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Disclaimer: This design talk series on my blog is ment to be a discussion. All things in this blog post are my opinions, however, I would love to hear what you think in the comments.

Almost every surface pattern designer has probably been told when starting out how important it is to make pattern collections. To an extent I agree with that, however, making pattern collections isn’t for everyone. Primarly, whether or not you need to create pattern collections will depend on your goals.

You may have noticed that I don’t make a lot of pattern collections. This was a choice I made when asking myself what I wanted to get out of surface pattern design. I really wanted to make wrapping paper so I typically design with those products in mind. If you think about it, how often do you see wrapping paper that was designed using a pattern collection? I am sure they exist, however, typically different types of wrapping paper don’t go together unless they are reversable. This is why it’s important to think about your end goal before you start designing a pattern or pattern collection.  For example, if you wanted to create patterns for fabric, a collection would be preferable for those who wanted to use the collection for quilting. On the other hand, If you were making a pattern for a notebook, you probably only need that one pattern for the notebook.

The only time when I would recommend that you absolutely need to create pattern collections is if you choose to go the traditional path of licensing. You never know what companies will use your patterns for. You might have designed your patterns with a notebook in mind, however, a company might license your patterns for a fabric collection so you need to show companies that your patterns can be used in a variety of ways. 

With my designs, I primarily sell them online and I know a lot of surface pattern designers sell their designs online also. In those cases where you might be making patterns for specific products, pattern collections are not as necessary. For instance, Society 6 allows you to put your designs on products. If you put your pattern on a pillow you won’t necessarily need to create a collection as people will mostly likely be buying just that one pillow.

One thing I have noticed is that once you enter a creative field people will have opinions about everything you do. They may tell you that you absolutely need to create pattern collections or they may tell you not to create pattern collections, but you should weight the advice of others with what you want to accomplish as a surface pattern designer and pick and choose advice that will work best for you. Sometimes I give advice on this blog that won’t be a good fit for everyone and that is something you have to realize as you continue on your creative journey.

I know this design talk can be kind of controversial in the surface patern design space so I would love to know what you think about pattern collections in the comments. Do you think surface pattern designers need to create pattern collections?

The post Design Talk: Single Patterns vs Pattern Collections appeared first on Kelcie Makes Patterns.

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This tutorial is a continuation of my previous tutorial. If you want to learn how to draw the dripping popsicle in Adobe Illustrator click here. This tutorial is going to talk about how to color in your popsicle and create simple flat design shading to give your popsicle more dimention. After you have finished drawing your popsicle come back to this post to finish it off.

For those of you who have already drawn your popsicle let’s get started!

Step 1:

If you followed the steps in my last tutorial correctly you should have a popsicle that looks like this.

Grab the top of the popsicle (not the stick) and go to object in your top toolbar, scroll down to path, and click on offset path.

This should open up an offset path options box. We want to create a copy of the top of the popsicle that is slightly smaller than our popsicle base. To do this put a negative number in your offset box. I put -7 but you will need to play around with that number until you get something that looks like this:

Remember the number you used for the offset. You will need to use that number again later.

Step 2:

Grab the inside copy of your popsicle that you just created. While holding down alt and shift, drag the inside copy of your popsicle up slightly to duplicate it. It should look like the picture above.

Step 3:

Select the two inside popsicles. In your right-side toolbar, locate your pathfinder panel. It looks like this:

In the picture you will notice that under shape modes one box is highlighted. This is your minus front box. Click on that box to delete all of the overlapping parts of your two inside popsicles.

You should now have a popsicle with what looks like little tiny crescent moons where your popsicle looks like it is dripping. Those will act as your highlights. There are 4 crescent moons that I have circled in the picture above. We don’t want those crescent moons so you should delete them now. Your drippings should look like this:

Step 4:

Select the top part of the popsicle again (not the popsicle stick) and go to object in the top toolbar, path, then offset path. Remember in step two I told you to remember the offset number you used to create a copy of your popsicle that was slightly smaller than the original. Place that number in the offset box. In my case that number would be -7.

Step 5:

To create the highlight on the top of the popsicle select your pencil tool (N) and draw a curved line like in the picture above. Grab your curved line that you just drew and your inside popsicle.

Go back to your pathfinder panel and under pathfinders click on the divide box that is highlighted in the picture above.

This will divide your inside popsicle along that curved line and create two seperate shapes.

Select the bigger bottom shape using the direct selection tool (A) and press delete.

Step 6:

We now get to work on shading the popsicle stick. Grab your popsicle base (not the stick) and hold down shift and alt. Drag your popsicle base diagonally so it looks like the picture above.

In order for this to work, you need to make sure that one of the drips on the popsicle you just duplicated is overlapping the popsicle stick. Use the picture above as a guide. Select your duplicated popsicle and the popsicle stick.

Go back to the pathfinder panel and under pathfinders, click divide.

Select the top of your duplicate popsicle using your direct selection tool (A) and press delete. Your popsicle should now look like this:

Step 7:

The last thing you want to do is color in your popsicle. Select the top of your popsicle and in your left-side toolbar click on your fill box. Your fill box looks like the picture above. Double click on your fill box to open up your color options.

Click on the color you want for the base of your popsicle. I want my posicle to be orange so I am going to click on the orange color for my base.

Adding this color has helped me notice that my popsicle is not layered properly. If you notice in the picture above I have circled part of the popsicle stick that needs to go behind the orange top of my popsicle.

To move it to the back, select the popsicle stick and it’s shaded part. With those selected, right-click on your screen, scroll down to arrange, and click on send to back. Now we can color in our popsicle stick.

Double click on your fill box in your left-side toolbar and fill in your popsicle stick/popsicle stick shadow with any color your want. Use the direct selection tool (A) to select your popsicle stick shadow. Fill this in with a similar color to your popsicle stick that is a few shades darker.

Your final step is to select all of your highlights. Unlike your popsicle stick shadow, you want your highlights to be a few shades lighter than your base. Since my base is orange, I want to select a lighter shade of that orange. Your final flat design popsicle should look like this:

The next step will be to turn this popsicle into a pattern. For part 3 of this tutorial, tune in February 18. Next weeks post was supposed to be part 3 of this tutorial, but I was inspired by an email I got to write another design talk/rant so stay tuned for that.

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The post Making a Popsicle in Adobe Illustrator: Part 2 appeared first on Kelcie Makes Patterns.

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I want to do more tutorials teaching you to make specific objects so in this tutorial I am going to teach you how to make a simple flat design popsicle. This tutorial is going to be split into three parts. The first part will focus on making the base of the popsicle as well as providing you with a simple trick you can use to make your popsicle look like it is dripping. In the second part of the tutorial which will go up next monday on my blog we will finish the popsicle by adding highlights and shadows. The final part of the tutorial will show you how you can use this popsicle motif to create a simple repeat pattern. At the end of this tutorial you should have a flat design popsicle that you can use in desings as well as tools needed to .

Let’s get started.

Step 1:

Using the rectangle tool (m), draw a rectangle that looks like the picture above. Press V on the keyboard to switch back to your selection tool and click on rectangle.

When the rectangle is select you will notice that there are 4 blue circles each in one of the corners of your rectangles. These are called live corners and they allow you to easily round your corners. If we were to drag one of these circles inward at this point all of the corners would be rounded because we used the selection tool to select the rectangle and that has selected all the anchor points that the blue live corners control. We, however, only want the top two corners to be rounded so we need to select their anchor points. To do this, click on your direct selection (keyboard shortcut: A) in your left side toolbar. Click and drag your mouse over your two top corners to select them. You then need to grab one of your blue live corners to round them.

Live Corners

This process can be confusing if you are not that familiar with Illustrator so I have included a video so you can visualize what I am talking about. You can view the video by clicking on the live corners link above. Your rectangle should now look something like this:

Step 2:

Draw another rectangle using the rectangle tool (m). This will act as the popsicle stick so you want the rectangle to be long and skinny like in the picture above.

Use your direct selection tool (A) to select the bottom corners of your popsicle stick. Grab the blue live corner buttons and drag them inward to make the corners round.

Step 3:

Now comes my favorite part where we get to draw the popsicle drippings. Using the rectangle tool (M) draw some rectangles at the bottom of your popsicle. I drew 5 rectangles each at an equal distant apart, but you can change yours up to fit whatever style you are looking for. Also, vary the length of your drippings so some drippings are longer than others.


Round all of the bottom corners of your drippings by grabbing their blue live corners with your direction selection tool (A).

Step 4:

Select your popsicle top and your drippings and unite them by going to your pathfinder panel in your right side toolbar and clicking unite. Unite is the first box in under shape modes in the pathfinder panel and is highlighted above. Make sure your popsicle stick is not selected when you unite your popsicle and your drippings or else you wont be able to apply different colors to your popsicle and popsicle stick.

The last thing you want to do is to use your direct selection tool to select all of the corners on the inside of your drippings and use the live corners feature to round the corners. In the picture above, I have arrows pointing to exactly the corners I am talking about. Your end popsicle should look like this:

This is where the tutorial will stop for now. In part two of this tutorial we will be coloring in our popsicles and shading them so tune in next week to finish your designs.

The post Making a Popsicle in Adobe Illustrator: Part 1 appeared first on Kelcie Makes Patterns.

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The blog is offically back and I thought for my first post I would go back to the basics and do a tutorial for you. If you follow me on Instagram you may have noticed one of my recent patterns featured a hippo stamp for Valentine’s Day. One of the things I played around with when making that stamp was trying to get the edges to look like an actual stamp while still having the cutouts in the stamps outer edge to be the same size. This tutorial is going to cover the technique I found that worked best for making stamp edges and is perfect for beginners who want to level up their designs.

Let’s Get Started!

Step 1:

Draw a rectangle using your rectangle tool (keyboard shortcut: M). It doesn’t matter  what size your rectangle is so play around with your rectangle until you get something that will fit well with your design. You could even flip your rectangle so the length is longer than the height if your design is longer.

Step 2:

Make sure your rectangle is still selected and in your top toolbar go to object, scroll down to path, and click on offset path. An offset path options box should pop up that looks like the picture above. Make sure preview is checked so you can view your rectangle as you manipulate it’s offset. The only thing you need to change in the options box is the offset. We want to create a new rectangle that is inside the old rectangle so the offset has to be a negative number. Put -20 in the offset to start and adjust that number up or down until your rectangle looks something like this:

Step 3:

Select the outer rectangle and copy (Control-C) and paste the rectangle in back in back (Control-B). Lock that rectangle into place by pressing control-2 so you don’t accidentialy manipulate or move that rectangle. We will unlock that rectangle later. Select your top outer rectangle and go to your strokes panel in your right side toolbar. In the picture above, I have gone in and changed some of the settings. We want our stroke to be dotted instead of a solid line. To do that, change your cap and corner to round which is the middle boxes of your three options. Also, check the box that says dashed line.

To the right of the dashed line check box there are two options to chose from as to how your line will look. Click the right box that will align your dotted stroke to the corners of the rectangle like in the picture below. Underneath your dashed line check box, there are 6 boxes that represent your dash and the gap between your dash. Your dash should be zero as this will make sure that your dashes are circular and not oval. You will have to play around with your gap until you get a look that you like. For my rectangle, I have a gap of 65. You also need to change the weight of your dashed line. My weight is set at 26, but depending on the shape of your rectangle and what you set your gap to be, your weight might be different. Your rectangle should now look like this:

Step 4:

Select your dashed line and go to object in your top toolbar and scroll down to expand or expand appearance (depending on which one is showing). You will have to do this twice to turn your dashed line stroke into shapes. At this time you want to unlock your back rectangle by pressing alt/option-control-2. Select your back rectangle and your dashed line. Use the keyboard shortcut shift-m to select your shape builder tool. With your dashed line and back rectangle selected, hold down alt and click on the circles in your dashed line to delete them. Each circle will likely have two parts that you need to delete so make sure you delete every part of the circle. The only circles you should not delete using the shape builder tool are the corner circles. We will delete those later.

Your stamp should now look like this. For the 4 corner cirlces, use the selection tool (keyboard shortcut: V) and click on one of the corner circles. This should select all of the circles. Press delete to get rid of all 4 circles.

After you have deleted your final circles, the stamp is done. You can now fill your stamp in with anything you want. Stamps are always good for designs where you are trying to depict a letter sending holiday like Christmas or Valentine’s day although, they can really be used any time of the year. To finish off your stamp, don’t forget to put the price of the stamp on your design.

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The post How to Get Stamp-Like Edges on Your Stamp Designs appeared first on Kelcie Makes Patterns.

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Kelcie Makes Patterns by Kelcie Makes Patterns - 7M ago

I was going through my old designs and I found some designs that I don’t think I have ever shown online before because they are some of my least favorite designs. One of these designs is my very first design so it does give you an accurate depiction of how I have grown over the last few years. I thought this would be helpful for beginner designers to see as most designers only post their good designs. I am guilty of that sometimes, but as I started making designs before I ever started posting them online, you don’t get to see my beginning designs that I was making to get better before I felt confident enough to post my designs online. Get ready because I saw my first design and it was cringeworthy.

My First Design

Yep, my first design was a kitchen pattern. I hadn’t viewed this pattern in a while so when I searched for it in preparation for this post, I didn’t think it was going to be that bad. A few things I noticed from this pattern are I was really bad at spacing, I really need to study color theory, and what was I thinking putting back strokes around all of my motifs.

My Second Design

This was somewhat better than my first design but also a lot worse. I remember having so much trouble making this simple tulip pattern. When I made this pattern, I wasn’t familiar with the move tool so I was placing everything by hand hoping they were spaced evenly. By the way, the pattern doesn’t actually look like what it does in the picture above. I made four color options for the pattern and thought it would be good to showcase them by unevenly spacing the different color options in a square.

Handlettering Disaster 

When I got Adobe Illustrator for the first time, one of the things I wanted to do was digitize my hand lettering, however, I didn’t realize how hard that would be. I had watched a video on how to use the image trace tool and I had an idea to make this easter design. I really hate the color pallet I chose for this pattern and that swirl on the big E in easter is just plain awful.

I tried to make that hand lettered happy easter look better by adding flowers to it, but my hand lettering could not be saved.

Then I thought I would just take the tulip from the hand lettered pattern and repeat that, but I gave up after that, however, this was ultimately a learning experience.

Flat Flowers

This is probably my best worst pattern on the list, but it encouraged me the most to keep going. I made this pattern very early on when I started learning pattern design and I actually liked it at the time. It was slightly more detailed than all of the other patterns I created and really got me thinking that I could be good at pattern design. This pattern could use some shading and some of the flowers need a little reworking, but it served its motivational purpose.

Back to School Pattern

This is the most recent pattern on the list and is a good example of one of those patterns that you think is going to look good when you create the motifs, but when you put everything together, the motifs don’t really look like they go together. Often, we tend to be more critical of our own desings and I didn’t want this pattern to go to waste so I believe I included this in one of my freebie Fridays. If nothing else, I thought people could take the pattern apart and use the individual motifs for a design of their own.

I am sure I have more designs I could add to this list, but these are some of my earliest, least favorite designs. If you want to contribute to this discussion, include a picture of one of your least favorite designs in the comments down below.

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The post My Worst Pattern Designs appeared first on Kelcie Makes Patterns.

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Winter is almost approaching so I thought I would show you how to make a simple festive snowflake pattern. This pattern utilizes Illustrators pattern tool so you don’t have to know a lot of the technical stuff to make this pattern. Before we get started, make sure you only have a stroke color selected and no fill color. To do that, go to your fill box. The fill box looks like this:

Select the square box that doesn’t have a hole in the middle of it. In my case, that square is white. Below your fill and stroke color boxes, you will notice that there are three smaller boxes.

Click the box all the way to the right with the red diagonal line in it and that will get rid  of your fill color.

Now that you have gotten rid of your fill color, Let’s get started!

Step 1:

Draw a vertical line using your pen tool (P).

Select the vertical line and go into your stroke panel in your right-side toolbar. If you cannot see your strokes panel, you can find it by going to window in your top toolbar and scrolling down to stroke. In the stroke panel your want to change your cap and corner to round like in the picture above. You also want to change the weight of your stroke to 11.

Step 2:

Use your pen tool (P) to draw a v near the top of your vertical line like in the picture above. To make your v symetrical on both sides, hold down shift while drawing the v. This will draw your lines at a 45 degree angle.

Select the v and drag it down a little bit, holding alt at the same time so you duplicate the v. Select the second v, hold down alt and shift, grab the corner of your bounding box, and drag out your v to make it slightly bigger.

Select your design and press control-G to group all of the elements in your design together.

Step 3:

Select your design and press R to activate the rotate tool. To use your rotate tool, click on the anchor point at the very bottom of your design. The picture above indicates where you should be clicking. This should drop a little rotate marker that looks like this:

This rotate marker lets Illustrator know where you want to rotate your design around. Hold down alt and click on your rotate marker again.

This should open up a rotate options box. In the angle box put 360/6. This tells Illustrator that you want to rotate your design 6 times around a 360 degree circle. Press copy.

This should create another section of your snowflake. Press control-D 4 times to complete the snowflake. 

Step 4:

To finish off your snowflake, draw an upside down v in between two of your snowflake parts like in the picture above. Select your upside down v and click the rotate tool (R). Click in the center of the snowflake to drop your rotate marker, Hold down alt and click on your rotate marker to open your options box, and in the angle box put 360/6 to duplicate your upside down v 6 times around your snowflake. Press control-D 4 times to duplicate your upside down v. 

Select your whole snowflake and press control-G to group your snowflake together. The last thing you need to do is draw a circle with the ellipse tool (L) in the center of your snowflake. This time make sure your circle has a fill and not a stroke. At this point, you might also want to change the color of your snowflake if you haven’t done so already.

Step 5: 

Now your snowflake is ready to make into a pattern. Make sure your snowflake is selected, go to object in your top toolbar, scroll down to pattern, and click on make. Your pattern should look something like this:

You may have noticed that the pattern is overlapping a little bit. To fix this we want to adjust some of the settings. 

Change the tile type to hex by row. Also, click the size tile to art box and change the H spacing/V spacing both to 70 pt. Your pattern should now look like this:

Near the top of your artboard there is a strip of commands like in the picture above. Click done to click out of pattern view and your new pattern should be in your swatches panel in your right side toolbar.

In the picture above, the new pattern has been highlighted. You can find your new pattern at the very end of your swatches first chunk of colors, right above the row of black, grey, and white colors. To use your pattern click on it in the swatches panel and with your rectangle tool selected (M), drag out a square. If you want your pattern to have a background color, click on your pattern and press control-C to copy your pattern and control-B to paste your pattern behind your original pattern. Make sure you do not deselect your new pattern and change that pattern to a color for your backround. After you have done this, you are done. 

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The post How to Make a Simple Snowflake Pattern in Adobe Illustrator appeared first on Kelcie Makes Patterns.

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In a lot of designs, you will often see what I consider to be flat design rosy cheeks where the rosy cheeks are drawn on top of the face. There is really no blending in these types of cheeks and they are typically used to achieve a certain flat type of effect. That cheek technique is great for certain designs, however, sometimes you want to create rosy cheeks that are more realistic. In this Adobe Illustrator tutorial, I am going to teach you how to make blended cheeks for both a lighter and darker skin tone. 

Let’s get started!

Step 1:

Use the blob brush tool (Shift-B) to draw two cirles on your design’s cheeks. You could also use the ellipse tool (L) if you want a more exact circle. Don’t worry about the cheek’s color at this point. I have included the hex codes for the two skin colors I used if you want to follow along with this tutorial. 

Step 2:

Select the gradient tool (G) in your left side toolbar and double click on one of the cheeks. The gradient tool will turn the cheek black and white. Go to your gradient panel in your right side toolbar. 

Make sure your cheek is selected and in the type box at the top, change your gradient type from linear to radial. This will create a circular gradiant where the white color is in the center of the circle. 

In the outer portion of the cheek that is black, we want the color to be the same color as the skin color. To do this, I want to copy the hex code for the skin color. To find the hex color click on your skin color and then double click on your fill box in your left-side toolbar. The fill box looks like this:

This fill options box will pop up.

The white box at the bottom that is highlighted in blue is your hex code. Copy your hex code and press ok. Go back to your gradient panel in your right-side toolbar.

With your cheek selected, click on your marker that represents the black section of your gradient. 

Double click on the fill box in your gradient panel. 

Add your hex code in the highlighted box at the bottom of your fill options box and press ok. 

Now click on the marker that represents the white part of your gradient.

Again, double click on the fill box in your gradient panel. Add that same skin color hex code to the highlighted box, but don’t press ok. By adding the hex code for your skin color you have just created a guide. You want the inside of your rosy cheeks to be slightly darker than the skin color.

Drag your color marker slightly to the right. Your color marker looks like an outlined circle like in the picture above. 

Step 3:

With your other cheek selected, select your eyedropper tool (I) and click on your other cheek that has the gradient applied to it. This should apply your gradient effect to the other cheek. After this step you might want to mess with the size of your rosy cheeks, but essentially you are done. 

For Darker Skintones:

You can use the same tutorial for darker skintones with one exception. When you are picking your rosy cheek color for darker skintones, make sure the darker color that you use for the inside of the gradient is not just a darker brown. That color should be a redish brown to create a rosy effect. The hex color I used for the picture above is 812819. 

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The post How to Create Rosy Cheeks in Adobe Illustrator appeared first on Kelcie Makes Patterns.

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When I decided to sell my designs on Creative Market, I would often read about success stories online and while those success stories are really encouraging, they don’t always represent reality. I have been on Creative Market for a while now, but I have only been selling my designs for about 5 months. This post is not intended to brag about how much money I made on Creative Market (sarcasm), but instead, I just wanted to show you what typical growth looks like on Creative Market so when you start your Creative Market shop you can be more prepared for what is to come. 

Let’s get into it!

I started selling my designs on July 8, 2018. This is going to go over all of my sales from July, to today’s date November 5, 2018. 

I have 24 products in my shop. Out of those 24 products I have sold 4 of them. These are the 4 products I have sold so far: 

Sold: July 28, 2018

Revenue: $10

Earnings: $7

Sold: August 26, 2018

Revenue: $4

Earnings: $2.80

Sold: October 24, 2018

Revenue: $4

Earnings: $2.80

Sold: November 5, 2018

Revenue: $4

Earnings: $2.80

Total Earnings: $15.40

When I opened my shop, I was pretty sure I was going to make at least $10,000 dollars that I would use to fund my trip to Disney World. I also remember asking my local city hall what happens if I go over the $20,000 estimated revenue I put on my business license application. I was a little off on the estimate, however, I do think there are things to be learned from my shop’s revenue. 

Things I’ve learned in my first 5 months . . . 

1.  Quality vs Quantity 

There is always this misguided notion that you cannot have a lot of products without sacrificing on the quality, but that is simply not true. On Creative Market, there are a lot of high-quality product bundles and if you can create a great bundle, that is where you are going to make the bulk of your money. My one sale of a pattern bundle accounted for almost half of my earnings.

2. Pricing

I still don’t know what I should price my designs at, but I have noticed some patterns based on my own sales. My patterns are underpriced, but I did so because I looked at other shops that were selling single patterns on Creative Market and priced my patterns similar to the market. I also thought that people would be more likely to buy a product from a new seller with no comments/reviews if the prices were cheap, however, I was wrong. Buyers on Creative Market equate higher prices with quality so, if you’ve created a high-quality product in a field that supports higher prices (e.g., fonts, brushes, etc.) don’t devalue your products for a quick buck. 

3. Cover Images 

The way you present your product is just as important as the product you are selling. I had different cover images than the ones you see now that were quite bland so I decided to change all of them. It wasn’t until after the change that I started to get sales, but even though my cover images could still use a lot of work, I like that when you look at them you can immediately tell that those are my designs. Consistency is key when you are creating your cover images. Your cover images are the first things a customer is going to notice when looking at your products. Having nice cover images is also something the Creative Market staff suggest if you want to get your products picked as free goods so spend the extra time making good cover images.

4. Just Have Fun

I am sure we have all had those dreams of quitting our jobs and successfully selling our designs online, but when you start your shop, do not make it your full-time job. 99% of the time you will not be successful right away. Your first few years of shop ownership should be all about creating new high-quality products and you cannot make those high-quality products if you are worrying about getting enough sales to pay your bills. 

Starting a shop on Creative Market is an easy process, but getting the sales to sustain yourself on Creative Market takes time. Hopefully, that success comes sooner than later, but in the meantime, work hard, make lasting connections, and enjoy yourself. This is the time when you have the most creative control so don’t waste it. 

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The post How I made my first $15.40 on Creative Market appeared first on Kelcie Makes Patterns.

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I have done texture tutorials before, but they mainly dealt with adding textures to patterns or making your own textures. This tutorial is going to mainly focus on adding textures to elements of your designs instead of adding whole pattern textures. I also will go into how to use textures where instead of having small jagged shapes all over your texture you are going to be using a texture that has the small jagged shapes cut out of them like so:

If you want to follow along with this tutorial, you can download this texture here: Texture

So let’s get started!

Step 1:

Draw out your design. If you already have a design you want to add the texture to then you can skip this step, however, make sure your design only has strokes at this point and is not filled in with color. Make sure your design does not overlap.

I have circled the part where my design is overlapping so you can see what I am talking about.

To get rid of that, I am going to use the shape builder tool (Shift-M) to unite the bottom of the pom-pom and the top of the actual hat together. I have highlighted in gray the two sections that I need to unite with the shape builder tool. Select the sections you want to unite and with your shape builder tool, click and hold your mouse down on one of the sections and drag your mouse to the other section you are uniting.

This will make it easier to apply the texture later.

Step 2:

Take your design and add it on top of your texture. If you use the texture I provided, you might want to change your strokes to white so you can see your design.

Select the texture and all elements of your design. Using the shape builder tool (Shift-M), click on every section of your design to cut out shapes in your texture. I have 3 sections in my design that I want to cut out so I am going to click one section and let go, move my mouse to another section, and continue the same process until all my sections are cut out.

The nice thing about having strokes in your design is when you cut out your texture with the shape builder tool it will add strokes around your texture holes so you can see which sections you already cut out. We will remove those strokes later.

Step 3:

Select the background of your texture and delete it.

Step 4:

Select your design and remove the strokes.

You can do this by selecting your fill box in your left-side toolbar. The fill box is shown in the picture above and has a square hole in the center of it. Click on that box to bring it to the front. Underneath the fill box are three separate little boxes. You need to click the little box all the way to the right that has the red diagonal line in it so you can remove the fill.

Step 5:

With your direct selection tool (A), select the outer edges of your design. If you select the whole design it sometimes will fill in the texture with the color you select so that is why you don’t want to select your whole design with the selection tool.

Now double click on your fill box in your left-side toolbar to change the color of your design. Choose the color you want and press ok.

Step 6:

The next step is to add details to your design. Ideally, you would have already added the details to your designs, but if you forget a detail or want to add a highlight or shadow you can add those later on without cover up your texture. To do this, draw out your detail you want to add using the blob brush tool (Shift-b), pen tool (p), pencil tool (n), etc. select your detail you added to your design and the base textured image.

With the shape builder tool (shift-M) selected, hold down alt and click on all of the sections of your detail that are overlapping the texture to delete the sections of your detail that are hiding your texture and you are done.

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The post Adding Textures in Adobe Illustrator (Part 2) appeared first on Kelcie Makes Patterns.

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As a designer, criticism is an inevitable nuisance. I remember on my first blog I received a comment about one of my tutorials. At the time I didn’t get a lot of comments on my blog so any comment was a big deal. The comment said something to the effect of “This did not help” which for nonconstructive criticism, it’s pretty tame, however, I try to respond to all of my comments and that proposed a challenge of how I should respond to this one. Should I delete the comment and act like it never happened or respond with a critical comment. Obvious not because there is a level of professionalism when trying to start a blog/business, however, that doesn’t mean you can’t have a little fun. Here are 5 things you can say in response to hate comments. 

Thank You

Sometimes just a simple thank you is all you need. When someone is tearing down your designs it might take all of your strength not to tell the person they are wrong, but after you write a long worded response with all of the expletives in the world, delete that comment and replace it with Thank You!

That’s Exactly What I was Going For

Every designer has probably received a comment at some point in their design career referring to their designs as “cutesy” or “simple.” Sometimes they might even try to make those comments positive, but no matter how many times you hear “Your designs are so simple. I love them!” you will always take that as an insult. My favorite response to those comments is “That’s exactly what I was going for.” 

I’m Sorry You Feel That Way

This is a great response to a wide variety of criticism and lets the criticizer know that there is no need to respond any further. If you want the conversation to end as quickly as possible, post this response. This also helps you to know if the criticism is legitimate. “I’m Sorry You Feel That Way” is a conversation ending topic as there is really no way to respond to that, however, if someone keeps hurling criticisms at you it’s probably because they like putting other people down. 

Did You Know Geico Can Save You 15% or More on Car Insurance

Sometimes misdirection is the best solution for dealing with criticism. Well, maybe don’t post something too random like the Geico quote, but you can say something to the effect of “Thank You for the advice. Did you see my new post it’s about using the blend tool to make colors lighter or darker. Maybe you would like that better.” With this response, you are acknowledging the criticism, but you are also encouraging them to view more of your posts. This could lead to more criticism, but hey, a view is a view. 

Where Did You Have Trouble Understanding the Post

As someone who writes a lot of tutorials, I often have to distinguish between legitimate criticisms that need my help from those spiteful criticisms that deserve a sarcastic response. Like with the hate comment I mentioned above, It would have been beneficial to know why the tutorial “was not helpful” so I might have asked the person “Where in the tutorial did you have trouble with it?” It’s possible your tutorial was unclear and that would be really helpful to know so you can modify your post for future readers. Not all criticism should be taken personally because there is always something you can learn from that criticism.

I know at the beginning of this post I recommended not deleting criticisms and I still stand by that, however, there is a difference between criticism and hate comments. If someone is insulting your physical appearance or telling you they would be happy if you die, you have every right to delete a comment. The comments section of your blog is for opinions, but not for hate so if you feel like the comment isn’t unnecessarily mean you can delete it. 

If you liked this post, why not share it! It lets me know what posts you like so I can make more posts like this.

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The post Design Talk: Responding to Criticism appeared first on Kelcie Makes Patterns.

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