from the University of California. Toguri travelled to Japan in mid-1941, and got stranded there after the attack on Pearl Harbor. She responded to pressure from coerced Allied service members to help them with their propaganda broadcasts, providing a female voice. According to many accounts, Toguri did her work unwillingly and did what she could to provide support to the prisoners-of-war. After the war she was arrested and spent a year in jail before being released due to lack of evidence of wrongdoing. She was then transported to the US, where she stood trial on eight counts of treason. After a long and expensive trial she was found guilty on one count and served over six years in prison. In 1977, President Gerald Ford granted her a full and unconditional pardon.

12 Boxer Laila : ALI

Laila Ali is the daughter of the great Muhammad Ali and is a very capable boxer in her own right. Laila’s professional record is an impressive 24 wins, including 21 knockouts. Now retired, she never lost a fight, and nor did she ever draw. One of those victories was against Jackie Frazier-Lyde, daughter of her father’s nemesis Joe Frazier. Laila is not a bad dancer either, coming in third place in the fourth season of “Dancing with the Stars”.

18 “Size matters not” Jedi master : YODA

Yoda is one of the most beloved characters of the “Star Wars” series of films. Yoda’s voice is provided by the great modern-day puppeteer Frank Oz of “Muppets” fame.

29 Part of a Park Ave. address : NY, NY

Park Avenue in New York City used to be known as Fourth Avenue, and for much of its length carried the tracks of the New York and Harlem Railroad. When the line was built, some of it was constructed by cutting through the length of the street and then forming underground tunnels by covering over the line with grates and greenery. This greenery formed a parkland between 34th and 40th Streets, and in 1860 the grassy section of Fourth Avenue was renamed Park Avenue, a name that was eventually used for the whole thoroughfare.

31 Japanese seaport : OTARU

The Japanese city and port of Otaru is just a 25-minute drive northwest from Sapporo. Just like Sapporo, Otaru has a famous beer that shares the city’s name.

32 Group often threatened in dystopian fiction : HUMAN RACE

A dystopia is an imaginary community in which the residents live unhappily and in fear. “Dystopia” is the opposite of “utopia”. One example of such a society is that described by George Orwell in “Nineteen Eighty-Four”. A more contemporary example would be the setting for the novels “The Hunger Games”.

34 Quran reader : IMAM

An imam is a Muslim leader, and often the person in charge of a mosque or perhaps a Muslim community.

36 Peace Nobelist Root : ELIHU

Elihu Root was an American statesman, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1912 for his diplomatic work that brought “nations together through arbitration and cooperation”. Root served as Secretary of State under President Theodore Roosevelt.

37 43,560 square feet : ACRE

At one time, an acre was defined as the amount of land a yoke of oxen could plow in a day. Then, an acre was more precisely defined as a strip of land “one furrow long” (i.e. one furlong) and one chain wide. The length of one furlong was equal to 10 chains, or 40 rods. A area of one furlong times 10 rods was one rood.

49 Wispy clouds : CIRRI

Cirrus (plural “cirri”) clouds are those lovely wispy, white strands that are often called “mare’s tails”.

51 “This I Promise You” band : NSYNC

“This I Promise You” was a hit for boy band NSYNC in 2000. The group recorded a version of the song in Spanish at the same time, “Yo te Voy a Amar”, and released it in Spanish-speaking countries all over the world.

54 IM VIP : BFF

In the world of IMs (instant messages), a BFF (best friend forever) is a VIP (very important person).

57 Lao Tzu’s “way” : TAO

Lao Tse (also “Lao-Tzu”) was a central figure in the development of the religion/philosophy of Taoism. Tradition holds that Lao-Tzu wrote the “Tao Te Ching”, a classical Chinese text that is fundamental to the philosophy of Taoism.

58 Brian of ambient music : ENO

Brian Eno was one of the pioneers of the ambient genre of music. Eno composed an album in 1978 called “Ambient 1: Music for Airports”, which was the first in a series of four albums with an ambient theme. Eno named the tracks, somewhat inventively, 1/1, 2/1, 2/1 and 2/2.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers Across

1 Car cam spot : DASH
5 Sacred Judaic scroll : TORAH
10 Wild guess : STAB
14 Reverberate : ECHO
15 Of __: helpful for : USE TO
16 Pop in a bottle : COLA
17 *Ingratiate oneself (with) : CURRY FAVOR (giving “party favor”)
19 Similar : AKIN
20 Childish comeback : ARE NOT!
21 Needing cleaning, as tabletops : DUSTY
23 Doctored in a bad way : FAKED
24 *Hardly cutting-edge : OLD SCHOOL (giving “party school”)
28 Latin American dances : TANGOS
30 Spooky : EERIE
31 Surprised sounds : OHS
33 “__ light is not daylight”: Juliet : YON
34 Shoe pad : INSOLE
35 Good name for a cook : STU
36 *Last stage of a chess match : END GAME (giving “party game”)
38 Sun. speech : SER
39 That is : NAMELY
41 Early TV maker : RCA
42 Pricing word : PER
43 Armenian’s neighbor : IRANI
44 Coo : MURMUR
46 *Joke payoff : PUNCHLINE (giving “party line”)
48 Type of pie popular in Southern cuisine : PECAN
52 Lecherous sorts : ROUES
53 Concerns of teachers and ophthalmologists : PUPILS
54 Drop of sweat : BEAD
56 Oscar night celebration … and where to find the ends of the answers to starred clues : AFTER-PARTY
59 Turn toward : FACE
60 Brahms played it : PIANO
61 Element with the symbol “Fe” : IRON
62 Mister Rogers : FRED
63 Deign (to) : STOOP
64 Part of DVD : DISC

Down

1 Brew for an early night : DECAF
2 High-end Honda : ACURA
3 Princess Fiona’s love : SHREK
4 Charlotte NBA team : HORNETS
5 Hair clump : TUFT
6 Mama bear, in Madrid : OSA
7 Gun, as an engine : REV
8 In conflict : AT ODDS
9 Falcon-headed son of Osiris : HORUS
10 Verbally tears apart : SCATHES
11 Name in Japanese WWII propaganda : TOKYO ROSE
12 Boxer Laila : ALI
13 Outlaw : BAN
18 “Size matters not” Jedi master : YODA
22 Play part : SCENE
24 Prayer opener : O, GOD …
25 Extended period of time : LONG RUN
26 Refueling ship : OILER
27 Rude look : LEER
29 Part of a Park Ave. address : NY, NY
31 Japanese seaport : OTARU
32 Group often threatened in dystopian fiction : HUMAN RACE
34 Quran reader : IMAM
35 Salon sound : SNIP
36 Peace Nobelist Root : ELIHU
37 43,560 square feet : ACRE
40 Made cryptic : ENCODED
42 Like most phone cards : PREPAID
44 Fish out of water : MISFIT
45 “__ and away!” : UP, UP
47 Springs : LEAPS
49 Wispy clouds : CIRRI
50 Choir section : ALTOS
51 “This I Promise You” band : NSYNC
53 Shore (up) : PROP
54 IM VIP : BFF
55 Musical talent : EAR
57 Lao Tzu’s “way” : TAO
58 Brian of ambient music : ENO

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Constructed by: Dan Margolis
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer(s): This is U S

Themed answers are common two-word phrases starting with the letters US:

  • 63A With 64-Across, NBC drama … or, in four parts, a hint to the answers to starred clues : THIS …
  • 64A See 63-Across : … IS US (or “this is U S”)
  • 19A *Anonymous Arlington honoree : UNKNOWN SOLDIER
  • 31A *Evil Cinderella sibling : UGLY STEPSISTER
  • 38A *Possibly the perp : UNDER SUSPICION
  • 51A *Entryway conveniences for rain deflectors : UMBRELLA STANDS

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

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Bill’s time: 5m 07s

Bill’s errors: 2!!!

  • CLIO (Cleo!!)
  • GIDE (Gede)
Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies Across 1 After-bath powder : TALC

Talc is a mineral, actually hydrated magnesium silicate. Talcum powder is composed of loose talc, although these days “baby powder” is also made from cornstarch.

13 Cookie in some Breyers Cookies & Cream : OREO

Breyers ice cream was introduced by William A. Breyer in 1866, in Philadelphia. Always known for using all-natural ingredients, Breyers products made in recent years contain more and more food additives in an attempt to cut costs in a competitive market. In fact, most Breyers products can’t even be labeled “ice cream” anymore as they don’t contain enough milk and cream and so are labeled “frozen dairy dessert” instead.

14 Vintner’s prefix : OENO-

In Greek mythology, Oeno was the goddess of wine, giving us “oeno-” as a prefix meaning “wine”. For example, oenology is the study of wine and an oenophile is a wine-lover.

16 “The Twelve Days of Christmas” tree : PEAR

The fabulous Christmas Carol called “The Twelve Days of Christmas” dates back at least to 1780 when it was first published in England, though it may be French in origin. The concept of twelve days of Christmas comes from the tradition that the three kings came to visit the Christ Child twelve days after he was born. This same tradition is the origin of the title to Shakespeare’s play “Twelfth Night”.

17 Crooner Crosby : BING

The singer Bing Crosby was a great lover of the game of golf. Crosby had just finished up 18 holes on a course in Spain in 1977 when he suffered a massive heart attack on the final green. Crosby’s last words were “That was a great game of golf, fellas.”

19 *Anonymous Arlington honoree : UNKNOWN SOLDIER

The Tomb of the Unknown Soldier in Arlington National Cemetery was completed and opened to the public in 1932. Entombed there are unknown soldiers from WWI, WWII, and the Korean War. The remains of the unknown soldier entombed there in 1984 were identified in 1998 as those of Air Force 1st Lt. Michael J. Bassie, using DNA testing. The remains were interred i Jefferson Barracks National Cemetery in near St. Louis, where Blassie’s family resided.

23 Dispenser candy : PEZ

PEZ is an Austrian brand of candy sold in a mechanical dispenser. Famously, PEZ dispensers have molded “heads”, and have become very collectible over the years. The list of heads includes historical figures like Betsy Ross and Paul Revere, characters from “Star Wars” and “Star Trek”, and even British royalty like the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (“William and Kate”). The name PEZ comes from the first, middle and last letters of “Pfefferminz”, the German word for “peppermint”.

24 Boot the ball : ERR

That would be baseball …

25 Wall St. specialist : ARB

An arbitrageur (arb.) is someone one who profits from the purchase of securities in one market and the subsequent sale in another, by taking advantage of price discrepancies across markets.

26 Fill to the gills : SATE

“Sate” is a variant of the older word “satiate”. Both terms can mean either to satisfy an appetite fully, or to eat to excess.

28 __-Wan Kenobi : OBI

Obi-Wan Kenobi is one of the more beloved of the “Star Wars” characters. Kenobi was portrayed by two fabulous actors in the series of films. As a young man he is played by Scottish actor Ewan McGregor, and as an older man he is played by Alec Guinness.

31 *Evil Cinderella sibling : UGLY STEPSISTER

The folktale usually known as “Cinderella” was first published by French author Charles Perrault in 1697, although it was later included by the Brothers Grimm in their famous 1812 collection. The storyline of the tale may date back as far as the days of Ancient Greece. A common alternative title to the story is “The Little Glass Slipper”.

35 History Muse : CLIO

In Greek mythology, the muses are the goddesses who inspire the creation of literature and the arts. The number of muses is a subject of debate at times, but the most popular view is that there are nine:

  • Calliope (epic poetry)
  • Clio (history)
  • Erato (lyric poetry)
  • Euterpe (music)
  • Melpomene (tragedy)
  • Polyhymnia (choral poetry)
  • Terpsichore (dance)
  • Thalia (comedy)
  • Urania (astronomy)

Before the adoption of the nine muses of Greek mythology, there were originally three muses, the three Boeotian Muses. These were:

  • Mneme (memory)
  • Melete (meditation)
  • Aoede (song)
36 Sean Lennon’s mom Yoko : ONO

Sean Lennon is the only child of John Lennon and Yoko Ono, and godson of Elton John. Sean is a musician and composer, and has a band called the Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger.

37 School orgs. : PTAS

Parent-Teacher Association (PTA)

38 *Possibly the perp : UNDER SUSPICION

Perpetrator (perp)

43 Singer Carly __ Jepsen : RAE

Carly Rae Jepsen is a singer/songwriter from Mission, British Columbia. Jepsen got her start on TV’s “Canadian Idol” when she placed third in the show’s fifth season.

44 Where Cork is : EIRE

Cork is the second largest city in the Republic of Ireland. Cork has been a major port for many years, and was the last port of call for many, many Irish emigrants to America. When these Irish people reached the US it was common for them to give their point of origin as “Cork”, whereas they may have come from almost anywhere in Ireland. It’s because of this that many descendants of Irish immigrants who had been told they were from a Cork family often find out they were under a misapprehension as their ancestors just sailed from Cork.

48 Freelancer’s enc. : SAE

An SAE is a “stamped, addressed envelope”. An SASE is a “self-addressed, stamped envelope”.

57 MacFarlane of “Family Guy” : SETH

Seth MacFarlane is best known for creating the very successful (although they don’t get my vote!) animated TV shows “Family Guy” and “American Dad!”. My kids love ’em …

58 Lane at the Daily Planet : LOIS

The “Daily Planet” is the fictional newspaper for which Clark Kent and Lois Lane work in the “Superman” universe. Clark and Lois’ editor-in-chief is Perry White.

60 Part of un opéra : ACTE

In French, “un opéra” (an opera) usually comprises several “actes” (acts).

61 “The African Queen” screenwriter James : AGEE

James Agee was a noted American film critic and screenwriter. Agee wrote an autobiographical novel “A Death in the Family” that won him his Pulitzer in 1958, albeit posthumously. He was also one of the screenwriters for the 1951 classic movie “The African Queen”.

“The African Queen” is a 1935 novel by C. S. Forester that was adapted into a very successful 1951 film of the same name starring Katherine Hepburn and Humphrey Bogart. The title refers to a steam-powered launch that travels the Ulanga River. The story is set during World War I. At the climax of the tale, the African Queen is used as a makeshift torpedo to sink a German gunboat (spoiler!).

63 With 64-Across, NBC drama … or, in four parts, a hint to the answers to starred clues : THIS …. 64 See 63-Across : … IS US

“This Is Us” is a television drama that debuted in 2016. The storyline centers on three siblings and their parents. Two of the siblings are the surviving members of a triplet pregnancy. The parents decide to adopt a child born on the same day as the surviving siblings. The adopting family is white, and the adopted child is black.

Down 4 Succotash kernel : CORN

The main ingredients in succotash are corn and lima beans, although in parts of the South, succotash can be made with any collection of vegetables prepared with lima beans and topped with butter.

5 Attic accumulation : COBWEBS

An attic or loft is a room or space located below the roof of a building. The term “attic” is a shortened form of “attic story”, the uppermost story or level of a house. This term “attic story” originally applied to a low, decorative level built on top of the uppermost story behind a building’s decorative facade. This use of decoration at the top of buildings was common in ancient Greece, and was particularly important in the Attica style. That Attica style was so called because it originated in the historical region of Attica that encompassed the city of Athens. And that’s how our attics are linked to ancient Greece.

6 “57 Varieties” brand : HEINZ

The HJ Heinz Company is an American concern that is based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. The company was founded in 1869 by Henry John Heinz. It was Heinz himself who came up with the marketing slogan of “57 Varieties”. The “57” really doesn’t have any relevance to the range of products available as Heinz chose the “5” because it was his lucky number, and the “7” because it was his wife’s lucky number.

8 Possum in comics : POGO

“Pogo” is a comic strip launched in 1948 that was the creation of cartoonist Walt Kelly. The story centers on animals that live in the Okefenokee Swamp on the Georgia-Florida border, with the title character “Pogo Possum” being an anthropomorphic opossum.

10 Icy winter coating : RIME

Rime is the beautiful coating of ice that forms on surfaces like roofs, trees and grass, when cold water freezes instantly under the right conditions.

12 Media mogul Turner : TED

Ted Turner’s big initiative in the world of business was the founding of CNN, the first 24-hour cable news channel. Turner never graduated from college as he was expelled from Brown University for having a female student in his dormitory room. Years later, in 1989, Brown awarded him an honorary B.A.

15 Peace Nobelist Sakharov : ANDREI

Andrei Sakharov was a Soviet nuclear physicist, and in his later life a human rights activist. Sakharov participated in the USSR’s program to develop the country’s first atomic bomb, and was an even more crucial contributor to the development of the devastating hydrogen bomb. By the fifties, he was concerned about the consequences of his work, and in the sixties Sakharov started to become active, raising awkward questions not appreciated by the Soviet administration. He was banned from further work with the military as a consequence, and later found himself under constant police surveillance and harassment. He was then moved from Moscow and put into internal exile in Gorky. It was only under Mikhail Gorbachev’s leadership, that Sakharov was able to return home to Moscow. Sakharov was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1975.

20 Grand Ole __ : OPRY

The Grand Ole Opry started out as a radio show in 1925 originally called the WSM “Barn Dance”. In 1927, the “Barn Dance” radio show was broadcast in a slot after an NBC production called “Musical Appreciation Hour”, a collection of classical works including Grand Opera. In a December show, the host of “Barn Dance” announced, “For the past hour, we have been listening to music taken largely from Grand Opera. From now on we will present the ‘Grand Ole Opry'”. That name was used for the radio show from then on.

28 Director Preminger : OTTO

Otto Preminger was noted for directing films that pushed the envelope in terms of subject matter, at least in the fifties and sixties. Great examples would be 1955’s “The Man with the Golden Arm” that dealt with drug addiction, 1959’s “Anatomy of a Murder” that dealt with rape, and 1962’s “Advise and Consent” that dealt with homosexuality. If you’ve seen these films, you’ll have noticed that the references are somewhat indirect and disguised, in order to get past the censors.

29 Noggin : BEAN

Slang terms for “head” are “bean”, “coconut”, “gourd” and “noggin”.

30 W-2 agcy. : IRS

Form W-2 is provided by US employers to their employees by January 31 each year. The form reports wages paid to the employees and taxes withheld.

31 Bone parallel to the radius : ULNA

The radius and ulna are bones in the forearm. If you hold the palm of your hand up in front of you, the radius is the bone on the “thumb-side” of the arm, and the ulna is the bone on the “pinkie-side”.

32 “The Immoralist” author André : GIDE

André Gide was an author from Paris who won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1947. His works weren’t popular with the Roman Catholic church, and were placed on the Index of Forbidden Books in 1952.

35 Mangy mutt : CUR

Mange is a skin disorder in animals caused by parasitic mites that embed themselves in the skin, perhaps living in hair follicles. The same disorder in humans is called scabies.

42 Penny : CENT

The official name of our smallest denomination coin is “cent”, and our use of the word “penny” is just a colloquialism derived from the British coin of the same name. In the UK, the plural of penny is “pence”, whereas we have “pennies” in our pockets.

46 Instruments among the reeds : OBOES

The oboe is perhaps my favorite of the reed instruments. The name “oboe” comes from the French “hautbois” which means “high wood”.

47 Singer LaBelle : PATTI

“Patti LaBelle” is the stage name of singer Patricia Holt-Edwards from Philadelphia. She started her career in the sixties as the lead singer of the vocal group Patti LaBelle and the Bluebelles, later changing its name to simply “LaBelle”. When the group disbanded in 1976, Patti launched a remarkably successful solo career.

48 Canoodles, in Britain : SNOGS

“Snogging” is British slang of unknown origin that dates back to the end of WWII. The term is used for “kissing and cuddling”, what we call “making out” over here in the US.

49 French bye word : ADIEU

“Adieu” is the French for “goodbye, farewell”, from “à Dieu” meaning “to God”. The plural of “adieu” is “adieux”.

50 Letters after ars : ESSES

In the alphabet, the letter R (ar) precedes the letter S (ess).

53 Future atty.’s hurdle : LSAT

Law School Admission Test (LSAT)

54 Solidarity leader Walesa : LECH

Lech Walesa worked as an electrician in the Gdansk Shipyards in Poland. Walesa was active in the trade union movement in the days when unions were not welcome behind the Iron Curtain. His efforts resulted in the founding of Solidarity, the first independent trade union in Soviet-controlled territory. For his work, Walesa was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1983, and in 1990 he became the first democratically elected President of Poland. He has lost support in Poland in recent years, but he is a very popular booking on the international speaking circuit.

55 Jai __ : ALAI

Jai alai is a game that derives from Basque pelota, and is known as “cesta-punta” in the Basque language. The name “jai alai” translates from the original Basque as “merry festival”.

56 Republican org. : GOP

The Republican Party has had the nickname Grand Old Party (GOP) since 1875. That said, the phrase was coined in the “Congressional Record” as “this gallant old party”. The moniker was changed to “grand old party” in 1876 in an article in the “Cincinnati Commercial”. The Republican Party’s elephant mascot dates back to an 1874 cartoon drawn by Thomas Nast for “Harper’s Weekly”. The Democrat’s donkey was already an established symbol. Nast drew a donkey clothed in a lion’s skin scaring away the other animals. One of the scared animals was an elephant, which Nast labeled “The Republican Vote”.

Read on, or …
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Complete List of Clues/Answers Across

1 After-bath powder : TALC
5 Crunchy potato snack : CHIP
9 Stew (over) : FRET
13 Cookie in some Breyers Cookies & Cream : OREO
14 Vintner’s prefix : OENO-
15 Still in the running : ALIVE
16 “The Twelve Days of Christmas” tree : PEAR
17 Crooner Crosby : BING
18 Entitled : NAMED
19 *Anonymous Arlington honoree : UNKNOWN SOLDIER
22 Be worthwhile : PAY
23 Dispenser candy : PEZ
24 Boot the ball : ERR
25 Wall St. specialist : ARB
26 Fill to the gills : SATE
28 __-Wan Kenobi : OBI
31 *Evil Cinderella sibling : UGLY STEPSISTER
35 History Muse : CLIO
36 Sean Lennon’s mom Yoko : ONO
37 School orgs. : PTAS
38 *Possibly the perp : UNDER SUSPICION
43 Singer Carly __ Jepsen : RAE
44 Where Cork is : EIRE
45 Bottom line : NET
46 Rowing implement : OAR
47 Criticize harshly, as a film : PAN
48 Freelancer’s enc. : SAE
51 *Entryway conveniences for rain deflectors : UMBRELLA STANDS
56 Best man’s best friend, often : GROOM
57 MacFarlane of “Family Guy” : SETH
58 Lane at the Daily Planet : LOIS
59 Makes eyes at : OGLES
60 Part of un opéra : ACTE
61 “The African Queen” screenwriter James : AGEE
62 Dogs, to dog owners : PETS
63 With 64-Across, NBC drama … or, in four parts, a hint to the answers to starred clues : THIS ….
64 See 63-Across : … IS US

Down

1 Refresh, as a cup of coffee : TOP UP
2 Sports venue : ARENA
3 Hardly watertight : LEAKY
4 Succotash kernel : CORN
5 Attic accumulation : COBWEBS
6 “57 Varieties” brand : HEINZ
7 Overnight places : INNS
8 Possum in comics : POGO
9 Natural aptitude : FLAIR
10 Icy winter coating : RIME
11 In any way : EVER
12 Media mogul Turner : TED
15 Peace Nobelist Sakharov : ANDREI
20 Grand Ole __ : OPRY
21 “Shall we?” response : LET’S
25 Burn soother : ALOE
26 Sight or smell : SENSE
27 Per unit : A POP
28 Director Preminger : OTTO
29 Noggin : BEAN
30 W-2 agcy. : IRS
31 Bone parallel to the radius : ULNA
32 “The Immoralist” author André : GIDE
33 Sightseeing outing : TOUR
34 Roasting rod : SPIT
35 Mangy mutt : CUR
39 Provides with more weapons : REARMS
40 Beget : SIRE
41 Reduced to rubble, as by a fire : IN ASHES
42 Penny : CENT
46 Instruments among the reeds : OBOES
47 Singer LaBelle : PATTI
48 Canoodles, in Britain : SNOGS
49 French bye word : ADIEU
50 Letters after ars : ESSES
51 Advocate : URGE
52 Shed skin : MOLT
53 Future atty.’s hurdle : LSAT
54 Solidarity leader Walesa : LECH
55 Jai __ : ALAI
56 Republican org. : GOP

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Constructed by: Matthew Sewell
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Theme: None

Read on, or jump to …
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Bill’s time: 13m 00s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies Across 13 Theatrical potpourri : REVUE

“Revue” is the French word for “review”.

The French term “pot pourri” literally translates to “rotten pot”, but in France it used to mean “stew”. Over time, the term “potpourri” evolved in English usage to mean a “medley”, and eventually a mixture of dried flowers and spices.

16 Multicolored solidarity emblem : PRIDE FLAG

The best-known rainbow flag is the one representing gay pride. Such usage of the rainbow flag was popularized in 1978 by artist Gilbert Baker. The varying colors of the flag represent the diversity of the gay community.

17 Modern gamer’s headset, briefly : VR GOGGLES

Virtual reality (VR)

19 Org. concerned with gaps, at times : ADA

American Dental Association (ADA)

20 Cavalry member : LANCEMAN

Lancers (also “lancemen”) were a special type of cavalry soldier, ones who fought with lances!

21 “Between the World and Me” author Ta-Nehisi __ : COATES

Ta-Nehisi Coates is a journalist and author from Baltimore, Maryland. His 2015 book “Between the World and Me” won that year’s National Book Award for Nonfiction. Coates also made a name for himself in the world of comic books, and is the writer of a “Black Panther” series for Marvel Comics.

24 Latin primer word : AMO

“Amo, amas, amat” translates from Latin as “I love, you love, he/she/it loves”.

25 Singer who made Georgia famous : RAY CHARLES

Ray Charles came up with his stage name by dropping the family name from his real moniker “Ray Charles Robinson”. His life was a wild ride, and was well-represented in the excellent 2004 biopic called “Ray” starring Jamie Foxx in the title role. Ray Charles was married twice and fathered 12 children with nine different women. As I said, a wild ride …

“Georgia on My Mind” is a song composed in 1930 by Hoagy Carmichael and Stuart Gorrell. Gorrell’s lyrics refer to the state of Georgia, although there is a common assertion that the reference is instead to Hoagy’s sister Georgia Carmichael. Hoagy himself assures us that the former is the case, in his second autobiography “Sometimes I Wonder”. Hoagy Carmichael himself made the first recording, in 1930, but most famous is the 1960 cover version by Ray Charles. “Georgia on My Mind” was made the official state song of Georgia in 1979.

27 TV warrior princess : XENA

The Xena character, played by New Zealander Lucy Lawless, was introduced in a made-for-TV movie called “Hercules and the Amazon Women”. Lawless reprised the role in a series called “Hercules: The Legendary Journeys”. Xena became so popular that a series was built around her character, with Lawless retained for the title role. The fictional Xena supposedly came from the “non-fictional” Greek city of Amphipolis.

34 San Joaquin Valley wine region : MADERA

Madera AVA is a wine region at the heart of the San Joaquin Valley in the Central Valley of California. 10% of all of California’s wine grapes are grown in Madera.

39 Fast-paced highlight video : SIZZLE REEL

A showreel (also “demo reel” or “sizzle reel”) is a short piece of edited footage used to show off a person’s work. Showreels are usually 2-3 minutes in length, and will often accompany a résumé.

43 Adjective for Scotty on “Star Trek” : WEE

In the “Star Trek” series on television and in the movies, the colorful character named Scotty was played by the Canadian actor James Doohan. Doohan joined the Royal Canadian Artillery at the start of WWII, and participated in the D-Day Invasion of Normandy. After surviving the landing, that same day Doohan was shot by one of his own men in a tragic mishap. Doohan was hit six times, with a bullet to his chest stopped by a silver cigarette case he was carrying. One of Doohan’s fingers was shot off in the incident. He managed to conceal that injury during his acting career.

44 Baker, for one : STREET

In the “Sherlock Holmes” stories written by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, the famous detective has lodgings at 221b Baker Street in London. Holmes shares rooms with his friend and chronicler Dr. Watson. The landlady in the residence is the amiable Mrs. Hudson.

47 Cy Young Award stat : ERA

Earned run average (ERA)

Cy Young was a pitcher in the major leagues from 1890-1911. Young is remembered for pitching the first perfect game of baseball’s modern era. Soon after he died in 1955, the Cy Young Award was created and is presented to the best pitcher in each baseball season.

53 Hitchcock antagonist : BATES

The top 5 movie villains in the American Film Institute’s list “100 Years … 100 Heroes & Villains” are:

  1. Dr. Hannibal Lecter in “The Silence of the Lambs”
  2. Norman Bates in “Psycho”
  3. Darth Vader in “The Empire Strikes Back”
  4. The Wicked Witch of the West in “The Wizard of Oz”
  5. Nurse Ratched in “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”

The classic Alfred Hitchcock suspense film “Psycho” released in 1960 is based on a 1959 novel of the same name by Robert Bloch. The Bloch novel in turn is loosely based on actual crimes committed by murderer and grave robber Ed Gein. The female protagonist is named Mary Crane in the novel, but that name was changed to Marion Crane in the movie. Marion Crane, portrayed by Janet Leigh, died in a celebrated and terrifying shower scene

55 Bizarre : OUTRE

The word “outré” meaning “unconventional, bizarre” comes to us from French, as one might imagine. It is derived from the verb “outrer” meaning “to overdo, exaggerate”. “Outrer” is also the ultimate root of our word “outrage”.

“Bizarre” is a French word, with the same meaning in French as English. However, back in the 16th century, “bizarre” used to mean “handsome, brave” in French. So that’s what my wife means when she refers to me as “bizarre” …

56 Go caving : SPELUNK

“Spelunking” is an American term for recreational caving, although the word has Latin roots (“spelunca” is the Latin for “cave”). The term originated in the 1940s in New England when it was adopted by a group of men who explored caves in the area.

Down 1 Nordic cured salmon appetizer : GRAVLAX

“Gravlax” is the Swedish name for a dish consisting of raw salmon cured in salt, sugar and dill. Gravlax dates back to the Middle Ages when fishermen fermented salted salmon by burying it in the sand above the high-tide line. The name gravlax comes from the Scandinavian “grav” meaning “grave, hole in the ground” and “lax” meaning “salmon”.

3 French city on the Rhone : AVIGNON

Avignon is a city in the southeast of France on the Rhône river. Avignon is sometimes called the “City of Popes” as it was home to seven popes during the Catholic schism from 1309 to 1423.

4 Hardy red hog : DUROC

Duroc is a breed of domestic pig, red in color and with a large frame, and a tendency to be quite aggressive. The breed originated in New England and supposedly takes its name from a thoroughbred stallion that was famous around 1800.

5 Honoree of Springsteen’s 2006 “We Shall Overcome” album : SEEGER

“We Shall Overcome: The Seeger Sessions” is 2006 studio album released by Bruce Springsteen. Despite the Seeger name being in the title, Seeger did not write any of the songs on the album. Rather, the tracks are Springsteen’s interpretation of folk and protest songs that were made popular by Seeger. Examples of those songs are “We Shall Overcome”, “Shenandoah” and “Froggie Went A-Courtin’”.

6 __ de Boulogne: Paris park : BOIS

Bois de Boulogne is a large park located on the western outskirts of Paris, France. It covers over 2,000 acres, making it about 2.5 times the size of Central Park in New York City. Life in the Bois de Boulogne is very wholesome during the day, with the park full of joggers, people on picnics and boaters, but at night the park is a prominent red-light district.

7 “Submitted for your approval … ” first name : ROD

“Submitted for your approval … ” is an oft-quoted phrase used by Rod Serling in his introduction to some episodes of “The Twilight Zone”. Even though Serling impressionists use the phrase a lot, Serling himself used the phrase in only three episodes.

Rodman “Rod” Serling was the man behind, and in front of, the iconic science-fiction TV series “The Twilight Zone”. Serling used a lot of the shows he created to advance his strongly held views against war (he was a soldier in WWII), against racism and against censorship.

12 “Place de la Concorde” artist : DEGAS

Edgar Degas was a French artist who was famous for both his paintings and his sculptures. Some of Degas’ most beautiful works feature female ballet dancers, and others depict women bathing.

“Place de la Concorde” is an 1876 oil painting by French artist Edgar Degas. Featured in the work are Degas’ friend Ludovic-Napoléon Lepic, as well as Lepic’s two daughters and his dog. There is also an 1871 Degas called “Count Lepic and His Daughters” that features the same subjects. You can see “Place de la Concorde” in the Hermitage Museum in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

18 1975 ABC debut, initially : GMA

“Good Morning America” (GMA) is ABC’s morning show, and has been since 1975. There was even a spin-off show called “Good Afternoon America”, although that only lasted for a few months in 2012.

21 Dear, to Donizetti : CARO

Gaetano Donizetti was a composer from the Lombardy region of Italy. He is best known for his operas, of which he wrote almost seventy. The most famous of these is probably “Lucia di Lammermoor” (1835).

31 Trimming tool : ADZE

An adze (also “adz”) is similar to an axe, but is different in that the blade of an adze is set at right angles to the tool’s shaft. An axe blade is set in line with the shaft.

32 Lat neighbor : DELT

The deltoid “muscle” is actually a group of muscles, the ones that cover the shoulder and create the roundness under the skin. The deltoids (delts) are triangular in shape resembling the Greek letter delta, hence the name.

33 “And fly, __ evil intercept thy flight”: Milton : ERE

Here are some lines from John Milton’s “Paradise Lost”:

… This report,
These tidings carry to the anointed King;
And fly, ere evil intercept thy flight.’

“Paradise Lost” is an epic poem written by Englishman John Milton. It is indeed an epic work, published originally in ten volumes with over ten thousand lines of verse. The “paradise” that is “lost” is the Garden of Eden, from which Adam and Eve were expelled by God in the “Fall of Man”.

37 Best __ : WESTERN

Best Western is a very large hotel chain in the world, with over 4,000 locations. The chain is a little unusual in that all of its properties are independently-owned franchises, with none being company-owned. Best Western was founded in 1946 and grew out of a small network of independent hotel operators who informally agreed to make referrals to each other’s properties.

39 “The Post” co-star : STREEP

Meryl Streep has had more nominations for an Academy Award than any other actor, which is both a tribute to her talent and the respect she has earned in the industry. I am not a huge fan of her earlier works but some of her recent movies are now on my list of all-time favorites. I recommend “Mamma Mia!” (you’ll either love it or hate it!), “Julie & Julia”, “It’s Complicated” and ”Hope Springs”.

“The Post” is a 2017 historical drama directed by Steven Spielberg that recounts the true story of attempts by “The Washington Post” to publish the Pentagon Papers. Tom Hanks plays the paper’s executive editor Ben Bradlee, and Meryl Streep play the paper’s owner Katharine Graham. I loved this film …

Daniel Ellsberg is a former military analyst, who famously became very disillusioned with the Vietnam War. While still working as an analyst, he made copies of classified documents related to the Johnson administration’s conduct of the war. The documents, known as the Pentagon Papers, demonstrated that the administration knew early on that the Vietnam War was essentially “unwinnable” and that continued fighting would lead to higher numbers of casualties than were being projected in the public arena. Ellsberg ended up in court charged with espionage, but all charges were dropped when it was revealed that the Nixon administration had used illegal methods to bolster its case against the defendant.

40 Taloned predators : ERNS

The ern (sometimes “erne”) is also known as the white-tailed eagle or the sea eagle.

42 Portugal’s capital, locally : LISBOA

In Portuguese, “Lisboa” (Lisbon) and “Porto” (Oporto) are the two largest cities in Portugal.

Lisbon is the capital of Portugal. Lisbon is the westernmost capital city in Europe, and indeed is the westernmost large city on the continent. It is also the oldest city in Western Europe, and was founded hundreds of years before London, Paris and Rome.

44 Lowly laborers : SERFS

A serf was a member of the lowest feudal class, someone attached to land owned by a lord. “Serf” comes from the Latin “servus”, meaning “slave”.

46 Hawaiian parties : LUAUS

Nowadays the word “luau” denotes almost any kind of party on the Hawaiian Islands, but to the purist a luau is a feast that always includes a serving of poi, the bulbous underground stems of taro.

50 Delta hub code : ATL

Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport is the world’s busiest airport, as measured by passenger traffic. Atlanta has had that distinction since 1998, and was the world’s busiest in terms of take-offs and landings from 2005 until 2013. Over 50% of Atlanta’s traffic comes from Delta Air Lines.

Delta was the world’s largest airline for a while (after merging with Northwest Airlines in 2008) and is also the oldest airline still operating in the US. Delta’s roots go back to 1924 before it started carrying passengers and was called Huff Daland Dusters, a crop dusting company based in Macon, Georgia. The name Delta Air Service was introduced in 1928.

51 Sch. with a Schuylkill campus : PSU

Pennsylvania State University (PSU) was founded in 1855 as the Farmer’s High School of Pennsylvania. Penn State is listed as one of the “Public Ivies”, a public university that offers a quality of education comparable to that of the Ivy League.

52 Many a Ben & Jerry’s flavor : PUN

Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield did a correspondence course on ice-cream making in 1977 given by Pennsylvania State University’s Creamery. The following year they opened an ice cream parlor in an old gas station in Burlington, Vermont. Today Ben & Jerry’s has locations in over 20 countries around the world, and theirs was the first brand ice-cream to go into space.

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Complete List of Clues/Answers Across

1 Annual gown renters : GRADS
6 Dwelled (on) : BROODED
13 Theatrical potpourri : REVUE
14 Got some air, say : TOOK FIVE
15 Lit : AFIRE
16 Multicolored solidarity emblem : PRIDE FLAG
17 Modern gamer’s headset, briefly : VR GOGGLES
19 Org. concerned with gaps, at times : ADA
20 Cavalry member : LANCEMAN
21 “Between the World and Me” author Ta-Nehisi __ : COATES
24 Latin primer word : AMO
25 Singer who made Georgia famous : RAY CHARLES
27 TV warrior princess : XENA
29 Classic paper name : HERALD
30 Restored : MADE WHOLE
34 San Joaquin Valley wine region : MADERA
35 Anguished protest : YOWL
39 Fast-paced highlight video : SIZZLE REEL
43 Adjective for Scotty on “Star Trek” : WEE
44 Baker, for one : STREET
45 Most delicate : FRAILEST
47 Cy Young Award stat : ERA
48 Two-piece ensembles : PANTSUITS
49 Sports show hosts, often : RECAPPERS
53 Hitchcock antagonist : BATES
54 Had no doubt : FELT SURE
55 Bizarre : OUTRE
56 Go caving : SPELUNK
57 Perfectly harmonious : AS ONE

Down

1 Nordic cured salmon appetizer : GRAVLAX
2 Provide another context for : REFRAME
3 French city on the Rhone : AVIGNON
4 Hardy red hog : DUROC
5 Honoree of Springsteen’s 2006 “We Shall Overcome” album : SEEGER
6 __ de Boulogne: Paris park : BOIS
7 “Submitted for your approval … ” first name : ROD
8 Fine, in old slang : OKE
9 Not right : OFF
10 Widened : DILATED
11 Gets by : EVADES
12 “Place de la Concorde” artist : DEGAS
14 Fighting involving excavated shelters : TRENCH WARFARE
16 Word with safe or out : PLAY
18 1975 ABC debut, initially : GMA
21 Dear, to Donizetti : CARO
22 Dictated : ORAL
23 Urban shortcut : ALLEY
26 Devious laugh : HEH
28 Bowl over : AMAZE
31 Trimming tool : ADZE
32 Lat neighbor : DELT
33 “And fly, __ evil intercept thy flight”: Milton : ERE
34 Wonder : MIRACLE
36 Credit as an inspiration : OWE IT TO
37 Best __ : WESTERN
38 Chin stroker’s words : LET’S SEE
39 “The Post” co-star : STREEP
40 Taloned predators : ERNS
41 Take off the table? : EAT
42 Portugal’s capital, locally : LISBOA
44 Lowly laborers : SERFS
46 Hawaiian parties : LUAUS
48 Exec’s private jet, say : PERK
50 Delta hub code : ATL
51 Sch. with a Schuylkill campus : PSU
52 Many a Ben & Jerry’s flavor : PUN

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Constructed by: Rich Proulx
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: T-Bird

We join the 21 letters T in the grid, and that draws the outline of a BIRD:

  • 58A Classic car … and a hint to the hidden image you can draw using 21 identical squares in this grid : T-BIRD

Read on, or jump to …
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Bill’s time: 12m 57s

Bill’s errors: 3

  • DUBITABLE (debatable!!)
  • CULTIST (celtist!)
  • HAJI (haja!)
Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies Across 1 Confidentially informs : BCCS

A blind carbon copy (bcc) is a copy of a document or message that is sent to someone without other recipients of the message knowing about that extra copy.

13 Solar panel site : ROOF

Solar panels are arrays of solar cells that make use of what’s known as the photovoltaic effect. We are more likely to have learned about the photoelectric effect in school, in which electrons were ejected from the surface of some materials when it was exposed to light or other forms of radiation. The photovoltaic effect is related but different. Instead of being electrons ejected from the surface, in the photovoltaic effect electrons move around in the material creating a difference in voltage.

14 Chili partner : CARNE

The full name of the dish that is often called simply “chili” is “chili con carne”, Spanish for “peppers with meat”. The dish was created by immigrants from the Spanish Canary Islands in the city of San Antonio, Texas (a city which the islanders founded). The San Antonio Chili Stand was a popular attraction at the 1893 Chicago World’s Fair, and that stand introduced the dish to the rest of America and to the world.

15 Words that can precede and follow “what” : IT IS

It is what it is.

16 BB, e.g. : AMMO

A BB gun is an air pistol or rifle that shoots birdshot known as BBs. Birdshot comes in a number of different sizes, from size 9 (0.070″ in diameter) to size FF (.230″). Birdshot that is size BB (0.180″ in diameter) gives the airgun its name.

17 “Waiting for Lefty” playwright : ODETS

Clifford Odets was a playwright, screenwriter and director from Philadelphia. “Waiting for Lefty” was the first play by Clifford Odets that made it to stage, in 1935. The storyline deals with cab drivers who are planning a strike. Famously, the play breaks through the “fourth wall” by placing actors within the audience who react to the action taking place on the stage.

18 Native of Riga : LETT

Latvia is one of the former Soviet Socialist Republics (SSRs). People from Latvia are called Letts.

Riga is the capital city of Latvia. The historical center of Riga is a UNESCO World Heritage Site, declared as such because of the city’s magnificent examples of Art Nouveau architecture.

19 FCC chairman Ajit __ : PAI

Ajit Pai is a lawyer who was appointed to the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) by President Obama, and who was designated the FCC’s chairman by President Trump. Pai is seen by most as the person behind the repeal of the Net neutrality rules put in place by the Obama administration.

20 Bichon __: dogs with fluffy coats : FRISES

The breed of dog known as a Bichon Frisé is characteristically small and fluffy.

21 Early smartphone : TREO

The Treo is a smartphone that was originally developed by a company called Handspring. Handspring was bought by Palm Inc. Subsequently, the Treo was phased out and replaced by the Palm Pre.

22 Mole sauce chili : ANCHO

An ancho is a dried poblano pepper that is used in Mexican cuisine. The poblano is a mild chili.

Mole sauce comes in various guises, with “mole negro” including everyone’s favorite ingredient, namely chocolate.

24 Classic guitar, briefly : STRAT

The Stratocaster (often “Strat”) is an electric guitar made by Fender since 1954. The company that made Fender electric guitars was founded in Fullerton, California in 1946 by Leo Fender.

26 One verifying safe arrivals? : UMP

That would be baseball.

34 How some nursery-rhyme men traveled : IN A TUB

The nursery rhyme “Rub-a-Dub-Dub” dates back to at least 1798 when it was first published in London:

Rub-a-dub-dub,
Three men in a tub,
And how do you think they got there?
The butcher, the baker,
The candlestick-maker,
They all jumped out of a rotten potato,
‘Twas enough to make a man stare.

36 Outspoken chef Gordon : RAMSAY

Gordon Ramsay is a celebrity chef from Scotland who appears more on US television now than he does on British TV. Personally, I think the man is pretty obnoxious.

39 Wyatt of “People of Earth” : CENAC

Wyatt Cenac is a comedian and writer from New York City who was raised in Dallas. Cenac worked for three years as a writer for the TV show “KIng of the Hill” before joining “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart” as writer and correspondent.

“People of Earth” is a sci-fi comedy show on TBS. It’s all about a support group for alien abductees, as well as some of the aliens that did the abducting.

43 Monopoly piece : HOTEL

In the game of Monopoly, one can purchase a hotel by “demolishing” four houses and by paying an extra amount equal to the price of one house.

46 Open to question : DUBITABLE

Something dubitable is open to question, open to “doubt”.

48 Actress Gardner : AVA

Ava Gardner is noted for her association with some big movies, but also for her association with some big names when it came to the men in her life. In the world of film, she appeared in the likes of “Mogambo” (1953), “On the Beach” (1959), “The Night of the Iguana” (1964) and “Earthquake” (1974). The men in her life included husbands Mickey Rooney, Artie Shaw and Frank Sinatra.

49 Ursa Minor shape : LADLE

Ursa Minor (Latin for “Smaller Bear”) sits right beside the constellation Draco (Latin for “Dragon”). Ursa Minor used to be considered the wing of Draco, and so was once called “Dragon’s Wing”. The tail of the “Smaller Bear” might also be considered as the handle of a ladle, and so the constellation is often referred to as the Little Dipper.

51 Floss brand : ORAL-B

The Oral-B toothbrush was introduced to the world in 1950, designed by a California periodontist. The first “model” was the Oral-B 60, a name given to reflect the 60 tufts in the brush. In 1969, the Oral-B was the first toothbrush to get to the moon as it was the toothbrush of choice for the crew of the Apollo 11 spacecraft.

52 “brb” or “ttyl” : TEXT

Be right back (brb)

Talk to you later (ttyl)

54 Injure again, as one’s ACL : RETEAR

The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of four major ligaments that support the knee.

57 Beethoven’s Opus 11, e.g. : TRIO

Beethoven’s “Piano Trio in B-flat major, Op. 11” was written and 1797, when the composer was still in his twenties. It is scored for piano, clarinet (sometimes violine) and cello (sometimes bassoon). The work also goes by the nickname “Gassenhauer Trio”.

58 Classic car … and a hint to the hidden image you can draw using 21 identical squares in this grid : T-BIRD

Ford manufactured the Thunderbird (T-Bird) from 1955 to 2005. Originally a two-seater sporty convertible, the T-Bird was introduced as a competitor to Chevrolet’s new sports car, the Corvette.

60 Mid-month day : IDES

There were three important days in each month of the old Roman calendar. These days originally depended on the cycles of the moon but were eventually “fixed” by law. “Kalendae” were the first days of each month, originally the days of the new moon. “Nonae” were originally the days of the half moon. And “idus” (the ides) was originally the day of the full moon, eventually fixed at the 15th day of a month. Well, actually the ides were the 15th day of March, May, July and October. For all other months, the ides fell on the 13th. Go figure …

64 Ferrara family name : ESTE

“Ferrara” is the name of a province and its capital city in northern Italy. The city is located just 30 miles northeast of Bologna. The city was also home to a branch of the princely House of Este during the 14th and 15th centuries.

65 Cabs are among them : REDS

The cabernet sauvignon grape has been around since the 17th century, and is the result of a chance crossing in southwestern France of the cabernet franc and sauvignon blanc grapes.

Down 2 First Olympic gymnast to receive a 10 : COMANECI

Nadia Comaneci won three golds in the 1976 Summer Olympics and was the first gymnast to be awarded a perfect score of a ten in the gymnastics competition. Comaneci published a book called “Letters to a Young Gymnast” in 2003, and now lives in the United States.

3 Where Vulcans congregate? : COMIC-CON

San Diego’s Comic-Con was founded in 1970 as the Golden State Comic Book Convention. Held over four days each summer, apparently Comic-Con is the largest show in North America.

Vulcans are an alien race in the “Star Trek” franchise. The most famous (half-) Vulcan is Spock, played by Leonard Nimoy. Spock’s father is a Vulcan, and his mother is human.

4 BART stop : SFO

San Francisco International Airport (SFO) served as the main base of operations for Virgin America (sold to Alaska Airlines), and is also the maintenance hub for United Airlines.

Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) is a commuter rail system serving the San Francisco Bay Area (and, indeed, my home town).

5 Exemplar of cruelty : SADIST

A sadist is someone who derives pleasure from inflicting pain, with that pleasure often being sexual in nature. The term “sadist” comes from the Marquis de Sade, who was known to exhibit such tendencies.

6 “The Good Wife” Emmy winner Carrie : PRESTON

Carrie Preston is an actress from Macon, Georgia who plays Elsbeth Tascioni, a wonderful character on the TV show “The Good Wife” and its sequel “The Good Fight”.

8 Championship ice dancer __ Virtue : TESSA

Tessa Virtue is a Canadian ice dancer who won the 2010 and 2018 Olympic gold along with her partner Scott Moir. Virtue and Moir have been skating together since 1997, when they were seven and nine years old respectively. That makes them the longest-standing Canadian ice dance team in history.

9 Arcade goof : TILT

In a game of pinball, some players get an irresistible urge to “nudge” the machine . Such a nudge, a movement of the machine designed to influence the path taken by the ball, is called a “tilt”. Most pinball machines have sensors designed to detect a tilt, and when activated a “tilt” warning light comes on and the player’s controls are temporarily disabled.

12 Bars in court : ESTOPS

The term “estop” means to block or stop by using some legal device. “Estop” comes from Old French, in which “estopper” means “to stop up” or “to impede”.

14 __ anglais: English horn : COR

The English horn is also known by its French name “cor anglais”. It is a double-reed woodwind instrument.

20 Augur : FORETELL

The verb “to augur” means “to bode”, to serve as an omen. The term comes from the name of religious officials in Ancient Rome called augurs whose job it was to interpret signs and omens.

23 Public school advocate Mann : HORACE

Horace Mann was Massachusetts politician, and the first Secretary of the Massachusetts State Board of Education. Mann made sweeping educational reforms in the state, with other states around the country adopting many of the policies he developed. Such was his influence that he is known by historians as the “Father of the Common School Movement”. And as an aside, Mann was brother-in-law to author Nathaniel Hawthorne.

33 Muslim pilgrim : HAJI

“Haji” (also “Hajji” and “Hadji”) is the term used for someone who has made a pilgrimage to Mecca, and it is sometimes also used as a form of address for such a person. The journey itself goes by the name “haj”, “hajj” or “hadj”.

37 Much canned tuna : ALBACORE

Skipjack tuna would be called medium-sized, growing to about three feet long. Albacore tuna is a little larger.

42 Fillets : DEBONES

A fillet is a boneless cut of meat or fish. The term comes from the Old French “filet” meaning “small thread, filament”. Apparently we applied the term to food as the piece of fish or meat was tied up with string after it was boned. Here in the US, we tend to use the French spelling “filet”.

50 Bandleader Shaw : ARTIE

Artie Shaw was a composer, bandleader and jazz clarinetist. Shaw’s real name was Arthur Jacob Arshawsky, born in New York City in 1910. One of his many claims to fame is that he (a white bandleader) hired Billie Holiday (a black vocalist) and toured the segregated South in the late thirties. Holiday chose to leave the band though, due to hostility from Southern audiences back then. Artie Shaw was married eight times in all. The list of his wives includes the actresses Lana Turner and Ava Gardner, as well as Betty Kern, daughter of songwriter Jerome Kern.

53 Cornhole turn : TOSS

Cornhole is a game in which contestants throw bean bags towards a tilted-up platform with a hole in it. Bags that land in the hole score 3 points, and bags that land on the board score 1 point.

59 Plant owner: Abbr. : MFR

Manufacturer (mfr.)

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Complete List of Clues/Answers Across

1 Confidentially informs : BCCS
5 Skewer : SPIT
9 __ top : TUBE
13 Solar panel site : ROOF
14 Chili partner : CARNE
15 Words that can precede and follow “what” : IT IS
16 BB, e.g. : AMMO
17 “Waiting for Lefty” playwright : ODETS
18 Native of Riga : LETT
19 FCC chairman Ajit __ : PAI
20 Bichon __: dogs with fluffy coats : FRISES
21 Early smartphone : TREO
22 Mole sauce chili : ANCHO
24 Classic guitar, briefly : STRAT
26 One verifying safe arrivals? : UMP
27 New homeowner’s hire : DECORATOR
29 Heads up : RISES
31 Ball game official : SCORER
32 Like a rare baseball game : NO-HIT
34 How some nursery-rhyme men traveled : IN A TUB
36 Outspoken chef Gordon : RAMSAY
39 Wyatt of “People of Earth” : CENAC
41 Cheeky? : JOWLED
43 Monopoly piece : HOTEL
46 Open to question : DUBITABLE
48 Actress Gardner : AVA
49 Ursa Minor shape : LADLE
51 Floss brand : ORAL-B
52 “brb” or “ttyl” : TEXT
54 Injure again, as one’s ACL : RETEAR
56 Bit of baby talk : COO
57 Beethoven’s Opus 11, e.g. : TRIO
58 Classic car … and a hint to the hidden image you can draw using 21 identical squares in this grid : T-BIRD
59 Cut down : MOWN
60 Mid-month day : IDES
61 Identification assuming familiarity : IT’S ME
62 Loose : FREE
63 Whale groups : PODS
64 Ferrara family name : ESTE
65 Cabs are among them : REDS

Down

1 Some cup liners : BRA PADS
2 First Olympic gymnast to receive a 10 : COMANECI
3 Where Vulcans congregate? : COMIC-CON
4 BART stop : SFO
5 Exemplar of cruelty : SADIST
6 “The Good Wife” Emmy winner Carrie : PRESTON
7 Really scared : IN TERROR
8 Championship ice dancer __ Virtue : TESSA
9 Arcade goof : TILT
10 Embryo’s home : UTERUS
11 Sassy retort : BITE ME!
12 Bars in court : ESTOPS
14 __ anglais: English horn : COR
20 Augur : FORETELL
23 Public school advocate Mann : HORACE
25 Three-engine plane : TRIMOTOR
28 Gave __ for one’s money : A RUN
30 Fighting words : IT’S WAR!
33 Muslim pilgrim : HAJI
35 They may be written off : BAD DEBTS
37 Much canned tuna : ALBACORE
38 Like old manuscripts : YELLOWED
40 Certain worshipper : CULTIST
42 Fillets : DEBONES
43 Polite greeting gesture : HAT-TIP
44 Go too far : OVERDO
45 Approached the gate : TAXIED
47 “I’ll take a brewski” : BEER ME
50 Bandleader Shaw : ARTIE
53 Cornhole turn : TOSS
55 Lemon finish : -ADE
59 Plant owner: Abbr. : MFR

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Constructed by: Roland Huget
Edited by: Rich Norris

Today’s Reveal Answer: Poles Apart

Themed answers each include the letter sequence “POLES”, with the sequence split APART, at either end of the answer:

  • 58A In complete opposition … and a feature of the four other longest answers : POLES APART
  • 17A *Finds flaws (in) : PICKS HOLES
  • 21A *Casino fixtures where blinds might be used : POKER TABLES
  • 36A *They make nuts healthy : POLYUNSATURATES
  • 50A *Skilled debaters : POLEMICISTS

Read on, or jump to …
… a complete list of answers

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Bill’s time: 6m 18s

Bill’s errors: 0

Today’s Wiki-est Amazonian Googlies Across 1 Award named for a goddess : CLIO

The Clio Awards are the Oscars of the advertising world and are named after Clio, the Greek Muse of History. Clio was also the recorder of great deeds, the proclaimer and celebrator of great accomplishments and a source of inspiration and genius. The Clio Awards were first presented in 1959.

19 “Star Wars” sentence inverter : YODA

Yoda is one of the most beloved characters of the “Star Wars” series of films. Yoda’s voice is provided by the great modern-day puppeteer Frank Oz of “Muppets” fame.

20 Baseball bat wood : ASH

The wood of the ash tree is a hardwood, although it is relatively elastic. Famously, ash is the wood of choice for baseball bats. It is also the wood of choice for hurleys, the wooden sticks used in the Irish sport of hurling.

21 *Casino fixtures where blinds might be used : POKER TABLES

In some variants of poker, a forced bet is made by one or two players sitting to the left of the dealer. These bets are known as “blinds”, and are used instead of antes to ensure that there is some money in the pot. The player to the immediate left of the dealer posts the “small blind” (usually half the minimum bet), and the next player to the left posts the “big blind” (usually the minimum bet).

25 River through Tours : LOIRE

Tours is the largest city in the Centre region of France. Sitting on the Loire river, it is said that the people of Tours speak the “purest” form of French in the whole country. The French spoken by a local is also said to be free of any accent.

31 Citation ender, briefly : ET AL

“Et alii” (et al.) is the equivalent of “et cetera” (etc.), with “et cetera” being used in place of a list of objects, and “et alii” used for a list of names. In fact, “et al.” can stand for “et alii” (a group of males, or males and females), “et aliae” (a group of women) and “et alia” (a group of neuter nouns, or a group of people where the intent is to retain gender-neutrality).

32 Usually multilayered dessert : TORTE

A torte is a type of cake made primarily with eggs, sugar and ground nuts (but no flour).

36 *They make nuts healthy : POLYUNSATURATES

An unsaturated fat is one in which the molecules are not completely “saturated” with hydrogen atoms, i.e. there is at least one double bond, and hence at least two less hydrogen atoms. A polyunsaturated fat has more than one double bond. Double bonds create “kinks” in hydrocarbon chains, and so the fat molecules cannot pack together densely as they cool. This means that saturated fats solidify at lower temperatures than unsaturated. This is one of the main reasons that unsaturated are deemed healthier than saturated fats.

40 __ card: common phone component : SIM

Most cell phones have SIM cards these days. SIM cards hold the personal information of the subscriber, with the acronym being short for “Subscriber Identity Module”.

42 Half of sechs : DREI

In German, half of “sechs” (six) is “drei” (three).

43 Alaskan cruise sight : FJORD

A drowned valley might be called a ria or a fjord, with both formed as sea level rises. A ria is a drowned valley created by river erosion, and a fjord is a drowned valley created by glaciation.

44 Iris ring : AREOLA

An areola (sometimes “areole”) in anatomy is a small ring of color, as in the areola surrounding the nipple, and the areola surrounding the pupil of the eye. “Areola” (plural “areolae”) comes from Latin, meaning “small open space”, and is a diminutive of the Latin word “area”, meaning “open space”.

The iris is the colored part of the eye. It has an aperture in the center that can open or close depending on the level of light hitting the eye.

46 Milan’s La __ : SCALA

La Scala Opera House opened in 1778. It was built on the site of the church of Santa Maria della Scala, which gave the theater its Italian name “Teatro alla Scala”.

49 The Huskies of the NCAA’s Big East : UCONN

The UConn Huskies are the sports teams of the University of Connecticut. I wasn’t able to uncover the derivation of the “Huskies” moniker. Although it is true that “UConn” sounds like “Yukon”, that isn’t the derivation of the “Huskies” nickname. The school didn’t become the University of Connecticut (UConn) until 1939, and the Huskies name has been used since 1933.

50 *Skilled debaters : POLEMICISTS

“Polemic” can also be spelled “polemical”. Either way, the term describes something controversial. The word came into English from the Greek “polemos” meaning “war”. The derivative term “polemicist” can be used to describe someone who can make a skilled and aggressive attack on the opinions of another.

54 Tank contents : GAS

The gas pump was actually around before there were cars on the road. The first gas pump was the invention of one Sylvanus Bowser from Fort Wayne, Indiana. His first pump was designed to pump kerosene for lamps and stoves, and was introduced in 1885. As automobiles became popular, he modified the design to pump gasoline. He introduced the Self-Measuring Gasoline Storage Pump in 1905. He marketed his devices all around the world, and in some parts the name “bowser” is still used sometimes to refer to fuel pumps, and indeed some fuel tankers.

60 Wild, all-night party : RAVE

As you might imagine, I’ve never been to a rave, and don’t have one upcoming in my diary. And as raves often start at 2 a.m.,then I’m unlikely ever to experience one. A rave is generally an all-night party featuring loud, electronically-synthesized music usually played by a DJ as opposed to a live band.

61 Tiny swimmer : AMEBA

An ameba (also “amoeba”) is a single-celled microorganism. The name comes from the Greek “amoibe”, meaning change. The name is quite apt, as the cell changes shape readily as the ameba moves, eats and reproduces.

62 Marine threat : ORCA

The taxonomic name for the killer whale is “Orcinus orca”. The use of the name “orca”, rather than “killer whale”, is becoming more and more common. The Latin word “Orcinus” means “belonging to Orcus”, with Orcus being the name for the Kingdom of the Dead.

64 Fixes : SPAYS

Our verb “to spay”, meaning “to surgically remove the ovaries of” (an animal) comes from an old Anglo-French word “espeier” meaning “to cut with a sword”.

65 Urban bane : SMOG

“Smog” is a portmanteau formed by melding “smoke” and “fog”. The term was first used to describe the air around London in the early 1900s. Several cities around the world have a reputation of being particularly smoggy. For example, the most smog-plagued city in Latin America is Mexico City, which is located in a highland “bowl” that traps industrial and vehicle pollution.

Down 1 Historic NYC club, with “The” : COPA

The Copacabana of the 1978 Barry Manilow song is the Copacabana nightclub in New York City (which is also the subject of the Frank Sinatra song “Meet Me at the Copa”). The Copa opened in 1940 and is still going today although it is struggling. The club had to move due to impending construction and is now “sharing” a location with the Columbus 72 nightclub.

2 ’60s-’70s All-Star pitcher Tiant : LUIS

Luis Tiant is a former Major League Baseball pitcher from Cuba. During his career, Tiant was noted for his cigar smoking. After retiring from the game, he launched a line of his own cigars called “El Tiant”.

3 Sensory omen regarding money : ITCHY PALM

Tradition holds that someone with itchy palms is about receive a tidy sum of money.

7 Roadster rod : AXLE

A roadster is a two-seater car with an open body and a sporty appearance. The term “roadster” is American in origin, and was first used back in the 19th century to describe a horse that was used when traveling by road.

10 Airman, slangily : FLYBOY

A flyboy is a pilot, especially a member of an air force

11 Pungent mayo : AIOLI

To the purist, especially in Provence in the South of France, aioli is prepared just by grinding garlic with olive oil. However, other ingredients are often added to the mix, particularly egg yolks.

12 “Star Wars” heavy breather : VADER

Darth Vader is (to me) the most colorful antagonist in the “Star Wars” universe. Born as Anakin Skywalker, he was corrupted by the Emperor Palpatine, and turned to “the Dark Side”. In the original films, Darth Vader was portrayed by English bodybuilder David Prowse, and voiced by actor James Earl Jones. Jones asked that he go uncredited for the first two “Star Wars” films, feeling that his contributions were insufficient to warrant recognition. I disagree …

18 Source of fries : SPUD

The word “spud” is used as a slang term for a potato and was first recorded in the mid-1800s, in New Zealand would you believe?

27 French possessive : A TOI

“À toi” is the French term for “yours”, when talking to someone with whom one is familiar. “À toi” literally means “to you”.

30 “The Simpsons” disco guy : STU

On “The Simpsons”, the character of Disco Stu is voiced by Hank Azaria, although he was voiced for a while by Phil Hartman. Disco Stu is described as “a black, wrinkly John Travolta”.

32 Old Russian ruler : TSAR

The term “czar” (also “tsar”) is a Slavic word that was first used as a title by Simeon I of Bulgaria in 913 AD. “Czar” is derived from the word “Caesar”, which was synonymous with “emperor” at that time.

34 Thurman’s role in “The Avengers” (1998) : PEEL

1998’s film “The Avengers” is an action movie inspired by the British television series of the same name. The film stars Ralph Fiennes and Uma Thurman as secret agents John Steed and Emma Peel. I am a big fan of the original TV show, and really did not like the 1998 movie … at all …

35 Home to K2 : ASIA

K2 is the second highest mountain on the planet (at 28, 251 ft), with Mount Everest being higher by over 700 feet. K2 is known the “Savage Mountain” as it is relatively difficult to climb, having claimed 1 in 4 mountaineers who have attempted to reach the summit. It has never been climbed in winter. The name K2 dates back to what was called the Great Trigonometric Survey, a British survey of the geography of India carried out during the 19th century. Included in this survey were the heights of many of the Himalayan peaks, including Everest. The original surveyor, a Thomas Montgomerie, included two peaks he first called K1 and K2. He discovered later that the locals called K1 Masherbrum (the 22nd highest mountain in the world), but the remote K2 had no local name that he could find, so it was christened Mount Godwin-Austen. This name was rejected by the Royal Geographic Society although it does still appear on some maps. So, the most common name used is K2, that original notation in a surveyor’s notebook.

39 Yemeni port : ADEN

Aden is a seaport in Yemen that is located on the Gulf of Aden by the eastern approach to the Red Sea. Aden has a long history of British rule, from 1838 until a very messy withdrawal in 1967. A native of Aden is known as an Adeni. Some believe that Cain and Abel are buried in the city.

45 Soprano Ponselle who debuted at the Met opposite Caruso : ROSA

Rosa Ponselle was an American soprano who performed mainly with the New York Metropolitan Opera. Ponselle’s performing career started in vaudeville, but she caught the eye of the Met’s star tenor Enrico Caruso. Ponselle made her debut with the Met in 1918, singing opposite Caruso, in Verdi’s “La forza del destino”.

46 Slash on a score sheet : SPARE

In bowling, a spare is recorded on a score sheet with a forward slash mark. A strike is recorded with a large letter X.

48 Advil alternative : ALEVE

Aleve is a brand name used for the anti-inflammatory drug Naproxen sodium.

51 Hoppy brews : IPAS

India pale ale (IPA) is a style of beer that originated in England. The beer was originally intended for transportation from England to India, hence the name.

52 Freebie : COMP

To comp is to give for free, with “comp” coming from “complimentary”.

53 Intestinal sections : ILEA

The human ileum (plural “ilea”) is the lowest part of the small intestine, and is found below the jejunum and above the cecum of the large intestine.

55 Violin music instruction : ARCO

“Arco” is a musical direction instructing a string player to return to normal bowing technique after a passage played using some other technique (perhaps pizzicato).

59 Bldgs. with many boxes : POS

Post office (PO)

Read on, or …
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Complete List of Clues/Answers Across

1 Award named for a goddess : CLIO
5 Put down : ABASE
10 First choice : FAVE
14 “You’re __ luck” : OUTA
15 __ shorts : BOXER
16 Truth stretcher : LIAR
17 *Finds flaws (in) : PICKS HOLES
19 “Star Wars” sentence inverter : YODA
20 Baseball bat wood : ASH
21 *Casino fixtures where blinds might be used : POKER TABLES
23 Sign-off word : YOURS
25 River through Tours : LOIRE
26 Shot water? : RAPIDS
28 Rash : HASTY
31 Citation ender, briefly : ET AL
32 Usually multilayered dessert : TORTE
33 Place to unwind : SPA
36 *They make nuts healthy : POLYUNSATURATES
40 __ card: common phone component : SIM
41 Closes in on : NEARS
42 Half of sechs : DREI
43 Alaskan cruise sight : FJORD
44 Iris ring : AREOLA
46 Milan’s La __ : SCALA
49 The Huskies of the NCAA’s Big East : UCONN
50 *Skilled debaters : POLEMICISTS
54 Tank contents : GAS
57 Tip : APEX
58 In complete opposition … and a feature of the four other longest answers : POLES APART
60 Wild, all-night party : RAVE
61 Tiny swimmer : AMEBA
62 Marine threat : ORCA
63 Kept in one’s sights : EYED
64 Fixes : SPAYS
65 Urban bane : SMOG

Down

1 Historic NYC club, with “The” : COPA
2 ’60s-’70s All-Star pitcher Tiant : LUIS
3 Sensory omen regarding money : ITCHY PALM
4 Wine barrel wood : OAK
5 Can’t stand : ABHORS
6 Financial records : BOOKS
7 Roadster rod : AXLE
8 Oracle : SEER
9 Formerly, formerly : ERST
10 Airman, slangily : FLYBOY
11 Pungent mayo : AIOLI
12 “Star Wars” heavy breather : VADER
13 Wipe out : ERASE
18 Source of fries : SPUD
22 Let out, e.g. : ALTER
24 Like some fried food : OILY
26 Gym iterations : REPS
27 French possessive : A TOI
28 Squirrel away : HOARD
29 Fine __ : ARTS
30 “The Simpsons” disco guy : STU
32 Old Russian ruler : TSAR
33 Coerce : STRONG-ARM
34 Thurman’s role in “The Avengers” (1998) : PEEL
35 Home to K2 : ASIA
37 Clear, as a copier : UNJAM
38 Prefix with natal : NEO-
39 Yemeni port : ADEN
43 Showed off a muscle : FLEXED
44 Fills in for : ACTS AS
45 Soprano Ponselle who debuted at the Met opposite Caruso : ROSA
46 Slash on a score sheet : SPARE
47 Insured patient’s obligation : COPAY
48 Advil alternative : ALEVE
49 “Best before” cousin : USE BY
51 Hoppy brews : IPAS
52 Freebie : COMP
53 Intestinal sections : ILEA
55 Violin music instruction : ARCO
56 Unaccompanied : STAG
59 Bldgs. with many boxes : POS

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