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Come meet your new best friend! We’ll be waiting from 11 AM to 4 PM at PetSmart in Millburn, 187 Millburn Ave. in Millburn, NJ, with some of our adoptable dogs. Remember to complete an adoption application online before you arrive to begin the approval process.
 
https://homeforgooddogs.org/adoption-application/

The post PetSmart Millburn Adoption Event appeared first on Home For Good Dogs.

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Join us Saturday, February 10, from 11 AM onward at the Menlo Park Mall to learn more about our rescue mission, buy some tasty Valentine’s treats at the bake sale, and to meet some of our adorable adoptable dogs! Maybe you’ll even find someone to love you for life.

Remember to complete an application to adopt online before you arrive in order to begin the approval process.

ADOPTION APPLICATION

The post Menlo Park Mall Adoption Event appeared first on Home For Good Dogs.

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Come meet your new best friend! We’ll be waiting from 11 AM to 4 PM at our headquarters, 465 Springfield Avenue in Berkeley Heights, NJ, with our adoptable dogs. Remember to complete an adoption application online before you arrive to begin the approval process.

The post Join us for an Adoption Event on February 3! appeared first on Home For Good Dogs.

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In February we have many exciting events that will be taking place throughout New Jersey. Be sure to visit our Events page for more details and how to find your new best friend.

Feb 3 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm – Adoption Event @ Home for Good Dog Rescue 
Feb 10 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm – Adoption Event & Valentines Day Bake Sale @ Menlo Park Mall 
Feb 17 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm – Adoption Event @ PetSmart Millburn 
Feb 24 @ 11:00 am – 4:00 pm – Adoption Event @ Home for Good Dog Rescue 
 
Remember to complete an adoption application online before you arrive to begin the approval process. 

The post February 2018 Events appeared first on Home For Good Dogs.

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For the ninth consecutive year, Home for Good Dog Rescue’s “Taste of Italy” Spaghetti & Meatballs Dinner and Tricky Tray returns to the Long Hill Community Center in Stirling, NJ. More than 300 guests will gather on Saturday, March 3, 2018, for a family- friendly Italian-themed dinner featuring a wealth of fabulous prize baskets, including but not limited to gift certificates, pet products and electronics. Past years’ winners have gone home with laptop computers, televisions, and more!
 
Participants can purchase tickets for three prize categories: small, medium and large; enjoy a menu featuring freshly prepared salad, spaghetti, meatballs and a variety of desserts; and take part in Home For Good’s annual 50/50 raffle.
 
We will directly engage visitors about the work we do through a multimedia presentation and an evening long program featuring special sponsor recognition!
 
Sponsorship opportunities are now available. Become a sponsor.
Tables for this exciting annual event have also just gone on sale and are going fast! Purchase tickets

The post “Taste of Italy” Spaghetti Dinner & Tricky Tray – March 3, 2018 appeared first on Home For Good Dogs.

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Our Previous Year’s Statistics: 2016 About us: Home for Good Dog Rescue (HFGDR) is a 100% foster-based, non-profit 501(c)(3) dog rescue established in 2010 in Summit, New Jersey with offices in Berkeley Heights, New Jersey. We rescue homeless dogs from high-kill shelters in the South, which are overflowing with unwanted dogs on the brink of being euthanized. We socialize, care for, and provide them life-saving medical care at our property in Aiken, SC, transport them to our rescue in New Jersey, and nurture them in our network of foster families while they await adoption into loving homes – giving them a second chance at life.

Home for Good updates its relevant lifesaving statistics on an annual basis. 

Lifesaving:
  • 879 dogs came into our care for the very first time
  • 885 dogs were adopted out.*
  • 908 dogs passed through our care**
  • Live Release Rate: 99%**
*This number includes dogs returned to our care by their adoptive owners. Home for Good always takes its dogs back and rehomes them in the instance that an adopter cannot continue to care for them.  **A small percentage of dogs were transferred to other rescues for adoption, were lost dogs returned to their owners, or were adopted out in 2017 after coming into our care at the end of 2016. This number does not include dogs already in our care at the start of 2016.  *** Our “Live Release Rate” is the number of live outcomes divided by the number of total outcomes. As a 100-percent foster-based rescue, Home for Good does not euthanize dogs for space.
Intake:
  • 908 dogs from shelters, community rescue groups, or the public.
  • 63.3% of these dogs were transferred to Home for Good from shelters throughout South Carolina and Georgia
  • 26.7% of these dogs were transferred to Home for Good from community animal rescue groups in South Carolina and Georgia
  • 10% of these dogs were transferred to Home for Good by their owners or found as strays.
Foster Program:
  • 895 dogs passed through our Aiken property and entered foster care in New Jersey.
  • 75 volunteer families opened their homes to foster.
Volunteers:
  • 178 active volunteers (including 75 fosters) assisting with all aspects of Home for Good’s operations
  • Over 15,000 hours of service donated
Adoption Centers:
  • 80.9% of our adoptions occurred at our offices in Berkeley Heights, NJ
  • 19.069% of our adoptions occurred at an off-site adoption venue
  • 0.03% of our adoptions occurred at an off-site Home for Good fundraiser
  • 0.001% of our adoptions occurred in Aiken, SC

Board of Directors as of Dec. 31, 2016:

  • Toni Ann Turco, Co-Founder & President of HFG
  • Richard Errico, Treasurer
  • Kim Deskovick 
  • Anthony Laura 
  • Dirk Vander Sterre
  • Jess Chang
  • Gale Mellusi
  • John Wicklow
  • Howard Shallcross

Download Our Shelter Metrics via Shelter Animals Count for 2016

The post Yearly Statistics appeared first on Home For Good Dogs.

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Yes, that chubby tummy might make your dog look cute, but the fact is that those few extra pounds your pooch is carrying around are severely dangerous to its health. Research from PetMD has shown that overweight dogs are at a higher risk for a host of health problems, like cancer, osteoporosis, and bladder stones. In many cases, obesity can even shorten your dog’s overall lifespan.

You may think your dog is doing fine, but obesity is a danger to all dogs, especially middle-aged ones that spend a lot of time indoors. According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, around 54% of dogs in the United States are considered obese or overweight so it can be easy for people to not notice the symptoms of obesity until it’s too late.

The most common cause of obesity in dogs is an imbalance between its caloric intake and energy output, meaning that your dog is eating way more calories than it can actually use. The best food for your dog is high in protein and dietary fiber and low in grain and other filler ingredients. Brands like Fromm (sold at our Home for Good store!) offer tasty and nutritious choices for your pooch. Check the back of the packaging on food to see how much you should be feeding your dog.

Also remember to not spoil your dog with treats. Treats should be given sparingly and mainly used for training purposes. If you must give your dog a treat, consider low-calorie options like raw carrots or unsalted, unbuttered popcorn.

Of course, diet and exercise isn’t the only factor in your dog’s weight. Other causes of obesity in dogs include: hypothyroidism (low hormone production from the thyroid gland), insulinoma (a tumor on the pancreas that produces too much insulin), and Cushing’s Disease (overproduction of glucocorticoid from the adrenal gland). Consult your veterinarian immediately if you think your dog could be suffering from any of these conditions.

For a quick and informal test you can do at home, check to see if you can easily feel your dog’s rib cage with your hand. Also, your dog will ideally have a slight hourglass figure around it’s waist. Of course these tests cannot officially diagnose your dog and you should make an appointment with your veterinarian to be sure. Your veterinarian should be your go-to resource for help and information. He or she will be able to properly diagnose your pet and help construct a diet and exercise regimen for it to follow.

Please remember that your dog can’t calories or open the pantry so its diet is YOUR responsibility.

The post The Dangers of a Chubby Tummy appeared first on Home For Good Dogs.

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The post App Test appeared first on Home For Good Dogs.

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I knew that once I entered the building and got the scent of newly washed dog that my nerves would settle down. As someone who has a rough time with first impressions, the knowledge that dogs would be around pretty much all of the time made the first day rather comfortable.  Plus, it’s pretty hard to be nervous while puppies are nibbling on your fingers. Seriously, you try being on edge while a black lab puppy is desperately trying to lick you through a crate. Feelings of discomfort are replaced by the sensation of drool quickly enveloping your hand. The moment I walked into the grooming room I couldn’t keep from smiling. The energy that those dogs release is just too infectious to ward off, even for a “grump” like myself.

My name is Bill Foley, and I am going to be spending my summer interning with Home For Good Dog Rescue. I’m a college student studying media communication, so I’ll be assisting the Public Relations and Social Media Coordinator, who you know as Matt. On that first transport day, I must have taken over 60 pictures. Around half of them are blurry because puppies are unhinged, fluffy balls of happiness. I even got to hold one as she was being cleaned. The task handed to me was holding a puppy while it was being blow-dried. Her name was Maddie.

Home For Good Intern Bill Foley helping to groom Maddie coming in from transport.

She seemed pretty nervous too. That sure would explain the ceaseless squirming. It’s all right Maddie; I’d also be nervous if an incomprehensible blast of warm air was engulfing me. While the scary hot air monster was drying her off, she backed herself into me. Now, Maddie probably did this in an attempt to get as far away from the blow drier as possible. But I preferred to interpret this as her coming to me for comfort or safety. Little did she know that I was secretly aiding the blow drier by holding her in place! At any rate, Maddie reminded me of something that day: the absolute bliss that dogs bring to my life. Dogs don’t take into account your faults, insecurities, or general awkwardness. They love unconditionally.

That was the reason my family and I got a dog in the first place. I was 10-years-old when we brought Mickey home from a kill shelter in Newark. My mother, brother, and myself found him on PetFinder. He had been tied up and abandoned by his previous owner. He was six-months-old when we took him into our family. We initially got Mickey because he was mild-mannered and had a really distinctive pattern on his face. I wanted to name him Harvey, after Harvey Dent (a.k.a Two-Face) in the Batman comics. His face was divided right down the middle, with the right half being black and the left half being brown. Suffice it to say that he was not quite the mild-mannered dog we thought.

In a matter of months, our curtains were shredded, our carpet was soiled, our window was shattered, our couch was chewed, our yard looked like a scene out of Holes, and our hearts had been stolen. We were in love. Mickey was my first dog and my best friend. He died of kidney failure in May of this year.

Mickey hadn’t been feeling himself for quite some time. My family and I knew this was coming, but it still felt so sudden. I tell myself that it’s for the best, that he was suffering and died peacefully amongst people who loved him deeply. It didn’t make it hurt any less. Life goes back to normal, minus one life. I can still hear the pitter patter of Mickey’s paws against the wood floor in the kitchen. When my family and I had dinner, he used to sneak in while everyone was laughing so we couldn’t hear him. I thought about Mickey while I held Maddie.

Transport dog Dunkel’s first photo after being dried off.

The pain of losing a friend is enough to shy away from making a new one. But I can’t imagine my life without the love that a dog brings. I need the wagging tail, I need the doggy kisses, and I even need the stained carpet. Maddie helped me see that. I may not be ready for a new forever friend just yet, but I am more than ready to do whatever I can to help provide good homes for these dogs at Home for Good. They deserve to be happy. And hey, who knows? Perhaps I’ll adopt my own pooch from Home for Good Dog Rescue some day.

The people here put every ounce of passion into giving forever friends a loving family. I think I can say with confidence that this is going to be a rewarding ride. The first day was quite the cathartic experience. I saw dogs that will make people as happy as Mickey made me. And I couldn’t have asked for a better start.

Thank you for welcoming me onboard, and stay tuned throughout the summer as I give you more inside looks at what goes on here at Home for Good Dog Rescue!

The post Meet Our New Intern: The Dog Days Are Far From Over appeared first on Home For Good Dogs.

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This month, we’re highlighting the Olivapotenza family! They have fostered so many of our dogs, young and old, and we are so grateful for all their hard work! To read the full interview, visit us here.

The post Meet Our Fosters of the Month! appeared first on Home For Good Dogs.

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