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A Little Known Classic Thai Dish

This is a dish that’s ubiquitous in Thailand, and a favourite amongst kids and adults alike. Kids love it because it’s not spicy. Adults love it because it’s just super yummy and goes great with a cold beer! If you know my Garlic Pepper Chicken recipe, this one is a similar idea, but different. Apart from the obvious pork VS chicken, we are also deep frying instead of stir-frying. Trust me, the deep frying makes all the difference!

It’s a dish that many people make at home, but you can also find it sold by street vendors or even some nicer restaurants. Have it with some rice as part of a bigger meal, but I also love it with some Thai sticky rice.

Fried Garlic & Garlic Oil

Fried garlic is an ingredient that comes up very often in Thai cuisine. We sprinkle it on so many different dishes: noodle soups, dumplings, congee, and deep fried foods like this dish. We use it so much that you can buy jars of fried garlic already made from the store. However, the flavour is so much stronger when you make it fresh.

When you make fried garlic, the oil will become scented with garlic so keep that oil! Sprinkle garlic oil on any dish to instantly add fried garlic flavour. You can keep the oil in the fridge for a few months.

The most important thing is to not to over fry garlic—you want light golden yellow, not golden brown, otherwise you’ll have bitter garlic!

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Garlic Pepper Pork หมูทอดกระเทียมพริกไทย
  • Author: Pailin Chongchitnant
  • Yield: 2 servings
Ingredients
  • 250g pork butt, ¼” thick slices (see note)
  • 2 tsp oyster sauce
  • 2 tsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • 1 ½ tsp sugar
  • 1 head garlic, divided
  • ½ tsp white peppercorns
  • 8 cilantro stems, chopped (keep the leaves for garnish)
  • 2 Tbsp cornstarch
  • Jasmine rice for serving

Note: Pork butt, also known as pork shoulder, is a flavourful and fatty cut that I prefer for this. When you slice it, trim off any large chunks of fat, but leave in the smaller fat streaks that run through the meat. For a leaner option you can also use pork loin or tenderloin, but keep in mind that leaner cuts are not as juicy and flavourful.

Ingredients and Kitchen Tools I Use

Instructions
  1. In a mortar and pestle, pound peppercorns until fine. Add one-third of the garlic and chopped cilantro stems and pound into a fine paste.
  2. Add herb paste, oyster sauce, soy sauce, fish sauce and sugar and mix well (it’s faster to massage everything in by hand, but wear gloves or your hands will smell like garlic for a long time!). Let sit for 20 mins minimum, and up to one day.
Meanwhile, make fried garlic. 
  1. Chop the remaining garlic as evenly as you can.
  2. Add about 1/2-inch of frying oil to a small pot or wok you’re using to fry the pork. Turn heat on to high then right away add garlic. Once garlic starts bubbling, turn heat down to low and fry, stirring frequently, until garlic is light golden. Do not let it brown or it will be bitter. 
  3. Once done, use a fine mesh skimmer to remove ALL the garlic from oil. Alternatively you can pour it through a strainer and return oil back to pot. Don’t let garlic bits remain in the oil or it will burn when you fry the pork.
To fry the pork:
  1. Add cornstarch to pork and mix well. It will look wet and pasty.
  2. Add more oil to the pot so it’s now about 1.5 inch deep and heat to 375°F (190°C) over medium high heat.
  3. Fry the pork in batches so as to not crowd the pot. Once you drop the pork immediately pull the pieces apart so they are not stuck together. Fry for about 45 seconds to 1 minute only, just until the exterior has browned slightly. Remove with a slotted skimmer and drain on paper towel. 
  4. To serve, sprinkle fried garlic over pork and top with cilantro leaves if desired 
  5. Serve with jasmine rice or sticky rice, and a cold drink!

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The post Garlic Pepper Pork หมูทอดกระเทียมพริกไทย appeared first on Hot Thai Kitchen.

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Hot Thai Kitchen by Pailin Chongchitnant - 2w ago
A Whole Squid is Easily Deconstructed

If you like to eat squid but have not cooked much with it because the idea of breaking down a whole squid seems intimidating, well this video is all you need! It’s really not hard…and in fact, once you see it, it’s almost as if squids were made for simple disassembly. Each part comes apart distinctly, easily, and intuitively. Nothing like filleting a fish, trust me.

Want a delicious Thai recipe that uses squid? Check out my Dry Tom Yum recipe here. This recipe uses a mix of seafood, but you can totally do all squid if you like.

P.S. I buy my whole squid from the seafood counter at an Asian grocery store.

The post How to Clean and Prepare a Whole Squid appeared first on Hot Thai Kitchen.

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Dry Tom Yum is on Netflix

This is a luxurious recipe that is incredibly simple and delicious. I was reminded of it because it was talked about in a Netflix documentary “Street Food” in the Bangkok episode. The episode featured Jay Fai, a street food vendor who started incorporating expensive seafood into otherwise common everyday dishes, and she became globally known after she earned a Michelin Star for her humble establishment. Dry tom yum is one of the dishes that she makes.

The documentary implied that she invented the dish…but I actually don’t know if that is true. This is a dish that has been around for a long time, made by many people, and I am not aware of any evidence that she was the one who invented it. It’s not even a dish associated with her, or anyone in particular. Perhaps she was the one who popularized it? Note, however, that Jay Fai did not claim that she invented it; it was implied by one of the people interviewed.

What is a “dry” dish?

In Thailand there are many dishes that has “dry” in its name, or in Thai, hang. These dishes are typically derived from a normally soupy dish, and have been modified so that the soup part is gone. A classic example is a “dry noodle soup” which sounds like an oxymoron, but basically you can order most types of noodle soups in Thailand without the broth, and the noodles are instead tossed in the seasoning. It actually makes it much easier to make at home, check out this “dry wonton noodles” recipe here.

So as you probably know, Tom Yum is originally a soup, and a dry tom yum is basically the stir-fried version of it. Plain and simple. It uses all of the same herbs and seasonings, minus the broth. So what you end up with is a tom yum flavoured sauce that is light and herbaceous and just delightful to pour over some jasmine rice.

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Dry Tom Yum Seafood ต้มยำทะเลแห้ง
  • Author: Pailin Chongchitnant
  • Yield: 2-3 Servings
Ingredients
  • 350 g mixed seafood of your choice (I use shrimp, scallops, and squid, see note)
  • 1 stalk lemongrass, bottom half only, very thinly sliced
  • 5 thin slices galangal, finely julienned
  • 5 kaffir lime leaves, torn into chunks
  • 1 large head shallot, julienned
  • 3–5 Thai chilies, finely chopped (remove seeds for less heat)
  • 2 Tbsp water or stock
  • 2 Tbsp fish sauce
  • 1 Tbsp finely chopped palm sugar or 1 Tbsp Thai chili paste (see note)
  • 100 g shimeji, oyster or straw mushrooms
  • 1 cup cherry tomato halves
  • 2 Tbsp lime juice
  • A handful chopped cilantro

Shop Ingredients & Kitchen Tools I Use

Notes:

  1. Check out this video for how to clean and prep a whole squid.
  2. Using Thai chili paste will make a dish that has a more robust flavour, while using palm sugar will give you a lighter, more refreshing dish. Either is delicious. I prefer to use palm sugar because I want the subtle, sweet flavours of the scallops to come through. But if you’re looking to replicate the flavour or tom yum goong soup that usually has chili paste, then I would add it. 
Instructions
  1. Pre-cook the seafood first by sauteing or searing in the wok with a little oil just until done, then remove from wok and set aside. Tips: Cook each type of seafood separately. If using scallops, cook only until medium doneness rather than well-done for best texture. If using squid, cook them last as they can release a lot of water when cooked, And be careful not to overcook squid; they should take no more than 1 minute.
  2. In the same wok you cooked the seafood, add a little extra oil, then add lemongrass, galangal, lime leaves, chilies and shallots. Saute over medium heat for about 1 minute.
  3. Deglaze with a splash of water, then add fish sauce and palm sugar or chili paste. Stir briefly to dissolve the sugar.
  4. Turn heat to high, then add mushrooms and toss briefly.
  5. Add the cooked seafood back in the pan along with tomatoes and toss just to mix then turn off the heat.
  6. Add lime juice and cilantro, and stir to mix. 
  7. Serve with jasmine rice, enjoy!

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The post Dry Tom Yum Seafood ต้มยำแห้ง appeared first on Hot Thai Kitchen.

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Kaffir lime, also known as “makrut lime” is one of the most important ingredients in Thai cuisine. But most of the time we only use the leaves rather than the fruit. In this video I talk about everything you need to know to start cooking with kaffir lime leaves. I talk about what it is, how to use, how to store, and how to substitute.

What about kaffir lime fruit?

From the fruit, we only use the zest, which as you can see in the video is quite thick so you can just use a knife to slice off the green part and you don’t have to bother with the zester. When zesting kaffir limes try your best not to get the white pith because it’s bitter.

As for the flesh on the inside, kaffir limes have a ton of seeds and do not have very much juice at all, so we never really use it in cooking. If you have the fruit, and you can coax out some juice out of it, you can use it to add acidity to your dish, but it is very sour so use sparingly!

For more videos on other Thai ingredients

Check out my Thai Ingredient Playlist where I have informational videos about the most important ingredients in Thai cuisine.

Recipes with Kaffir Lime Leaves

Want to start cooking with kaffir lime leaves? Here are some recipes that use them in various different ways:

Simmering: Tom Ka Gai – Coconut Chicken Soup

Toasting: Laab Gai – Northeastern Ground Chicken Salad 

Stir-frying and julienned: Panang Curry

Or anything “Tom Yum”! Do a search on the site for any recipe containing the word “tom yum” and it’s going to have kaffir lime leaves in it. I have everything from the traditional Tom Yum Goong soup to the fusion Tom Yum Pizza!

The post KAFFIR LIME LEAVES 101: What You Need to Know appeared first on Hot Thai Kitchen.

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Hot Thai Kitchen by Pailin Chongchitnant - 3w ago

In this video I introduce my brand new baby to you! Also I took this opportunity to do an AMA (Ask Me Anything). I asked for questions submissions on Facebook and Instagram and boy were there lots of really good questions! If you want more AMA, there are some more questions answered on my Instagram Stories (click on the AMA highlight circle).

Also, many people asked about my story. I’ve done a video dedicated to that questions before, so check this out: MY STORY: Who Am I and How I Got Here?

The post Meet Baby & Ask Me Anything! appeared first on Hot Thai Kitchen.

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Hot Thai Kitchen by Pailin Chongchitnant - 1M ago

Sponsored by the makers of Becel.

Many of you who have been following the show for a long time probably know that I love adding Thai twists to non-Thai food. So when the makers of Becel asked me to partner with them to take their customizable cookie recipe and add my own spin on it, I was excited by the challenge! This cookie recipe is calledPlant-Based Anything Goes Cookie Dough, and it’s a versatile soft and chewy cookie dough recipe that you can use as a base and customize by adding your choice of flavours and mix-ins. The recipe uses Becel Original which is a non-hydrogenated, trans-fat free margarine that can replace butter 1:1 in baking. As a busy mom, I also love that it’s soft when refrigerated, so I can use it right away without having to wait for it to soften!

Pandan and Coconut: Quintessential Thai Dessert Flavours

When it comes to Thai dessert flavour, there is nothing else more classic than the flavour of pandan leaves and coconut. So it wasn’t hard for me to come up with this recipe using these two flavours. I added cashews for texture and nuttiness, and fun fact: cashews are one of the only 2 nuts we use in Thai cuisine! The other being peanuts, of course.

What are Pandan Leaves?

Pandan is basically our vanilla. Pandan leaves are long, thin, dark green leaves that have a floral aroma that goes incredibly well with coconut. It’s commonly used in Southeast Asian desserts, and in Thailand, it’s added to almost all of our sweets. It is even used in some savoury dishes, such as the broth of boat noodles. 

You can buy pandan leaves fresh or frozen at Asian grocery stores that carry a lot of Southeast Asian products. If you buy them fresh, you can store any leftovers in the freezer. Make sure you wash and dry them first and store them in a heavy-duty freezer bag and they’ll last you several months.

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Pandan Coconut Cookies with Cashews
  • Author: Pailin Chongchitnant
  • Yield: 30-40 cookies
Description

This recipe is adapted from Becel Plant-Based Anything Goes Cookies Dough Recipe

Ingredients
  • 1 3/4 cups (425 mL) all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup shredded coconut, unsweetened, plus extra for garnish
  • 1 1/2 tsp (7 mL) cornstarch
  • 1 tsp (5 mL) baking powder
  • 1/2 tsp (2 mL) baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/2 cup (125 mL) Becel® Original margarine
  • 3/4 cup (180 mL) granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup (60 mL) unsweetened applesauce
  • 3 Tbsp concentrated pandan juice (recipe follows, see note)
  • 2–3 drops green food colouring (optional)
  • ⅓ cups roasted chopped cashews
  • 30 whole roasted cashews for garnish, optional
Concentrated Pandan Juice
  • 8 pandan leaves, washed and chopped
  • 1/2 cup water

Note: Pandan leaves are long, thin aromatic leaves that can be found frozen or fresh. Look for them at Asian grocery stores that carry a lot of Southeast Asian products. If you cannot find it, you can substitute 1 tsp coconut or vanilla extract plus 3 Tbsp of water.

Instructions For the pandan juice:
  1. Blend half of the pandan leaves with the water until fine. Strain, then put the juice back into the blender.
  2. Add the other half of the pandan leaves in the blender and blend until fine and strain.

Notes:

  • I’m blending half of the leaves at a time because the blender cannot process all the leaves at once with this amount of water.
  • This makes more than you need in the recipe, but I find that the blender needs at least this much volume in order to blend effectively. You can make pandan tea with the leftover juice—simply add water and sweetener of your choice and enjoy it hot or iced.
For the cookies:
  1. Whisk together flour, shredded coconut, cornstarch, baking powder, baking soda and salt in medium bowl; set aside.
  2. Beat Becel® Original margarine and granulated sugar using electric mixer until light and creamy. Beat in applesauce, pandan juice and green food colouring until blended.
  3. Gradually add in flour mixture and beat on low speed, scraping down sides of bowl occasionally, stopping just as the flour is almost completely blended, but not quite.
  4. Add cashews, and use a wooden spoon or rubber spatula to fold them in until they are evenly distributed and the dough is well blended (do not overmix).
  5. Refrigerate dough at least 30 minutes or until chilled. You can make the dough up to 2 days in advance, keeping it well covered in the fridge.
  6. While cookie dough is chilling, preheat oven to 350°F (180°C) and set the rack in the middle of the oven. Line baking sheet with parchment paper.
  7. Drop cookies by tablespoonfuls on prepared baking sheet 2 inches apart.
  8. Optional cashew garnish: place a whole roasted cashew on top of each dough ball, pressing them in so that the bottom half is buried into the dough. Optional coconut garnish: Roll the top side of each dough ball into shredded coconut. If you want to garnish the cookies with both cashews and coconut, make sure you put the cashews in first before rolling them in the coconut.
  9. Bake 10-12 minutes or until edges are golden. (Shorter baking time yields softer cookies.)
  10. Let cookies cool for 5 minutes, then transfer them onto a wire rack to cool completely.
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The post Pandan Coconut Cookies with Cashews appeared first on Hot Thai Kitchen.

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Hot Thai Kitchen by Pailin Chongchitnant - 2M ago

Aunty Jenny is my Chinese mother-in-law, and this is something she makes ALL the time. And we love it because it looks like a luxurious stew that took time and effort to make, yet it’s really quick and easy. I don’t know if this is a traditional Chinese dish, but I do know it is delicious! Chicken wings are braised with sweet caramelized onions, so the chicken comes out tender and the onions practically melt in your mouth.

Key to Flavourful Wings 

The recipe starts out with searning the chicken wings until well browned. Even though once the wings are braised you may not see the searing job you did, and you may be tempted to just skip it, don’t! It is super important because that browning of the skin adds so much flavour—think the flavour of fried chicken skin VS boiled chicken skins…yeah, a LOT of flavour. So take the time to really get a beautiful sear.

Key to Tender Wings

Wings are small and technically can cook in just a few minutes, but in this recipe we want more than just “cooked”. We want tender, which means we need to braise them. Braising is when you cook meat gently in a liquid for an extended period of time until the meat is fork tender. So as the meat cooks it goes from raw, to cooked, to overcooked, and then eventually to scrumptiously tender.

If we were doing red meat, this would take hours, but luckily for wings, it only takes 20 minutes! And this time also allows for flavour to penetrate the meat for a thoroughly flavourful wings. Not to mention the onions cook and become sweet and melty!

The Perfect Freezer Meal

Yes, you can freeze this dish! And it thaws and reheats so perfectly you couldn’t tell the difference. Make the recipe as is, no need to modify anything, and freeze. You can let it thaw in the fridge first overnight (my preferred method) then microwave, or just microwave it from frozen. If using the microwave to reheat, I would stir it a few times in between for a more even heating. You can add some fresh green onions or cilantro to it after reheating to bring back some freshness, but otherwise, just eat! You can also freeze some rice to go with it so it can be a ready-made-meal for you.

Bonus content for Patreon members: For this episode I share a cooking time guideline for braising different types of meat, a useful thing to know for sure! Click here to learn more about becoming a Patreon member.

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Braised Wings with Caramelized Onion
  • Author: Pailin Chongchitnant
Ingredients
  • 750g chicken wings
  • 2 Tbsp soy sauce
  • ½ tsp sugar
  • 2 Tbsp cornstarch
  • 1–2 tsp dark soy sauce
  • 1 large onion, cut into strips
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 5 cloves garlic, chopped
  • 2-inch pc ginger, finely minced
  • 1 ½ Tbsp oyster sauce
  • 1 ½ Tbsp Chinese cooking wine (optional)
  • ½ tsp black or white pepper
  • ~½ cup water
  • 1–2 green onions
  • A squeeze lemon or lime juice (optional)
  • Jasmine rice for serving

Ingredients & Kitchen Tools I Use

Instructions
  1. Marinade chicken in soy sauce and sugar for at least 30 mins or overnight.
  2. Dry off excess liquid from chicken with paper towel, then add cornstarch and toss until evenly distributed.
  3. In a large heavy-bottomed skillet or pot (something with a lid), add enough oil to coat the bottom and heat over medium high heat.
  4. Once oil is hot, sear wings until well browned on both sides. Do not crowd the pan, you will likely need to do this in 2 batches. Once browned (inside will be raw, that’s okay), remove wings from pan and set aside.
  5. In the same pan, add onions and salt and saute over medium high heat until onions are browned, deglazing with water as you notice brown bits forming on the bottom of the pan. You will need to deglaze a few times as you go. Do not worry about onions being super soft at this point, focus on browning as the onions will have time to soften later.
  6. Once browned, add garlic and ginger and saute for another 1 minute.
  7. Add chicken, oyster sauce, dark soy sauce, Chinese cooking wine and just enough water so it comes halfway up the chicken. Cover and cook on low heat for 20-25 minutes or till chicken is fork tender.
  8. Taste and adjust seasoning. If you want, add a little squeeze of lemon juice to brighten up the flavour of the sauce. 
  9. Stir in green onions and serve with rice.

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The post Aunty Jenny’s Braised Chicken Wings appeared first on Hot Thai Kitchen.

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Hot Thai Kitchen by Pailin Chongchitnant - 3M ago
Breakfast in Thailand

There are few dishes in Thailand that are considered specifically “breakfast food”. Our breakfast often looks like lunch, snacks, or even dinner foods. Growing up in Thailand my breakfast was often just leftover dinner!

Congee is the one exception. Congee, or what we call “jok” in Thai, is one of the few dishes considered “breakfast” and you can easily find it on the streets of Thailand in the morning (although you can buy jok at all times of the day, even night time, too.)

Slow VS Quick Method

I have a video that shows you the traditional way of making congee from scratch, which takes a long time stirring broken rice in a pot until thick and creamy. Well, this version is much quicker and still comes out equally delicious if you ask me! It does require that you have some rice already cooked, and you also need some good stock on hand as well.

To be honest since I discovered this method I no long go back to doing it the long method anymore!

Bonus content for Patreon members: For this episode I share other types of rice porridge/soup type dishes that we have in Thailand. We have a bunch! Click here to learn more about becoming a Patreon member.

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Quick & Easy Congee with Meatballs
  • Author: Pailin Chongchitnant
  • Yield: 4 Servings
Ingredients Congee
  • 3 cups cooked jasmine rice, can be leftover
  • 4 cups pork or chicken stock, unsalted (or if salted, reduce seasoning)
  • 1 Tbsp + 1 tsp soy sauce
  • 2 tsp fish sauce
  • Ground white pepper, to taste
  • 1 green onion, chopped
  • 1 inch piece ginger, julienned, or more to taste
Meatballs:
  • 250 g ground pork or chicken, preferably not lean
  • 2 cloves garlic, finely grated
  • ¼ tsp ground white pepper
  • 1 Tbsp soy sauce
  • 1 tsp fish sauce
  • 1 ½  tsp sugar
  • ½  tsp sesame oil (optional)

Check Out Ingredients & Kitchen Tools I Use

Instructions
  1. If the rice is chilled, microwave it for a minute so it’s hot, which will help it absorb liquid more readily.
  2. Add rice to blender along with just enough of the stock to blend. Blend the rice briefly (several seconds) until you have your desired consistency—this could be coarser or finer depending on your preference, but make sure not to over-blend it cuz you do not want a smooth puree!
  3. Pour blended rice into a heavy-bottomed pot, then use the remaining stock to rinse out the blender so you get everything out and add to the pot.
  4. Add soy sauce and fish sauce and bring rice to a simmer.
  5. Simmer for at least 10 minutes, or up to 20 minutes. The longer you simmer, the softer and smoother the texture will be, but for a “quick” version, I find that 10 minutes will do just fine. Once the rice starts to thicken up, stir frequently with a rubber spatula to prevent the bottom from sticking to the pot.
  6. While the rice is cooking, make meatballs simply by combining all ingredients in a mixing bowl and knead everything together with your hands until smooth (wear gloves if you have them).
  7. When rice is done, add meatballs in chunks directly into the rice using 2 teaspoons. Cook the meatballs for about 3 minutes until done.
  8. Taste and adjust seasoning.
  9. Stir in julienned ginger if you want, or you can leave it for each person to add to their own bowl when serving.
  10. Serve with green onions and extra white pepper if desired. Enjoy!

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Notes

If you want to add eggs, you can poach eggs separately and add it to the congee when serving. Or if you want the eggs mixed in, you can crack the eggs right into the congee, let them poach submerged in the congee for 3-4 minutes to firm up the whites slightly, then stir it up to mix into the congee.

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The post Quick & Easy Congee with Meatballs appeared first on Hot Thai Kitchen.

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Hot Thai Kitchen by Pailin Chongchitnant - 3M ago

As my pregnancy came to its last weeks, freezer meals were on top of my mind in preparation for this baby! But with an always-packed freezer, I have to be conscious of how much space things take.

Here’s how I make Thai curries for the freezer that will reheat well AND will not take up unnecessary space. This video isn’t so much as recipe, but more of a tips and tricks video. You can apply this method to any of my coconut-based Thai curry recipes. And now you will have a meal that’s ready to be served in just a few minutes!

Tricks & Tips for Making Freezer Curries that Reheat Well and Saves Space
  1. Concentrate the sauce. When making a freezer curry I reduce the amount of sauce down to only what’s necessary to cook the meat. Then I simply add more water when I reheat it! If you’re working with a recipe that calls for stock or water in addition to coconut milk, be sure to omit it and and add it when you reheat. You will still reduce the coconut milk as shown in the video.
  2. Use overcook-resistant meats. Because you need to reheat the curry, the chances of you overcooking the meat is high. So don’t freeze protein that is not something you want to eat if it’s overcooked. For example, I really dislike overcooked chicken breast, so I opt for thighs instead. Apart from chicken, any stewed and braised meats are perfect as they are essentially overcooked-proof.
  3. Consider adding vegetables when you reheat. If you are particular about veggie texture, please note that thawed vegetables will be completely soft, so if you like that “al dente” or firm vegetables, I recommend adding them at the end when you reheat. Most veggies only take a couple of minutes to cook anyway, and this way you save even more space!
  4. If freezing veggies, choose them wisely. Of course you CAN add in veggies if you want to make it a microwave-ready meal. Here’s the rule of thumb: Choose vegetables with low water content. Water turns into ice crystals in the freezer, and those ice crystals are sharp and they puncture the cells of the vegetables causing them to be soft when thawed (which is why thawed berries “bleed” out their juices). Broccoli, cauliflower, potato, bell peppers, peas are some vegetables that will be intact when thawed. Bamboo shoots in particular will come out almost exactly the way it went in!
  5. If possible, add delicate herbs when reheating. Delicate herbs such as Thai basil will look and taste much better if you add them at the end. This is not to say that you cannot freeze the curry with Thai basil, but just so you are aware that the Thai basil will be dark and mushy when thawed.

Bonus content for Patreon members: For this episode I share what other foods I regularly freeze which makes my cooking much easier. Click here to learn more about becoming a Patreon member!

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Freezer Red Curry with Chicken
  • Author: Pailin Chongchitnant
  • Yield: 4 servings
Description

This video isn’t so much a “recipe”, as you can apply this method to any of my curry recipes. Having said that, this recipe below is a what I made in the video

Ingredients
  • 50g (3-4 Tbsp) red curry paste (or another paste of your choice)
  • 1¾ cups (420 ml) coconut milk
  • 1 lb (450g) chicken thighs, boneless, skinless, 1.5-inch pieces
  • 1-2 Tbsp fish sauce (this depends on the saltiness of your curry paste, if not sure, start with 1 and you can add more when you reheat) 
  • 1 1/2 Tbsp palm sugar, chopped
  • Optional: 5 kaffir lime leaves, recommended if making red, green or panang curry
  • Optional: ~1½ cups vegetables of your choice (see notes above regarding freezing vegetables)

For Reheating:

  • 1 cup unsalted chicken stock or water
  • 1 ½ cups vegetable of your choice (if you didn’t add it prior to freezing)
  • A big handful of Thai basil, optional
  • Cooked jasmine rice for serving (which you can also freeze!)
Instructions Make the curry:
  1. Reduce ¾ cup coconut milk in a pot until thick, then add curry paste and saute with the coconut milk for a few minutes until coconut oil separates from the paste, or until the paste is very thick. 
  2. Add the remaining coconut milk , 1 Tbsp fish sauce and 1 Tbsp palm sugar, and simmer for 7-10 mins to reduce liquid volume by about half. Note: I keep the seasoning on the light side for now so I have room to adjust when I reheat and add fresh veggies to it. 
  3. Add chicken (or whatever meat you’re using) and kaffir lime leaves, if using, and cook another 15-20 mins until chicken is fork tender. If using another meat, adjust cooking time accordingly.
  4. I stop and freeze the curry at this point, and I will add vegetables, fresh herbs, and more water/stock when I reheat. But if you want, you can add in some vegetables now (see note above).

To freeze:

  1. Put the curry into freezer bags, dividing it into portions that you will most likely eat at a time. So for me, I divide it into 2 servings per bag. 
  2. Removing as much air from it as you can before closing, and place in a large bowl of cold water to cool it down quickly.
  3. Once cool, dry and label the bags, you might also indicate that it’s concentrated and needs diluting in case you forget! 
  4. Lay the bags flat to freeze, pressing it down so it has even thickness. This will make is fast to thaw.

To reheat: 

  1. Bring out frozen curry and soak the bag in a bowl of hot tap water for a few minutes just until it can slide out of the bag. Meanwhile, bring water or stock to a full boil in a pot (if you divided the curry into portions, make sure you divide the water accordingly.)
  2. Slide the curry out into the pot. Cook over medium heat until everything is melted. Bring to a simmer then add whatever vegetables you want and cook till they’re done.
  3. Stir in any fresh herbs, such as Thai basil. 
  4. Taste and adjust seasoning.

If you don’t need to add any veggies you can microwave it:

  1. Place the curry bags in a bowl of hot tap water just until it can slide out.
  2. Break the curry into chunks and add to a microwave-safe bowl.
  3. Add only half of the water or stock called for, then microwave until hot, stirring a few times in between.
  4. Stir in fresh herbs at the end if desired.
  5. Taste and adjust seasoning, adding more of the remaining water/stock as needed to adjust consistency and flavour. 
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The post Space-Saving Freezer Thai Curry appeared first on Hot Thai Kitchen.

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What is a Laab?

In its most classic form, laab is a spicy and tart northeastern Thai salad made from ground meat, toasted rice powder, and lots of fresh herbs. Traditionally laab is meat-based, but because it’s got such a delicious flavour, nowadays people make laab out of just about anything. So this dish is more of a modern variation of laab, and it’s not the most common one, though you can find it at many restaurants in Thailand that serve Northeastern food.

If you want to check out other kinds of “non-traditional laab” see my recipes for Laab Omelette, Laab Salmon, Laab Burger and Laab Meatballs.

Is it a Laab? Or larb? Or laap?

This popular dish goes by many English spellings: laab, larb, or laap are a few common ones you see on Thai restaurant menus. Spell it how you want, but for the love of god do NOT pronounce the “r” (I’m looking at us North American English speakers here). Makes me cringe every time I hear someone say “laRRRRb”. Writing out Thai words in English is a challenge because English has such limited consonants and vowels compared to Thai, this is why people will be looking for a dish on my website and they can’t find it because they spell it differently!

Bonus content for Patreon members: For this episode I share with you other types of unconventional laab that you can find in Thailand. Click here to learn more about becoming a Patreon member.

Print
Spicy Glass Noodle Salad with Mint (laab woonsen)
  • Author: Pailin Chongchitnant
  • Yield: 4 servings
Ingredients
  • 40 g dry glass noodles (see note)
  • 15 g dried black fungus mushroom, aka wood ear or cloud ear mushrooms
  • 3 Tbsp uncooked jasmine or sticky rice
  • 200g ground pork or chicken, preferably not lean
  • 1 head shallots, thinly sliced
  • 1 ½ Tbsp fish Sauce
  • 2 Tbsp fresh lime Juice
  • Roasted chili flakes, to taste (see note)
  • ½ cup chopped cilantro
  • 1 green onion, chopped
  • ½ cup mint leaves, roughly chop large leaves

Ingredients & Kitchen Tools I Use

Notes:
  1. Glass noodles are often labeled “bean threads” or “bean vermicelli” because they’re made from mung bean starch. Best quality ones are made from 100% mung bean starch (like one I used in the video), though it is not necessary if you can’t find them.
  2. Roasted chili flakes give smokiness in addition to spiciness, though you can just use regular chili flakes as well. To make roasted chili flakes, toast some Thai dried chilies in a dry saute pan, stirring constantly, until the darken slightly and develop a smokey flavour. Grind with a coffee grinder.
Instructions
  1. Soak dried mushrooms in hot water for 10-15 minutes until the soften.
  2. In a separate bowl, soak glass noodles in room temp water for 10 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, make toasted rice powder: In a dry skillet, toast uncooked rice over high heat, stirring constantly, until it has a deep golden brown colour. Remove from pan, then pound in a mortar and pestle or grind in a coffee grinder into a powder. Be sure not to grind it so fine that it’s like flour, you want a bit of grittiness.
  4. Once noodles are done soaking, drain and use scissors to cut into shorter, easier to eat pieces (I make about 3-4 cuts).
  5. Once mushrooms are done soaking, drain and cut into thin ribbons, removing any hard “core” pieces you find.
  6. Bring 2-inches of water to a boil in a small pot, add noodles and mushrooms and cook 2-3 minutes until noodles are done. Drain noodles, but use the pot to catch about 1 Tbsp of the cooking water (if you don’t know what I mean, watch the video for this part, and see note below)
  7. Place the drained noodles in a mixing bowl.
  8. Put the pot with that little bit of water back on medium high heat, then add ground pork and cook, stirring constantly, until done. Add cooked pork to noodles along with all the juices.
  9. While noodles are still hot, toss in shallots so the heat can help wilt the shallots slightly. Then add fish sauce, lime juice, chili flakes and toss well.
  10. Add toasted rice powder and all fresh herbs, toss well, then taste and adjust seasoning as needed.
  11. Serve immediately.

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Notes

I use some of the noodle cooking water to cook the pork, but this is done simply for convenience since the water is already hot, so it will take no time to heat back up. You can also just add fresh water to the pot if you forget to do this, because unlike pasta cooking water, the cooking water from glass noodles are tasteless and starchless, so it really doesn’t add anything in terms of flavour.

Did you make this recipe?

Tag @hotthaikitchen on Instagram and hashtag it #hotthaikitchen

The post Spicy Glass Noodle Salad with Mint (laab woonsen) appeared first on Hot Thai Kitchen.

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