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Highlights from the interview with Alex McClafferty
  • [5:06] Alex talks about his success as a combination of luck and measured risk.
  • [10:00] Early attempts to hack together a WordPress site that led to WPCurve.
  • [15:40] The process of deciding, “What’s next?” after a big project is over.
  • [18:11] Alex describes productized services as an online business model.
  • [23:24] The first question Alex asks his consulting clients.

Back in 2013, Alex McClafferty was searching for an idea — a project he could dive into headfirst and turn into a business.

Then from California, he came across Dan Norris working away in Australia on a newly created service called WP Live Ninja. Alex loved the idea and saw that Dan had $478/month in revenue and was struggling to acquire customers. So he reached out to Dan to see if he wanted to partner up — and from this conversation, WP Curve was born.

Alex and Dan ran with the idea and In 2013 and by 2015, they’d built a remote team around the world and grown to $1MM annual recurring revenue. Then in December 2016, GoDaddy acquired WP Curve and Alex joined GoDaddy as the Director of Product Management, where he stayed until October of 2018.

Today, Alex has joined the ranks of the digitally nomadic as he travels the world with no set schedule or destination. While at the same time, he has started a private consulting company for CEOs looking to scale their productized companies the same way he did with WP Curve.

In this conversation we discuss:

  • The problem with tying your identity to your business
  • The 3 pillars of success for a productized service
  • How to find the right business idea to start

Now, let’s hack…

Alex McClafferty Resources and links from the interview Show sponsor

Combin: Safe and organic promotion for your Instagram account.

To get started absolutely for free, go to Combin.com.

The post Validating Ideas with Measured Risk | Alex McClafferty appeared first on Hack the Entrepreneur.

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Barry Turner is a former competitive bodybuilder, but to American Gladiator fans he was known as “Cyclone.” As cool as that is, he’s here today because he has built a successful business, sold it, bought back half of it, and sold it again!

Along with his business partner, he helped create the baked nutrition category back in 1993. While eating after a workout, they asked, “Why can’t we put the protein from this chicken breast into that muffin?” This was the birth of Lenny and Larry’s.

Highlights from Barry Turner’s interview
  • [4:23] Why being an entrepreneur is awesome.
  • [5:50] There’s no time limit on success as long as you keep moving forward.
  • [9:33] The giant spotlight moment when 2 bodybuilders became entrepreneurs.
  • [17:30] How to find business ideas (and how business ideas find you).
  • [20:43] Why you can’t chase trends if you want your brand to last.

They didn’t have a business plan or any experience, but that didn’t stop Barry or his partner. They launched the company with only $1,400 doing almost everything themselves to get rolling — right down to designing their iconic logo. Gold’s Gym was its first client.

Today, Lenny and Larry’s products are available almost anywhere you can buy food — from Walmart to Whole Foods, and Target to Publix.

The effect of Lenny and Larry’s products have rippled across the natural foods space. Protein-infused snacks are everywhere as consumers are beginning to understand the importance of high-quality protein to their overall health and nutrition.

In this conversation, we discuss:

  • Finding an idea and taking immediate action
  • Enjoying the chaos around you
  • Why it’s better to show someone than to tell them

Now, let’s hack…

Barry Turner Resources and links from the show Show sponsor

LinkedIn Marketing Solutions: Every day, over 500 million professionals engage with content on LinkedIn, and chances are, your future customers are among them!

To redeem a free $100 LinkedIn ad credit, go to LinkedIn.com/HACK.

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The post Finding an Idea and Taking Action | Barry Turner appeared first on Hack the Entrepreneur.

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In today’s episode, we talk to the founder of AWeber, the company that invented what we now know as autoresponder emails.

Tom Kulzer founded AWeber back in 1998 and has since bootstrapped the company from a side hustle into a team of 100 employees and more than 120,000 users worldwide.

In this conversation, we discuss the invention of email autoresponders, poking holes in your beliefs, and never accepting what is presented to you as the best solution to a problem.

Highlights from Tom Kulzer’s interview
  • [8:00] The first version of AWeber (and what email marketing was like in 1998)
  • [13:38] How Tom Kulzer thinks about competition (in his market)
  • [15:45] Why solving your customer’s problem is more important than adding features
  • [24:25] Tom explains how he “gets run over” by his company (but keeps bouncing back)
  • [39:35] The HACK

Much of AWeber’s impressive growth can be attributed to their six core values that have become the foundation of everything they do. These core values are:

1. Create remarkable experiences.

Anyone can say they’re remarkable. But how many companies will, say, knock your socks off with awesome email marketing… and then send you a new pair of socks in the mail?

2. Execute with passion.

There’s a lot that goes into creating remarkable experiences. Once they commit to a project that enables them better help customers, their team is quick to plan and execute with passion.

3. Foster respect and cooperation.

AWeber has created and nourished a culture of respect and cooperation. It doesn’t come from policy, it comes from treating people like people — the way everyone should be treated. Teams openly collaborate to solve problems and work together to make sure their service is the best it can be.

4. Listen to what people say about us. Invite feedback.

Throughout AWeber, every team has their own way of incorporating customer feedback on a daily basis — and that helps the entire team to decide what feature, marketing channel, or product to focus on next.

They believe that every team member’s opinion matters and they encourage everyone to share feedback and listen to suggestions from one another.

5. Learn. Educate. Innovate.

Being the company who invented autoresponder emails, AWeber knows all about innovation and they aim to keep it at the forefront of their thinking.

Constant education is a big part of that. They encourage team members to keep learning by attending events and conferences or continuing formal education in their field.

6. Don’t take ourselves too seriously. Have fun!

As serious as AWeber is about helping people succeed with using email, they strongly believe it’s all about loving what you do, and having fun while doing it.

Now, let’s hack…

Tom Kulzer Resources and links from the interview Show sponsor

LinkedIn Marketing Solutions: Every day, over 500 million professionals engage with content on LinkedIn, and chances are, your future customers are among them!

To redeem a free $100 LinkedIn ad credit, go to LinkedIn.com/HACK.

Dig this episode? Wait until you hear these…

The post Turning One Tiny Idea into 120,000 Happy Customers | Tom Kulzer appeared first on Hack the Entrepreneur.

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James Altucher is one of my all-time favorite writers and I rarely go more than a few months without reading his book Choose Yourself.

James is an American hedge fund manager, entrepreneur, bestselling author, blogger, and podcaster. He has founded or co-founded over 20 companies and 17 have failed. He sold one for $15 million and spent all of the money — all of it. Then he built and sold another within its first year for $10 million.

He fails quickly. He fails frequently. He claims Entrepreneurship is a sentence of failures punctuated by brief success. Due to this, he believes that learning to master the entrepreneurial mindset is crucial to your success.

He is invested in about 28 private companies. He advises about another 50 private companies — companies ranging from $0 in revenues to a billion in revenues. Most recently he wrote the Side Hustle Bible, a business book about starting a business you run in your free time that allows you the flexibility to pursue what you’re most interested in. It’s your 5-to-9 after your 9-to-5, so to speak.

This conversation is longer than usual but you will not even notice because not a second is wasted.

Now, let’s hack…

James Altucher.

What you will learn in this episode with James Altucher:
  • How James makes his sound better during a podcast (maybe I should have edited this part out)
  • Exactly how to make a living in six months, a great living within two years and be rich within three to four years.
  • Success can be measured today or it can be measured in decades.
  • The important thing is to always be thinking of giving to others.
  • Most side hustle ideas that people have are bad (and this is ok).
Resources and links mentioned:

[episode_transcript]

How to Choose Yourself

Voiceover: Welcome to Hack the Entrepreneur. The show which reveals the fears, habits, and inner battles behind big-name entrepreneurs and those on their way to joining them. Now here’s your host, Jon Nastor.

Jonny Nastor: Welcome back to Hack the Entrepreneur. I am so glad you decided to join me again. My name is Jon Nastor, but you can call me Jonny. Today’s guest is one of my all-time favorite writers. I seriously never go more than a few months without rereading his book, “Choose Yourself,” and I am super excited for this conversation.

He’s an American hedge fund manager, entrepreneur, bestselling author, blogger, and podcaster. He has founded or co-founded over 20 companies, and 17 have failed. But he sold one of them for $15 million, and spent all of the money. All of it.

Then he built another and sold it within the first year for $10 million. He fails quickly. He fails frequently. He claims entrepreneurship is a sentence of failures punctuated by brief success. He’s invested in 28 private companies. He advises about another 50 private companies. Companies ranging from zero dollars in revenues to a billion in revenues. This conversation is a bit longer than usual, but you will not even notice because there’s not a second wasted. Now let’s hack James Altucher.

Welcome back to Hack the Entrepreneur. I can’t even believe that I get to introduce this guy today, but welcome to the show, James Altucher.

James Altucher: Jon, thanks for having me on this show. This is really great. I like the title, too, Hack the Entrepreneur.

Jonny Nastor: Thanks, James.

James Altucher: I hope it doesn’t mean we’re going to axe though.

Jonny Nastor: It depends on how the interview goes. All right, James.

James Altucher: I’ll make sure then, that it will be as good as possible. Or I’ll try.

Jonny Nastor: Excellent. Hey James, can you tell me, as an entrepreneur, what is the one thing that you do, that you feel has been the biggest contributor to your successes so far?

How He Improves His Sound During a Podcast (Maybe I Should Have Edited This Part Out)

James Altucher: Most things that you do, fail. So whether you’re an entrepreneur or not an entrepreneur, most things just in general fail. People might date a dozen potential spouses before they find their spouse. People might start a bunch of businesses before they have a business that makes money. People might start and stop 10 books before they finally write a book. That implies several things are important. One is persistence. It’s really important because I know people who start a business — and I have been this way too — and then it fails, and then it’s like, “You know what, I am not cut out for this. I am never going to do this again. It is so annoying and so painful. I just don’t want to do it.” Oh, I’m actually making my sound better right now. Does that sound better?

Jonny Nastor: Oh wow. Yeah.

James Altucher: All right. You can keep this in the podcast, too. It’s good to see how things go wrong. I just failed at making my sound better, and now I made my sound a little better. So persistence is really important. But persistence is not something you’re born with. A little baby doesn’t get born and say, “You know what? Life is going to be pretty difficult for here on out. It was pretty easy while I was in the womb, but now I’ve got to make sure I persist through all the times that I cry, and I don’t get fed, and all this other stuff.” So persistence is something you learn and something you get through. I had to learn the hard way. Every time I said, “Oh my God, I can’t believe this horrible thing is happening to me again,” I had to learn the hard way, take a step back, and say, “Look, that was one experiment that didn’t work out. Now I’m on to the next experiment.”

Life itself is like a sentence of failures and only punctuated by the briefest successes. That doesn’t mean it’s constantly up and down, up and down, up and down. Hopefully, it’s more like a roller coaster that’s taking you up in the long run. I think that’s largely true, particularly as you keep yourself healthy, and you have persistence, and you figure out there’s many different ways to succeed and make money.

The other thing I want to add, it’s incredibly important to give. I got a question yesterday. Someone said to me, “I have an idea for a video game. How do I patent it, and how do I prevent other video games from stealing it, and how do I sell it to a video game company?” So he went through all these things. That’s fine. But he was so concerned with how he could protect himself. Then before he even develops the idea, he’s already thinking, “How does he sell it to a video game company?”

Well, does it actually do anything for people? Does it help people? Does it entertain people? Does it do both? It’s very cheap to make a video game, particularly if it’s a basic video game. Why don’t you make it, and see if people actually use it. Then you know you have a good idea. Most people don’t know — most ideas are bad. Even if you have an idea you think is good, chances are it’s not so good. Why don’t you first test to see if this is a good idea or not. Then you can start thinking about deals you can make. You can’t make a deal with nothing.

An idea — as much as I’m happy for people to come up with online business ideas — ideas are ephemeral. They go away. They’re like ghosts. You have to actually make the idea before you can sell it, or do things with it, or even protect it. The important thing here is to always be thinking of giving to others. Are others going to have value from this? Are others going to be entertained by this? Are others going to be able to make use of this to make their lives better? This is really important. Those are the basics of entrepreneurship.

The real basic for me — and I had to learn this the really hard way — the real hard way is failing, and losing a ton of money, and just really struggling with money, and family, and everything. You have to keep yourself physically, emotionally, mentally, and spiritually healthy. I’ve talked about that in a number of places. But building that basic foundation of health, they’re all connected. You can’t be mentally healthy if you’re physically sick all the time. You can’t be grateful for what you have if, emotionally, you’re only around bad people and bad situations. They’re all connected. That’s the basic foundation that needs to be built for the house of entrepreneurship to be built on top of — for the ability to what I call choosing yourself to be built on top of. For me, those are the basics of entrepreneurship.

I’ll add — I know I’m talking a lot — I’ll add that even with all that, you’re still going to fail most of the time. But you start to basically learn how to transform that from failure to calling it an experiment and saying, “Okay, well I’ve just got to keep on doing the next thing. There’s a reason for everything, and I don’t always know what my best interests are, so I’m just going to keep going because I have to. There’s nothing else to do.”

Jonny Nastor: I was going to say, is it really failure? I saw — actually on your blog — and you replied to somebody, and you said, “There’s this whole thing about failure. Everyone’s glorifying failure,” and it’s just that there are hard problems we have to through.

James Altucher: Exactly.

Jonny Nastor: And I liked the way you said that, “Yeah, it’s not failure!” It’s not like, “Okay, now I’m dead, and that’s it. I never get to do anything else.” It’s like, “You’re just a hard problem you have to work through.”

James Altucher: A lot of people use Thomas Edison as this great example. He tried a 1,000 times — he failed 998 times to make the light bulb, and on the thousandth try, he finally succeeded. I’m sure he did not once think for a second, “Oh, I just failed again. It was 998 times I failed.” I’m sure he just thought to himself, “Okay, that experiment didn’t work. I’m going to move the wire over here, and now we’ll try this.” It’s all experimenting. If you view it as failure, that’s a very negative way to view things, and it’ll stop you from eventual success.

Everything that you do prepares your way for eventual success. Thomas Edison, every experiment, prepared himself for that thousandth experiment where the light bulb actually stayed lit. If he had given up 500 times too and said, “You know what? No one is ever going to make the light bulb.” He never would have done it and, guaranteed, somebody else would have. It’s just a matter of having the health to stay with it, and be persistent, and keep being creative, so you can try new things.

All these things added up together, guarantee, add up to success. Success means both inner success — because by the time you end with something that works you’re in a much better place psychologically than when you began, and in a much better place creatively, and spiritually, and so on — then it also adds up to outward success. Because the outward is really a mirror of what’s going on inside of you, and that’s how you find abundance.

Jonny Nastor: Yeah, I agree. With finding success and working through the hard problems. Somebody emails you about a video game, and his idea, and you say, “Well, just make the game.” But what about if you think, “Well, maybe I’m not someone to make a video game?” You know what I mean. Does anybody know what they’re doing before they do it?

James Altucher: I don’t think so. I gave just the basics of what I view as entrepreneurship. Kind of the second layer is this tricky layer, where you do things that you have no idea what you’re doing. This is important because nobody really knows the future.

A great example is there was this company. I’m sure some of you listeners know of this story. There was this company called Odeo, which was like a podcasting platform. They made software to help people do podcasts. Check out our definitive guide on how to start a podcast. It wasn’t really doing that well. This was like in 2005. It wasn’t really doing so great, and some of the programmers started a project on the side where they could send SMS-style messages to each other. That little side project started taking off.

The CEO of Odeo said to all of his investors — and they were all the best venture capitalists in the world. They were the top guys. You would think they would know the future one way or the other, and they had all made their bet on Odeo, on the podcasting software — the CEO said to them, “Listen, it’s not really working out. This little side project seems fun, but it only has 10,000 users, which is not a lot in the grand scheme of things. I am willing to make sure you’re all even. I will give you back all of your money at cost. All of the money you invested in my company, or you can stay in and we’re going to play with this new little project that only has 10,000 users.”

He gave that offer to all of his investors, and they were all venture capitalists, all professionals. A 100% of these professional investors said, “I’m going to take my money back. I really do not want to go into your other little crappy project.” So he gave them all their money back, and the other project eventually went public. It’s a little company called Twitter. It was just a huge success. Who would know? All these professionals didn’t know. The CEO didn’t really know. He was just excited about it. He had already made his tens of millions when he sold Blogger to Google, so he wasn’t sweating it that much either. Which is why he’s probably not the CEO anymore. He gave it to a different CEO.

Exactly How to Make a Living in Six Months, a Great Living within Two Years, and Become Rich within Three to Four Years

Nobody really knows the future, so you kind of have to make that leap into something you don’t know. In an extreme case, let’s say this guy does not know how to make a video game. Well, there are a thousand companies out there that you can delegate to, “I have this idea for a video game. Can you make it?” They’ll say, “Sure. It’ll cost you $3,000. We’ll make it for you from beginning to end.” Then he can say to himself, “Well, what if they steal my idea?” Which, by the way, they’re not. One out of a thousand steal, or one out of a hundred thousand steal ideas. But okay, worse come to worse, outsource it to a software company in India. Let them steal it in India. They’re not going to be able to market it here in the U.S. the way you would because you have the passion for it. Passion is always the best way to protect an idea.

That’s how he would handle the situation if he didn’t know how to program video games. Now he’s got a video game. He doesn’t know how to market it. Okay, well he does know how. He can put it in the app store on iTunes and on Google. Then he can make Facebook ads. You can make a Facebook ad for as cheap as like $5. You can make 20 of them, and you could test which ones people are clicking on and actually downloading the app. Then, when you see one that works, out of your 20 ads, you can start adding money to that one and so on.

There’s many blogs, and books, and texts on how to market apps now even. Or you can hire a company to help you market your app and pay them per performance. Again, you don’t have to know anything. In fact, what I would encourage that guy to do is to come up with 10 ideas for apps or games, and make all of them. Try all of them.

A lot of people think, “Oh, well, I know how to make a car, so I better start a car company.” Well, we live in a different world now, you know. A car company cost you a million dollars back in 1900. An app company costs you a few thousand dollars to start. Start 10 app companies, and see what happens. That’s how it’s worked for me in every single case. I had no idea what I was doing. I started many things, and some things worked. Actually most, 90% of things did not work, and one thing worked. Or zero things worked. And then I would either focus on the one thing that worked, or I would throw away all the ideas and start something new.

Jonny Nastor: Yeah. Exactly. Or you can give the ideas, like you always say. If you have 10 ideas — if you write 10 ideas down for great video games, he can just give those to somebody else. I actually just, in my email on Monday, somebody randomly — his name is Andrew, I believe. Monday morning I woke up and there was 10 ideas. A couple of them were actually really, really smart. The other ones were like, “Okay, I’ve thought of that.” But it was like, “Here’s what you can do with Hack the Entrepreneur, and different business places you can go. Here’s a section on books you can create. Here’s a … ” I was like, “Wow, who is this guy?” And I responded to him.

James Altucher: That’s a great idea.

Jonny Nastor: I’m like, yeah. I was like, “Did you get this from James Altucher?” He’s like, “I’ve been reading his blog for a couple of years, and I know the idea machine. But I never thought of this. I just kind of…” He’s been doing this 28 days in a row now, and just emails them to people he has no clue what they are. I was like, “Do you know how to implement these? Is that the point? Is this to build business?”

He’s like, “No, I have no idea how this…but I mean if you want help with any of them, I’ll see what I can do, but that was not the point. I just came up with these ideas last night, and I thought you could maybe use them, Jon.”

James Altucher: Yeah. That is a great thing to do.

Jonny Nastor: It’s brilliant!

James Altucher: If you’d do that every day, then most people won’t respond to you, but I guarantee you within six months, you’re making a great living. If that’s all that guy does every day is those 10 ideas to people like you or people like me, then he is going to be making a great living within six months. He’s going to be making a great living within two years. He’s going to be rich within three to four years. That’s how it works every time, a hundred percent of the time. That’s how it’s worked for me. I’ve had to start from scratch. I always start from scratch, doing those ideas, and sending them to people.

You know what? Sometimes I send them to people, and they say, “It’s great. Can I hire you to do this?” And I ignore that response because I’m on to my next 10 ideas. I’m happy to just give. Then you just have to find the right match. Sometimes you’re going to give, and they’re going to respond, but it’s not quite the right match. Sometimes you give, and they respond, and you feel like, “Okay, this feels right.”

Jonny Nastor: Right. They don’t even all have to be like the James Altuchers of the world do they?

James Altucher: No.

Jonny Nastor: I mean, it’s me. I just have a podcast. A small podcast that’s less than three months old. Yet, it’s funny because he emailed me, and I was like, “Oh.” Today, I actually responded back to him because he had sent me another email, and I was like, “Actually, I’m talking to James later today. That’s interesting.” He’s like, “Oh wow.” Then I was like, “That’s interesting isn’t it?” What a weird connection. Just because he put out the effort. Now we’re actually talking about him.

How Success Can Be Measured Today or In Decades

James Altucher: Right. Also, that’s a connection you’ll have for the next 10 years. Let’s say you never talk to him again. Ten years from now you build a business, and it turns out he’s the head of business development at Google. You could say, “Hey, remember you sent me those 10 ideas 10 years ago? I’ve got this other business now. I’m going to be in San Francisco. Would you love to meet?” Of course, ninety nine percent chance he’s going to say, “Whoa, Jon that’s great! We haven’t talked in 10 years. Let’s meet.”

These things build up over time. I was just talking this morning with my wife, Claudia, actually, and I was thinking how — and this is something I’ve learned from my podcast a lot, just talking to so many people who have been successes in their different fields — success can be measured. Forget for a second all kinds of self-help, success can be measured by your inward stuff. I’m just going to be blatant about money. Success can be measured today. Like, “How much did I make today?” Or success can be measured in decades.

Those are really the two metrics. Because almost everyone I’ve spoken to, they had their good years, and their down years, and their good days, and their down days. But over time, over decades, their contacts, their intelligence, their creativity, their ability to execute, grew and grew and grew. Then finally they hit upon that lucky set of circumstances over decades that really propelled them into the ‘overnight success.’ I can’t think of an example where it didn’t work like that.

It’s important to remember that success is measured today. Like, “how many people did I help today? How many opportunities did I create for myself to make money today? How much money did I make today?” But also to keep in mind you’re planting seeds for the future. It’s like you’re planting perennial seeds. Perennial seeds, you throw them in your garden. Ten to 20% of them will actually grow into plants. The rest of them will disappear. Then 10 years later, those plants are still growing. It’s the same thing — or 20 years later. Or 30 years later. Sometimes, that’s depressing. “Well, I want success now. I’m feeling really sick right now because I can’t pay my mortgage.” Well,..

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To redeem a free $100 LinkedIn ad credit, go to LinkedIn.com/HACK.

What if you could run a successful software company with your significant other, have you are your team of 30 people work just 32 hours per week, build houses on the side, and be a loving and caring parent?

Natalie Nagele has done just that. For the past 14 years, she has been the co-founder and CEO of Wildbit. Wildbit is the parent software company of Beanstalk, Postmark, Conveyor, and Deploybot which they sold in 2017.

Wildbit builds software that enables developers to get out of the weeds and focus on what they do best — which is to design, code, and ship brilliant software.

In this conversation we discuss:

– Why focusing on your team is more vital than focusing on your products
– How to solve really big pain points for a really small audience
– Making space to enable your team to get into deep work

Now, let’s hack…

Natalie Nagele.

The post 453: Solve a Big Pain for a Small Audience | Natalie Nagele appeared first on Hack the Entrepreneur.

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Paul Jarvis is a veteran of the online tech world, and over the years has had such corporate clients as Microsoft, Yahoo, Mercedes-Benz, Warner Music, and even Shaquille O’Neal.

Today, he teaches online courses, writes, and runs several software businesses, his latest being a simple and privacy-based website analytics platform called Fathom. Plus, he does all of this from his home on an island on the West Coast of Canada.

His latest project is his brand new book Company of One, your official guide to building around the idea that staying small and avoiding growth can be more durable and even more enjoyable.

In this conversation, we discuss:

  • Why you should constantly be challenging the ideas of others
  • When is enough finally enough?
  • Understanding success as a personal metric that can (and should) change

Now, let’s hack…

Paul Jarvis Resources and links from the episode Show Sponsor

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The post Company of One | Paul Jarvis appeared first on Hack the Entrepreneur.

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What if you could run a successful software company with your significant other, have your team of 30 people work just 32 hours per week, build houses on the side, and be a loving and caring parent?

Natalie Nagele has done just that. For the past 14 years, she has been the co-founder and CEO of Wildbit. Wildbit is the parent software company of Beanstalk, Postmark, Conveyor, and Deploybot which they sold in 2017.

Wildbit builds software that enables developers to get out of the weeds and focus on what they do best — which is to design, code, and ship brilliant software.

In this conversation we discuss:

  • Why focusing on your team is more vital than focusing on your products
  • How to solve really big pain points for a really small audience
  • Making space to enable your team to get into deep work

Now, let’s hack…

Natalie Nagele Resources and links from the episode Show sponsor

LinkedIn Marketing Solutions: Every day, over 500 million professionals engage with content on LinkedIn, and chances are, your future customers are among them!

To redeem a free $100 LinkedIn ad credit, go to LinkedIn.com/HACK.

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The post Solve a Big Pain for a Small Audience | Natalie Nagele appeared first on Hack the Entrepreneur.

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Jacqui Ma got a business degree and worked in the manufacturing industry for a couple of years, then went back to school to study industrial design.

She began her career designing products such as medical equipment and furniture before getting into luggage design, which then led to designing all types of bags. Since then she has worked for PUMA and consulted to Amazon Fashion.

During all of this, she was living above a bike shop in east London. As a cyclist, she saw a gap in the market for fashion inspired bike bags. So she wanted to design something that women cyclists would appreciate.

After designing prototypes and setting up manufacturing in China, Jacqui founded Goodordering with a desire to create and a successful crowdfunding campaign.

In this conversation, we discuss:

  • Using your bosses as early business and growth mentors
  • How vulnerability can drive the foundations of your business
  • Finding and harnessing the entrepreneurial mindset in the most unlikely places

Now, let’s hack…

Jacqui Ma Resources and links from the episode Show sponsor

Fin: Try Fin, your new on-demand executive assistant for free!

As a listener of my show, I’ve arranged for all of you to try Fin for FREE.

Just use my link – Fin.com/HACK.

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The post Starting Before You’re Ready | Jacqui Ma appeared first on Hack the Entrepreneur.

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Mary Marantz graduated from Yale Law school, and spent some time working at a London law firm before deciding that she wanted to start her own business.

During this same time, her husband began taking photos of weddings on the side. That was 12 years ago, and they have scaled from one-off wedding photography to being named top wedding photographers by Profoto.

In this conversation we discuss:

  • Taking (calculated) risks to accomplish your goals
  • Why you need to look around and see what everyone else in your market is doing
  • How to set monthly, yearly, and five year goals

Now, let’s hack…

Mary Marantz Resources and links from the interview Show sponsor

Fin: Try Fin, your new on-demand executive assistant for free!

As a listener of my show, I’ve arranged for all of you to try Fin for FREE.

Just use my link – Fin.com/HACK.

Dig this episode? Wait until you hear these…

The post Don’t Wait for Permission | Mary Marantz appeared first on Hack the Entrepreneur.

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Ryan Millman started his first business in 1999 out of the library in his college.

From this original venture and $5000 in startup money, he has built his original idea into Millman Multimedia, the umbrella that encompasses five companies and 350 employees.

This is a fascinating conversation about growing and scaling, the constancy of change, and bringing production in-house to grow and optimize your processes.

Now, let’s hack…

Ryan Millman Resources and links from the interview Show sponsor

Discover.bot: A digital space for bot developers and enthusiasts of all skill levels to learn from one another, share stories, and move the conversation forward.

New to bots? Get started with their Beginner’s Guide.

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The post The Only Constant is Change | Ryan Millman appeared first on Hack the Entrepreneur.

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