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Just when you thought it couldn’t be done, Infogram went and got even cooler! We’ve added awesome new integrations and accessibility options that make it easier for you to connect to your data and your audience. An added bonus? We’ve given your library a total makeover. Here’s a breakdown of Infogram’s latest exciting additions:

Powerful Integrations

We’ve just released a variety of integrations that make it easy to connect to the data and apps you use every day. Pull data, upload reports, find GIFs, add videos, embed social media posts, insert interactive maps, and more – all from Infogram. Stay tuned as we continue to add to our growing list of available integrations.

Brand New Library

You may have noticed your Infogram library looks a little different – and this is good news! Now you can quickly find what you need, all in one place, thanks to our simple search bar and easy-to-use organized folders. You can also view detailed analytics, manage your teams, and switch between multiple team libraries in just one click.

Increased Accessibility

And last but not least, Infogram has made huge improvements to comply with the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG 2.0). Infogram’s accessibility features let you:

  • Make Infogram content visible to screen readers
  • Navigate published content with keyboard controls
  • Apply simple design principles to improve readability

Note: Accessibility is only available for single chart and map projects at this time.

Infogram integrations let you connect to the data and media sources you love, straight from the editor. Login to your Infogram account to connect to your favorites.

Get connected

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December is our favorite time of year. Not just because the holidays are in full swing, but because it’s the month we put our heads together to pick our favorite projects of the year! We’ve hand selected the best reports, animated infographics, landing pages, interactive news articles, and so much more.

In no particular order, here are 10 of our favorite Infogram projects from 2018:

Click the images or arrows below to navigate.

Chinese Private Equity Report

by PEI Media Group

2018 Women in Tech Report

by HackerRank

The Ericas of Yolanda

by ABS-CBN News

2018 Top Gift Card Preferences

by Blackhawk Network

Interactive Solar System Infographic

By Infogram

Loyalty and Retention in Healthcare

by NRC Health

Emerging Markets Lead the Disruption Race

by Martin Currie

Holiday 2018 Consumer Trends

by National Retail Federation

Catalan Independence: Spain’s Losses

by Politico

Addressing the Gender Pay Gap

by Cushman & Wakefield

You can make great projects just like these in 2019. We’ve made it easier than ever to build professional, data-driven content that’s guaranteed to win over any audience.

Build winning content

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The turkey’s been eaten, you bought all the things,
The holiday season is now in full swing,
So celebrate fully before the year’s end,
(And be sure to check out these holiday trends).

1) Americans Buy More Than Just Gifts
2) Star Wars Wins Out at the Box Office
3) Money Spent on Real vs Fake Trees
4) How Much Do You Think You’ll Spend?
5) Do Consumers Prefer In-Store or Online?

Now that you’re filled with the gift-giving spirit, it’s time to make some charts! Celebrate the season with Infogram’s simple drag-and-drop editor and slick designer templates.

Make a chart

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In our ‘Do This, Not That’ series, we offer insight and best practices for the world’s most common chart types. For each chart, we explain when to use it and offer before and after examples for you to compare. Check out our abbreviated versions of each of the posts below, or click the buttons below each section to dive into the details.

Bar Charts

The x-axis and y-axis are the backbone of your bar chart. Don’t start the axis at a value above zero. When you start your axis above zero, you shrink the bars and skew the way your data looks, often confusing the viewer and robbing them of context. You also want to avoid gaps in between your bars that are uneven or too large. This can be a result of poor design or an axis that isn’t scaled evenly.

Do This: Once you’ve set your origin to start at zero, make sure your axes are scaled evenly. The spaces in between your bars should be uniform and consistent. If the data isn’t in chronological order, place the bars in order by size.

Makeover your bar charts

Line Charts

Don’t feel pressure to include all the information you have about your chart in the form of text. You don’t want to overwhelm your viewer with paragraphs of copy, bulky legends, axes labels, and additional words. Legends aren’t a requirement for single line charts but can be very useful when comparing multiple lines on the same chart.

Do This: Be very selective with the text you choose to add to your chart. Give it a good, memorable title. Label the axes if the information provided by the tick marks needs further explanation. If you are visualizing data you didn’t collect yourself, list a source somewhere small that doesn’t distract from your line chart. If one of your data points stands out and needs to be highlighted, feel free to add a pop of color or a few words of text to focus your viewer’s attention there.

Makeover your line charts

Pie Charts

The human brain is very good at distinguishing differences in length and volume, which is why bar and column charts are so popular. What the brain isn’t good at, though, is comparing angles. Never ask your viewer to compare one pie chart with another pie chart. This practice is confusing and time-consuming.

Do This: If you’re looking to compare two datasets side by side that represent parts of a whole, use bar and column charts instead of pie charts. It’s much easier for people to compare the length of bars and columns than it is for them to compare the angles found in a pie chart. When comparing two datasets, try a grouped bar or column chart. This means you don’t have two separate charts to compare. Instead, you have one organized chart that saves space and your viewer’s time.

Makeover your pie charts

Maps

Nothing is worse than a cluttered, hard to read map. Don’t make your design so elaborate that people can’t understand your message quickly. Resist the urge to add all of the information you have in the form of legends, text, labels, and images. That being said, you don’t want to leave out crucial information that your viewer needs for context and deeper understanding.

Do this: Craft a map that is clean, simple, and organized. Keep in mind the size of your final map, and where it will be viewed, as this will determine how detailed or general you should be. Give your map a clear title, legend or scale, and source for your data. Try different layouts to avoid overcrowding or large blank areas. Everything on your map should have a purpose. Ask yourself – Does this element play an essential function? Can it be simplified? Does it require explanation? And is it critical for reading comprehension? Always remember that less is more.

Makeover your maps

Pictorial Charts

The right icon is key to the perfect pictorial chart. Don’t pick a generic icon that doesn’t relate directly to your story. You want to grab people’s attention and understanding quickly, not leave them wondering what they’re looking at. You also need to think about where people will be viewing your chart. If it’s relatively small, say on a mobile device or a sheet of paper, you don’t want to pick an icon with a lot of detail that’s tough to see.

Do this: Once you’ve honed your overall message, pick an icon that makes your topic pop. There are a lot of great icon options available these days, so it’s easy to find one that is specific to your dataset. Pick an icon that is easy to read, clear, and to the point. If you’re talking about fruit sales, pick an icon that corresponds with the specific fruit you’re selling. If you’re talking about iPhone sales, grab an icon of a smartphone, or a stack of money.

Makeover your pictorial charts

Funnel Charts

Color can make or break the appearance of your funnel chart. Don’t pick one color for your entire funnel or a gradient that moves seamlessly from the first stage to the last. This will make your chart almost impossible to read. You also don’t want to pick colors that are so dark your viewer can’t clearly read the labels you’ve added.

Do This: Pick colors that make it easy for your viewer to tell the different stages apart. Use clearly different shades of the same color in blocks, from dark to light, to give the impression of flow and connectivity. If you want your stages to reflect different colors that truly stand out, pick an easy to decipher yet pleasing color scheme, like blue, purple, and green.

Makeover your funnel

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Newsrooms around the world are bracing themselves for the results of the U.S. midterm elections – the first major election since Trump became President in 2016. Election data can get pretty complicated, which is why readers have come to expect clear data visualizations from the media in order to fully understand the numbers.

Good election visuals can take time to create, so we’ve put together a short list of free charts you can quickly build with Infogram. Become the go-to source for your readers with high-quality maps, bar charts, pictorial charts, progress bars, and more.

Bonus: Connect an Infogram chart to live data and watch your embeds update automatically online. You can also upload your logo and add company colors.

1) Maps – Heatmap (Cloropleth) and Grouped

Infogram gives you access to a free map of the United States, and our premium plans let you build individual state and regional maps. Our maps feature clickable legends, hover-over tooltips for additional information, and interactive tabs that save space and engage your audience.

2) Bar and Column Charts

Bar and column charts are insanely popular for a reason – they are easy to read and our brains love them! Here we visualized data from the 2016 presidential election, comparing total votes and swing-state votes from 2012 and 2016. With Infogram, you can make a standard, grouped, stacked (see below), or 100% stacked bar chart.

Make a chart

3) Pictorial Charts

On Nov. 6, the focus will be on which of the two parties will control the two chambers of the U.S. Congress. In the House of Representatives, all 435 seats are up for election, and in the Senate, 35 out of 100 seats are up for election. Pictorial charts use relative sizes or repetition of icons to represent data. Search our large library of icons to build the perfect election pictorial chart.

4) Semi-Circle and Pie Charts

Pie charts get a bad rep because they are often used to visualize data that could be much better served with a different chart type. But, if you have election data that represent parts of a whole, and adds up to 100%, a pie chart or semi-circle chart might be your best option.

Make a chart

5) Stacked Bar Charts

Here we built a stacked bar chart showing the party breakdown in specific states after the 2016 presidential election. Stacked bar charts are a nice way to display multiple datasets on the same topic, making your visualization concise and organized.

6) Progress Bars

Progress bars help monitor the overall progress towards a target or goal. Use them to update readers on election results in real-time, showing the number of votes counted compared to how many have yet to be calculated. This chart, showing the major parties in the Senate after the 2016 election, is easy to read and effective at a glance.

If you’re a journalist, it’s your job to grab people’s attention and keep it. People count on you to share the latest election results, which is possible with Infogram.

Cover the election

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Your mission, should you choose to accept it, is to explore this in-depth, interactive solar system infographic. You’ll discover how long a day lasts on each planet (one day on Venus = 116 Earth days), how many moons Saturn has, which planet is known as the solar system’s vacuum cleaner, and so much more.

Watch the video below to prepare for your galactic journey.

The Solar System Infographic - YouTube

If you want to get right to it, enjoy the fun solar system facts on page one and select your favorite planet at the bottom to learn more. If you’d like to view in more detail, open this link and click the button in the top right corner to view in full screen.

Pretty cool, huh? Make your own animated infographic with Infogram – and don’t forget to share this visual space quest with your friends!

Make an infographic

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We love helping our customers succeed and sharing their stories. That’s why we’ve gathered some of the most engaging tales of data visualization success from our customers for our new Infogram Customer Spotlight series. From the classroom, to the newsroom, to the boardroom — this is how real people are using Infogram to change the way they visualize data.

In this piece, we chat with Michal Simkovic, Director of Design at HackerRank, who builds reports and instructional guides that beautifully blend data and design. Bonus: he also provided his best data visualization tips for success.

HackerRank’s mission is to match every developer to the right job. Their unique platform is a hub where over 4 million developers can practice coding, prepare for interviews, and get hired. They also aid in technical recruiting, offering a rich pool of talent to some of the biggest companies in the world.

Along with their goal of matching the right engineer with the right position, HackerRank also conducts a lot of research. This research helps people in the industry better understand the state of developer skills. They also conduct research on the business side to improve and understand the process of hiring in tech. All of this research comes with data – a lot of data.

Michal needed to find a data visualization tool to simplify and enhance the research conducted at HackerRank. “We regularly publish industry research, all of which is very information-heavy, which is why data visualization plays a key role here,” he explained.

But, there was a problem: Michal wanted to find a product that was simple, easy-to-use, and powerful. He didn’t think a data visualization option like this existed — until he found Infogram.

Discovering a tool that would help him create rich reports and guides with as little engineering support as possible was extremely valuable. “We love interactive charts in media articles, but I had no idea there was a data visualization service that enabled us to do the same without getting too deep into the code. We researched all the services out there and Infogram was the only one doing it at the scale we needed.”

Before HackerRank started using Infogram, they were publishing charts as static images using Photoshop or Illustrator. Infogram offered their team the option of quick chart updates and engaging animations.

“We like that charts are customizable and responsive. Animations and transitions are a very nice bonus. Also, once you embed Infogram charts to a website, its form and content auto-updates. We had multiple last minute changes, and they were super easy and fast to execute thanks to Infogram.”

They’ve built multiple interactive research reports that feature Infogram charts, including The 2018 Developer Skills Report, The 2018 Women in Tech Report, and The 2018 Tech Recruiting Report. These reports have been read by millions of people and covered by hundreds of media outlets including Forbes, MIT Tech Review, TNW, and CNET. The response on social media has also been overwhelmingly positive.

Michal is especially proud of the Women in Tech report, and he should be: the report just won the 2018 W3 Gold award in the Branded Content-Public Service & Activism for Marketing category. This award showcased HackerRank next to brands like The Washington Post, Bloomberg, MasterCard, IKEA, and Dropbox.

Beyond being positioned alongside these market leaders, Michal is proud that the WiT report directly reflects the diversity at HackerRank — particularly the strong women on his team that he counts on to successfully launch and promote their work. “All our reports are led by our Head of Marketing & Communications, Ritika, and executed on time thanks to our Marketing Operations Manager, Rachel. They’re amazing.”

Infogram’s flexible customization and export options have also contributed to HackerRank’s strong online brand identity. Their logo, color palette, and style are prevalent in the charts they share, both in their content and across social media platforms. They use Infogram’s wide variety of export options to create support graphics for social media posts.

Data Visualization Tips from Michal Simkovic

What tips do you have for applying color to charts?

Infogram is a very customizable tool, so take advantage of it and get the charts as close to your own branding as possible. Oh and don’t forget about people with impaired vision and shoot for sufficient color contrast.

How do you decide how many charts to share at once?

We were shooting for a single chart per screen, to keep a single focus point.

How do you decide what elements of your chart to label?

We like to start with a minimalistic approach and label only the necessary elements. Based on external feedback, we add axis labels and more – luckily in Infogram, it only takes a couple of clicks.

What content do you choose to visualize and how do you pick the right chart?

This is a pretty hard process, as our team has to extract insights from an overwhelming amount of data. After pulling out the most interesting information, we craft a story to make it easier to digest. At this point, we can already see which information is important and which data needs to be visualized. We also have a panel of friends and experts we ask for early feedback and then we iterate further.

Did you know HackerRank’s reports are something people are referring to as “scrolly-telling?” Why do you think this format works so well?

To tell you the truth, I’ve never heard the term before. The format felt very natural –  we simply had too much data, and it wouldn’t fit on one screen or slide.

What role do you think data visualization will play in the future?

I hope it will keep enabling data, making it more accessible and easy to consume for broader audiences. Hopefully, it will get us out of this post-factual era.

If you’d like to learn more about how Infogram has helped businesses visualize and communicate with data, visit our Customer Stories page.

Michal Simkovic is the Director of Design at HackerRank, and formerly worked as the Visual Design Lead at Amazon.

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If you want to get another job, advance your career, do better in school, or grow your business with data, we have a solution for you – free online courses! Browse this list of classes you can take from home to become a data pro without spending a dime.

Free Data Visualization Online Courses

1) Introduction to Data Analysis using Excel

In this course, you will learn how to perform data analysis using Excel’s most popular features. You will learn how to create pivot tables from a range with rows and columns, showing you the power of pivots in action. In 4 weeks you’ll be able to gain valuable insights from pivot tables, calculate margins, filter data, and create aggregate reports.

2) Data Visualization: A Practical Approach for Absolute Beginners

The ability to create charts that are compelling, accurate, and tell a story is becoming a core skill of any job in the 21st Century. This course provides a practical approach to learning the theories and techniques of data visualization for data analysis. In 4 weeks you’ll be able to build the basic chart types and create basic reports and dashboards.

3) Introduction to Data Science

Learn what it takes to become a data scientist from Microsoft in this introductory course. You’ll learn how Microsoft’s Data Science curriculum works, as well as the basics of exploring data using a variety of visualization, analytical, and statistical techniques. In 6 weeks you’ll be able to plan your next steps in their program, basic visualization techniques in Excel, and foundational statistics used to analyze data.

4) Data Analysis Essentials for MBA Success

If you want to study for an MBA, but you’re not sure what basic data analysis is required, this course is for you. The goal of this course is to teach you fundamental data analysis skills so you are prepared for your MBA study and able to focus your efforts on core MBA curriculum. In 6 weeks you’ll learn the fundamentals of presenting data and data-based decision making.

5) Analytics for Decision Making

This statistics and data analysis course will help you understand the fundamental concepts of sound statistical thinking that can be applied to a variety of contexts. In 4 weeks you’ll learn about variability in the real world, data types, appropriate visualizations, effective decision making, and how to apply these learnings to managerial decisions in start-up environments.

6) Intro to Data Science, Tools, and Methodology

IBM offers three simple courses for aspiring data scientists. This learning path currently consists of one course that introduces you to Data Science from a practitioner point of view, to courses that discuss topics such as data compilation, preparation, and modeling throughout the life-cycle of data science from basic concepts and methodologies to advanced algorithms. It also discusses how to get some practical knowledge with open source tools.

7) Analytics for the Classroom Teacher

This course is an introduction to the emerging field of teaching and learning analytics from the perspective of a teacher. You’ll learn how teachers, curriculum developers, and policymakers are collecting and analyzing data from the classroom to help guide decisions at all levels. In 6 weeks you’ll see how data analytics can improve the classroom while also gaining an understanding of current analytics tools and data-driven lesson planning.

8) Data Science Ethics

This course focuses specifically on the ethics of data and data science. This course will provide you with the framework to analyze concerns regarding data collection, analysis, privacy, and the consequences of sharing data. In 4 weeks you’ll go over who owns data, the definition of informed consent, and what it means to be fair with data.

9) Data Analysis: Visualization and Dashboard Design

Turn raw data into beautiful charts and dashboards with this course. This course covers the main tasks required from data analysts today, including importing, summarizing, interpreting, analyzing and visualizing data. It will equip you with the tools that will enable you to be an independent data analyst. In 6 weeks you’ll learn how to build basic charts and dashboards.

10) Data Analytics for Business

This course teaches the scientific process of transforming data into insights for making better business decisions. It covers the methodologies, issues, and challenges related to analyzing business data. It’s a little long at 15 weeks, but when you’re done you will know how to approach business problems analytically with data.

11) Marketing Analytics: Marketing Measurement Strategy

Marketers depend on metrics to determine the success of their campaigns. In this course, you’ll learn how to execute market sizing, identify market trends, and predict future conditions. Analytics-based marketing is increasingly important in determining a company’s spending and ROI. In 4 weeks you’ll know how to understand marketing metrics and successfully measure your success.

12) Data Visualization for All

In this data visualization course, you will learn how to design interactive charts and customized maps for your website. It begins by showing you easy to use tools, followed by step-by-step tutorials, then offers real-world examples. This 6 week course is perfect for nonprofit organizations, small business owners, local governments, journalists, academics, or anyone who wants to tell their story with data.

13) Practical Learning Analytics

Learning analytics is the measurement, collection, analysis and reporting of data surrounding learning. This class focuses on using traditional student record data – the kind every campus already has. It will address questions raised by stakeholders, campus leaders, faculty, staff, and students. In 4 weeks you’ll learn how to bring in data or your own for analysis and visualization.

14) Analytics Storytelling for Impact

In this analytics storytelling course, you’ll learn effective strategies and tools to master data communication through well-crafted analytics stories. You’ll learn what a story is, why they matter, and how to craft a great story. Get practical help applying these ideas to your data analytics work. In 6 weeks you’ll be able to apply storytelling principles to your analytics and improve your presentations with stories.

15) ProPublica Data Institute Online

Couldn’t attend the ProPublica Data Institute? Now you can learn some of the lessons from home. This year they recorded five video lessons from the institute and you can watch them online. They cover intro to coding, how websites work, HTML, basic CSS, and CSS classes. These videos are perfect for journalists trying to learn data journalism and interactive database design.

We’ve spent time creating resources that you can access right now, but we plan to offer a data visualization course in the near future. What would you like to see us teach?

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A new month at Infogram means a new list of fun features that work to improve workflow and company branding. We’ve just introduced three ways to enhance project editing, public sharing, and customizable footers.

Public Downloads

You’ve worked hard on your work, and you want other people to be able to download and share it. Now you can add a public downloads button to your Infogram projects, which lets your viewers download static files directly from embeds and view links to take with them.

Locking Objects

We know what it’s like to get carried away editing a project, quickly dragging and dropping charts, images, and icons around the editor. But what if you move something by accident? To help avoid that problem, we’ve made it possible to lock individual objects and groups of objects into place. That way, you and your team can spend more time creating and less time clicking undo.
 

More exciting updates

Customizable Footers

When people see the bottom of your infographics and reports – you want to leave them with something to remember (or click). That’s why we’ve made it easy to customize the footer of your project with color, a logo, footnote, specialized share button, or page numbers. This is a great way to brand your work, make a mark, and get more traffic.

It’s time to see these recent additions in action. Head on over to Infogram to edit like a pro, easily share your work with the public, and create memorable customized footers.

Visit Infogram

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Creating amazing charts takes time and experience – that’s why we’ve put together a quick list of the best data visualization resources we have to offer. The Infogram team has spent years putting together educational videos, helpful tutorials, and fun dataviz filled blog posts for you to enjoy. Click away!

Data Visualization Workshop

Welcome to our Data Visualization Workshop video series. This series consists of instructional videos that are simple and easy-to-follow. We want to show you how to make the most of your data, giving you useful skills and helpful advice along the way. We’ve included the pilot episode below – don’t forget to watch episodes one, two, three, four, five, six, seven and eight.

Choosing The Right Chart For Your Data - YouTube

Infogram Support Center

The Infogram Support Center is your go-to resource 24/7 complete with step-by-step guides on project creation, charts, maps, editing, publishing, exporting content and so much more. Simply add a keyword to the search bar to view a list of suggested articles.

Tip: Make sure to check the product updates section often. This is the best place to learn about exciting new developments.

To kickstart your journey with Infogram, here are a few helpful articles:

eBooks

Explore our free eBook library for thoughtful content on data visualization, infographics, chart techniques, social media, and more!

Getting Started with Infogram

Learn how to create beautiful infographics, reports, maps, charts and more with Infogram. We offer over 100+ templates, flexible drag-and-drop editor, 1 million images and icons, and a wide variety of data import options.

Tutorial: How to use Infogram - YouTube

Learn the Basics

We’ve created a variety of landing pages explaining what charts Infogram offers, how to make them, and colorful examples to help guide you. Check out: treemaps, word clouds, pyramids, dual axis charts, timers, scatter plots, and social media graphics.

Do This, Not That Blog Series

Welcome to Infogram’s ‘Do This, Not That’ blog series – offering insight and best practices for the world’s most common chart types. Each post offers three dos and don’ts specific to each major chart type. Explore each post in the series:

Infogram Customer Stories

Learn how companies around the globe use Infogram to communicate with data in a clear and engaging way. Take a deeper look at how Access to Medicine uses Infogram to shed light on access to crucial medicines around the world, GTB uses Infogram to share social media successes, and how Brazillian think tank FGV uses Infogram to bring awareness to Dengue Fever.

Now that you have fresh data visualization knowledge, it’s time to log in to Infogram and make a chart, map, or infographic for yourself! And remember, if you have any questions or want to learn more, feel free to reach out to our lovely support team.

Make a chart

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