Loading...

Follow International Culinary Studio Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid
Critical thinking and how to effectively evaluate information

In an assignment, you not only need to demonstrate that you have studied and understood the subject but also that you have thought about it and can communicate your thoughts. A significant aspect of this is to think critically, analyze, and evaluate the data you discover during your studies.

Critical thinking

The way the thinker thinks— about any topic, material, or issue— increases the quality of his / her thinking by competently analyzing, assessing, and reconstructing it. Critical thought is self-directed, self-disciplined, and self-monitored thinking.

Identify the problem

Look at the text you have on the subject:
• What are the main points?
• What’s the case for or against?
• Are there assumptions (things without evidence accepted as real)?

Next look at the problem you have to solve or the issue at hand. Write it down and then see if you can break it down into its separate parts and begin by choosing one of them. Take into account:

• What do you believe about the problem?
• Why do you believe you’re doing that?

Critical thinkers do not recognize as facts all thoughts, theories, and findings. They have an attitude to examine thoughts and findings. They create reasoned, logical, and well-thought-out decisions by evaluating the proof supporting a certain hypothesis or conclusion.

Critical thinkers may ask questions such as;

“What information does that support?”
“How has this information been obtained?”
“Who received the information ?”
“What is the validity of the information ?”
“Why is it like this?”
“Why is it doing that?”
“How are we aware of it?”
“Are there any other options?”

Ask, “for example,” ‘ why’ and’ so what?’

You could also use the sentence:’ “for example,” ‘ why’ and’ so what? To assist with your questioning. For instance, say you thought about the issues created by high charges for students. Start with the subject and ask:’ Can I think of any instances?

Basic concept: high fees for students.
• For example: the cost of the course is as high as $10,000 annually.
• Why: More learners want to study, so there is less tax money per student.
• What, then? Poorer students could be put off from studying.

Now take every fresh concept and apply’ why and what, for example.’ This leads to more thoughts, for which you can use the same method.

Consider looking at opposing opinions. In the above instance, you may consider why learners should pay for themselves.

Best to use diagrams

You can also use diagrams or mind maps to see how concepts relate to each other. The following arrows can be used for a flow diagram, an organizational chart, or a mind map:

• Display sequence:’ This is followed by …”
• Cause and impact:’ A contributes to B because…’
• Mean’ for example’ means’ B causes A.’
• Mean’ Because of that, this is essential.’

Applying ABCDs of Evaluating Sources Author

• Think about the author(s) of the source after you discover a source of text you might want to use. Are the author’s specialists and able to write about the subject? What are their credentials? Are they a member of any organization or university?
• Consider the publisher or source as well. Where has the data been released? Was it released in a peer-reviewed journal? Examine the author and source a little to make sure the information supplied is reputable.

Bias

• Look for any information bias. Does the submitted text cover all aspects of the subject in a neutral, objective fashion? What is the aim… of informing, teaching, convincing or selling this information?

Content

• Assess the real content of the document critically. Is the information presented as a shallow overview or a thorough analysis? Is the information appropriate to your subject, or is it too different? Is the level of readership too easy or advanced?
• Focus also on content accuracy. Is the information consistent with your knowledge of the subject and can you check allegations from other sources? Compare its results with those of other associated papers. Don’t depend on one source alone.

Date

• Take into account when the information was released, updated, or amended. Has the information become obsolete? See also the date given in the reference list. Is the source of information too old?

Evaluate the material

You can assess the different opinions with your sources, looking at:
• What evidence is there for the multiple viewpoints?
• Which points agree, and which do not agree?
• It’s important to consider all sides of the argument, particularly those with which you disagree.
• Are the different sources and thoughts logically connected?
• Compare your original thoughts on the subject with what you discovered? Do you still believe the same thing, or do you change your opinions?
• Which of your thoughts are applicable to your requirements?

Synthesizing and writing

You should strive to synthesize the content by incorporating published writing into your own writing. Synthesization needs critical reading and thinking in order to compare and highlight similarities, differences, and relations between distinct materials. When the authors effectively synthesize them, they present fresh thoughts based on other proof or arguments.

Synthesis can also be seen as an expansion of — or a more complex type of — analysis. One primary distinction is that various sources are involved, while analytics often concentrate on one source.

The post Critical Thinking and how to effectively evaluate information appeared first on International Culinary Studio.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
How  to read critically What is critical reading?

Critical reading does not necessarily mean that you are critical of what you read. Reading and thinking critically do not imply to be “critical” about an idea, argument, or piece of writing-claiming it is defective or defective somehow.

Critical reading implies getting involved with what you read by asking questions like,’ What is the writer attempting to say? Or’ what is provided as the primary reasoning? There is a reasoned argument in the critical reading which assesses and analyzes what you have read. Therefore-in the educational sense – Being critical, therefore – in an academic sense – means advancing your understanding, not dismissing and therefore closing off learning.

Critical reading means exercising your judgment on what you read, that is, not taking anything you read with a face value.
You are confronted with the author’s interpretation and opinion when reading scholarly content. Of course, various authors will have distinct slants. You should always look at what you read critically and find constraints, omissions, inconsistencies, disregards, and arguments against what you read.

In scholarly circles, while you are a student, you should comprehend and create your own judgments based on what you read.

As a critical viewer, you should consider:

• What the text says: you should be able to take notes after reading a piece, paraphrasing the main issues–in your own words.
• What the text explains: you should be sure that the text has been adequately understood so that you can use your own example and compare it with other writings about the topic.
• Text interpretation: this implies you should be able to analyze the text in full and indicate a significance for the entire text.
Critical reading implies that you can think about what a text says, what it defines and what it means by examining the style, structure, and content of the writing, the language used, and the content.

Proficient adult readers:
  • Know why they are reading the text
  • Preview and make predictions
  • Do selective readings
  • Connect text and associate it with, what they already know
  • Refine predictions, and expectations
  • Use context to define unfamiliar phrases
  • Rereading and making notes
  • Assess the quality of the text
  • Reviewing significant points in the text
Reinforce your reading

To help you take in and understand what you are reading, also remember to:

• Stop for a few minutes at the end of each chapter to think about what you read and summarize the key points in your own words.
• Tell another person what you read about. If they don’t know anything about the subject, what would you ask them to understand it?
• Take part in group discussions and talk to your fellow learners about what you read.
• Please consider why your assessor asked you to read the text. What questions would your lecturer ask to make sure that you understand the text? Write down these questions and then attempt your own words to answer them.

The post How To Read Critically appeared first on International Culinary Studio.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Make the most of your reading

Reading is a significant component of your research. Below we have some handy tips and different methods to help you make the most out of the text you do. Throughout, you will be required to read the course material and assessments, and part of this will require research. These will most likely include creating text, offer suggested reading, refer you to library books, publications, and relevant internet sources.

It’s vital that you read efficiently and effectively for your studies to be successful: this implies reading what is essential, without wasting time, so that you can comprehend, use and recall whatever you have read. Below are advice, methods, and strategies that you can use to help you make the most of your studies.

Use these general tips for reading for any subject. 

Be selective. You should not read books from the beginning to the end.

Change approach. Depending on how helpful the content is for your purpose, you need to build the skills required to switch from one kind of reading to another. Using the book’s index pages at the end, you can find the specific pages you need.

Rather read from paper. Avoid reading from computer screens for lengthy periods if you use the web. It may be best to print an electronic copy on the appropriate font that you enjoy to read. Set objectives. When you read, it is simple to lose focus. 

Set yourself goals for reading through the assignment with clear goals for what you want to accomplish. 

Focus on the objective. Before you begin reading, write down the questions you need to answer. This will enhance your focus and save you from being side-tracked. 

Active Reading 

Active reading can assist you in getting the most from your text. This is how you do it:

Break the reading task into manageable parts or chunks before reading it. Skim read every portion. How do you do this?: Start by thinking about the subject.

  • What are you aware of?
  • What are you expecting to learn?
  • What would you like to know?

Check for headings, pieces of text in bold or italics, graphics, and text boxes. Then ask yourself:

  • Do you see anything that looks familiar?
  • See something in the writing which is new to you?

What’s your general feeling about the text?

After reading the text

Think about what you’ve just read after it.

  • What are the key issues?
  • Please note the key points and use your own phrases to clarify their meanings.
  • Could you explain the concept to another student or family member? Try to say it out loud to yourself, as this will assist in clarifying your thinking.
  • If you’re not sure what the words mean, find out–if you can’t understand what it means, you can’t use it. (And if you do not have anyone to explain it to, attempt an’ imaginary’ friend, or disclose it to your dog or cat).
  • Make a glossary, e.g., keep a notebook with new phrases, words, or jargon and technical terms that you need to understand.

Using the scan, skim, slurp, and summarize approach.
Skimming and scanning are reading methods using the fast motion of the eye and keywords to move text fast for slightly distinct reasons. Skimming means reading quickly to get an overview of the content. Scanning entails reading quickly to discover particular facts. While skimming informs you what general information is in a chapter, scanning enables you to find specific facts. Skimming is like snorkeling, and scanning is more like diving with pearls.

This is a straightforward four-stage method that helps to improve your reading.
1. Scan

  • Look over the page or websites you’re going to read rapidly.
  • Note the headings, the photos, and diagrams (usually in large print).
  • This should offer you an idea of what it is like to read.

2. Skim

  • Skim read the text
  • Dip into the text in search of the subheadings, keywords, and thoughts–for anything which stands out.
  • Pay attention to bold or italic phrases or look for text boxes in the document.

3. Slurp

Return to your main concepts when you skim the text and’ slurp’ (or’ drink’) data off the page with brief bouts of focused reading. Ask questions while you read so that the data is understood and remembered. You should ask yourself these questions:

  • What is this text in front of me? 
  • What do I already understand about this subject?
  • How can I use this data in my own life/studies?

4. Stop thinking about what you read after every slurp (5 to 10 minutes of reading burst).

  • Give yourself the opportunity to sink in the data.
  • Summarize the information, i.e., place your own phrases in the information and thoughts you have just read.

Preview-View-Review System of Study 
The View relates to either a lecture, a book chapter, or anything to be studied. What’s best is to prepare our minds for the things to come. This is where the Preview is useful. The objective of the Preview is to give our minds a taste of what will happen before the real incident takes place. In other words, pre-study the material (or listen/take notes while going through the study material). During the preview phase, our mind activates the associated understanding that it has stored on this topic automatically. For example, if we read a Supervising Staff chapter, the Preview will activate related knowledge and increase the likelihood of remembering things during the View (e.g., the actual chapter reading).

So, how to Preview effectively? Well, there can be a lot of distinct reading. Let’s say we’re about to read the Human Resource module. In the chapter read the bold text, look at figures and tables, and read through the questions and summary statements at the end of the chapter. This process will give us a taste of things to come when we read the chapter fully. Cognitive psychologists would call the Preview an advanced organizer. It has been recognised that after the research, if you preview something, you are more likely to remember it. In other words, there is a better chance of information being stored in memory when you attach it to earlier learned subjects.

Now, what about this portion of the review. The Review relates to a method to refresh your mind about what was found in the View. The review is just how it sounds: to be reviewed. There is an art to review. First of all, you need to work through the material more than once. Some indicate the first review occurs soon after the View has taken place (within an hour). Then one day after the View, the next (second) review should take place. The third review should then take place one week after the initial View. Now, depending on the content, there would be subsequent reviews on a weekly basis. Any review should be brief, say 5-10 minutes. The goal is to scan the material and activate memories.

In short, almost any situation can be covered by this method. Probably the first step for a beginner in this field is to use the preview material. Discipline and motivation are obviously needed for achievement.

The post Make the most of your reading appeared first on International Culinary Studio.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Practical Tips When Doing Research

How much research you need to do will differ from assignment to assignment. There is no single way to conduct research, but the following tips will assist you in improving the effectiveness of your research.

Think about what it is you need to research

It’s nice to have a specific question in mind when you’re doing research. This will help to inform you on what you’re looking for. Look at the question about your assignment and analyse it, to make sure you know what it means and what you expect. Ask yourself:

  • What’s the issue?
  • What’s it all about?
  • What should I do?
Steps to write an assignment – Analyse the question

Consider if you need to discover information that is a reality, opinion, private reflections, news or other reports, analyses, or something else. Check the amount of information you need to discover. This may rely on the following:

  • What you need to do.
  • The expectations of the lecturer/tutor.
  • The length of the task and the value or proportion of the total mark of the assignment.
Think about what you already may know

Brainstorm what you already know when you begin looking for information:

  • What precisely is this topic about?
  • What am I already familiar with?
  • What should I find out?
  • How do I think/feel about the topic?
  • Which approach will I take?

Tip: Use a mind map to brainstorm the subject and identify what you know and need to know.

Find and evaluate information

Along with considering the information found in your study material, you can also try:

  • Recommended readings or set texts (if your course has any) as well as find and evaluate information in your learning materials.
  • To visit your public library locally.
  • Speaking with specialists.
  • Sources available online.

Tip: Wikipedia can be a useful starting point for your investigation. While the best source of information is not always considered, good pages have references that can lead to more information.

What to do with the information you find

Start by skim reading what you found to evaluate it and make sure it’s what you really need. Once you’re sure it’s relevant, it’s time to read more thoroughly. Keep a list of all you read, including information about what you choose not to use. Make notes for:

  • Title, author, date, and source.
  • Wherever you have found a source to retrieve the information if you need it.
  • Your opinion and whether the data was helpful or not.

This way you will remember what you tried and will not waste time returning to information that was not helpful. Tip: Make sure you have enough content to compile a bibliography or list of references, including the author, title, edition, publisher, date, ISBN, website.

The post Practical Tips When Doing Research appeared first on International Culinary Studio.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In shops and markets around the world, thousands of cheeses tempt our eyes and challenge our taste buds.  Wrinkled and mouldy, smooth and sunshine yellow, orange and smelly, or brilliantly white…various shapes, sizes, flavours and textures ranging from sublime to truly extraordinary!  And all made from the basic product…MILK!  What changes this simple product into something so complex and diverse?

Firstly, the type of animal yielding the milk makes a difference!

Friesian Cow’s milk is slightly sweet, Guernsey Cow’s milk is rich and pale yellow with larger fat globules than most, and Water Buffalo’s milk, which is used in Italy for making Mozzarella, is ivory white, earthy and nutty.  Sheep’s milk is also mild, with undertones of roast lamb and lanolin, and slightly sweeter than cow’s milk.  As sheep’s milk cheese matures, the characteristics are intensified, like we find with the hard mature sheep’s milk Pecorino of Italy or the cheeses from France and Spain; these are nutty and sweet as if the milk has been infused with brazil or walnuts, caramel and fudge, and have the aroma of lanolin – like the smell of wet wool also comes through!

The most misunderstood of all the cheeses are those made from goat’s milk.  There is an explanation for this:  if the milk is handled badly, the globules of fat suspended in the milk releases their contents.  These impart a bitter, nasty, ‘billy goat’ flavour to the milk.  If you have been close to a male goat, it is a smell you are unlikely to forget.  However, if the milk is handled correctly, these globules will gradually break down and contribute to the delicious herbaceous taste of the cheese.  A goat’s milk cheese tastes as though the milk has absorbed the oils and aromas of tarragon, thyme and marjoram, set against a background of dry, crisp white wine.

Sheep and goat’s milk cheeses are seasonal and is not produced while the animal is lactating!  Some producers freeze their milk and continue to produce, others simply stop milking.

In some countries, cheese is also made from the milk of llamas, camels and even reindeer…adding yet another dimension to the cheese!

Of equal significance is what the animals eat.  Even the most unobservant of us cannot fail to notice the smell of different grass, wild clover and spoilt meadows compared to compacted feed, silage, turnips and grass.

The seasons will affect the taste and texture of the cheese from animals that seek their own grazing and do not rely on their keepers.  In spring the grass is sweet, moist and green, with lots of young shoots coming through and grazing is bountiful and varied, compared to late summer when the earth becomes hard and parched.  Autumn brings the early rains and another burst of new growth, until the winter rains force the animals inside and they then become reliant on hay and prepared feeds.  The flavour of the milk reflects these changes.

The soil and geology of an area also affects the milk and may even govern the types of cheeses that can be made.  Clay and Limestone will support different grasses than those from volcanic soils and granite.  The grass that grows will absorb different minerals, making a minute, but significant impact on the flavour of the milk.  Rainfall, humidity and temperature also affect what will grow and which animals will survive.

Gradually, cheese-making arose wherever land would support grazing animals – mainly goats, sheep and cows.  People found ways to press, flavour, form, ripen and cure the basic fresh white cheeses to eventually produce many different kinds.

Today, cheese is commonly known as one of the oldest and most nutritious foods known to mankind.  For most of us, cheese is a favourite food we have in our fridges most of the time, and eat almost everyday, if not more than once a day!

Keep an eye out for my next blog where we will dig into grazing, soil and seasons, the cheese making process and much more!

Keep it cooking!

Chef Andy

The post The Discovery of Cheese…Part 2 appeared first on International Culinary Studio.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When humans stopped hunting and began domesticating animals, they discovered that the milk of grazing animals was good to drink!  In very hot countries like Egypt, leftover milk must often have curdled and humans must have subsequently found the solids to be good to eat.

Nobody really knows when it started, but chemical tests of pots 5000 years old produced traces of cheese, and ancient cave paintings seem to show milk being processed.  The big step during those times was to turn milk into cheese “at will”, not wait for it to happen naturally over some period of time.  This process needed an enzyme called rennet;  an enzyme naturally present in the stomach of a young grazing animal!  Arab herdsmen probably discovered this by accident too, when milk kept in animal skins made from sheep’s stomachs, curdled quickly and made a sweet tasting “lumpy substance”.

Throughout the world, cheese is well known for its variety in taste, flavours, texture, shapes and versatility in uses!  Europe has a large selection of different types of cheeses, with shops dedicated to selling cheese only!  In certain countries, especially France, one can buy to 400 different types of cheese in one shop!

The average person grows up mostly with Gouda and Cheddar in their homes, and therefore still need to develop a taste for the more exotic types of cheese.  It is time we start moving away from the more ordinary ‘mousetrap’ cheeses and start experimenting with the unusual ones!

Cheese production methods range from the primitive, traditional to the ultra-modern.  Greek shepherds for instance, still make their Feta using methods scarcely changed since before Christ.  In modern creameries however, milk becomes cheese on semi-automatic production lines, passing from huge tanks to milling machines, pipes, conveyor belts, etc.

Keep an eye out for my next blog where we will dig into different types of milk, grazing, soil and seasons, the cheese making process and much more!

Keep it cooking!

Chef Andy

The post The Discovery of Cheese…Part 1 appeared first on International Culinary Studio.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Why is being a chef a great career choice?

There really should be no unemployed or self-employed chef out there.

There is currently a global shortage of chefs and weekly we see articles written by newspapers, magazines, online social media and all over the web on how restaurants, hotels, and catering companies are battling to find chefs. I am always amazed at the myriad of different jobs a qualified chef can hold from working in airline catering, on cruise ships, hospitals, aged care facilities as well as the new age jobs of being food stylists, food photographers, food bloggers, restaurant reviewers and critics along with the social media influencers. Gone are the days of just cooking in a restaurant, the world now really is your oyster. Traveling with a Culinary Qualification is definitely worth its weight in gold!

Have you seen how many followers the largest Instagram Food hashtag has? #thefeedfeed has over 1.5 million followers …..it’s incredible when you think of how powerful everything they do can have on their followers?

After recently attending the IACP conference in Santa Fe New Mexico, USA, I was simply amazed at the number of recipe book authors, food stylists, recipe developers, bloggers and vloggers etc we met who earn a living working from any kitchen and with their PC. Many influencers only use a mobile phone for their job and have endorsements from products that earn them lots of money.

Many recipe websites and media companies that pay for recipes and the stories that accompany the recipe. I wondered just how many banana bread recipes are actually on the web. According to Google, about 68 million 800 thousand searches bring up Banana Bread recipe.. Goodness the choices and that was probably only the English recipes, I wonder how many there are in other languages.

We also learnt at the conference about the desire for new product development. One of the speakers spoke about the use of now legalised Cannabis in so many products. I saw a restaurant recently claiming the first Cannabis Pizza for offer on their restaurant menu (maybe the first legal Cannabis Pizza) but still the opportunities abound. People are keen to to try new items and experiment with products never been seen before in their home countries and with the ability to fly fresh ingredients and unique products in from anywhere in the world, creativity has never been this incredible. So whether you have a secret desire to launch a unique range of sauces or work on a private yacht cooking for celebrities, you would have all these choices and where 7.7 Billion people have to eat each day, I would say a career as a chef is a fantastic option!

For more information on how to study while you work speak to one of our consultants today.

Cheryl Nesbitt is our Director of Studies at International Culinary Studio. Her life story is the stuff of legends and not only is she a Culinary Guru in her own right, but she is also an award-winning Business Woman and our dynamic leader at ICS.

The post Why is being a chef a great career choice? appeared first on International Culinary Studio.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Blended learning is the answer for reducing skills shortages in Chefs.

Every article about skills shortages in the Hospitality Industry talks about shortages of skilled chefs. Many articles are written about how TV chef celebrities and cooking shows have changed the profile of chefs and made the role seem very glamorous. Still qualified chefs remains a skills shortage and on many countries skills shortage lists.

Education for most occupations has changed drastically in the past years but Culinary Education remains for the most part the same. In house – apprenticeship programmes for chefs remains largely unchanged, normally for 3 years. Chefs can however get qualified in Culinary Colleges in 1 or 2 years and then enter the industry with a recognised Diploma or at least a recognised Certificate in Culinary Arts. I can understand why no-one wants to do a 3 year apprenticeship anymore, during your 3rd year, you will still be earning a trainee salary as opposed to earning the minimum wage which is what a kitchen hand would earn. And once qualified they are still earning a very low salary as chefs are notoriously badly paid. They mostly work long hours in poor kitchen conditions and yet we wonder why they leave the industry.

Industry cries, “we will have charge our customers more if we pay our chefs more”. What they forget to measure is how much more a qualified chef contributes to a kitchen versus an unqualified cook, who has little or no experience in food costing, portion control, the correct technical skills, correct use of equipment and caring for equipment, speed due to having had the practice, correct hygiene and storage practices which actually save businesses money. Not to mention, a qualified chef will always be more confident and extremely proud of their creations as they have achieved a qualification in the field. Why one would rather hire unskilled cooks in order to pay them less escapes me, surely the benefits speak for themselves?

Along comes “blended learning” but how does it fit into a long standing culinary tradition of attending culinary college and that along with the traditional apprenticeship programme being the only ways to become a qualified chef. Let’s firstly give some interesting stats which I have either read or been quoted from industry experts:

  1. More than 50% of chef students drop off they programmes before completion.
  2. A chef typically lasts 5 – 7 years in the industry. (so, if they train for 3, they only last another 2 – 4 years with all their skills then lost to the industry)
  3. Most qualified chefs will go into a food related industry or start their now business.

School graduates no longer want to attend traditional teaching colleges, they want a more technologically advanced option for learning. They want to get into a job and get qualified at the same time. They have access to their own device, whether it is a tablet or home PC as well as a smart phone. Every potential student school leaver that I have met and across a number of different countries want to study via “blended learning” and get qualified as soon as they can.

International Culinary Studio (ICS) exists for that reason. Students can enrol with us and study the theory component online whilst completing their industry practical in their job. They will have full access to all their study material online and all their assignments are marked by qualified chef instructors and qualified assessors. All our courses are aligned to City & Guilds in the UK and thus on successful completion, students can elect to write the International Examination and be awarded an Internationally Recognised Vocational Qualification.

Current people who have been working as a chef/cook can also apply for RPL/APL through ICS. We regularly hold focus groups with industry professionals to ensure our students are learning what the industry needs. We can also tailor make a course for your establishment.

For more information please email Cheryl@internationalculinarystudio.com or visit our website.

www.internationalculinarystudio.com

Article by Cheryl Nesbitt

Director

International Culinary Studio

The post Blended learning is the answer for reducing skill shortages in Chefs. appeared first on International Culinary Studio.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

  Catering Management        Course going live on the 30th of August – Sign up early

We are excited to welcome you to our professional Catering Management course.

Catering Managers are required for very busy catering and event companies. Studying to ensure you are well equipped to handle the diversity of skills required in this job will help secure you a position in the future. Apart from the long hours most of these jobs expect of their employees, the role comes with the huge job satisfaction of successfully completing an event. Most catering companies specialise in a particular type of event ranging from weddings, corporate events to birthday parties and new product launches.

Our hugely popular Catering Management course will give you the skills and tools you need to succeed in the cutting-edge Hospitality and Catering Industry.

At the completion of this course, you will be able to:

  • Confidently apply for a position as a Catering Manager
  • Up-skill in your current position
  • Start your own catering business and be your own boss
  • Turn your hobby into a full-time profession

We are excited to welcome you to our professional Catering Management course.

Catering Managers are required for very busy catering and event companies. Studying to ensure you are well equipped to handle the diversity of skills required in this job will help secure you a position in the future. Apart from the long hours most of these jobs expect of their employees, the role comes with the huge job satisfaction of successfully completing an event. Most catering companies specialise in a particular type of event ranging from weddings, corporate events to birthday parties and new product launches.

Our hugely popular Catering Management course will give you the skills and tools you need to succeed in the cutting-edge Hospitality and Catering Industry.

At the completion of this course, you will be able to: 

  • Confidently apply for a position as a Catering Manager
  • Up-skill in your current position
  • Start your own catering business and be your own boss
  • Turn your hobby into a full-time profession

Who’s it for?

This programme is ideal for those who want to learn professional supervisory techniques and skills in a role of Catering Manager and who either don’t require an accredited qualification or already have an accredited qualification but are looking to further their career.

Course features

  • Join a global community of online culinary students just like you
  • Receive one on one tuition, mentoring and feedback with your Chef Instructor
  • Fit your study programme into your own schedule
  • Have access to all the course material required to complete the modules and assessments
  • Graduate with real skills that will help you succeed in today’s competitive workplace
  • Have a completed e-portfolio (online CV) and be ready to apply for the job you have always dreamed of
  • Personal login to our Learner Management System
  • No need to take time off work to attend classes
  • Access to our Hi-Contact teaching model designed to ensure successful course completion for all students

Our online platform is exciting, interactive and user friendly – We bring the classroom to your home. Our team is on hand and ready to get you started in achieving your Culinary dreams!

If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to Contact Us our team is on hand to assist you with everything you may need.

Course Duration:

This self-paced programme could be completed in an average of 9 weeks. A maximum of 6 months is allowed to complete this course.

Online Studies:

Your studies will be completed from your own home, via our Learner Management System. Once registered your student experience is accessible on any pc, most portable or mobile smart devices – meaning you can literally study anywhere! Our Chef Instructors will be available and will guide you through your programme, keeping you motivated to a successful course completion.

About International Culinary Studio

AboutOur team’s commitment to providing excellent technology driven culinary education has taken us to new levels of excitement about education in this modern learning environment.For the first time in chef education, we are truly bringing the classroom to your kitchen.Now that’s what we call an excellent way to study!

  • Introduction to the Hospitality and Catering Industry
  • Customer service in the Hospitality and catering Industry
  • Maintain a healthy, safe and secure work environment
  • Supervise customer service
  • Supervise staff training
  • Food safety supervision for catering
  • Supervise food production
  • Supervise hospitality events
  • Catering operations, costs and menu design
  • Food and beverage service
  • Handling payments

INTERNATIONAL CULINARY STUDIO CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT

On completion of this course, you will be awarded with:

International Culinary Studio Certificate of Achievement* and a Digital Badge.

INVESTMENT OPTIONS:  

Payment Options Once off Fee Deposit Payment Terms
Full Payment $999 Once Off
Monthly Payment $249 Deposit $250 for 3 Months
Weekly Payment $249 Deposit $62.50 for 12 Weeks

The investment includes:

  • Personal online login to our Learner Management System, all study material
  • Online e-portfolio
  • Certification 

Additional Costs 

You need to prepare for the following additional costs, depending on your programme:

  • Cost of your internet access
  • Any printing you choose to do from the study guides

*This is a non-accredited programme

What are the Minimum Enrolment Requirements? 

  • You must be 16 years or older

Where to download your Learner Management System App 

Download the Canvas Student App on the link below. Find International Culinary Studio as your school and login with your details.

Google Play

Apple

Who’s it for?

This programme is ideal for those who want to learn professional supervisory techniques and skills in a role of Catering Manager and who either don’t require an accredited qualification or already have an accredited qualification but are looking to further their career.

Course features

  • Join a global community of online culinary students just like you
  • Receive one on one tuition, mentoring and feedback with your Chef Instructor
  • Fit your study programme into your own schedule
  • Have access to all the course material required to complete the modules and assessments
  • Graduate with real skills that will help you succeed in today’s competitive workplace
  • Have a completed e-portfolio (online CV) and be ready to apply for the job you have always dreamed of
  • Personal login to our Learner Management System
  • No need to take time off work to attend classes
  • Access to our Hi-Contact teaching model designed to ensure successful course completion for all students

Our online platform is exciting, interactive and user friendly – We bring the classroom to your home. Our team is on hand and ready to get you started in achieving your Culinary dreams!

If you have any questions please don’t hesitate to Contact Us our team is on hand to assist you with everything you may need.

Course Duration:

This self-paced programme could be completed in an average of 9 weeks. A maximum of 6 months is allowed to complete this course.

Online Studies:

Your studies will be completed from your own home, via our Learner Management System. Once registered your student experience is accessible on any pc, most portable or mobile smart devices – meaning you can literally study anywhere! Our Chef Instructors will be available and will guide you through your programme, keeping you motivated to a successful course completion.

About International Culinary Studio

AboutOur team’s commitment to providing excellent technology driven culinary education has taken us to new levels of excitement about education in this modern learning environment.For the first time in chef education, we are truly bringing the classroom to your kitchen.Now that’s what we call an excellent way to study!

  • Introduction to the Hospitality and Catering Industry
  • Customer service in the Hospitality and catering Industry
  • Maintain a healthy, safe and secure work environment
  • Supervise customer service
  • Supervise staff training
  • Food safety supervision for catering
  • Supervise food production
  • Supervise hospitality events
  • Catering operations, costs and menu design
  • Food and beverage service
  • Handling payments

INTERNATIONAL CULINARY STUDIO CERTIFICATE OF ACHIEVEMENT

On completion of this course, you will be awarded with:

International Culinary Studio Certificate of Achievement* and a Digital Badge.

INVESTMENT OPTIONS:  

a

Payment Options
Full Payment
$999 Once Off
Monthly Payment
$249 Deposit and $250 for 3 Months
Weekly Payment
$249 Deposit and $62.50 for 12 Weeks

The investment includes:

  • Personal online login to our Learner Management System, all study material
  • Online e-portfolio
  • Certification 

Additional Costs 

You need to prepare for the following additional costs, depending on your programme:

  • Cost of your internet access
  • Any printing you choose to do from the study guide

*This is a non-accredited programme

What are the Minimum Enrolment Requirements? 

  • You must be 16 years or older

Where to download your Learner Management System App 

Download the Canvas Student App on the link below. Find International Culinary Studio as your school and login with your details.

Google Play

Apple

The post Catering Management appeared first on International Culinary Studio.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Chefs Proud of their Achievements!
I have been involved in all things culinary for ever or so it seems. I baked my first cake at 5 years old you get the picture….

Once again today I was let down by the Hospitality Industry, just when I thought things were improving. The way Gordon Ramsay treats his chefs on his TV shows, is just that, TV and although it was like that when I was a trainee chef, things have changed drastically and now kitchens are sought after places to work in and as a career for many people. Chefs have worked hard to get where they are in the industry, they have put themselves through a college, worked the long hours and now can “wow” a customer.

Why then does industry place adverts for chefs with 3 or 4 years experience at minimum wage. Today, I was sent a copy of a job for a chocolatier with 4 years experience at minimum wage too. Qualified Chocolatiers in Europe can train for up to 7 years. This skill takes years to perfect, the courses are costly, the ingredients to costly and they are expected to earn the same as a school leaver with no training or work experience.

There is documented evidence of a worldwide skills shortage in chefs, Ireland and England are reaching out to the rest of the world for chefs to go and work for them, most countries still have chef de partie on their skills shortage lists and yet, industry is still offering such poor pay rates.

While I am on a roll, why the need to have a chef “trial” in the restaurant, I believe this is sadly being abused and chefs are being used as casual labour for free on a “trial”.

All our chefs have references, plenty photographs of their work and are willing to work for these low wages, why then abuse them even more. Also to be fair, how can you “test” a chef on a trial. They will not be familiar with the kitchen layout, where the ingredients are kept, the menu, the portion control, standardisation ( I have yet to see a restaurant other than a chain restaurant with pictures on the wall or easily able to be viewed by a new chef for standardisation), and then are told after a trial, sorry you will not fit into our brigade as the reason for not hired. Really how can you put someone through that kind of pressure and then judge their character on top of it.

I would really like things to change in the industry, as an culinary educator of many years, I am really asking for a change, these hard working individuals deserve to be treated with respect, paid a living wage and only then will more young people who are desperately needed to enter this industry and be proud as the chefs pictured above.

Note to INDUSTRY: Posting your “unpaid trial 8 – 10 hours chefs” pictures on your social media for your benefit really “takes the cake”…..

Article by Cheryl Nesbitt

Director

International Culinary Studio

The post Chefs Proud of their Achievements! appeared first on International Culinary Studio.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview