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Its the middle of the week in the middle of the month….one gorgeous picture – this one was taken at Uluru before a fabulous storm.

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The post Wednesday Wallpaper – pretty pictures appeared first on Jenie Yolland.

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As you know I love sharing the gifts and skills of all types of artists and today I’d like to introduce you to the absolutely astonishing work of Lorenzo Quinn, hence today’s blog: Artist profile. How amazing is Lorenzo Quinn?

Lorenzo Quinn at work

Watch this video that was released on June 8, 2019 about his life his inspiration his art his life.  If you are interested in art in the world today, you’ll be pleased you sat down and watched this 12 minute video.

“Building Bridges” by Lorenzo Quinn

In case you decided NOT to watch the video – I’ll show you an image or two or three of his work that I think will entice you to find out more about him.

“Building Bridges” by Lorenzo Quinn 2019

BUILDING BRIDGES 2019

Sculptor Lorenzo Quinn triumphantly returns to Venice with yet another monumental installation. Six pairs of hands stretch across the basin of the historic Arsenal, joining together to create a bridge of unity.

Building Bridges by Lorenzo Quinn

At almost 50 feet high and 65 meters wide, Building Bridges is a stunning addition to the city as it experiences the Venice Biennale. And for Quinn, it’s a spectacular bookend to his 2017 work in Venice, Support, which garnered worldwide acclaim.

Each pair of the sculpture’s hands celebrate one of six universal human values: Friendship, to build on the future together; Wisdom, to make mutually beneficial decisions; Help, to cement lasting relationships; Faith, to trust in your heart and self-worth; Hope, to persevere in worthwhile endeavors; and Love, the fundamental purpose for it all,” shares Quinn.

Every pair of these hands express these values through their touch. Whether lightly brushing or gripping strongly, the groups form an undeniable expression that translates universally.  These words are taken from an article about Lorenzo from My Modern Met.

SUPPORT 2017

“Support” by Lorenzo Quinn 2017

While the hands of his very famous Support spoke to the dual nature of humanity and its ability to be both creative and destructive in terms of the environment, Building Bridges focuses wholly on the positive. In an age when walls are being raised to divide us, Quinn looks to spread a message of unity and peace in a city built on bridges.

His work featured on the cover of National Geographic as seen in the feature image of this blog.

If you want to learn more about Lorenzo Quinn or follow him on any of the social media platforms, you’ll be able to find him there. His website home page is here

Lorenzo Quinn at work

My Modern Met is about the best blog on all things art.  We should all subscribe because their articles are both inspiring and fascinating.  Thanks MyModernMet!

Lorenzo Quinn at work

Hand of God

From MyModernMet and again on Lorenzo Quinn, they write abut “Hand of God”-  a piece created in 2013.  It is a visually symbolic piece representing a life journey filled with all kinds of strong emotions. This large-scale public installation features a giant hand reaching out from the ground and supporting a slouched, possibly downtrodden, figure resting atop the palm. Isn’t it moving?

Hand of God by Lorenzo Quinn 2013

The piece encapsulates moments of self-doubt and fear and visually conveys what it is to be human. Many of Quinn’s sculptures exemplify our continuous path towards finding balance in life. In his work, he often uses a recurring theme of human hands, stating, “Hands are part of a universal language, they transcend borders.” The recognizable form provides a commonality with which viewers are able to identify, allowing every culture to connect with the work on a basic level.

“This is not a game” by Lorenzo Quinn

After exploring different types of sculpture, including surrealism, Quinn eventually found great success with a well-received, classical approach. According to his bio, many of his pieces start first as interpretations of quotes, phrases, or poetry that then grow and develop into their final, public installations. This piece was recently unveiled in London’s Royal Exchange courtesy of the Castle Fine Art and Halcyon Gallery, and it is open to the public daily and free of charge.

You can read this 2013 Article about Lorenzo Quinn and the sculpture he created titled “This is not a game”, and you can see it here. 

“This is not a game” by Lorenzo Quinn 2013

“Sculptor Lorenzo Quinn playfully designs disembodied hands playing with life-size toys. The artist’s public installation titled Esto no es un juego, or This is not a game, is especially interesting in its declaration juxtaposed with a pair of hands holding onto what appear to be plastic toys. Like the set of a child’s imagination gone wild at playtime, the display is adorned with classic green army men holding varying stances. It is simultaneously playful and powerful, sending a message about the seriousness of war that is made light of through toys.”

Vroom Vroom by Lorenzo Quinn 2011

Visually similar (though more lighthearted in nature), Quinn’s installations titled Vroom Vroom and La Dolce Vita feature an amusing display of hands guiding life-size vehicles like toys. The installations simply show a child-like grip over a car and a gentle hand plucking a vespa to pop a wheelie, but the gestures are universally understood.

The artist provides an entertaining bit of nostalgia with each installation” explains My Modern Met.

Lorenzo Quinn at work

He also makes jewellery in white gold, rose gold and yellow gold.  Here you can see how his work translates magnificently to jewellery.   At the time of writing this blog (June 2019) this bangle is 5,650.00€ incl. VAT which translates to Australian $9,2222.30 or US $6,338.30.  Here’s a link to his shop if you’d like one for the love in your life!

“Finding Love” 18K white gold bangle by Lorenzo Quinn.

There are several versions of this piece. I find it thought-provoking.  Do you?  This is what he’s written about this sculpture “The Force of Nature”.  

The Force of Nature by Lorenzo Quinn

“We humans think of ourselves as supreme beings, above all others and in absolute control of our destiny and our surroundings.

We live with a false sense of security only to be awakened by Mother Nature’s fury, almost as if she needs to remind us of her presence and our responsibility towards her child (The Earth).

After having seen the ravaged coast of Thailand and the Hurricane that affected the Southern States I decided to create a sculpture dedicated to Mother Nature.

This would be reminiscent of the early statues made as peace offerings to the Gods in the hope of quenching their anger. In essence, people are not very different today from the people who lived thousands of years ago. We still devote ourselves to symbols in order to escape our destiny.”


At work – Lorenzo Quinn


Thank you Lorenzo Quinn for sharing your insights with the world, and congratulations for making us think about the world we live in and our responsibilities to the future of our planet! 

And thanks to everyone, as always, for reading today’s blog Artist profile. Lorenzo Quinn? I’ll be sharing the skills and talents of someone else next month.  In case you want to see the last blog about a genius I love click here this one is about Paige Bradley,   and another blog about Zenos Frudakis  

You can recommend someone for me to write about if you like. 

Comments are always welcome and responded to individually. 

jenie x

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What is a hand? She asked me, and I thought I knew what it was but then I felt I should have the correct answer and here’s the answer.

Today we visited our new investment.  We have invested a teeny weeny investment in this lovely little horse.  She is as yet without a name and is merely described by using her pedigree.

Let me tell you something of the derivation of the measurement of The Hand.

(This demonstrates the detail of the cubit rod in the Museo Egizio of Turin, showing digit, palm, hand and fist lengths.)  See the centre line of this graph – its an ancient Royal Egyptian measurement.

The hand, sometimes also called a handbreadth or handsbreadth is an antropic unit originally based on the breadth of a male human hand, usually a clenched fist and sometimes with and sometimes without the inclusion of the thumb.  The hand is usually about 4inches of 101.6mm.

You can even read how the dimension of “the hand” was used as far back as in Biblical times.  The example from Ezekiel 40:43 I have copied for you to see:

“This is the law of the house; Upon the top of the mountain the whole limit thereof round about shall be most holy. Behold, this is the law of the house.

And these are the measures of the altar after the cubits: The cubit is a cubit and an hand breadth; even the bottom shall be a cubit, and the breadth a cubit, and the border thereof by the edge thereof round about shall be a span: and this shall be the higher place of the altar.“

According to the An Acte for Bryde of Horses, “The hand” is a traditional unit in the UK as well.  It was standardized at four inches by a statute of King Henry VIII in 1540, but some confusion between the various types of hand measurement, and particularly between the hand and the handsbreadth, appears to have persisted.

The adoption of the international inch in 1959 allowed for a standardized imperial form and a metric conversion. It may be abbreviated to “h” or “hh”.

A horse is measured from the ground to the top of the highest non-variable point of the skeleton, the withers.   For official measurement, the spinous process of the fifth thoracic vertebra may be identified by palpation, and marked if necessary.     Miniature horses, but not miniature ponies, are measured at the base of the last true hairs of the mane rather than at the withers.

Interestingly, for international competition regulated by the Fédération Équestre Internationale (FEI) and for USEF competition in the US, a horse can be measured with shoes on or off.

In the United Kingdom, official measurement of horses is overseen by the Joint Measurement Board (JMB). For JMB purposes, the shoes must be removed and the hooves correctly prepared for shoeing prior to measurement.

Today, it is used to measure the height of horses in some English-speaking countries, including Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and the United States.

There you go, now I’ll be you understand more about what is meant by The Hand that you ever did.

I hope you enjoy the images I took today at the new Luke Oliver Stables near Romsey in Victoria, click here to find out more.

Thanks Luke for a fabulous day at your Stables! Thank you!

The post What is a hand? She asked me and I thought I knew appeared first on Jenie Yolland.

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The date of the discovery of glass seems to be lost in antiquity; but its history is fascinating.

People had used naturally occurring glass, especially obsidian (volcanic glass), before they learned how to make glass.

Obsidian was used for production of knives, arrowheads, jewelry and money.

The ancient Roman historian Pliny the Elder (Ad 23-89) suggested that Phoenician merchants made the first glass in the region of Syria around 5000BC.

Pliny reported the tale of natron (soda) merchants who, when they stopped to prepare a meal, supported their cooking vessels on the beach with blocks from their cargo. The heat of the fire fused natron and sand, and a new substance was formed. This, Pliny says, was the origin of glass.

But according to the archaeological evidence, man first made glass in Eastern Mesopotamia and Egypt around 3500BC and the first glass vessels were made about 1500BC in Egypt and Mesopotamia.

Clear phiale, ground and polished with stones or sand and water.

For the next 300 years, the glass industry was increased rapidly and then declined. In Mesopotamia it was revived in about 700BC and in Egypt in the 500’s BC.

For the next 500 years, Egypt, Syria and the other countries along the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea were centres for glass manufacturing.  There’s a fascinating article here about how the experts argue that glass was first in Egypt and not Mesopotamia.

The oldest glass ingot was discovered in the 1300 B.C. Egyptian Uluburun shipwreck off the coast of Turkey. Approximately 175 glass ingots of cobalt blue turquoise and lavender were found (the earliest intact glass ingots known)  – as a side note, the discovery of the Uluburun shipwreck is truly fascinating and worth reading about.

Archaeological evidence for glass making during the Roman period is scarce, but by drawing comparisons with the later Islamic and Byzantine periods, it is clear that glass making was a significant industry.

This pyxis is an exemplary example of luxury Roman glassware, ca. late 1st century BC. Walters Art Museum, Baltimore

Ritual Glassmaking in Mesopotamia

As early as 3,300 years ago, ritual instructions for glass making in Mesopotamia were written on clay tablets in a cuneiform script. These instructions were copied and recopied over the centuries.

One group of clay tablets detailing glass making is from the library of King Assurbanipal (668-627 B.C.) and is currently housed in the British Museum. Part of the translation of the tablets (from Glass and Glassmaking in Ancient Mesopotamia by Leo Oppenheim) is below.

“When you set up the foundation of kiln to make glass, you first search in a favorable month for a propitious day, and only then you set up the foundation of the kiln. As soon as you have completely finished in the building of the kiln, you go and place Kubu-images there, no outsider or stranger should enter the building thereafter; an unclean person must not even pass in front of the images. You regularly perform libation offerings before the Kubu-images. On the day when you plan to place the glass in the kiln, you make a sheep sacrifice before the Kubu-images, you place juniper incense on the censer, you pour out a libation of honey and liquid butter, and then only, you make a fire in the hearth of the kiln and place the glass in the kiln…

6th-century bottle from Syria, on display at the Landesmuseum Württemberg.

If you want to produce zagindurû-colored [a greenish type of lapis lazuli] glass, you finely grind, separately, ten minas [about one pound] of immanakku-stone [sand], fifteen minas of naga-plant ashes, and 1 2/3 minas of ‘white plant.’ You mix these together. You put them into a cold kiln which has four fire openings, and arrange the mixture between the four openings… You keep a good and smokeless fire burning until the glass glows golden yellow. You pour it on a kiln-fired brick and this is called zukû-glass.

You place ten minas of “slow” copper-compound in a clean dabtu-pan. You put it into a hot chamber kiln… You crush and grind finely ten minas of zukû -glass. You open the door of the kiln and throw the ground glass upon the copper compound…When the glass assumes the color of ripe grapes, you keep it boiling for a time … After it has become yellow [hot], you observe some drops forming at the tip of the rake. If the glass is homogeneous, you pour it inside the kiln in a new dabtu-pan, and out of the cooled-off kiln emerges zagindurû-colored glass.”

Roman glass from the 2nd century

Wow – it sounds almost as complicated as when I make glass in my kiln!

Although this ancient recipe for glass making is shrouded in mystical rituals, the same basic ingredients are still used today.

  • immanakku-stone (sand) – the main component of glass
  • naga-plant ashes (soda ash) – the alkali flux that helps to lower the melting temperature of the sand
  • ‘white plant’ – unknown ingredient
  • “slow” copper compound – can be used as a colorant for glass

A triptych of an ancient stained-glass window, with central framed aperture. Small detail is repeated in three colour versions, with space for text or insertion of an image.

By the end of the Roman period glass was being produced in large quantities contained in tanks situated inside highly specialised furnaces, as an 8-tonne glass slab recovered from Bet She’arim illustrates. These workshops could produce many tonnes of raw glass in a single furnace firing, and although this firing might have taken weeks, a single primary workshop could potentially supply multiple secondary glass working sites.

Roman glass depicting a gladiator, found at Begram, Afghanistan, which was once part of the Greco-Bactrian Kingdom, but was ruled by the Kushan Empire during the contemporaneous Roman Principate period, to which the glass belongs, 52-125 AD (although there is some scholarly debate about the precise dating)

It is therefore thought that raw glass production was entered around a relatively small number of workshops, where glass was produced on a large scale and then broken into chunks.  There is only limited evidence for local glass making, and only in context of window glass.  The development of this large-scale industry is not fully understood, but Pliny’s Natural History, in addition to evidence for the first use of molten glass in the mid-1st century AD, indicates that furnace technologies experienced marked development during the early-to-mid-1st century AD, in tandem with the expansion of glass production.

Glass was becoming big business.

The use of coloured glass in windows is of great antiquity. It is said to have been imitated from the Byzantine-Greeks by the Saracenic races, and it is continued in the cities of the East to the present day.

Coloured glass was used in the palaces of the Roman Emperors in the mosaic work with which the walls and floors were decorated, and that is supposed to have been the first form in which glass was used pictorially.

The earliest direct reference to coloured glass windows in Europe occurs in a description of the Basilica of St Paul at Rome, written in the end of the fourth century. The next allusion to it is made in an account of a church built at Lyons in the fifth century, the windows of which are described as being composed of coloured glass “arranged in patterns.” Those early windows were furnished with “stained glass”—that is, glass coloured in the pot, as distinguished from “painted glass,” which is produced by the application of colours to the surface.

The earliest existing examples of painted windows are believed to be those in the Abbey of Tergernsee in Bavaria, which were presented to the abbey in the year 999.

Figure subjects do not appear to have been introduced until the middle of the eleventh century, when “The Mystery of Paschasius” was illustrated in one of the windows of a church at Dijon. The French King Charles le Chauve was the first great patron of glass-painting; and under the impetus it received from the encouragement of royalty, the art became universal, painted glass windows being introduced into all religious edifices of any pretensions.

In the twelfth and thirteenth centuries glass-painting reached its highest point of perfection, the French being the most successful artists.

The mosaic and medallion windows of the thirteenth century are considered to be the best specimens of decorative work ever produced. The oldest English examples of that period are in Canterbury and Salisbury Cathedrals; but the finest are in York Minster and Lincoln Cathedral. In France the chief works of the same age embrace some of extraordinary grandeur and beauty —such as the windows of the cathedrals of Chartres, Bourg

Glass vessel from the 2nd century AD found in Bosanski Novi.

es, Paris, Amiens, and Rouen, and in the magnificent Sainte Chapelle at Paris.

The first mention of glass in English history relates to the glazing of the windows of a church at Wearmouth, in Durham, which was done in the year 674 by workmen brought from abroad.

I do hope you’ve enjoyed this little blog. I love working with this amazing substance, and I hope you enjoy learning abut it from my articles. If you want to see my glass work or book in for one of my classes, just head to jenieyolland.com.

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Can you imagine making your own glass platter – you can keep it for yourself or give it to someone special – you can come to a workshop with your bestie and create shared memories.

Well come to one of Jenie Yolland’s workshops with your bestie and create shared memories.  There’s nothing better than an experience shared with your friends!

You have loads of colours to choose from and you can see how its done here. The tools you need are all available for you to use right here in our studios.

OK, you’ll need an oil filled glass cutter: These are the ones we use, top quality, made by Toyo in Japan. These hand-held glass cutters have an oil reservoir in the centre for self-lubrication plus they are transparent to easily monitor fluid level. Makes it very easy to create the shapes you want to!

We put sewing machine oil in them because its a very fine oil and runs easily through the stem of the cutter and onto the carbide wheel that scores the glass telling the glass molecules to separate along your score line.  Score line?  Keep reading.

When you’ve scored your glass, you “run” the score with these “running pliers”.  The mark you’ve made on the glass actually runs from the bottom to the top like a ladder does in stockings.  You can watch it go from the bottom to the top and the glass just separates along this line like magic!

Needless to say, all this time you’ve been wearing safety glasses to protect your precious eyes.  These need to be worn over your reading glasses if you are wearing prescription glasses.  Safety practices are the best practice.

In our studios each person cuts their glass on a canvas base.  This gives you a lovely white background so you can see the colours of the glass you are working on. As well as this it gives you a soft surface for the glass to move and flex as it needs to while you are cutting it.  The canvas base is a softer landing spot for the carbide wheel on your cutter as well. You can see here a piece of blue glass being cut using the correct vertical angle and using the black plastic “L” rulers that everyone is given to work with. It’s easy, and fun!

Everyone gets to choose from loads of different colours and as you can see from the results – everyone makes something absolutely UNIQUE!

When you arrive at the workshop we explain to you about what glass does inside the kiln at different temperatures.  We have a whole board of samplers that show what’s happening and allows you to understand a little about the fundamentals of glass and what will happen to your piece after you leave the studio. Many people say this sets them thinking about other projects to try later on!

The piece you’ll make is a bit like making an open sandwich.

Everyone gets a piece of clear and then they start choosing what goes on top.  You have loads of glass to choose from to go on the top.  You can choose glass with swirls, like the licorice black and white you can see above or transparent in a wide variety of colours.

There’s a piece of clear System 96 glass (clean and with ground edges) sitting on ceramic fibre paper which in itself is sitting on a solid kiln shelf.  This ceramic fibre paper is 1mm thick, its exactly like paper you use in your printer, however, its fire proof.  We cut it with scissors and lay it between your kiln shelf and the clear glass, that forms the basis of your masterpiece.  Here you can see a whole roll of the ceramic fibre paper.

You cut your own pieces and simply lay them on the clear base sheet of glass.  Here’s a piece that is about half way through being put together.  The student has gaps between the coloured glass pieces as we are going to add powdered glass (deep black in colour) between the pieces to make it look like a stained glass work.

When she finished laying her coloured glass on the top she selects what shape she’d like the finished item to be.

There are currently four different shapes for you to choose from, and then you leave the rest of it up to me.  I’ll fire it and wash it the first time to fuse all the pieces together gently.  The temperature of this first firing isn’t as hot as the second firing.  That’s called “tack fusing”. Its a bit like gluing it together.

The tack fused glass item has been thoroughly washed and dried, and now you can see it as been loaded with black glass frit.  Black glass powdered that is also made by the same company who makes the sheet glass.   (It is important to put glass together that has the same COE, this isn’t the venue for explaining that (its technical and for another blog).

After being full fused, it is now ready for its third and final firing.  This time it goes in at a much lower temperature and is slumped into the Nippon shape that has been chosen for this piece.

How much would you like to make something like this?

Some students opt for a cheeseboard shape, and some prefer different shaped platters, here are some examples.

See the happy faces.  I love these workshops.  Give the gift of a workshop to someone you love.

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So many of you have finished the Level One workshops we have on offer … Heart Workshop, Life’s Colours Plate Making, Jewellery Workshop, and our Coaster Workshop. 

So from May 1st we’ll be offering a greater variety to choose from in our Level 2 Workshop area (with more being added by popular request all the time). 

BAGUETTE PLATTERS

Are you interested in creating a platter that’s the shape of the much-loved French Meadow platter but in your own colour combination?  Well its here! 

The platter you’ll make is 17cms in width and 50cms in length. You can create any design you like.  And here’s the everyone’s favourite “Life’s Colours” in this interesting and practical size and shape.  As with all our workshops, everything is included.  You don’t need to purchase anything at all before during or after our classes. 

My dog, Zachary, is never phased by me taking glass photographs out doors – you have to love a Labrador!

And the very dark blue adventurine one on white (at the top of the page) was made by a student who regularly comes to the studio and makes these “baguette” platters for any upcoming family wedding or major birthday.  Here’s another one she’s designed especially for a family member.

And here is a piece I make for my customers as part of my bold and earthy Arizona series.


Also you can create something elegantly stylish – see this Pick Up Stick design – I love it and I hope you do too. The baguette here is from Bakers Delight – does that give you some idea of the size of this glass piece?

For information about booking in to this workshop – click the link here.

DRAPES

Also you can learn about draping your glass pieces.  Some sample pictures are here to help you decide which shapes you’d like to try. 

This was created from a circular base as was this teal piece below.

Alternatively you can do a drape in a square design and it gives you more of a handkerchief effect.  See here:

Or if you want to try your hand at something completely different – here’s a truly organic drape you can learn about. 

GIANT CENTREPIECES

As well as these two new workshops you can also make a Giant Centrepiece.  Its 33cms x 44cms and is a stunning gift to present to someone for a significant birthday or family event. 

You can see here its in the style of my Life’s Colours design.  This was a recent order for a wedding present.  I can’t show you the images of the lady collecting it because the wedding hasn’t happened yet and the gift hasn’t been presented yet.  But I hope the groom loves his wedding gift from his sister.

Another Giant Centrepiece design you can see here was also made by me for a special order: this is the Sunrise Anticipation design. 

Or you could make my Rainforest Freedom design – a bit  hard to see here as the edge is white against a white table.  This one was sold almost as soon as it was finished, hence no decent pictures on contrasting surfaces.  I just want you to get the idea of the lovely shape of this Centrepiece. 

MIX AND MATCH!

These workshops are all “mix and match workshops” which means that if you want to make this item and your friend wants to make something else, we can mix and match whatever combination you’d like. 

So one of you can make a baguette platter and the other one can make a set of coasters or a Giant Centrepiece – it’s “whatever you want” as long as you both have completed the Level 1 workshops with me. 

As always, if you don’t see a date that suits your diary please call me and we’ll work out a new date for you and your family or friends. 

Next term there’ll be new workshops which include more sculptural challenges for you, for example a “Leaf Litter Workshop” … here’s a sneak peak!

Email me if you have any questions at all glass@jenieyolland.com

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I want to share with you the diversity of pieces being created in our new French Meadow workshops.

You can see some of these amazing platters being created here. I’ve loved watching these being built and I hope you do too.

some people are adding cute little bumble bees to their French Meadow platters.

some people are adding flowers – this one apparently is called an Angel flower.

another bumble bee!

  • a butterfly being created with clear iridized wings
  • sometimes people want coasters instead of a baguette platter

some of the works are simple with few colours and others have loads of colours and are bright and full of a variety of colours and textures.

Often the workshops include two people who have come to the studio together to enjoy the experience of creating two items for their home.

He’s making the stringers for all of their pieces

Some people create their flowers in a random patter and others put their flowers on their platters very carefully.

The best part is when they see their finished work and realize just how clever they’ve been creating something so wonderful.

I hope you’ve enjoyed seeing a few of our achievements in our French Meadow workshops.

  • Next I’ll show you the new round French Meadow workshop ideas.

I hope you enjoyed this blog. Please feel free to book into any of our French Workshops when ever time allows, I look forward to seeing you soon.

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100+ new colours on their way to a studio near you! Yes, that’s right! They’re on their way to my studio, at 127 Church Street, Richmond, Melbourne, Australia.

Why we are getting 100+ new colours?

After the complete debacle that started at a community meeting in February of 2016, when Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (ODEQ) air toxics specialist Sarah Armitage publicly stated “… yes, we’re confident it’s Bullseye [Glass Company]” being the source for pollutants in the Brooklyn neighborhood”, it started the dominoes falling.

The events of 2016

The Bullseye Glass Company is a major manufacturer of coloured glass for art and architecture with worldwide distribution and a strong commitment to research, education, and promoting glass art. 

Bullseye was forced to radically reduce their manufacturing to refurbish and fight their lawsuit, (If you want to know more about what I’m talking about you can read more here.)  The neighbors were alarmed, the media went into overdrive and as a result the legislation changed. 

Renowned manufacturers Spectrum Glass, Woodinville, Washington State announced on May 12, 2016 it was closing its operations permanently, and Uroboros Glass, Portland, Oregan, announced closure on September 28, 2016 resulting in devastation to the art glass community (including Oceanside Glass & Tile who utilised their glass in many product lines).

This was the worst news for the Warm Glass family across the planet as there was almost nowhere else to purchase our basic product.  Yes, there are other producers of fusing glass, but none that produced high quality product in quantities enough for us fusers.  Everyone I know of, in our glass world uses either Bullseye glass, Spectrum Glass, Uroboros, Kokomo, or Youghiogheny glass.

The world of art glass appeared to be the verge of collapse, and the world as a whole would have been poorer.

Who saved the day?

So with fearless creativity and a hunger to keep art glass alive Oceanside Glass & Tile made a phone call that would change the history of art glass forever … they purchased Spectrum Glass and Uroboros Glass and their recipes and their equipment.

The story of Oceanside Glasstile is fascinating.   This is from their website.  “Our story begins just over 25 years ago in the year 1992. Three artists and a young entrepreneur (all who love surfing) created a game-changing trifecta – Tile, Glass and Sustainability. Forging into uncharted waters to develop handcrafted tile with recycled bottle glass, Oceanside Glasstile was born.” 

The founding fathers of this business were Sean Gildea, Boyce Lundstrom, John Stokesbury and Don Petty.

Who are they – this Oceanside?

A humble backyard operation grew its roots in Oceanside.  These glass makers broadened their horizons of artistic expression inspired by travel, nature and modern design.  With customers who shared their vision for a renaissance of art tile, they helped pioneer a new era.  The adventure was catalyzed by a boundless spirit of innovation as Oceanside made waves across the design and building industry.

The Hearst Castle enlisted Oceanside Glasstile to develop tile to refurbish their indoor roman pool.

Quickly outgrowing the shop on Cleveland St. in Oceanside, they expanded to a funky factory down Coast Highway in Carlsbad. 

The old barrio WWII era buildings were perfect for a glass production line.  With homegrown equipment and a salvaged conveyor oven (Lehr), the founders could feel the swell picking up. The housing economy, product desirability and design trends all lined up to produce a perfect storm that propelled the team from a small shop to a more sophisticated enterprise. 

With a continued commitment to innovation, the company outfitted a new manufacturing facility with state of the art equipment, producing contemporay tiles and even bespoke tiles for unique designs.  See the violin pool above! 

Then in 2017  3 Factories Become 1 ! with a big warehouse move to a new offsite location, El Aguila in Mexico – which means “The Eagle” in Spanish.

This opened up space under the Oceanside Glass & Tile factory roof to move in Spectrum’s production, but not without additional improvements to the gas, electric, and water lines. Over the course of the next four months, trenches were dug, conduits were laid, and machinery was assembled. Take a virtual tour here to see how much the factory has changed.

Oceanside Glasstile has been an environmental steward since their inception in 1992.

All Oceanside Glass & Tile is made primarily from silica sand, an abundant natural resource, and recycled content that may include recycled bottle glass from curbside recycling programs

In June 2017 the factory was finished and Oceanside created an enormous time line of when they would be producing the glass needed for the cold workers (mosaic artists, leadlighters, etc) as well as the fusible glass that all the warm glass people were waiting for.  The two glasses aren’t the same.  The two glass recipes are different.  The two glasses had different requirements completely.  When they had scrap of COLD GLASS they couldn’t add it to a batch of WARM GLASS for lots of different reasons. 

So guess what some genius decided?

Let’s make all the glass WARM GLASS so any scrap anything coming out of their new factory can have two functions – it can be used by the WARM GLASS people and the COLD GLASS people.  Happy Days!  The only drawback, and there always seems to be a drawback, is that the price of warm glass rose enormously.  Its not a cheap hobby!  Don’t take it up if you can’t afford it!

Hence the 100+ new colours on their way! 

There are loads of colours that we used to purchase that have been “retired”: here is a PDF of those colours if you are interested to know. 

However, much more exciting are all the new colours that they used to make for the leadlight industry and the mosaic industry that we will now be able to put in our kilns safely and happily!  Oh Frabjous Day!

I haven’t seen any of the new colours “in the flesh” yet, but I’ll share them with you when I see them. The good news is that colours and designs that have been unavailable since 2017 are now on their way back into production and hence our studios! 

I’ve attached a list here of the colours which will be available eventually. 

The shipping to Australia, of course, will add to the cost and time delay in them actually getting to 127 Church Street, but if you want a particular colour for a project, let me know and I can get hold of them and get them flown out, just for you, from the USA wholesaler fairly quickly.  I’ll even get back in stock, my beloved 171SF (the orange/red) that I love so much for my Barcelona series which goes all over the world, and that our students love too.

Lagoon Opal Art glass will be coming back too … people love it as the base for their jewellery

More on this as soon as I see the new glass colour combinations that the people at Oceanside Tile and Glass have created. 

Thanks for reading, please let me know what colours you’d like to learn more about. Exciting times, huh?! Let your imagination loose!

jenie yolland

The post 100+ new colours on their way – in production – not here yet – but on their way! appeared first on Jenie Yolland.

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I want to share with you some of the delightful Hearts that have been created in our Heart in Art Glass Workshops. There are some lovely stories that have come as a result of creative the workshop: no wonder I love my “job”.

As you can see, people come and make hearts in glass in all different colour combinations. Its a fun – and fast – workshop. Just 90 minutes long – but plenty of time to learn new skills and have fun!

After they’ve gone from the studio, I put the hearts which are sitting on the kiln paper on ceramic fibre board, and put them into the kiln. I don’t want the hearts to lose their lovely texture so I put it into a firing which is not too hot. If I did a hot fuse or a full fuse as we call it, the glass would all melt together and the heart shape would be lost.

Here’s a picture to describe what I’m doing at this point.

  • Close up image of a heart after its been “tack” fused in the kiln …
  • And this is what a thick piece of glass looks like when its been “full” fused.

So I “tack” fuse all the hearts in my kiln. After that I cut clear pieces of glass that fit perfectly inside the square box frame in the colour they have chosen. Mostly people choose white, but sometimes the black frame looks better given the colour combination they’ve used for their heart. This week I built a heart in a black frame and it looks simply stunning. Here it is!

  • at the end of the workshop before firing
  • after firing and ready for putting in its box frame
  • ready to be collected, ready to hang!

At the same workshop was a young man who asked if his art glass heart could be ready for him to collect on Valentine’s Day. This was certainly possible as its usually only one firing for the hearts. He had organized to come to the workshop and make the heart in the colours most loved by his girlfriend, and then give her the heart on Valentine’s Day.

Here he is building his heart in the workshop.

  • This proves he made it himself – what a thoughtful man!
  • Here’s the piece before firing
  • His gift, framed and ready for her
  • Happy Valentine’s Day
  • Happy Valentine’s Day

This made my day, probably my week!

Thank you to my wonderful students!

I really do love my job, especially on days like this. Spreading the joy of art glass. That’s what it’s all about. And they call this “work”!

The post Heart Workshop Successes on Valentine’s Day 2019 appeared first on Jenie Yolland.

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Weird wonky and wonderful Wednesday – experiments and unusual happenings in and around the kiln that I’d like to share with you from the past week or so!

So: ever wondered what would happen to that glass if you popped it in the kiln for a little firing? 

Wonky wine glass by Jenie Yolland (just for the fun of it)

Here you can see, it bent slightly on its base, however the actual shape of the mouth of the glass melted even more. The glass on the mouth is much thinner so the heat affected it more than the base.

Cute wonky wine glass by Jenie Yolland

You can see here how much the mouth of the glass changed shape with just a little heat. I’m sorry but I can’t remember the exact temperatures – too much wine perhaps. Not sure how good it will be as a drinking vessel any more – I may need to test it!

more wonky stuff later.

Want more information about wonky stuff 0r to add your own?  Feel free to email me via our contact page.  Talk soon.

The post Weird, wonky and wonderful Wednesday – experiments and unusual happenings in and around the kiln appeared first on Jenie Yolland.

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