Loading...

Follow Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

I eased into the low canvas deck chair my driver had set up next to our jeep. Waving off the glass of wine he proffered, I focused on the enormous lemon-colored sun descending through the salt haze. Earlier, I had walked across the salt flats in Ethiopia’s Danakil Depression to Lake Karum. As I approached the turquoise shoreline, the hard-pan salt became soggy underfoot. Before long, I was carefully placing my feet on ridges in the characteristic polygonal desiccation cracks to avoid walking in the inch or more...

The post PHOTO: Sun Sets Over Salt Flats in the Danakil Depression of Ethiopia appeared first on Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Dallol, officially one of the remotest places on earth, is located in the Danakil Depression in northeast Ethiopia. The area is known for its otherworldly hydro-geothermal features that include acidic sulfur lakes, geysers, and bizarrely colored mineral deposits. Though technically listed as a settlement by the government, Dallol is no longer inhabited. Other than nomadic peoples who mine salt and run camel caravans in the area, the only residents in this nearly uninhabitable landscape live in the nearby community of Hamedela, which serves as a base for tourists...

The post PHOTO: Hydro-Geothermal Deposits of Dallol, in Northeast Ethiopia appeared first on Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Initially, I thought the line of brown bumps were cliffs on the distant horizon. But as our jeep sped across Ethiopia’s infinite salt flats in the Danakil Depression, I realized the bumps were moving. Moments later our driver pulled over and invited us to step out into 115 degree temperatures to watch the first camel caravan of the day. Searing heat seeped through my thick rubber soles and burned my feet. Sunshine bounced off the bleached white salt, nearly blinding me. With each breath, waves of heat burned...

The post PHOTO: Camel Caravan on the Salt Flats in Ethiopia’s Danakil Depression appeared first on Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The urgent need to pee woke me at 5:30 a.m. I swung my legs over the side of my bamboo cot and gingerly tested my right ankle, which I’d twisted the previous day on a loose rock. It was much better, but I wasn’t taking any chances in the rock-strewn landscape. Carefully, I picked my way to a spot away from any cots, lowered my pants, and squatted, praying that I was far enough away that no one could see my white moon butt or hear my explosive...

The post Ethiopia’s Danakil Depression -The Most Brutal Place on Earth  appeared first on Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Many of the indigenous peoples that inhabit southern Ethiopia have settled in the lowlands, but members of the Dorze Tribe prefer to live in the mountains that surround the Great Rift Valley. Twelve Dorze villages are scattered across these mountains, each nestled in a green glade like the one shown in the above photo. The Dorze live in extended family compounds, with huts being added each time a male member of the family takes a bride. Cooler mountain temperatures allow cultivation of a wider variety of crops than...

The post PHOTO: Green Hills in Ethiopia’s Omo Valley are Home to the Dorze Tribe appeared first on Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The Mursi people are among the least developed of the 56 indigenous tribes that inhabit the southern Omo Valley in Ethiopia. I visited this tribe during a day trip into the remote Mago National Park. Thick, black mud sucked at my shoes as I walked among chest-high straw huts scattered around a small clearing. The living conditions were miserable: no electricity, very little shade, and no sign of water. In fact, the Mursi exist mostly on meat, milk, and blood from their livestock. Several Mursi women followed me...

The post PHOTO: Mursi Woman with Lip Plate in the Southern Omo Valley of Ethiopia appeared first on Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I LOVE Ethiopian food. I was first introduced to it 12 years ago, in Tanzania. I took one bite of Injera, the spongy, sourdough flatbread that Ethiopians use to scoop up everything on their plate, and was hooked. Not only is Injera delicious, it’s made with fermented teff flour, which is milled from a Gluten-free seed rather than a grain. So it follows that the bread must also be devoid of carbohydrates and empty calories, right? Okay, okay, I’m delusional. But it’s what I told myself before arriving...

The post Tale of an Ethiopian Food Disconnect appeared first on Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Until the early 1980’s most cultivated land around Arba Minch, Ethiopia, was devoted to growing maize, cotton and sweet potato. In 1984, experts in Ethiopia’s office of agriculture began discussions with area cooperatives, hoping to convince farmers to plant Cavendish bananas on a portion of their land. This had been attempted previously, with little success. Bananas grew successfully in the rich volcanic soil, but the market for the fruit was not well developed. By 1984, however, demand for bananas had grown in Ethiopia. Eventually, a small group of...

The post PHOTO: Banana Harvest in the Lush Konso Highlands of Southern Ethiopia appeared first on Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In Amore Gedel National Park, on the shores of Lake Awassa in Hawassa, Ethiopia, I happened upon this this traditional woven hut, built in the style of the Sidama tribe. Descendants of the ancient kingdom of Kush, the Sidama people live in the southern part of Ethiopia, concentrated around the lakes that formed within the Great Rift Valley. Today Sidama and their sub-tribes number about eight million, making them the fifth largest ethnic group in Ethiopia. Living on some the most fertile land in Africa, for centuries the...

The post PHOTO: Traditional Woven Hut in Amora Gedel National Park, Hawassa, Ethiopia appeared first on Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Imagine being a slave in Ethiopia during the 12th and 13th century reign of King Lalibela. Now imagine being handed a chisel, hammer, and an axe, and told to carve a three-story high church out of solid rock. Inconceivable, certainly. But when you consider that Lalibela, with the sweat of 40,000 Egyptian slaves, actually completed construction of 11 such churches in a span of just 23 years, the feat is practically incomprehensible. Perhaps he had help beyond the corporeal plane. It is said that Lalibela performed miracles throughout...

The post The Magnificent Rock-Hewn Churches of Lalibela, Ethiopia appeared first on Hole In The Donut Cultural Travel.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview