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Working with middle school writers at our library this summer, I’ve found a few storytelling tools that are too awesome not to share.

Now, I’m the first to admit that creative writing isn’t something I spend much time on during my regular English 9 and English 11 classes, so it’s been a fun challenge to try something new. Here are a few things that are working for my kids.

1. Eyebombing
A sheet of self-adhesive googly eyes and the cameras on their phones led to a fun afternoon of writing for my kids as they turned inanimate objects into the protagonists of their stories. If you didn’t know, eyebombing is a thing.

WHAT IS EYEBOMBING ? BBC NEWS - YouTube

I didn’t know any of this until I saw a slide deck built by Lisa Highfill, one of my former Pleasanton Unified co-workers. She shares her presentation here and gives inspiration credit to Adam Randall, another colleague who turned the world’s cutest graffiti into a writing prompt for his elementary students. The middle schoolers were completely into it, too.

2. Storytelling Dice
Whenever a kid is stumped for inspiration, I break out the free story cubes from goalexandria.com. These are probably most effective with a younger audience, but my tweens have been surprisingly game. Maybe because it’s summer? (Tip: Print these on card stock to make them last longer and have the kids build them.)

3. Paintchip Storytelling
You might recall that I use paintchips from the home improvement store for our poetry stations, but I decided to use those same chips this summer for longer stories. Each student selects a paintchip and then must incorporate all four paint names somewhere in their story. I asked my kids to highlight/bold the paint names in their stories, which makes it easier when my old eyes read their work. 

What other creative writing resources do you use with your students? Leave an idea or link below to any free item that’ll help creative writing teachers – including me – keep their students inspired and productive.

Teach on, everyone!

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Looking for your next summer read? The awesome folks at YALSA, the Young Adult Library Services Association, have pulled together their list of the most popular books of 2019, as chosen by teen book groups from schools and public libraries around the U.S.

The top 25 nominees are listed below (click here for a PDF of the same list) and students ages 12 to 18 are encouraged to vote for their favorites beginning Aug. 15 to help determine the year’s Top 10 which will be announced in mid-October on the YALSA website. Previous year’s Teens’ Top 10 winners are also listed there.

If you’re looking for even more book recommendations, YALSA has a book search tool that’ll allow you to sort by genre.

I also really like the choose-your-own-adventure style of search offered by PickMyYA.com, a site curated by fellow English teacher James Tilton and his students at Eastside High School in Lancaster, Calif.

Whenever I’m baffled as to which SSR books to recommend to kids, these two websites have me covered. Hope they’re useful to you, too. Happy summer, everyone!

Please note: I have no business relationship with YALSA or PickMyYA.com and have received nothing in exchange for this blog post. I just like learning about cool stuff and sharing it with my teacher friends.

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Looking for your next summer read? The awesome folks at YALSA, the Young Adult Library Services Association, have pulled together their list of the most popular books of 2019, as chosen by teen book groups from schools and public libraries around the U.S.

The top 25 nominees are listed below (click here for a PDF of the same list) and students ages 12 to 18 are encouraged to vote for their favorites beginning Aug. 15 to help determine the year’s Top 10 which will be announced in mid-October on the YALSA website. Previous year’s Teens’ Top 10 winners are also listed there.

If you’re looking for even more book recommendations, YALSA has a book search tool that’ll allow you to sort by genre.

I also really like the choose-your-own-adventure style of search offered by PickMyYA.com, a site curated by fellow English teacher James Tilton and his students at Eastside High School in Lancaster, Calif.

Whenever I’m baffled as to which SSR books to recommend to kids, these two websites have me covered. Hope they’re useful to you, too. Happy summer, everyone!

Please note: I have no business relationship with YALSA or PickMyYA.com and have received nothing in exchange for this blog post. I just like learning about cool stuff and sharing it with my teacher friends.

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You’re a 6’6”, 240-pound high school senior – all muscle.
You’re a favorite on the football team, you just won an athletic scholarship to Boston College, and your coach says you’re built for a career in the NFL.
There’s just one problem – you’re terrified of being hit.

That was comedian Gary Gulman’s teenaged life and he shared his story recently on NPR’s This American Life in a charming 26-minute podcast episode. For the past few years, I’ve successfully used podcasts in my classroom to help students build the listening skills that are now needed for their computerized state exams. The kids love the episodes (maybe because those days are a half-hour less of me talking, eh?) and I love the breathing room they give us when we’re between units.

If you’d like to hear Gulman’s entertaining story of life as a reluctant football star, you can access both an uncensored copy and a clean/bleeped version here:
https://www.thisamericanlife.org/676/heres-looking-at-you-kid

Note: The NPR program’s language is mostly clean, but Gulman does say, “Fuck, yeah!” twice early in the uncensored version of the episode as a tool of characterization to describe his enthusiastic assistant football coaches. The material is appropropriate for high school students, but you should listen to the podcast before using it in your classroom to make sure the content is a good match for your students.

Also, the second half of the episode deals with issues surrounding childhood sexual abuse and repressed memories. I don’t plan to use this “part 2” segment of the podcast at all; instead, I’ll instruct my kids to stop listening at the 26-minute mark.

As always, I wrote some questions to guide my students through the episode. After they complete the question set on their own, I’ll have all of us come back together for a full-class discussion of the topics raised in the program. You can write your own questions or download a copy of my set here:
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Listening-Skills-Podcast-Based-Listening-Activity-Listen-Learn-8-CCSS-4611517

Want more podcast-based lessons? Click here and scroll down on that page to check out my full catalog of options: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Laura-Randazzo/Category/Listen-Learn-Podcasts-291031

Happy summer, everyone!

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You’re a 6’6”, 240-pound high school senior – all muscle.
You’re a favorite on the football team, you just won an athletic scholarship to Boston College, and your coach says you’re built for a career in the NFL.
There’s just one problem – you’re terrified of being hit.

That was comedian Gary Gulman’s teenaged life and he shared his story recently on NPR’s This American Life in a charming 26-minute podcast episode. For the past few years, I’ve successfully used podcasts in my classroom to help students build the listening skills that are now needed for their computerized state exams. The kids love the episodes (maybe because those days are a half-hour less of me talking, eh?) and I love the breathing room they give us when we’re between units.

If you’d like to hear Gulman’s entertaining story of life as a reluctant football star, you can access both an uncensored copy and a clean/bleeped version here:
https://www.thisamericanlife.org/676/heres-looking-at-you-kid

Note: The NPR program’s language is mostly clean, but Gulman does say, “Fuck, yeah!” twice early in the uncensored version of the episode as a tool of characterization to describe his enthusiastic assistant football coaches. The material is appropropriate for high school students, but you should listen to the podcast before using it in your classroom to make sure the content is a good match for your students.

Also, the second half of the episode deals with issues surrounding childhood sexual abuse and repressed memories. I don’t plan to use this “part 2” segment of the podcast at all; instead, I’ll instruct my kids to stop listening at the 26-minute mark.

As always, I wrote some questions to guide my students through the episode. After they complete the question set on their own, I’ll have all of us come back together for a full-class discussion of the topics raised in the program. You can write your own questions or download a copy of my set here:
https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Listening-Skills-Podcast-Based-Listening-Activity-Listen-Learn-8-CCSS-4611517

Want more podcast-based lessons? Click here and scroll down on that page to check out my full catalog of options: https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Laura-Randazzo/Category/Listen-Learn-Podcasts-291031

Happy summer, everyone!

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S-U-M-M-E-R is finally here. Yes, I’ve scheduled a few fun things with the family and I plan to spend plenty of afternoons reading in the hammock (Hillbilly Elegy, you’re up next), but I’m also already planning a big ol’ project for the new school year:

High School English Teacher Vlog, New Year of H.S. English Project Planning - YouTube

What do you think, teacher friend? What English class bits and pieces would you want included in the project? Due to the limitations of video, I suspect I’ll dig more into skills than specific works of literature, but I’m still not sure. Also, let me live vicariously as I read about your fun-in-the-sun plans. Leave a reply below and let’s have the BEST SUMMER EVER!

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S-U-M-M-E-R is finally here. Yes, I’ve scheduled a few fun things with the family and I plan to spend plenty of afternoons reading in the hammock (Hillbilly Elegy, you’re up next), but I’m also already planning a big ol’ project for the new school year:

High School English Teacher Vlog, New Year of H.S. English Project Planning - YouTube

What do you think, teacher friend? What English class bits and pieces would you want included in the project? Due to the limitations of video, I suspect I’ll dig more into skills than specific works of literature, but I’m still not sure. Also, let me live vicariously as I read about your fun-in-the-sun plans. Leave a reply below and let’s have the BEST SUMMER EVER!

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Note: This is an updated repost.

You’ve wrapped your last major unit and final exams are still a week or so away. You could spend five days on Review Jeopardy (um…no, thanks) or you could grab some of these tried-and-true resources that’ll keep kids focused until finals. Click on the lesson title to learn more about each item. Some are free and some cost a few bucks.

1. Words to Live By
Compare and contrast the advice adults give to teens by using Polonius’ speech to Laertes in Hamlet, Rudyard Kipling’s “If,” and the famous “Wear Sunscreen” newspaper column that went viral a few years ago. The lesson also includes a creative writing activity where students flip the script and build their own Guide to Life, giving advice to middle-aged adults about how to live a full and satisfying life. This video also makes a charming post-activity supplement:

How to Age Gracefully | CBC Radio - YouTube

2. Toughen Up, Snowflake
View the commencement speech given by David McCullough to the graduates of Wellesley High School where he calls into question the selfishness that’s bred when children are raised to believe they are special and unique. The video went viral in 2012 and the speech often gets students riled up, thinking about not only the way they and their classmates were raised, but also the effectiveness/ineffectiveness of McCullough’s rhetoric.

You Are Not Special Commencement Speech from Wellesley High School - YouTube

3. “We Made It”
Use Jason Reynolds’ 2018 commencement address at Lesley University to show your students the power of a well-constructed speech. In this one-class period activity, students discuss the techniques of effective public speaking, view Reynolds’ 10-minute speech, and deconstruct/discuss his use of rhetorical devices. My free pack of questions focus on audience, the value of storytelling over lecture, and rhetorical application of poetic devices including foreshadowing and symbolism.

Jason Reynolds delivers Lesley University Commencement address - YouTube

4. Steve Jobs’ Advice to Grads
Another great graduation day speech comes from Steve Jobs, who skillfully uses Aristotle’s rhetorical tools as he addresses the crowd at Stanford University. Kids enjoy the speech and I like hearing them discuss my questions about the specific techniques Jobs uses to reach his audience.

Steve Jobs' 2005 Stanford Commencement Address - YouTube

5. Best Commencement Speeches, Ever.
The day after I use the McCullough or Jobs speech, I’ll take my students to the computer lab and have them choose another commencement address from NPR’s site of 350+ “Best Commencement Speeches, Ever.” Kids usually choose celebrities they know, such as Jim Carrey, Katie Couric, Barack Obama, Andy Samberg, and Ellen Degeneres, but there are also great writers on that list that you could assign as a bridge to a book you’ve studied this year, such as Elie Wiesel, Toni Morrison, Ray Bradbury, Barbara Kingsolver, and John Green.


6. Two-Sentence Storytelling

One of my all-time favorite single-day lessons is Micro Fiction, where kids play with the idea that an entire story can be told using just two sentences. Genres covered include drama, horror, sci-fi, and romance.

7. The Power of Earbuds
The Listen & Learn series has been a hit with my classes. I give them a narrative non-fiction podcast – each about 20-30 minutes, high-interest, school-appropriate. My students love listening to these compelling real-life stories and I love the lively post-listening discussions the programs have sparked.


So far, here are the topics available:
#1 – The case of a live endangered tiger kept on display at a Louisiana truck stop
#2 – The story of an LAPD officer who dove into La Brea Tar Pits as part of a criminal investigation
#3 – The case of a woman whose identity was stolen when she was 11 years old
#4 – The story of an 11-year-old boy who was the sole survivor of an airplane crash
#5 – The story of racism and heartbreak at a high school senior prom
#6 – The case of a woman who claimed she could communicate with the dead
#7 – The story of a 9-year-old girl who survived a shark attack and info/research on attack prevention

8. A Video that Could Change the World
Billions in Change is a high-quality 43-minute documentary that focuses on 5-Hour Energy founder Manoj Bhargava and his pledge to use 99 percent of his $4 billion empire to help solve the global problems of energy, fresh water, and disease prevention. In this lesson, students are given questions to answer while they view the film and deeper-thinking questions to complete once the video has finished.

Billions in Change Official Film 2015 - YouTube

9. 10 Supreme Court Cases Every Teen Should Know
Add real-world relevancy to the last week of school with this free lesson where kids read a New York Times article that summarizes 10 important Supreme Court decisions that directly impact their lives. The lesson includes a small group presentation option that usually allows the activity to fill two days.

10. How to Read Editorial Cartoons
Let art meet logic with an overview of four persuasive tools used by editorial cartoonists (symbolism, exaggeration, labeling, and analogy) with real-world examples of classic political cartoons. Then, use modern cartoons to help students see how these same tools are used today. Finally, have students analyze a specific cartoon and even create one of their own.

11. Show a Movie and Still Learn Something? Inconceivable!
We analyze text all of the time. This time, let’s analyze one of the best films ever made – The Princess Bride. Viewing of the film is spread out over four days (about 25 minutes per lesson) as students also engage in supplementary activities, such as examining a debate on the merits of fairy tales, applying the Chivalric Code to four main characters, sharpening their pencils for creative writing tasks, and diving deep into an analysis of Rob Reiner’s film.

There you are. These are my favorite high-interest, low-prep lessons for this time of year. All also work as emergency sub materials, as planning is minimal and answer keys are included. If you need even more activities to soak up just parts of a class, be sure to give these sponge activities a look:
Worksheet designed to work with any TED Talk
Worksheet designed to work with any online or print current events article
Father’s Day poetry card activity
Just Give the Word game worksheet
Word ADDiction game worksheet
Brain Teaser slides

Hang on, everyone. Summer is so, so close!

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Note: This is an updated repost.

You’ve wrapped your last major unit and final exams are still a week or so away. You could spend five days on Review Jeopardy (um…no, thanks) or you could grab some of these tried-and-true resources that’ll keep kids focused until finals. Click on the lesson title to learn more about each item. Some are free and some cost a few bucks.

1. Words to Live By
Compare and contrast the advice adults give to teens by using Polonius’ speech to Laertes in Hamlet, Rudyard Kipling’s “If,” and the famous “Wear Sunscreen” newspaper column that went viral a few years ago. The lesson also includes a creative writing activity where students flip the script and build their own Guide to Life, giving advice to middle-aged adults about how to live a full and satisfying life. This video also makes a charming post-activity supplement:

How to Age Gracefully | CBC Radio - YouTube

2. Toughen Up, Snowflake
View the commencement speech given by David McCullough to the graduates of Wellesley High School where he calls into question the selfishness that’s bred when children are raised to believe they are special and unique. The video went viral in 2012 and the speech often gets students riled up, thinking about not only the way they and their classmates were raised, but also the effectiveness/ineffectiveness of McCullough’s rhetoric.

You Are Not Special Commencement Speech from Wellesley High School - YouTube

3. “We Made It”
Use Jason Reynolds’ 2018 commencement address at Lesley University to show your students the power of a well-constructed speech. In this one-class period activity, students discuss the techniques of effective public speaking, view Reynolds’ 10-minute speech, and deconstruct/discuss his use of rhetorical devices. My free pack of questions focus on audience, the value of storytelling over lecture, and rhetorical application of poetic devices including foreshadowing and symbolism.

Jason Reynolds delivers Lesley University Commencement address - YouTube

4. Steve Jobs’ Advice to Grads
Another great graduation day speech comes from Steve Jobs, who skillfully uses Aristotle’s rhetorical tools as he addresses the crowd at Stanford University. Kids enjoy the speech and I like hearing them discuss my questions about the specific techniques Jobs uses to reach his audience.

Steve Jobs' 2005 Stanford Commencement Address - YouTube

5. Best Commencement Speeches, Ever.
The day after I use the McCullough or Jobs speech, I’ll take my students to the computer lab and have them choose another commencement address from NPR’s site of 350+ “Best Commencement Speeches, Ever.” Kids usually choose celebrities they know, such as Jim Carrey, Katie Couric, Barack Obama, Andy Samberg, and Ellen Degeneres, but there are also great writers on that list that you could assign as a bridge to a book you’ve studied this year, such as Elie Wiesel, Toni Morrison, Ray Bradbury, Barbara Kingsolver, and John Green.


6. Two-Sentence Storytelling

One of my all-time favorite single-day lessons is Micro Fiction, where kids play with the idea that an entire story can be told using just two sentences. Genres covered include drama, horror, sci-fi, and romance.

7. The Power of Earbuds
The Listen & Learn series has been a hit with my classes. I give them a narrative non-fiction podcast – each about 20-30 minutes, high-interest, school-appropriate. My students love listening to these compelling real-life stories and I love the lively post-listening discussions the programs have sparked.


So far, here are the topics available:
#1 – The case of a live endangered tiger kept on display at a Louisiana truck stop
#2 – The story of an LAPD officer who dove into La Brea Tar Pits as part of a criminal investigation
#3 – The case of a woman whose identity was stolen when she was 11 years old
#4 – The story of an 11-year-old boy who was the sole survivor of an airplane crash
#5 – The story of racism and heartbreak at a high school senior prom
#6 – The case of a woman who claimed she could communicate with the dead
#7 – The story of a 9-year-old girl who survived a shark attack and info/research on attack prevention

8. A Video that Could Change the World
Billions in Change is a high-quality 43-minute documentary that focuses on 5-Hour Energy founder Manoj Bhargava and his pledge to use 99 percent of his $4 billion empire to help solve the global problems of energy, fresh water, and disease prevention. In this lesson, students are given questions to answer while they view the film and deeper-thinking questions to complete once the video has finished.

Billions in Change Official Film 2015 - YouTube

9. 10 Supreme Court Cases Every Teen Should Know
Add real-world relevancy to the last week of school with this free lesson where kids read a New York Times article that summarizes 10 important Supreme Court decisions that directly impact their lives. The lesson includes a small group presentation option that usually allows the activity to fill two days.

10. How to Read Editorial Cartoons
Let art meet logic with an overview of four persuasive tools used by editorial cartoonists (symbolism, exaggeration, labeling, and analogy) with real-world examples of classic political cartoons. Then, use modern cartoons to help students see how these same tools are used today. Finally, have students analyze a specific cartoon and even create one of their own.

11. Show a Movie and Still Learn Something? Inconceivable!
We analyze text all of the time. This time, let’s analyze one of the best films ever made – The Princess Bride. Viewing of the film is spread out over four days (about 25 minutes per lesson) as students also engage in supplementary activities, such as examining a debate on the merits of fairy tales, applying the Chivalric Code to four main characters, sharpening their pencils for creative writing tasks, and diving deep into an analysis of Rob Reiner’s film.

There you are. These are my favorite high-interest, low-prep lessons for this time of year. All also work as emergency sub materials, as planning is minimal and answer keys are included. If you need even more activities to soak up just parts of a class, be sure to give these sponge activities a look:
Worksheet designed to work with any TED Talk
Worksheet designed to work with any online or print current events article
Father’s Day poetry card activity
Just Give the Word game worksheet
Word ADDiction game worksheet
Brain Teaser slides

Hang on, everyone. Summer is so, so close!

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A few years back, I noticed something weird – kids sometimes, maybe even often, learned more when I did less. One unexpected side effect of our spring semester 20Time experience was that I saw kids taking more ownership of information when they were the ones doing the research. This started me thinking about, and changing, how I present all sorts of material.

Now I’ll admit, I love to lecture. I’m a big ol’ goofball and love acting out the highlights of the Trojan War in a one-woman show so my freshmen can picture Odysseus’ story as we launch his epic tale. I love using comedic timing as I explain logical fallacies, strategically pausing to pull a laugh from my students at exactly the right moment. And I especially love droppin’ a beat as I break down Shakespearean sonnet structure and figure out which students’ first names are iambic. But lecturing has its limits. I don’t do it every day. It’s just one tool in a crowded toolbox of teaching techniques and I’d lay odds that not all of my students love my lectures as much as I do.

Face it, few of us actually enjoy lectures. From toddlers to teenagers to teachers trapped at professional development worksops, no one likes to be talked at, especially if the speaker is dry or the content feels disconnected from our lives. However, most of us do enjoy the thrill of discovery. That’s what I’ve learned from watching 20Timers in action.

Because of this, I’ve expanded my approach when launching a new novel unit or explaining the historical context of an era we’re studying in American literature by placing the bulk of research in the hands of students, letting them determine what’s most interesting and important about an author or historical figure’s life.

When I provide just a few questions to help guide students’ research, they end up reading more articles about the person and learning much more information than I’d ever consider cramming into a slide deck. They also benefit from collaborating with a classmate, debating what is and isn’t important in their research.

If you want to try this, you could start by projecting a list of questions/prompts, such as:
1. When was this person born?
2. When did this person die?
3. What significant impact did this person have on the world?
4. What obstacles did this person overcome?
5. Which notable people living today cite this person as an influence on their lives and/or work?
And so on…

You could also present these kinds of questions in a grid, like this:

What can I say? I like to make things snazzy and everyone knows that writing sentences in a grid is way more fun than writing sentences on a blank sheet of binder paper.

I’m now building a collection of single-sheet grid research organizers to give students a concrete task to focus on as they learn about the important authors and historical figures whose lives we study.

Here are a few suggested uses for these student-driven research grids:

1. Book your school’s computer lab or have students access information on their own devices. Assign students to either work solo or in teams of two, all researching the same person. Once the grids are complete, have students share and compare answers in small groups, focusing on four interesting facts they discovered, a meaningful quote, and any personal/professional obstacles. Then, pull the students into a full-class discussion, having each group present an interesting fact, quote, or obstacle until every team has contributed. No repeats allowed.

This assignment works great as an “into” activity, but it could also be a “through” activity to add variety to your in-class routine as you work through a longer work. If you’re using this as an “after” activity, during the discussion I would also ask how any of the biography elements are reflected in the author’s work/s the class just studied.

2. Assign the worksheet as a traditional homework assignment. Launch the discussion mentioned in #1 at the beginning of the next class period.

3. Use the grid as the beginning assignment to a larger project where students must read two or three pieces by a single author or learn about two or three people from a specific era. Later, this research could be turned into a compare/contrast essay or a speech presentation, if you wish to expand the assignment.

4. Use as an emergency sub plan.

A note about sources: When students begin researching, most will automatically want to go to Wikipedia, looking to take material solely from that site. Before this happens, I let students know that Wikipedia is a fantastic website – as a starting spot. Due to the unvetted nature of submissions, citations of Wikipedia as a source don’t earn credit on academic work in my class. Instead, I emphasize that Wikipedia is a helpful starting spot for research because of the high-quality information available from the links within the “Sources,” “Further Reading,” and “External Links” sections at the bottom of each Wikipedia entry. Those links will (usually) take students to higher-quality source material that is seen as academically credible. For students who might struggle with this or need an IEP accommodation, I also sometimes supply a limited source pool, sending them directly to biography.com or history.com.

I hope you give this approach a try. Let your students do the research and see what happens. Teach on, my friend!

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