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HR Daily Advisor | Leadership by James Davis, Editor, Hr Daily Advis.. - 1M ago

HR leaders shouldn’t underestimate the impact they can have on an organization. While they might spend a lot of time doing nitty-gritty tasks like ensuring document accuracy and keeping current with compliance updates, they can also play the critical role of driving innovation.

Source: Sensay / shutterstock

Inert Begets Inert: HR to the Rescue

Any organization with designs on achieving excellence relies on innovation. Without the innovative spark, even a solid 10-year plan can become a 5-year bust. Who drives innovation? The odds are that a task might not be part of anyone’s specific job description.

However, the opportunity for such a driver rests squarely with HR leaders. And why not? They create and implement policies, help set strategic goals, and help select and onboard the very foundation of any organization: the employees.

Experts know that innovation struggles to thrive at the hand of existing processes. Indeed, objects at rest tend to stay at rest, and that is very true of an organization that has gotten a little too comfortable with the status quo. HR plays a big part in the processes that can either ignite or extinguish the innovative spark: it creates organizational policies and practices, helps define management structures, connects with leaders about strategy, and influences an organization’s culture.

For this reason, HR is in the perfect place to help encourage and facilitate innovation and apply the energy needed to get a stagnant organization moving again by realizing the full potential of its people.

How to Get Things Moving

To encourage a culture of innovation, an HR leader must use everything at his or her disposal, including fostering creative talent, offering useful frameworks to support that talent, and keeping in mind that innovation is a team effort.

Creative Talent

Most HR managers handle selecting and onboarding staff. This process is their chance to mold the organization’s people infrastructure into one dotted with creativity. By selecting applicants who show a tendency for creativity and innovation, you can seed an organization with the creative capital it needs to flourish.

Encouraging Creativity

Simply hiring new creative and innovative candidates will not be enough. Nothing stifles creativity more assuredly than surrounding creative people with people who lack confidence that they can be creative or who have given up. Getting your existing workforce to a more innovative space might be the most challenging part of creating an innovative workplace, but it also can be the most powerful—and one that supports new creative hires to thrive.

Experts talk about introducing tension as an effective method of fostering innovation. For example, creating healthy challenges or competitions among your existing workforce can bring out their creative side. Generally speaking, challenges force people to innovate just to meet the challenge. If you make that challenge about innovation in general, you can make some real headway.

It Takes a Village

Encouraging new types of teamwork can help you leverage both new and established creative people to innovate on a whole new level. That means designing projects that will bring people together who haven’t done so before or giving new projects to existing teams that will offer them a new challenge.

Experts sometimes suggest that a team that is innovating might appear to be a team that is playing—and there is nothing wrong with that. Encouraging a healthy, playful approach to fostering team innovation can really make it feel natural and easy for teammates to make great strides.

Working with Limited Resources

Some might resist changes that can lead to innovation because it can be perceived as requiring something entirely new (and therefore costly). But working with limited resources can be extremely valuable for encouraging innovation. Giving your employees a chance to introduce a solution with the resources at hand will bring people together and get them thinking in new ways.

Additionally, allowing teams to determine which outside solutions are needed can often help you identify a variety of solutions, including those that are low cost.

Finally, by accessing the diversity of thought available in teams, you might identify solutions that are not unnecessarily broad and can solve the problems at hand efficiently.

 Where to Get Started

Here is how to identify new ways of fostering and facilitating innovation and entrepreneurship.

The post How HR Leaders Drive Innovation appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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Netflix has been making headlines with a number of high-quality and popular original documentaries, movies, and series over the last several years, including hits like House of Cards and Bird Box. One recent documentary also gained a lot of attention, not just because it was well made but also because its subject is still fresh in people’s minds.

Source: Manuel Esteban / shutterstock

The Fyre Festival Debacle

The Fyre Festival documentary chronicles the disastrous Fyre music festival put on by young entrepreneur and scam artist Billy McFarland and rapper Ja Rule. The festival was marketed as a luxury event for the young, rich, and hip and was located on a private beach in the Bahamas, with beautiful people, parties, and great music. What resulted was anything but luxurious.

Forbes Contributor Jack Kelly argues that McFarland serves as a good example of what not to be as a leader. He points to McFarland’s “fanciful hype and over-promises,” his “horrendous management style,” and his hiring of “inexperienced, naive and gullible staff” as contributing to the disastrous event.

A Leadership Fail

“McFarland’s misleading promises of luxury villas was met with shabby tents procured from a prior natural disaster and soaking wet mattresses after an unexpected rainstorm hit the island. There was little food and what was available was inedible. The musical groups canceled or just didn’t show up. It was a complete failure.”

Anyone who watched the documentary would almost certainly agree that McFarland exemplified traits of a charismatic leader. He always seemed to have the answers and was perpetually optimistic.

However, Kelly notes that much of McFarland’s persona was built on lies. There are numerous examples in the documentary when McFarland refused to take advice from his closest lieutenants, preferring to push ahead in secrecy and deception.

Key Takeaways

Business leaders can take plenty away from this dystopian example. First, being truthful and transparent is a critical business leadership trait. Second, surround yourself with good people. Third, listen to them!

It’s not just the positive stories of business success that can teach us important lessons about leadership; sometimes, we can learn a lot from abject failures, as well.

The post Fyre Festival Debacle Contains Potential Leadership Lessons appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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Are we misdiagnosing the causes of employee burnout and prescribing the wrong remedies?

The boom in workplace wellness programs over the last decade has focused attention on an individual’s emotional and physical health and social and financial well-being.

Nine in 10 organizations worldwide now offer at least one wellness benefit to employees.

And at face value, the time and effort are well spent. The average spend by U.S. businesses on wellness programs is estimated at $742 per employee per year, with a return on investment of up to $4 for every $1 spent. That’s less time off and lower employee turnover.

Despite this investment and emphasis on individual well-being, the burnout problem endures.

Seventy-seven percent of U.S. professionals surveyed by consultancy firm Deloitte said they had experienced burnout at work. More than half said they had burned out more than once.

Perhaps leaders are overlooking two simple but connected questions:

Are we just asking people to do too much?

Worse still, are we asking people to do too much of the wrong thing?

Author and Bain & Company partner Eric Garton has suggested that employee burnout is a “problem with the company not the person.” He’s right. Leaders must look again at what work is being done—and how it’s getting done.

Doing Too Much: The Myth of Multitasking

First we need to tackle one of the great heroic myths of modern work: multitasking. The reality is that the more we try to do at once, the more we’re likely to slow down work and build up the stress that can lead to burnout.

A study by Microsoft and the University of Illinois found that it takes 10–15 minutes to regain focus when we switch between tasks.

Another study cited by the American Psychological Association found that up to 40% of an individual’s productive time can be lost if he or she is asked to repeatedly switch between different activities during the day.

MIT neuroscientist professor Earl Miller explains that our brains simply aren’t wired to process multiple tasks at once: “Switching from task to task, you think you’re actually paying attention to everything around you at the same time. But you’re actually not. You’re not paying attention to one or two things simultaneously, but switching between them very rapidly.”

Eric Garten summed it up: “Burnout is driven by the always-on digital workplace, too many priorities, and the expectation that employees can use their digital tools to multitask and power through their workloads. Multitasking turns out to be exhausting and counterproductive.”

It is far better, then, for both the individual and the business if leaders ask their teams to approach tasks with real focus.

Leaders can help to create a more focused culture by asking two simple questions:

“What are we going to do next?”

“What’s the one thing we’re going to do within the next 2 weeks that will take us closer to a milestone?”

By asking these questions, leaders are not inviting answers with multiple possibilities or encouraging multitasking.

Instead, leaders are encouraging teams to think about the best next action: an action that matters most and matters most right now. Teams can also flip the convention of daily to-do lists on their head to define what work they won’t do. At Facebook, for instance, managers are starting to set “nongoals”—calling out what their teams will not do while they focus on achieving strategic objectives.

The challenge for leaders is to create a culture of trust within teams where people feel empowered to do their most important tasks—and nothing more.

Doing Too Much of the Wrong Thing

But it’s not just a problem of doing too much. Stress grows when we feel we’re doing too much of the wrong thing.

Workfront’s annual State of Work research has shown for the last 5 years that employees are diverted from their primary tasks by time-sucking meetings and pointless e-mail threads.

The result is that U.S. knowledge workers are only spending 40% of their time on the jobs they were hired to do. Fifty-eight percent of knowledge workers say they are “too swamped with getting day-to-day work done to think beyond their daily to-do list.” Six out of 10 see their colleagues’ work as a mystery.

Our research paints a picture of employees working in a fog that obscures their most important tasks and where they fit in the wider business operation.

“Cynicism and detachment” and “feelings of ineffectiveness and lack of accomplishment” are as much symptoms of burnout as physical and emotional exhaustion, according to author and psychologist Sherrie Bourg Carter, PsyD.

The remedy is a combination of clarity about what the priority tasks are and what British psychologist Tony Crabbe has described as “downgrading perfectionism.”

Leaders need to set clear project milestones and encourage teams to barely accomplish them as they push toward their ultimate goals.

When a team is 99% of the way toward completing a project, it needs to invest only 1% more to get it finished—not another 10%.

Beating Burnout

So, while wellness programs do great work in supporting individual employees, leaders can tackle burnout by rethinking what work is happening—and how—across their whole organization.

The challenge is not to find new ways to do as much as possible; beating burnout means getting work done right.

Alex Shootman is the President and CEO of Workfront. He is also the author of Done Right: How Tomorrow’s Top Leaders Get Stuff Done.

The post How Leaders Can Help Teams Avoid Burnout and Get the Right Work Done appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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Facebook has been in the news a lot lately in a climate increasingly concerned about both privacy and “fake news.” Pundits are pointing to Facebook’s woes as fodder for understanding about the types of leadership foibles that can lead a company down a slippery slope from a public sentiment standpoint.What did they do? Facebook’s missteps fall into two camps: looking the other way as Russian hackers attempted to impact the presidential election, failing to protect user data from attempts from Cambridge Analytics to profile American voters. And, of course, after the fact, it failed to ‘fess up.

Transparency Matters

The New York Times has been hot on the heels of the massive social media powerhouse, with investigations revealing “how Facebook fought back against its critics: with delays, denials and a full-bore campaign in Washington.”

The situation shows a shocking failure of transparency from a company that is founded on wide open communications. An attempt to cover up actions that are now coming to light is, perhaps, surprising from a leader that more than anyone should surely have known how difficult it is to cover anything up in an era of digital communication. Yet, cover up is seemingly what the company and its leaders attempted to do. They failed.

Spreading the Leadership

Chief Executive Contributor, Dan Bigman, points to one potential reason why they failed: too much power at the top. Bigman says: “A CEO having total, imperial control over a public company is a really, really terrible idea.” In fact, Bigman says: “Business, when played best, is a team sport.” Despite Zuckerberg’s arguable brilliance, one person’s perspective is generally always inadequate from a standpoint of ensuring that all blind spots are considered.

In this case, Bigman says, Facebook failed to take into consideration the opinions of members of their board and executive team and instead, relied on Zuckerberg to call the shots.

It’s a situation that is still playing out and one that holds opportunities for others to learn from.

Important Takeaways

Facebook is certainly not the first company to attempt to cover up missteps or misdeeds and is likely to not be the last. Still, there are some important takeaways for other companies and their leaders that can be gleaned from this situation. These may seem oversimplified, but could companies really go wrong by:

  • Not doing bad things?
  • Telling the truth?
  • Protecting your people (employees and customers)?

Corporate leaders are wise to watch and learn from this situation as they consider how their own internal communication practices might impact public perceptions—and brand strength.

When “bad things happen” in, or to, your organization, what do you do? What will you do in the future in light of Facebook’s experiences and the impacts on its reputation?

The post What Leaders Can Learn from Facebook’s Trials and Tribulations appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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Companies must adopt a growth mindset and build a coaching culture in order to thrive in today’s highly competitive and evolving markets. In a coaching culture, everyone is encouraged to question their assumptions and seek out new ways of thinking and leading. Every success or failure is a chance to grow as individuals and as an organization.

We may live in a world of iPhones right now, but when the device debuted in 2007, it was BlackBerry that dominated the mobile market. Even with the iPhone available, BlackBerry’s sales kept trending upward for the four years that followed.

BlackBerry felt confident about the success of its model. Apple was doing things differently, for example by introducing a touchscreen. By the time BlackBerry knew what hit it, the iPhone had become ubiquitous. BlackBerry’s market share dwindled, and its stock dropped into the single digits.

BlackBerry’s mistake was being overconfident in its approach and not open to learning. It is just one example of why companies must adopt a growth mindset and build a learning culture to thrive in the contemporary market. Every success or failure is a chance for leaders to coach their employees to learn.

Bloom and Grow

The only way for organizations to thrive is to continually learn and grow, and that doesn’t happen with a top-down leadership culture. Instead, managers and executives must become coaches enabling employees to continually develop their skills and professional knowledge. It’s good for the individual, and it’s good for the company.

Internal coaching increases retention, engagement, productivity, and performance. How much so? A Mabey and Ramirez study found that managers who are skilled at developing their people achieve a 25% uplift in employee performance, while a report by the International Coaching Federation revealed that 60% of companies with strong coaching cultures report above-average revenue.

It’s simple, if not always easy. There is a big difference between teaching a few leadership coaching skills and building a genuine coaching culture.

Learning to Build a Coaching Culture

How can you tell whether your company has a strong culture of coaching? It’s not enough to run leadership training or to tweak the performance management process. Instead, a great business will weave the philosophy into the fabric of the entire business.

Three strategies that seem to have a disproportionate impact on creating a coaching culture are:

  1. To redefine coaching. Traditionally companies want to formalize coaching, creating a coaching “model,” giving it structure and a top-down focus. This may feel like progress, but employees rarely respond well to it. Instead, reframe coaching as a dynamic conversation and teach leaders to make every conversation a coaching conversation.

Many leaders think of coaching on a performance model: They have a template of what “good” looks like and give people feedback until they get there. This is an effective first step, but to create a true learning culture, your leaders will have to evolve their approach. They need to supplement performance coaching with person-centered coaching — helping people discover insight for and about themselves. In the process, you will both be able to challenge the way you think about your business.

  1. To build a growth mindset in every leader. Carol Dweck’s foundational work exposes the dangers of a fixed mindset. People who believe intelligence and talent are static focus on what they think they know about themselves instead of exploring ways to improve. In a coaching culture, leaders need to be aware that everyone has triggers that put them back into a fixed mindset. Leaders need to learn to notice and respond to these triggers in themselves and their teams in order to spark a learning environment.
  2. To challenge the feedback status quo. Many managers find it difficult to give constructive feedback because they worry about how it will be received. For this reason, they limit it to formal reviews. However, 72% of employees say they truly want corrective feedback. Knowing of this desire to improve, instill an “always on” feedback system within your company — one in which everyone gives and receives as much feedback as possible.

Feedback should be continuous and omnidirectional. Employees need to know it’s safe and even expected to ask for and receive it. Reimagining constructive criticism as an opportunity to improve will itself grow your learning culture.

Adult learning is less about acquiring new knowledge and more about challenging existing beliefs. For that reason, a culture of learning goes far beyond reading books or attending seminars. In a learning culture, everyone is encouraged to question their assumptions and seek out new ways of thinking. And, of course, the best way for leaders to create this is to model it themselves and coach others accordingly.

Often the biggest learning happens at the most uncomfortable times. Embracing the discomfort and learning from it and spreading that knowledge through coaching will afford your organization the greatest opportunities for growth.

Jerry Connor is head of the coaching practice at BTS, an organization that works with leaders at all levels to help them make better decisions, convert those decisions to actions, and deliver results. Jerry is the founder of Coach in a Box, a coaching organization with the goal of bringing coaching to the masses, which operated in more than 55 countries before being acquired by BTS in 2017. With more than 26 years of experience in change management and leadership development, Jerry has extensive experience working with a variety of top global organizations as well as in the public sector.

The post How to Create a Leadership Coaching Culture That Helps Your Business Blossom appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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HR Daily Advisor | Leadership by Jimmy Daniel, Talent Management Str.. - 6M ago

When corporate leadership and employees are asked to define their workplace culture, they often have trouble articulating a cogent response. Because workplace culture is the character or personality of a company, it isn’t hard to understand why it can be difficult to put into words. The personality and character of a company are largely dependent on the actions or behaviors of those within the company. At corporate giants like Amazon, it’s easy for team members to repeat the CEO’s assessment of the culture—for instance, Jeff Bezos’ description of Amazon’s “gladiator culture.” But what about smaller companies? What about your organization?

Culture Is in the Eye of the Beholder

An exercise I commonly perform is to sit down with leaders of small and medium-size organizations and ask them to define their company’s culture on a sticky note. It isn’t uncommon to collect as many different definitions of the company’s culture as there are people in the room. Culture can be a hard thing to pin down at many companies. So if you don’t know how to define your company’s culture, how can you have an effective leadership style that reflects your culture?

In today’s work environment, Millennials are starting to drive the culture. If your culture isn’t currently attracting and retaining this generation into your workforce, in the not-too-distant future, you will struggle to create a corporate culture that attracts Millennials. One of the most common traits among Millennials is their need for collaboration at work. So where do you begin?

You must to be able to define your company culture clearly. Take a look around at the workspaces inside your office. What do they say? If you claim to have a collaborative culture but employees are closed off from one another, are you really that collaborative? What do your common areas look like? How often are they used by groups of employees? If common areas aren’t being utilized, your culture may not be as collaborative as you think.

Collect Employee Feedback

To improve your workplace culture, you may have hung some trendy sayings on the walls or placed a couple of mission statements around the workspace. But do they really define how your employees feel about working at your company? As a leader, you must sometimes ask tough questions like “How do you describe working here to your family?” Or “Would you recommend this as a place to work to your friends?” You may even muster up the courage to ask, “If you were offered the same pay and benefits from another company, would you leave?”

If you aren’t usually open to feedback, you may need to get creative to collect it. A successful way to do that might be to send out a pulse survey that promises complete anonymity. That way, you’ll get the honest answers you seek, not necessarily the ones you want to hear.

Bottom Line

A word of caution: Be careful about claiming to have a culture that doesn’t exist at your organization. You’ll only succeed in developing negative feelings among your team members. For example, don’t claim to have an open-door policy, but open your door to employees only when it’s convenient for you. Don’t check e-mail or look at your phone while a team member is trying to utilize the open-door policy. And don’t say you have a culture that encourages honest conversations if you tend to interrupt employees or dispute every idea they bring you. We’ve all sat in meetings at which leaders end up being the only ones speaking because we don’t want to bring up ideas that are likely to be shot down.

It’s important to have a clear understanding of your culture so you can lead your team more effectively. If you’re feeling bold, pass out sticky notes during your next meeting and ask each person to define your company culture.

Jimmy Daniel is a talent management strategist for F&H Solutions Group and a contributor to Arizona Employment Law Letter. He can be reached at 901-291-1518 or jdaniel@fhsolutionsgroup.com.

The post Does Your Leadership Style Fit Your Culture? appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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When we talk about start-ups and start-up culture, many imagine a collection of smart and driven individuals fulfilling business goals. What’s missing from this picture is the team management ensuring that it all runs like a smoothly oiled machine. Without good team management, the future and success of a start-up can be short-lived if no one is looking after long-term strategy and steering the team. Below we look at some of the reasons why team management is important and how to improve yours.

The Importance of the Team

The success of a new venture doesn’t just lie with the founders and their vision. It’s only when those founders attract a great team around them, bringing in more experience and a diverse range of skills, helping to drive the founders’ vision forward, that long-term success will be possible. Good team management will identify any weak spots present with the intention of providing support until it can be resolved. Start-ups with a willingness to adapt, learn, and take on new ideas whilst implementing tangible changes should something be proved to not work are more likely to survive and thrive in a competitive market environment.

Speaking of steering and team management, it must be noted that start-ups don’t have the luxury of misreading the market like Microsoft did when they dismissed the mobile computing revolution as a fluke. However, start-ups do have the advantage of being more responsive to market demands. Good team management is all about analyzing the market from all the possible angle, making tweaks to business plans and strategy, before the business enters any particular market segment.

How to Best Manage Your Team

Identify weak spots: as mentioned before, all start-ups should evaluate the state of the team to see where extra support is needed. There should be a good balance of different skills to evenly cover the diverse needs of a business starting out.

Use tech to help: if your start-up is quite small, it can be tempting to not implement internal processes until a mythical ‘later’ date when the team or business grows. But doing this from the start will benefit the team in the long run and instill good working habits. Manage team resources with a tool like Resource Guru, ensure no one misses a meeting with GoToMeeting, and get daily activity reports with Team Colony.

Implement training: start-ups attract talented individuals but that doesn’t mean they don’t need training or further development. Invest in your employees through scheduled training, helping learn from each other through skill sharing, talks, and more.

Delegate: learning to delegate successfully is an art that needs to be practiced from the start. It’s easy to take on too much and feel that it’s all too important for someone else to complete. Instead, delegate early and trust the people around you to get things done well.

Understand different personalities: the kind of people who gravitate towards start-ups are likely to have similar dispositions. Nevertheless, simply holding that assumption won’t work; get to know every employee and their personality to best understand the kind of approach that will bring out their best qualities.

The post Why Good Team Management is Important for Start-up Businesses appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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L&D professionals identify the ability to effectively deliver insights on skill gaps as a key priority. However, as the workplace becomes increasingly more digitized it’s important that executives understand the key traits that are critical for leadership to succeed. According to research from Randstad US, executives must develop new leadership capabilities in order to successfully manage their organizations today and in the future.

Source: Dina Mariani / iStock / Getty

Insights from Randstad US’ Workplace 2025: The Post-Digital Frontier study identifies several personal traits as well as five key leadership competencies required in the post-digital age. The study also found that nearly all companies (95%) believe new and different types of leadership are going to be required to effectively address changes in organizational structures and operating models due to digitalization.

“Thanks to technology, organizational structures and operations are changing far more rapidly than they did in the past,” says Jim Link, chief human resources officer, Randstad North America. “If organizations don’t have leaders in place with the digital prowess required to navigate this new reality, they’ll struggle. The best investment that companies can make in their future is to identify and cultivate individuals with strong digital skills and sharp instincts for what’s coming next, as they’ll drive innovation and keep their companies competitive.”

Based on responses from nearly 3,000 workers across the U.S., this new wave of leaders must:

  • Have the ability to keep people connected and engaged (76%)
  • Be more agile and digitally savvy (77%)
  • Drive a culture of innovation, learning, and continuous improvement (76%)
  • Be adept at risk-taking (60%)
Building Digital Leaders

To assist organizations in identifying and developing digital leaders, Randstad partnered with talent assessment company XBInsight to gain more granular insight into building digital skills and developing forward-thinking leadership approaches.

Based on competency and assessment data from 5,000 leaders across a wide range of industries, XBInsight identified five competencies where successful leaders have scored highest and that correlate closely with the requirements of digital leaders according to Randstad’s data.

The five critical leadership traits needed to thrive in the post-digital workplace include:

  • Inspiring others
  • Leveraging technology
  • Encouraging collaboration
  • Driving innovation
  • Managing risk

“The digital revolution has changed many jobs, added new ones, and of course, dramatically altered the leadership skills and behaviors needed to navigate the post-digital landscape,” says Kathi Graham-Leviss, CEO of XBInsight. “The ability to lead with an innovative mindset is at the core of what it takes to be a digital leader. The good news is innovation is a competency, and much like other competencies, it can be developed.”

The Common Thread Among Digitally Successful Companies

It’s clear that having a leader with strong digital skills at the helm is critical to any organization’s success. Unfortunately, however, more than half (63%) of all companies surveyed don’t believe they have a strong digital leader in place today. And the risks for organizations lacking digital leadership can be significant, including:

  • A lower likelihood that digital initiatives will meet their full potential in driving business success,
  • An ineffective approach to digitalization that is largely tactical in nature without a cohesive, company-wide strategy or focus, and
  • Challenges in attracting and retaining top talent as a result of falling short of delivering the digital innovation and tools the majority of today’s workers desire.

To learn more about honing these important leadership skills, download the Hiring and Developing Digital Leaders white paper.

The post 5 Critical Leadership Traits Executives Need to Thrive in the Post-Digital Workplace appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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The term “teambuilding” often elicits groans and eye rolls from employees. Many workers see them as unwelcome interruptions in already packed workdays, thinking that these feel-good activities have little value and serve no real purpose.

While you can’t help that people may have these perceptions, you can help show them that their thoughts on teambuilding may be misguided.

Savvy leaders realize that collaboration and effective communication are essential if a group is to work well together, which is precisely why teambuilding should be anything but a dirty word among Human Resources (HR) professionals.

Benefits of Teambuilding

Each department or company is made up of diverse groups of individuals with highly specialized skills. Teams everywhere—from accounting and HR to sales and marketing—are often so focused on their own tasks that they don’t have a full understanding of what others do and how they all work toward common goals.

Teambuilding activities remove these blinders and place people in a new environment, where they can get to know one another better and learn about one another’s jobs and work styles. This is important for any type of group but especially if your team is multigenerational. Teambuilding also tends to increase morale and company pride—key components of a happy, motivated workforce. What’s more, when done properly, these sessions can overcome the groans and eye rolls and really be quite fun—and something your employees actually look forward to.

Getting Your Staff into It

Not all teambuilding events are created equally. Do you have a staff of introverts? They might resist any activities that involve acting silly in front of their peers. Is your team made up of more boisterous individuals? A 3-hour lecture from a motivational speaker might not be the ticket. So, the first step in getting your staff excited about teambuilding is to figure out what will and won’t work for the individuals in your department.

Next, make the teambuilding active, either physically or socially. That doesn’t mean you can’t have movie nights or theater outings as a department, but try to add a more dynamic component, such as postshow drinks and discussions.

For the greatest engagement, hold teambuilding activities off campus. If employees are in the office, their minds will be on all the things they have to do—but aren’t getting done. Going outdoors can be invigorating, but any non-work space will help your team disconnect from their daily tasks and engage with the activity.

Finally, document the results of the activity, and reference them during group meetings in the weeks and months to come. Was the goal of the activity to improve problem-solving skills? The next time your team triumphs over a sticky situation, acknowledge their good work, and reference a relevant session. As your employees begin to appreciate the value of teambuilding, it’ll become a cherished part of your company culture.

Ideas for Teambuilding Activities

Check out these examples of real teambuilding activities that leaders have implemented at their companies.

Budget-friendly activities:

  • “We play office trivia as a team.”
  • “Our department watches a movie together every month.”
  • “We celebrate birthdays and company anniversaries.”
  • “We hold chili cook-offs.”
  • “We instituted ‘Take Your Dog to Work Day.’ It creates camaraderie among employees.”
  • “We invite employees to family-friendly company picnics.”

Sporty activities:

  • “We organized a monthly bowling trip—and it turned out great.”
  • “We formed a company softball team.”
  • “We participate in activities such as basketball, pool. and laser tag.”
  • “We host an event for new hires that includes activities like wall climbing.”
  • “We invited all employees to a baseball game.”
  • “We went out for a go-kart race with all our employees.”

Brainy activities:

  • “We offer workshops to help develop skills like effective communication, team coordination, and problem solving.”
  • “We plan an annual staff retreat to talk about upcoming events and discuss strategies and goals.”
  • “We played a blindfold game, which helped build trust on the team.”
  • “We invite motivational speakers to present to employees.”

Pricey-but-worth-it activities:

  • “We competed in an escape room challenge.”
  • “We took a tour of the World Trade Center.”
  • “While at a national meeting, we broke into groups and composed songs and then performed with local country musicians.”
  • “We went zip-lining.”
  • “We participated in a water rafting trip.”

Activities that give back to the community:

  • “Employees participated in a 12K run to support a good cause.”
  • “We volunteered to help build a home.”
  • “We hosted a banquet fund-raiser to help students go to college.”
  • “Our team came together to help feed the hungry in our community.”

Teambuilding can be a powerful addition to your management strategy. But to make the activities work, you have to put some thought into them rather than just following the latest trends. Tailor the activities to your specific group and a specific need, and you’ll have less eye rolling and more enthusiasm for collegiality.

Diane Domeyer is the executive director of The Creative Group, a specialized staffing service placing interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals with a variety of firms. Robert Half, parent company to The Creative Group, offers annual Salary Guides, which contain salary information for a range of positions that you can adjust for your local market.

The post 25 Teambuilding Activities That Actually Interest Workers appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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HR Daily Advisor | Leadership by Juliana Marulanda, Founder, Scaleti.. - 8M ago

There are different factors for businesses to succeed, one of which is by learning how to fully maximize your team members. To do this, you must be able to learn the importance of delegation.

Source: TarikVision / iStock / Getty

Delegation is a skill that is groomed over time. And once you get the hang of it, doing it will be a breeze. As a business, you know that there are a lot of sacrifices involved—like personal savings, rest, and relaxation, among others. However, you can avoid sacrificing too much of yourself by delegating. It is a science as much as it is an art!

Learning the importance of delegation can help you avoid experiencing decision fatigue—a scenario wherein your decision-making powers are overworked and you become reactive instead of a proactive thinker.

Another thing delegation can help you with is empowering your team members and preventing them from burning out—an important aspect if you want to keep your turnover rate at bay. Empowered employees may stay longer than those who are burned out and can be useful in hitting your yearly business objectives!

These are just surface details about the importance of delegation. Check out this infographic from Scaletime to see a deep dive on the benefits of delegating tasks to your team members to help your business succeed in its area of expertise.

Juliana Marulanda is the Founder of ScaleTime.

The post The Art and Science of Delegation appeared first on HR Daily Advisor.

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