Loading...

Follow Growing Leaders on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
Or

Valid


Today, we hear from Andrew McPeak. Andrew is a next gen researcher, speaker, and author for Growing Leaders. 

A study released in Jan 2018 by Barna Research Group reveals that Generation Z is more emotionally affected by the perils of social media than other generations who are also online. Utilizing a quantitative survey of 1,490 nationally representative students—ages 13 to 18 across the US—researchers asked students about their relationship with technology. The findings are quite revealing.

When asked whether or not the following statements were true, Generation Z’s responses stuck out above other generations:

“Looking at other people’s posts often make me feel bad about the way I look.”

Gen Z – 31%
Millennials – 30%
Generation X – 20%
Boomers – 4%

“Looking at other people’s posts often makes me feel bad about the lack of excitement in my own life.”

Gen Z – 39%
Millennials – 34%
Generation X – 24%
Boomers – 8%

“I have experienced bullying on social media.”

Gen Z – 33%
Millennials – 29%
Generation X – 20%
Boomers – 12%

A full third of Generation Z seems to be emotionally impacted in some way by the thousands of posts they are viewing online. It doesn’t seem foolish to assume that these students might easily make their way from “feeling down” about what they see online, to experiencing depression and anxiety (both of which are on the rise among teens). Today’s teens work constantly to make sure that they keep up with their friends online. In fact, a full 26% of them tell us that they spend the equivalent of a full time job on social media sites every day.

This information may feel like nothing new to you. You probably don’t need me to tell you your students are on their phones all the time. The difference is not that we know they are on their screens, it’s that each new study released paints a more and more dire picture of the internal challenges today’s teens are facing. According to this research, a member of Gen X and a member of Gen Z could spend the same amount of time on social media and the Gen Z student would walk away feeling more inferior and possibly more depressed. It’s a reality we need to understand if we are to lead today’s students well.

So . . . What Do I Say to My Student?

You may already know about the negative effects of screen use, but that doesn’t make having a conversation with your students about technology any easier. They want to be on their phones just as much as ever. So, let me suggest a way that you can start a conversation with your students about this problem without them feeling threatened.

1. Show them this report. Maybe the best way to talk to your Gen Z student about their social media use is not to tell them anything. Just show them this report and let that start the conversation.

2. Ask them what they think. Ask them about their experiences. Have their friends ever been affected by screen use? What about them? Just be sure to follow the “They, We, Me” method. Always start by asking them about other people (students today, students at their school, etc.). Next, ask them “we” questions (our family, our classroom, our group). After those two steps you will be ready for a “me” question (Have you ever felt this way?) This method eases them into the conversation.

3. Ask them what their core values are. One reason today’s students are affected so much by social media is that so many of them don’t have an identity outside of what is said about them online. Challenge your students to build an identity through core values separate from their online persona. A great way to start the conversation is to ask them, when someone introduces you to a new person, what words do you want them to say about you?

4. Ask them what they think should be done next. Challenge them to build a healthy relationship with social media and their phone. I’ve talked with students who, of their own volition, decided to take a two week “fast” from technology, or to get rid of certain social media apps that affect them more than others, or to just spend less time online each day. Let your student come up with the idea, but then ask them if you can keep them accountable to their decision. You might even decide to take the fast along with them.

It is possible for today’s students to make wise choices online. They just need leaders like you to help them find a path toward wise decisions. Thank you for being their guide.

Order Now: Marching Off the Map
Inspire Students to Navigate a Brand New World

Our new book is now available! Leading today’s students often feels like being in a new country with old maps that don’t work. Understanding and connecting with the generation in this land is often times frustrating and draining. We need new strategies on how to march off our old maps and create new ones.

From decades of research and hands-on experience, Dr. Tim Elmore and Andrew McPeak collate their conclusions into one resource that helps adults:

  • Inspire students to own their education and their future
  • Lead students from an attitude of apathy to one of passion through metacognition
  • Enable students to push back from the constant digital distractions and practice mindfulness
  • Raise kids who make healthy progress, both emotionally and mentally, through their teenage years
  • Give students the tools to handle the complexities of an ever-changing world
  • Understand and practically apply the latest research on Generation Z
Order Here

The post New Report Details the Devastating Effects Social Media Is Having on Generation Z appeared first on Growing Leaders.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In the final week of January—our launch into a new year—Americans again felt the anguish of a school shooting. A 15-year-old boy shot several of his peers, killing two and wounding more than a dozen others at a rural Kentucky high school. That attack, the third at or near a U.S. school in just three days, serves to deepen the “narrative” inside so many of us.

Do you know this narrative?
  • School shootings are on the rise.
  • Kids are bad, and we should be afraid.
  • Life is dangerous, so we should be on guard.
What are the facts?

In the wake of such tragedies, we “feel” more than “think.” We’re frequently unaware of the facts over the last 20 years about schools. The number of such tragedies is actually down. Alan Fox, professor of criminology, law and public policy at Northeastern University says: “Schools are safe. They’ve been safe for a long time. They remain safe.”

Wait. What? Is he serious?

Although the odds of any child being the victim of a school shooting are extremely low, Fox says, the truth of the matter is for many kids, school is “the safest place for them because they have structure.” Fox has long stated that school shootings are overstated in the public imagination. Research shows that both the frequency and the toll have actuality dropped over the last two decades. Young people, he reports, are far more likely to die off school grounds than they are in a school attack, like Columbine High School (CO) or Sandy Hook Elementary School (CT). It’s a little like the fear many have of flying, but not driving. Flying is actually safer, but we’d sooner get in a car than a jet. We have a narrative.

In his research for an upcoming book, Alan Fox found that from 1999 (when the Columbine High tragedy occurred) to 2013, suicides, bicycle accidents, firearm incidents and swimming pool drownings accounted for 31,887 of the total 32,484 reported deaths. Deaths from school shootings numbered 154 or less than .05%. The bottom line: school shootings are actually a small part of the problem.

What have we unwittingly done?

The truth is, our society pushes fear. We are so aware of school shootings, terrorist attacks, child accidents and school campus blunders that we have an ongoing “narrative” playing out in our heads. Everywhere we look, we’ve seen signs: “Danger. Toxic. Hazard. Do not walk. Do not touch. Slippery when wet.” We are fearful and cautious. And it impacts what’s going on in the minds of our kids.

Consider the message we send to students when we constantly live in fear:

  • Don’t take any risks.
  • Don’t make mistakes.
  • The world is a scary place for everyone.
  • We should be suspicious of people.
  • Don’t get too curious if it could be dangerous.
  • Don’t try something unless you know you’ll be safe and successful.

We don’t mean to send these messages, but kids walk away afraid to try new things. In our 2016 focus groups with young teens (in multiple states), we discovered that middle school and high school students have fears and anxiety that stem from their parents and teachers. You may not hear it right away, but they said things to us like:

  • “It’s hard, but I try to keep myself thinking about the positive as much as possible.” – 6th grade boy
  • “I’m glad we have ISIS, because without them we would be living our lives as a lie, thinking like everything is ok when really nothing is ok.” – 7th grade girl
  • “There are things in our world that are getting better, but most of it is getting worse.” – 8th grade boy
  • “I think about the world and its problems on a daily basis.” – 9th grade boy

Despite the “happy go lucky” pics and videos they post on Snapchat or Instagram, too often their meta-narrative is caution, cynicism and fear. And it is partly our doing.

What’s Your Narrative? 

Every leader has a narrative. It is the over-arching mantra, the meta-message or the story you carry with you and communicate to your followers. It’s either positive or negative. It’s either hopeful or doubtful. It’s full of pessimism or optimism. We carry this narrative with us and, unless we’re intentional, we pass it on naturally to those around us. It’s like a sneeze that can be contagious. We gain our reputation among students, based on our narratives. So, my question is: what is your narrative?

As Parents: Is it Fear or Hope?

As I’ve stated, too many parents have automatically defaulted to a fear narrative. The world seems so unsafe today. There are predators, criminals, molesters and abusers everywhere, we assume, and so we pass on a dreadful mindset to our children. Some moms won’t let their children out of their sight. As a result, kids can grow up to be one of two extremes—a reckless renegade or a cautious coward.

As Administrators: Is it Annoyance or Invitation?

A second narrative is annoyance. We become put out with these entitled, lazy young slackers who don’t seem to have any ambition or work ethic. Even when we’re quiet, they pick up signals that we don’t like them, and we talk about them behind their back. And they’re sure we won’t invite them into a developmental relationship.

As Educators: Is it Doubt or Belief?

A third narrative is doubt. We begin our careers optimistic, believing the best about students, but the system has a way of beating us up. We begin losing heart that we really can make a difference with that marginalized student; the at-risk kid or the introverted goth. So, we clam up and students pick up that we doubt their abilities.

As Coaches: Is it Negative or Positive?

A fourth narrative is pessimism. We can’t help but come across negative to student athletes. At first, we patiently put an arm around their shoulder and explained the drill at practice, but now—it’s easier to yell and scream. We are impatient, short-tempered and can be abusive in our language. We rationalize that these kids are “too soft!” While that may be true, the real problem is our evolving negative narrative.

As Youth Leaders: Is it Avoidance or Engagement?

Still another narrative we accrue is avoidance. As we age, we become less comfortable with students. We felt like a big sister as we launched our career, but now it’s like we’re a distant aunt or grandparent. Not wanting to misstep, we avoid having conversations with them outside of our duties. We rationalize it’s better that way, but kids start assuming we don’t want to connect with them. We don’t even really care. We are “paid to be with them”—it’s only an obligation.

What story are you telling yourself about this generation of students?

Looking to Develop Character & Leadership in Young Adults?
Check out:
Habitudes: The Art of Self-Leadership

The Art of Self-Leadership helps students and young adults:
  • Build strong character based on integrity and emotional security
  • Develop habits of self-discipline and initiative to achieve their goals
  • Choose their own set of core values for making wise decisions in life.
  • Create an ongoing plan for personal growth outside the classroom
  • Identify their unique strengths and passions for a healthy self-image.
View Free Sample & Order Here

The post Our Narrative: One Variable to Reduce Student Stress appeared first on Growing Leaders.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

By now, we’ve all heard about and grieved over the school shooting last Wednesday at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that took 17 lives. It was horrific. Once again, the pattern was similar to many past school shootings:

  • The perpetrator was a young male.
  • The gun was an AR-15 rifle.
  • His parents were unable to guide him. (They were gone)
  • He was mentally ill.

So, is there anything we can do besides grieve together?

One of the positive aspects of this story has been students wanting and demanding change. They are planning a “March for Our Lives,” a big demonstration in DC on March 24. They have set up a website and are talking to fellow students all over the U.S. Not only will students and others march in DC, similar demonstrations will happen nationwide.  11th-grader Cameron Kasky said to ABC, “People keep asking us, what about the Stoneman Douglas shooting is going to be different, because this has happened before and change hasn’t come? — This is it.”

If this isn’t leadership in it’s truest form, I don’t know what is.

It’s Time to Become Proactive

I fully recognize this issue is complex. Simple solutions are insufficient, like merely keeping guns away from people with mental health issues. Nikolas Cruz easily passed a background check and was able to buy the gun legally. The students are already starting to act. Let me start a list of ideas for us to act on as adults.

  1. Offer Social Emotional Learning, focusing on empathy & conflict resolution.

An increasing number of K-12 schools have introduced social emotional learning into the curriculum. Many find it essential because at-risk students are unable to function well in class without the social skills to interact with others. I believe we will soon recognize this as a required skillset just like reading, writing and arithmetic. In fact, as I survey the landscape, I believe we must teach soft skills with an emphasis on empathy and conflict resolution. Too many students have little idea how to look someone in the eye with whom they disagree and speak civilly to them. Our phones have fostered incivility. There’s even a term now for how we can snub someone next to us by staring down: Phubbing. It’s snubbing with your phone. Both teachers and employers are asking for better soft skills in students. I believe this subject should be as common as the academic courses we teach.

  1. Require 21st century parent preparation.

What I’ve suggested above used to be the responsibility of parents. Moms and dads took it upon themselves (when I was growing up) to impart courtesy, ethics and values. Today, I find too many parents unready or unwilling to prepare children with this kind of a moral compass. Some superintendents have told me the parents are requesting the teachers do it since they don’t have time. What if we found a way to require parents and guardians to receive “basic training” to lead in today’s uncertain times? What if we found effective incentives for such training? What if we offered guidelines for technology and for teaching life skills to a young generation who is inaugurating new cultural norms and realities? Too many parents have become “snow plow parents” who only defend their child; “karaoke parents” who want to act like and befriend their child; or “dry cleaner parents” who want to drop them off like clothes to be cared for by a professional. We must equip them with new skills.

  1. Furnish social media boundaries for minors.

In his book The Inevitable, author Kevin Kelly said it best: “Smart technology is introduced so fast, it outpaces our ability to civilize it.” Part of our challenge is we’re unaware at what social media is doing to our kids. According to data from Monitoring the Future, the more time a teen spends on a screen, the less happy they become and the more likely they are to experience depression. One would assume if they’re connecting with peers on social media, they’d feel less lonely, but the opposite is true. For example according to psychologist Jean Twenge, “8th graders who are heavy users of social media increase their risk of depression by 27 percent, over teens who play sports, meet face-to-face or attend religious services”. If you track the rise of anxiety and depression among students nationwide, it directly parallels the rise in social media use. Risk begins at two hours daily or more. I believe adults must be more intentional about monitoring social media hours and interactions.

  1. Improve the ratio of counselors to students.

Both secondary schools and universities are reporting a growing number of students requesting mental health care—and schools often employ an insufficient number of professionals for the need. We live in a new day. The average ratio of counselors to students in American secondary schools is nearly 1 to 500. The ASCA recommends twice as many counselors. Why is this vital today? Not only do we have homicides, we also have suicides. A big increase in suicides. Again Dr. Twenge shared a report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, that there is a steady incline in suicides since smart phones became available, meaning kids began connecting on a screen rather than in person. On those screens, cyber-bullying occurs, sending kids into a tailspin sending suicides way up. In fact, “46 percent more teens killed themselves in 2015 than in 2007.” If we do nothing, we’re like ostriches with our heads in the sand.

  1. Provide better tracking of mental health symptoms.

Nikolas Cruz is a teen with clear mental health issues but somehow slipped through the cracks. We may never spot every problem teenager, but we must employ technology to improve our current tracking systems. For example, what if we noted each time a student posted or displayed potential trouble (like Cruz did). Then, a caring adult (counselor, guardian, coach, etc.) pursued a relationship with him or her. It is common knowledge that teens in relationships with caring adults are far less likely to commit crimes than those without them. This won’t magically solve every problem, but I believe it would certainly lead to a significant drop. There is no life change without life exchange. Conversation. Belief. Affirmation. Direction. We must build bridges of relationship that can bear the weight of truth. Sometimes hard truth. It must begin with tracking their habits and lead to touching their heart.

Let’s take some steps before we hear about another unnecessary tragedy.

The post Five Action Steps to Prevent Teens from Becoming Violent appeared first on Growing Leaders.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Today, we hear from Andrew McPeak. Andrew is a next gen researcher, speaker, and author for Growing Leaders. 

A recent article from the National Education Association explored the question of whether or not digital reading is equal to reading in print. Their findings were quite telling.

“While digital reading ‘is part and parcel of living and learning in the 21st century,’ […] educators should still give careful thought about how and when to employ a digital device in the classroom. The rush to digital […] is fueled by a number of factors, but improved student learning may not be one of them.”

Researchers found that digital reading was faster but less effective as a tool for helping students process and learn information. What’s interesting is that although their retention was worse when reading online, the students surveyed believed that reading online improved their retention. It’s a case of misunderstanding that the scientists blamed on the speed of digital reading. “Speed gives [students] the illusion of faster processing and that must mean they’re getting it better. Just like in school, kids who finish first are usually perceived to be somehow better or smarter. So, speed tends to be aligned with intelligence as it is with so many things. But it can actually result in a deficit of learning compared to print.”

Here’s one question I asked myself as I read this study: “Isn’t it the same content—just on two different platforms?” How can a difference in the medium so affect the message? Here’s one way to think about the differences between print and digital. Consider the unique focus between these two styles of reading:

Digital Text Print Text
Meant to be read for speed Meant to be read for comprehension
Comes in shorter sections Comes in longer chapters
Designed to be simple Designed to be thorough
Goal is attraction: writers are rewarded for page visits Goal is information: writers are rewarded for explaining a concept

Because of these differences in purpose and style the effect of digital reading is felt most when you are testing for retention. The study in question found that “for general questions, getting the idea of the content, the medium doesn’t really make a difference. But for deeper learning and critical analysis—that’s different. Comprehension is significantly better when participants read printed texts.”

Working Memory Capacity and Scrolling While Reading

A 2010 study on the effects of retention of text while scrolling and reading revealed some interesting findings that can help inform how we lead the next generation through this problem. The first thing the study did was determine what is called the “working memory capacity” (WMC) of each participant. WMC determines a person’s ability to “process and store information simultaneously.” To put it simply (probably too simply), some people have an ability to process and memorize content simultaneously while they read, others can’t.

After a series of tests, “results indicated that scrolling negatively affects learning from text, and this effect is most pronounced in learners who have lower WMC. Across two studies, these learners were less able to develop a causal understanding of a complex topic when presented with a scrolling interface than when presented the same information units in discrete pages.”

It’s worth noting, however, that findings from this same study showed that “scrolling had little impact on higher-WMC learners.” In other words, reading online may be fine for some students, and much worse for others. Your opinion on the best ways to read may be less important than the ability of the students you lead.

To Read (on Your Phone) or Not to Read

So how do we process these findings? Chances are that whatever we might be finding out about the effects of digital reading will have little effect on the prevalence of digital text. Colleges are going to keep pushing digital textbooks, and articles are going to continue to go viral on the web. In this world of unstoppable digital words, the best we can do is understand our students better and help them make decisions that will aid them in their personal educational experience. Here are some suggestions for ways to curb this trend in favor of your students’ learning and comprehension.

If you have to read digitally, get a kindle or other e-reader. While digital reading is in some ways inferior to print reading, e-readers, which break text into pages instead of forcing readers to scroll, are a much less disruptive way of reading digital content.

Get an app to help block out distractions. There are some great apps out there that can help curb distractions on the internet. Consider an app like Forest or Freedom. Present a couple of options to your students and let them choose which one they want to try.

When you want to learn something, write it down. Even if you or your students find yourselves reading online (and even scrolling) the same study mentioned above tells us that writing down pertinent information by hand is a way to stop the negative effects of digital reading. Carry around a little notebook for this purpose.

Order Now: Marching Off the Map
Inspire Students to Navigate a Brand New World

Our new book is now available! Leading today’s students often feels like being in a new country with old maps that don’t work. Understanding and connecting with the generation in this land is often times frustrating and draining. We need new strategies on how to march off our old maps and create new ones.

From decades of research and hands-on experience, Dr. Tim Elmore and Andrew McPeak collate their conclusions into one resource that helps adults:

  • Inspire students to own their education and their future
  • Lead students from an attitude of apathy to one of passion through metacognition
  • Enable students to push back from the constant digital distractions and practice mindfulness
  • Raise kids who make healthy progress, both emotionally and mentally, through their teenage years
  • Give students the tools to handle the complexities of an ever-changing world
  • Understand and practically apply the latest research on Generation Z
Order Here

The post How Is Digital Text Affecting Student Comprehension? appeared first on Growing Leaders.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Have you heard the news? A growing number of communities across the U.S. are now offering free college tuition to students. In reaction to rising higher education costs, as well as education budget cuts, 200 campus locations are providing some form of tuition-free community college education, hoping that the return on investment will boost their economies. If you’re counting, it’s 12 states that are now doing this … and growing.

This could be a game changer.

I have visited two of these cities. One is Kalamazoo, Michigan. Beginning in 2005, college and technical education was offered for free in this western Michigan community. The benefits have been tangible. Population decline—what some call “resident erosion”—has stopped. Students who could likely not afford post-secondary courses are now able to take them and perhaps envision a future different from their parents or grandparents. This is all good news.

A Mixed Bag for Some Cities

Tim Ready, a sociology professor at Western Michigan University, says free tuition has been “marginally beneficial but not a slam dunk.” He reports that between 2005-2014, the city’s public school enrollment grew by almost 25 percent, though the number of low-income kids receiving free lunches also increased. So, the bleeding has not been completely stopped. Often, a low-income college student will enroll in free classes, but not have any goal to reach or any ambition to finish and graduate. They simply remain consumers.

In other words, tuition does not equal aspiration.

In response, some city officials are seeing the need to incentivize outcomes for students. In other words, to make it worth their while to finish and take on jobs that are most lacking locally. This incentive is built off of the principle: what gets rewarded gets repeated. In addition, some officials are placing restrictions on who is eligible for the largest scholarships—making sure the right students get the most help. Many have learned the principle: if something is free, it often isn’t perceived as valuable as if the user has some skin in the game.

The city of Greeley, Colorado has also implemented “The Greeley Promise.” City leaders want students to know that if they want to attend college after high school graduation, money will not prevent them from doing so. Roy Otto, the City Manager, saw what had happened in Kalamazoo and has worked with business leaders and community officials to make scholarships happen in his city. It has brought so many people together on behalf of the kids. The initiative is so fresh, it may be too new to draw any long-term conclusions about how it will help city morale and the economy. My hat is off, however, to Roy for his vision to help disadvantaged students in Greeley. He and his comrades have become dear friends of mine; they are passionate examples for city leaders everywhere. I believe they possess the kind of vision community leaders need in today’s 21st century world. Established adults making a path for the emerging generation.

The Pros and Cons

Let me attempt to start a summary of “pros and cons” regarding free college education:

Pros Cons
1. All students gain access to education 1. A huge expense for taxpayers and cities
2. Students can envision a better future 2. Students may need incentives to finish
3. City population stays high and keeps workers 3. Some students don’t value what is free
4. Young professionals are better trained for jobs 4. Budgets may be unable to fulfill the promise
5. Morale and hope increase in the community 5. Restrictions are vital to prevent scamming

So—what are your thoughts?

Do you see more positives than negatives on this issue of free post secondary education? Why or why not? Leave your comments and let’s think through this issue.

Looking to Develop Character & Leadership in Young Adults?
Check out:
Habitudes: The Art of Self-Leadership

The Art of Self-Leadership helps students and young adults:
  • Build strong character based on integrity and emotional security
  • Develop habits of self-discipline and initiative to achieve their goals
  • Choose their own set of core values for making wise decisions in life.
  • Create an ongoing plan for personal growth outside the classroom
  • Identify their unique strengths and passions for a healthy self-image.
View Free Sample & Order Here

The post Are Free College Classes Good News or Bad News? appeared first on Growing Leaders.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I’ve noticed a missing word in our vocabulary for a decade now. I rarely hear the word “moderation.” Instead, I see both students and adults becoming addicted to technology, including everyday devices like phones, tablets or video games. Believe it or not, students in our recent focus groups readily admitted to an addiction to both their phones and to social media apps.

I’m not sure if they were proud of it or ashamed of it.

Did you know that for the first time ever, the World Health Organization has included “gaming disorder”(video game addiction) in a draft of the International Classification of Diseases? For someone to be classified as having the disorder, they must also continue to game despite negative consequences, the report adds.

Recently, two investors in Apple, Inc. wrote a letter to the company seeking CEO Tim Cook and his executive team to do something about iPhone addictions. They said:

“Apple can play a defining role in signaling to the industry that paying special attention to the health and development of the next generation is both good business and the right thing to do,” wrote billion-dollar investors Jana Partners and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System, a pension fund, in a letter to Apple they also posted online.

NBC News Journalist Ben Popken wrote, “There is a developing consensus around the world—including Silicon Valley—that the potential long-term consequences of new technologies need to be factored in at the outset, and no company can outsource that responsibility,” according to the Apple investors.

In a recent article, Huffington Post founder Arianna Huffington lamented how technology degrades the closeness between people in the same room. She cited how heavy social media usage has been linked to higher rates of depression, especially in the young. “Our ability to succeed in the technology-dominated workplace of the future depends, in no small measure, on our ability to—right now—take back control of our technology, and our lives,” she wrote.

What Do We Make of This?

We live in a strange era of history. For the first time, our everyday habits and devices actually encourage addictive behavior and make moderation difficult:

  • We can binge watch television shows and movies.
  • Video games can be played to our heart’s content.
  • Social media can be accessed anytime of day and on any day.
  • Prescription drugs can be purchased online or over the counter.
  • We can shop on our computers anytime of day or night.
  • Food can be purchased at any time and delivered to our home.
  • Our phones are with us all day, enabling us to communicate nonstop.
  • Almost everything we want is “on demand.”
Four Steps Toward Moderation

In 2010, Steve Jobs was interviewed and asked if his children liked the new iPad. Jobs famously replied: “We don’t allow the iPad in our home. We think it’s too dangerous for them.”

We all know Steve Jobs believed in his Apple products. But he also believed in moderation. And that has to be taught these days. Ancient Greeks had a famous phrase: “Pan Metron Ariston,” which translates to “Moderation in All Things.” It’s the ability to temper our appetites; to discipline our urge to binge on anything. The dictionary defines the term this way: Moderation is about finding a balance between two extremes—deprivation and overindulging. Let me offer four suggestions for teachers and parents to develop “moderation” in themselves and young people:

1. Teach them to distinguish between APPETITES and HUNGER.

We often fail to see the difference between these two. Hunger is the physical need for food, but appetites are fueled by our desire for food. If only hunger was involved in eating, we’d eat until we’re full and stop. Appetites kick in and cause us to eat the wrong kinds of food and to overeat. We condition ourselves to yearn for certain tastes in our mouths, or screens in our face, or habits in our lives. We must learn to boss our appetites—physically, socially and emotionally. While I believe emotions are important, I believe they make a better servant than a master. They tell us to be dissatisfied with what we own or the amount of food we eat. The fact is, we need time to play, but we also need time to labor and produce. We need time for community, but we also need time for solitude. Americans tend to overdo behaviors. Distinguishing between appetite and hunger could change our lives.

2. Teach them to think BALANCE, not BINGE.

I first heard the term “binge” over 25 years ago. Young people were bingeing on food or music. I began to hear the word “addictions” more frequently. Today, we binge watch Netflix, or binge on video games or alcohol. Binging is more familiar to us than balance. What if we taught our students the value of balance—to enjoy a pleasure from time to time, but to balance it with a reciprocal behavior? For instance, when I was a young adult, I took little time for meals. I was always on the go, so when I got hungry, I took 10 minutes for a burger or burrito at a fast food restaurant. Today, while I might enjoy a burger from time to time, I set a balanced standard for myself: one salad and three bottled waters daily. I have a “two soft drink” limit each week. For me, water is a reciprocal choice to soft drinks. Salads replace burritos. The key is to consciously think about balance in our lives—moderation—in the stuff we love. Those habits then serve us instead of the other way around.

3. Teach them to focus on OUTCOMES, not OBSTACLES.

When I try to change a bad habit, I often can only see the obstacles in the way. This makes change very difficult. What if we taught our students to clearly see the results of changing a bad habit? For instance, what if they could see that limiting themselves to two hours of video games and replacing the other hour with a positive or healthy option, like working out? What if they posted a photo on their bathroom mirror of a person who’s toned after working out for a year? People tend to do what they see clearest. Playing videos games is something they can “see” themselves doing, so they may default to it. We must help them envision the outcomes of other options. Focusing on the results rather than the necessary routines to reach them can be a game changer. It could actually enable this generation to live in moderation.

4. Teach them to pursue INCREMENTAL change, not FUNDAMENTAL change.

Far too often, we try to take gigantic steps when we see we need to change. This usually fails because our biological make up seeks equilibrium. Our body and mind generally return to the patterns we’ve already set for them. In the words of George Leonard, “Resistance is proportionate to the size and speed of the change, not to whether the change is a favorable or unfavorable one.” Author James Clear puts it this way: “The faster you try to change, the more likely you are to backslide. The very pursuit of rapid change dials up a wide range of counteracting forces, which are fighting to pull you back into your previous lifestyle. You might be able to beat equilibrium for a little while, but pretty soon your energy fades and the backsliding begins.” So—I recommend helping students to plan small, incremental changes in their binging. Encourage them to cut back 15 minutes on video games; or two bites of dessert; or a half hour of Netflix. Then add a bit more change each week.

In every case, practicing moderation enables students to lead themselves well.

Order Now: Marching Off the Map
Inspire Students to Navigate a Brand New World

Our new book is now available! Leading today’s students often feels like being in a new country with old maps that don’t work. Understanding and connecting with the generation in this land is often times frustrating and draining. We need new strategies on how to march off our old maps and create new ones.

From decades of research and hands-on experience, Dr. Tim Elmore and Andrew McPeak collate their conclusions into one resource that helps adults:

  • Inspire students to own their education and their future
  • Lead students from an attitude of apathy to one of passion through metacognition
  • Enable students to push back from the constant digital distractions and practice mindfulness
  • Raise kids who make healthy progress, both emotionally and mentally, through their teenage years
  • Give students the tools to handle the complexities of an ever-changing world
  • Understand and practically apply the latest research on Generation Z
Order Here

The post Practicing the Lost Art of Moderation appeared first on Growing Leaders.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Ah, we’re entering Oscar season again, where filmmakers and performers are awarded by the Academy for their work. It reminds me of what happened last year.

Do you remember the fiasco that happened a year ago?

It was at the 2017 Oscar Awards that one of the biggest mistakes in its history was made. The winner for the best picture was announced from the stage….and it was wrong. “La La Land” had not actually won, it was “Moonlight.”

How could such a thing happen with a company like Price Waterhouse Cooper in charge of computing and communicating the results? Well, it’s actually simple. The man backstage handing the envelope to Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway gave them the wrong one. He got distracted posting a photo on social media.

This is a picture of a larger reality today.

Distractions, Distractions for Generation Z

We live in a day when almost everyone is distracted by the multiple realities taking place around us. It’s not uncommon for me to walk into a room, and suddenly wonder why I even entered it. While Millennials multi-task on two screens, Gen Z multi-tasks on five. Some states have outlawed texting while driving. People, young and old, are constantly talking, messaging and scrolling social media feeds. Our Department of Motor Vehicles reports that when do it while driving it affords the same level of distraction as DUI. Speaking of a broader context, Sabastian Thrun once said, “almost all accidents take place due to human distraction.”

If we’re honest, we’d have to admit most of us suffer a little from Attention Deficit Disorder. It’s especially true for our young. The students in our focus groups told us they suffer from both FOMO (Fear Of Missing Out) and FOLO (Fear Of Living Offline). According to MediaKix, “Generation Z grew up with a smartphone, and it is estimated that 96% of Generation Z owns a smartphone…the importance of smartphones in Gen Z lives is reflected in their attitude towards smartphone ownership. Individuals in Gen Z are 4 times more likely than Millennials to believe that age 13 is the appropriate age for a first smartphone.”

A Pew Internet and American Life Project Report surveyed middle school and high school teachers and saw astonishing results. It was difficult to hold the attention of a young teen for even a half a minute. Another study involving the same age group (from Generation Z) analyzed study patterns. It also found these students are highly distracted and in fact, calls this population of kids the “distracted generation.”

Five Strategies to Prevent Distraction

I’m concerned we are now raising our children (students) in a day where they have little chance of really focusing on one item at a time. Unless, of course, they become counter cultural. Below are five steps I’ve taken with students to prevent distraction.

1. First, begin with a discussion on the greatest distractions they face.

I’ve done this exercise with high school and college students, finding they’re quick to admit the realities of a distracted life. They laugh as they confess addiction to mobile phones, social media and Netflix. Facilitate a fun and non-threatening conversation where they “admit” and list the enemies of focus and concentration.

2. Second, explore the data on the consequences of distractions.

After naming the distractions, I came armed with articles that included research on the negative impact of distractions in our lives. It wasn’t just about kids, either. It was all of us. Megan Daum wrote, “We use our gadgets for distraction and entertainment. We use them to avoid work while giving the impression we’re actually working hard.”

3. Outlaw “phubbing” among students.

Before establishing any other policies, our student community decided to eliminate “phubbing.” Have you heard the term? It’s snubbing someone with your phone. In public places, the easiest way to avoid genuine conversation is to look down at your phone (even standing next to someone) and never talk. We made this a no-no.

4. Next, determine what context and time periods are “phone free.”

In Meeting Four, we made decisions. I actually believe healthy living (for adults and students) requires certain contexts where we eliminate devices. Many teachers do this in their classrooms; coaches do this at practices; parents do it at dinnertime. The key is to invite the students into this conversation and decision.

5. Finally, empower students to police the enforcement of undistracted time.

The only way for this to work is for the students to “own” the decision. They must hold each other accountable and become responsible for healthy habits. This ignites metacognition within the students, which inspires and motivates. While most will fail at first, they must not abandon the standard they set for healthy living.

Tom Kite accurately noted, “You can always find a distraction if you’re looking for one.” The key is to teach students to lead themselves. It’s step one on the leadership journey. Vivienne Westwood put it well: “”… because you need to be alone to find out anything.”

Are you ready to set an example for an undistracted life?

Looking to Develop Character & Leadership in Young Adults?
Check out:
Habitudes: The Art of Self-Leadership

The Art of Self-Leadership helps students and young adults:
  • Build strong character based on integrity and emotional security
  • Develop habits of self-discipline and initiative to achieve their goals
  • Choose their own set of core values for making wise decisions in life.
  • Create an ongoing plan for personal growth outside the classroom
  • Identify their unique strengths and passions for a healthy self-image.
View Free Sample & Order Here

The post Five Strategies to Prevent Gen Z from Being a Distracted Generation appeared first on Growing Leaders.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

What goes through your mind when you hear the word, “apprentice”? Outside of the reality TV show, Celebrity Apprentice, I instantly think about an old English blacksmith or a shoe cobbler who invites a young adult to shadow him, to learn the tricks of the trade and to eventually master it. Many industries throughout history practiced apprenticeships as the primary means to prepare a new generation of workers.

Well, I’m happy to report—I’m seeing apprenticeships making a comeback.

I recently did an interview with Fast Company magazine, where we discussed the comeback of apprenticeships and which ones work the best. Let me share with you what I said during the interview.

First of all, what do you consider to be an apprenticeship?

At Growing Leaders, we consider an apprenticeship an entry-level role in a workplace environment. It’s a first step into a career—not just another classroom—where the stakes are higher, but growth remains paramount and learning is the focus. It is a step beyond an internship in our world. We hire college interns three times a year for a semester-long experience. Apprentices are college graduates who are paid a larger stipend, given more responsibility and opportunity, and serve for between nine and twelve months. Apprentices also specialize in a single area, such as marketing, program excellence, sales, or operations.

Why do you think they’re making a comeback?

First and foremost, I think it’s due to the fact that many university students I meet have never worked a real job prior to graduation. Parents have had them on teams, doing practices or recitals, throughout their K-12 education, but often they have not been encouraged to actually work at a paying job. Students frequently feel ill prepared for a full-time job, but they are willing to step into an apprenticeship to gain their “sea legs.”

Second, we meet many university grads who say they still don’t know what they want to do in their career. An apprenticeship allows them to explore tasks in a work environment and learn what they like and dislike, in a relatively short time period.

What do you do for apprentices to help them grow and mature?

We are intentional about the apprentice experience. First, they sit in on all team meetings—as if they’re full-time team members who’re hired indefinitely on our team. Our training for apprentices includes four quadrants that spell the word: IDEA.

I – Instruction. They attend our weekly Lunch and Learn, participate in monthly mentoring book discussions with me, and they meet with directors. They also will do one book review during their time with us in front of the entire team.

D – Demonstration. They work next to a veteran team member and get to watch them do the work, receiving a model for marketing or operations. They also get to travel and do field trips. We talk with them regularly about what they’re observing.

E – Experience. They’re assigned genuine projects that must get done, and they are given ownership of them. We’ve had journalism majors who research a book; marketing majors who help on social media, business majors who help with operations, etc.

A – Assessment. They’re given ongoing evaluations in real time during their months with us. Each apprentice will work in one or two departments and receive feedback on their progress, as well as the areas that need growth. We believe that reflection fosters maturity.

Do you pay them?

We pay a stipend to both interns and apprentices and help them find a host home to cover their room and board. Apprentices receive a larger stipend, serve a longer term and have greater responsibilities than our interns, because usually they are recent graduates who are more mature. But, their greatest “pay” is the experience.

How do parents benefit from the apprentice experience?

We’ve received countless “thank you” notes from parents while their child serves with us as an apprentice. The chief reason is that we stretch the apprentice in areas they must grow in for career success, but we stretch them with a healthy dose of “grace.” Much like the builders of the Golden Gate Bridge who were able to complete construction more efficiently because of the safety nets below, we try to offer a place for them that’s safe to fall or to fail forward. They are exposed to real work, in a healthy culture.

Do graduates prefer apprenticeships over a full-time job?

When a full-time job is available, graduates will frequently choose those over an apprenticeship. Often, I think they should. Yet, in today’s culture, the leap from backpack to briefcase is enormous. We meet employers all the time who complain about unready young professionals who made marvelous grades in the classroom, but who have unrealistic expectations about work. Becoming an apprentice equips recent grads to take both realistic and relevant steps forward in the marketplace. The role does not feel so daunting or intimidating to the young professional, and it gives them a middle and temporary step to take in route to their chosen career. For many of them, an apprenticeship feels like a “life hack.” It’s an advantage to getting ahead.

Not long ago, I received a note from a former apprentice. She simply wrote:

“Dr. Elmore—The further I go into my career, the more grateful I am for the Growing Leaders’ apprenticeship I had three years ago. It was just what I needed to expose me to the real world, but to insulate me from becoming cynical about it. The projects you all let me oversee, and your ‘management by objective’ leadership style enabled me to soar to new heights and feel like I was ready to make a difference in the world. Thanks for taking a chance on me… Now I get to supervise interns and apprentices in my new role and I can hardly wait to duplicate what you all did with me.”

Looking to Develop Character & Leadership in Young Adults?
Check out:
Habitudes: The Art of Self-Leadership

The Art of Self-Leadership helps students and young adults:
  • Build strong character based on integrity and emotional security
  • Develop habits of self-discipline and initiative to achieve their goals
  • Choose their own set of core values for making wise decisions in life.
  • Create an ongoing plan for personal growth outside the classroom
  • Identify their unique strengths and passions for a healthy self-image.
View Free Sample & Order Here

The post The Return of the Classic Apprenticeship appeared first on Growing Leaders.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

In recent surveys done by the Barna Group, Americans of all ages are feeling a divide. While millions of us cannot agree on many issues today—we do seem to agree on one issue: the generations are colliding. Many of the colleges and high schools we partner with have four generations on campus: Baby Boomers, Generation X, Millennials and Generation Z. In my last four trips to school campuses, I encountered students, faculty, coaches and parents debating over issues such as:

  • How many hours should a student be allowed to have on a portable device?
  • Should athletes kneel during our national anthem or is it a sign of disrespect?
  • What’s an appropriate dress code for events on campus?
  • What historical statues are proper to leave standing on the campus?
  • Should students have a choice on previously mandated coursework?
  • Should parents pay for Uber rides at the beginning of a college semester, knowing their child is likely going to get drunk at parties?
  • Is it OK to let a student enter whatever restroom they want, based on the gender in which they self-identify?

Let’s face it: some of these issues don’t have easy answers. Most of us would admit we’re treading in new territory. To use the title of my new book, we are “marching off the map.” We don’t have maps to guide us in such new and different territory.

Or, do we?

Four Fundamentals That Should Govern Our Decision Making

Below, I offer you a very simple list of several guardrails that I consider when I’m making a significant leadership decision—one that will affect many people. Knowing my decision will likely not please everyone, but will affect everyone, I must make it with both integrity and resolve that enables me to sleep well at night. While we’re definitely in new territory, the following four imperatives help us to make wise decisions amidst controversial and sometimes “gray” issues.

1. See the Big Picture. (Try to perceive all viewpoints.)

Very often, students are convinced we don’t understand them, nor comprehend what they’re going through. We felt the same way when we were young. Leaders must practice meeting with all involved parties, listening and hearing their angle before making a decision. This is more difficult than it appears. It is so easy to make snap judgments without all the facts, because we’re distant from the issues. Author Brene Brown reminds us that “people are hard to hate up close.” By listening, we not only gain insight on other perspectives, we build empathy as well. Further, even if we don’t please everyone with our decision, at least they felt they were heard. I learned long ago that people do not have the innate need to get their own way. They do have the need to be heard. Seeing the big picture equips us to manage by fact, rather than feelings.

2. Take the High Road. (Work to believe the best about others.)

This is a leadership act that John Maxwell taught me when I was young and serving on his team. He always took the high road, even when others didn’t deserve it. He made a choice to believe the best about people—especially in the middle of a “gray area”—and risked outsiders misunderstanding his motives. Some felt being so “nice” meant he agreed with them; others felt he was compromising his convictions. Our culture has accepted two huge lies. The first is that if you disagree with someone’s choices you must fear or hate them. The second lie is that if you love someone it means you agree with everything they believe or do. Both are nonsense. You don’t have to compromise convictions to be compassionate. Taking the high road means you treat others with respect and honor—and don’t burn bridges along the way.

3. Think Long Term. (Ponder the long-term impact of decisions.)

We must ponder the future implications of our words and actions. As I suggested earlier, we must guard against kneejerk reactions and impulsive judgments when we don’t have all the facts. We don’t do this naturally today. Society pushes consumers to think only about today’s benefits. This has led to huge credit card and student debt; mortgage foreclosures and failed relationships. But think about the benefit of this paradigm: “Pay now and play later.” Work now for a future benefit. People who do this always end up more satisfied. Tim Tassopoulos, president of Chick-fil-A, taught me long ago: the further out I can see, the better the decision I make today. Did you know there’s a man from India who started planting trees when he was 16-years-old? He’s now 52 and lives in his own forest with rhinos, tigers and elephants. That was his goal as a teen. He thought long term.

4. Choose Win / Win. (Find solutions where everyone sees a benefit.)

At times, this is extremely difficult, but it’s the only lasting perspective today. When making a decision, everyone should feel as though some improvement was made. Each party must come away feeling as if they gained value from the discourse. This means we must embrace ideas that will benefit each party. It also means we begin thinking of helping others to win, as we pursue our goals. Did you know that Japan has a network of roads that plays music as you drive over them at the correct speed? What an ingenious idea. Instead of merely penalizing speeding drivers, they reward those who stay within the speed limit. Who doesn’t like cool music? Everyone wins.

When we pursue these goals, we learn to listen and understand others’ viewpoints. We then respond with empathy, not just combative arguments. We learn to perceive what’s felt behind a remark and not merely feel consumed with our counterpoint. In fact, we begin to act, not react to others. It’s what effective leaders do.

Our Take Away

As we work with students, let’s do everything in our power to demonstrate that people can approach an issue differently, remaining civil and even empathetic toward each other. Let’s show our students what civil discourse looks like. Let’s lead the way in both compassion and conviction.

Looking to Develop Character & Leadership in Young Adults?
Check out:
Habitudes: The Art of Self-Leadership

The Art of Self-Leadership helps students and young adults:
  • Build strong character based on integrity and emotional security
  • Develop habits of self-discipline and initiative to achieve their goals
  • Choose their own set of core values for making wise decisions in life.
  • Create an ongoing plan for personal growth outside the classroom
  • Identify their unique strengths and passions for a healthy self-image.
View Free Sample & Order Here

The post Four Guidelines to Making Critical Decisions appeared first on Growing Leaders.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The month of January is named after the Greek god, Janus, who had two heads: one that faced backwards and one that looked forward. It makes sense, doesn’t it? The beginning of our year is always an excellent time to reflect on the past year and set goals to hit in the upcoming year. But, sometimes I meet people who say they aren’t good at setting or reaching goals. The task seems daunting and almost always reinforces their inability to stay on track. It is for those people, I offer this Q and A.

Is it important to set goals?

Yes, I do believe goal setting is important. Without a target, it’s difficult to be intentional about growth. Goals, however, should be a “guide” not a “god.”

For many, the primary difference between work and sports is: goals. In sports, there’s no question about it. Every basketball court has a rim. Every football field has an end zone. Too many U.S. employees go to work having little idea what “winning” looks like. Even for those people who enjoy the journey as much as the destination, I still think we all need a type of GPS in life to keep us on the right path.

Outside of “measurable” and “tangible,” what describes a good goal?

1. Big – They have to engage us at the imagination level.
2. Relevant – Something we want or need to achieve now.
3. Suitable – They have to fit our strengths and passions.
4. Meaningful – Most want to do something very important & almost impossible.

What do you consider to be a great goal?

We must all answer the question: Are we into the destination or just the trip? Some people are into goals and some are just into the journey along the way. In reality, both are important, but choosing the right destination for yourself makes a world of difference in whether you will enjoy the daily grind. Roads can have potholes, curves, rocks and traffic jams. If you’re looking forward to your destination, all those hardships are worth it. We must have a “great goal” that fits who we are.

What’s the difference between a standard and a goal?

Sometimes we need measurable goals, which are objectives that have an end. Once we reach them, the target has been hit. Standards are sustained goals. They are lifestyle aspirations—ones for which we want to live by consistently, without ending.

What are some of your goals and standards for this year?

Each year, I create a list of both goals and standards. My goals are both personal and professional, and my standards are a “bar” I raise for myself as an ongoing way of life. Here are a few of my goals and standards:

A Few of my 2018 Goals

  • Write and publish Habitudes for Life Giving Leaders.
  • Invest in my team weekly and create a personal growth plan for everyone.
  • Read 24 books this year on six categories in which I want to grow.
  • Release two e-books on reducing student anxiety and raising student ethics.

A Few of my Health Standards

  • Weekly workouts to strengthen my abs, arms and heart.
  • Keep blood sugars above 60 and below 140. (I am a type one diabetic.)
  • Two diet soft drink limit each week; drink three bottled waters each day.

A Few of my Family Standards

  • Date my wife once a week.
  • Date with my adult children each month.
  • Family calendar discussion each Sunday.

A Few of my Relationship Standards

  • Meet with my six mentors on a monthly or quarterly basis.
  • Meet one new neighbor in my subdivision and cultivate a friendship.
  • Enjoy coffee with my three closest friends each month.
What makes goals actually work?

One last tip. To list the actions we want to take is actually more transformational than listing the targets we want to hit. Both are important, but many set New Year’s Resolutions and drop them by March.

Each team member at Growing Leaders chooses 3 “big rocks” to measure each week and a dashboard of issues we prioritize (some as a team and some as individuals) that we’ll measure quarterly. We believe the right actions naturally enable us to reach our goals. In short, actions speak louder than goals.

Once you choose a destination, commit to it. Sure—it may change along the way, but the only way you’ll know if a goal is right is to sink your teeth into it and really give it your all. The Scottish mountaineer W. H. Murray wrote, “Until one is committed, there is hesitancy, the chance to draw back, always ineffectiveness. Concerning all acts of initiative (and creation), there is one elementary truth the ignorance of which kills countless ideas and splendid plans: that the moment one definitely commits oneself, then providence moves too. All sorts of things occur to help one that would never otherwise have occurred. A whole stream of events issues from the decision, raising in one’s favor all manner of unforeseen incidents, meetings and material assistance, which no man could have dreamt would have come his way….Whatever you can do or dream you can, begin it. Boldness has genius, power and magic in it!”

Order Now: Marching Off the Map
Inspire Students to Navigate a Brand New World

Our new book is now available! Leading today’s students often feels like being in a new country with old maps that don’t work. Understanding and connecting with the generation in this land is often times frustrating and draining. We need new strategies on how to march off our old maps and create new ones.

From decades of research and hands-on experience, Dr. Tim Elmore and Andrew McPeak collate their conclusions into one resource that helps adults:

  • Inspire students to own their education and their future
  • Lead students from an attitude of apathy to one of passion through metacognition
  • Enable students to push back from the constant digital distractions and practice mindfulness
  • Raise kids who make healthy progress, both emotionally and mentally, through their teenage years
  • Give students the tools to handle the complexities of an ever-changing world
  • Understand and practically apply the latest research on Generation Z
Order Here

The post Choosing the Right Goals This Year appeared first on Growing Leaders.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free year
Free Preview