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Andrew Youdarian, founder of ecommercefuel.com has grown his online community to over 1000 members. In this episode, I interview Andrew to find out exactly how he did that. Hint: he did it in some pretty unconventional ways.

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Andrew Youdarian, founder of ecommercefuel.com has grown his online community to over 1000 members. In this episode, I interview Andrew to find out exactly how he did that. Hint: he did it in some pretty unconventional ways.

Check out this episode with Scott and learn how he built his YouTube channel to over 350,000 subscribers!

The post How Andrew Youdarian Grew His Online Community To Over 1000 Members appeared first on AdWords & Facebook Ad Management - Green Arrow Digital.

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In the podcast:
01:57 – Guest Introduction
05:12 – Stunt Marketing
06:42 – Drop Shipping
08:54 – What Changed in Drop Shipping & E-Commerce
14:37 – Key Ways He Built His Membership Site
17:41 – Digging Deeper with Stunt Marketing
21:01 – What Would Andrew Do Differently Today
23:58 – What Would Ilana Do Differently Today
25:42 – Pain Points to Address to Build Likeability and Trust
31:16 – Perspective on Specific Niches

Andrew Youdarian, founder of ecommercefuel.com has grown his online community to over 1000 members. In this episode, I interview Andrew to find out exactly how he did that. Hint: he did it in some pretty unconventional ways.

How Andrew Youdarian Grew His Online Community To Over 1000 Members in PDF


Ilana:
Welcome to today’s episode, I have a very special guest called Andrew Youderian https://www.ecommercefuel.com/. You might have heard of Andrew before because he runs a very, very popular ecommerce membership. But Andrew has done lots of really interesting things online, which is why I’m so thrilled to have him as a guest on today’s show. So welcome to today’s episode, Andrew.

Andrew:
Yeah, thanks for having me on. This is a traffic and marketing is gonna be fun. I appreciate the invite.

Ilana:
Yeah, it’s awesome. The pleasure is definitely mine. So I am fascinated by people’s journey. And you know, I guess I can relate to ending up somewhere that I never dreamed of. So you and I, both our corporate escapees, being that we used to live in the corporate world. And now we are in very different territory. So do you mind giving us I guess, a brief background about who you are and what you’ve done? And I guess let’s touch on kind of what you do now a little bit.

Introduction

Andrew:
Yeah, absolutely. So it was fun. When we met in Miami, we’re able to share some kind of corporate war stories and in similar histories, and so I got a college went to the finance world that making world for a couple of years. And glad I did it, learned a lot, but quickly decided I did not want to do that for the next 10-20 years. And so I quit, I wasn’t quite sure what I was going to do. I had three options, I was looking at becoming an options trader on my own doing fashion photography, or starting an ecommerce business. And thank goodness that I chose the ecommerce business.

And so about 2008 and launched an ecommerce business selling radio equipment, ran that for a number of years and along the way started a second ecommerce company selling Trolling Motors. And then 2012 with both of those running in the background realized nobody was talking about ecommerce from a from a non corporate non, you know, massive fortune 500 perspective, and so started writing about it. And that kind of turned into a community for experienced store owners.

And so I’ve since sold those other two businesses. And now I focus full time on I’m running our community where we put on events, we’ve got about 10,000 members in the community. And we try to add value through live events. Every year, we have a you know, a conference for our members. Play it a discussion board kind of an in house private forum where all of our members talk and share what’s working, what’s not. And then some software we’ve built to help our members try to find what tools and what SaaS companies and contractors work well for their businesses and which ones to avoid. So that’s that’s kind of a story in a nutshell.

Ilana:
Yeah, interesting. And sure, you’ve definitely seen transformations and iterations over the years of when you had your own ecommerce stores to kind of what ecommerce store owners are doing now. Can you kind of touch on, I guess, your experience of growing the Trolling Motors website? And I guess, how you grew it to the level that it was and other strategies still relevant now?

Andrew:
Yeah, so my background is on the marketing side is largely and I would say two things. SEO based and kind of guerilla marketing, kind of crazy, unusual, stunt marketing more or less, I would say. So the Richard Branson style. So that’s I’ve seen big wins from that and big wins from long term SEO efforts. So both of those brands on the ecommerce side where we’re kind of just old school SEO, writing a lot of articles guest posting, making connections, influencer marketing back in, you know, before it was a term in 2009, or 10.

Remember, we gave away probably, it was a cheap site, and we gave away probably, you know, maybe $1,000 worth of equipment, and they sent us, oh, my goodness, probably $100,000 plus a free traffic over the course of a couple of years. And this is what it was much easier than it is now. So that’s kind of my background is old school SEO to build up both of those sites, both of their traffic. And one of the things was they were both drop ship sites in the, the margins weren’t phenomenal, which makes it hard to buy traffic. And the lifetime value was also not phenomenal, which also makes it hard to buy traffic. So SEO was really the only way to go.

Stunt Marketing

Ilana:
Interesting. So you know, running a community of 1000 odd members, you would hear a lot of discussions about what people are doing now to grow their ecommerce brands. Do you find that those strategies of SEO and what you were doing the stunt marketing? Do you find that your members are doing that kind of stuff still? Does that still work? Or is it getting way, way harder, that that kind of people are moving to other areas?

Andrew:
I SEO still works. But I think the moats that people have built up around those combined with the fact that Google is continually diminishing the organic reach of traffic is it makes it much harder, I’d say it’s exponentially harder than it was 10 years ago, I think, interesting creative, different people are things that you can do still works pretty well, I think it probably works as well as it used to, because there’s so much noise out there that if you have something that’s crazy and different, it can kind of cut through that noise.

So that that can still work. But I think the SEO side is it’s just gotten hard, it’s not impossible. I know people that still invest in, you know, if you start investing in it, and you do it consistently for 12, 24, 36 months, you’re going to see where you’ll definitely see results in ROI. But it’s nowhere near what it used to be.

Drop Shipping

Ilana:
I mean, I remember back in the day way before I started in the PPC journey, I used to also kind of be in the publishing and SEO space. And I mean, I used to be able to rank in a few hours, but man, those days are long gone. You know? (laughs) you think of where it’s come and come from and you know, what you could get away with back then in the in the early days, it just doesn’t fly now. So you know, running your membership with so many ecommerce businesses, you would see such a cross section of, I guess, the types of ecommerce businesses and and their forms of marketing. So you mentioned that drop shipping was not such an all in sales, not such a great model, but the margins were good. And people still doing drop shipping websites these days. Do you see that?

Andrew:
Yeah, good question. So I did a big report this last year called the state of the merchant a couple months ago and pulled 400 plus store owners average revenue, I think was about 3 million. And, and it’s a third year I’ve done it. And so it’s interesting, because I can look at some trends over time. And one of the trends is today, this year was the number of drop shipping companies from year over year, you know, over a 12 month period got cut in half 50% drop, which is crazy. So, definitely, it’s getting harder, more people in manufacturing companies, companies that had their own in house branded product they created was that by you know, 30% plus.

And so a lot of those people, then that the channel, the type of business model is shifting to that for reasons that, you know, I think fairly obvious, but it’s so but but that being said, there are still niches where it you know, it can work, I think it’s really hard to get a drop shipping model business model, correct, because you’ve got to kind of someplace where you can add value while you’re at the same time selling someone else’s product.

So if you’ve got really deep product selection, that Amazon doesn’t have really the product expertise, and you’re somehow able to convince people to even once they know what they need to buy from you that can work or if you have proprietary distribution agreements for manufacturers who aren’t selling on Amazon back and work potentially, it still can work. It’s just it’s tricky to, to find the model and make all those things line up when it does, it’s great. You can run a business from anywhere. You have zero capital investment and you know, it can be a great model, but it’s tricky to get it get all the stars to line up right for in 2019.

What Changed in Drop Shipping & E-Commerce

Ilana:
Why do you think that? What are some of the variables that have changed that have seen a 50% drop in the variables not kind of add up? What do you think has changed in 2019? Now that wasn’t the case years ago,

Andrew:
I think there’s two things the biggest ones Amazon, Amazon solid distribution and a lot of drop shipping sites. There, you know, you’re a middleman right, the value you add a great drop shipping site, they can still survive in 2019 is adding a lot of value and other ways I can talk about super deep selection that no one else has, or expertise or you know, world class website with education. But a lot of them are just, you know, websites with kind of reselling existing products. And if you want to buy a product, you know the name of the product, and you want to get a fair price from someone you trust relatively quickly.

Like where you go? You go to Amazon, and so that’s just destroyed the drop shipping, shipping world. The other thing too is, is selling online has gotten easier. So if I’ve got a brand that I’ve spent a ton of time and pain and energy and sweat and capital to build, and I’ve got my own in house proprietary product, they’re still value it potentially for some people and having dealer networks, but there’s a lot of value for the same brands and selling direct and capturing the margin for themselves, right? And so when it takes, it’s not that difficult to spin up a Shopify site and sell direct a lot of people are going that way too. So I think it’s , you’re getting pressure from both sides.

Ilana:
Interesting. So what do you see, given your exposure to so many ecommerce businesses in all these different industries? What would you say is their biggest struggle in 2019? From a traffic point of view, as a product point of view? What’s the biggest struggle?

Andrew:
That’s a great question, and I’d say the biggest struggle is probably Amazon for most people, I’d say Amazon and traffic in general. With maybe a one behind that being regulatory issues,like sales tax. So an Amazon and traffic kinda kind of go hand in hand a little bit, you know, so many more people are going to Amazon and Amazon’s the ultimate “frenemy”, you can, you can really build a business there that, that does well, that scales incredibly quickly. But you also are giving up the keys to your house in some sense, and that you don’t own the customer. You depend on them for for all your traffic year, you’re building your own asset, you’re leveraging someone else’s, and that can be taken away through suspensions or fees going up or, or you know, any number or Amazon deciding to as they often do, see which one of your products are selling the best and making their own in house brand or or house label brand and, and competing with you.

So I think that’s a big one. I think traffic’s another one because you have three companies that own 80% plus of the web traffic online. And it’s crazy you know. and they all have all three of those increasingly are making you pay to access that traffic. I mean, organic reach on Facebook is not even a thing anymore? Like if you post something to your fans, can you? I mean, if you have, if you have 1000 fans, you might have how many views? I mean, you know this one better than I do Ilana, how many fans? Do you think if you posted something and you have 1000 fans on your Facebook page that would actually see it without paid promotion? 50? 40?

Ilana:
I was gonna say 50. Yeah, is strictly a pay to play platform now. It’s crazy.

Andrew:
It’s nuts. So that is really difficult, because ad costs from that report, for merchants of that size are going up roughly 15% per year, every year, there’s some good things too, in terms of conversion rates seem to be going up and revenue growth seems strong and margin seems steady. But on the paid side, like your traffic, it’s scaring people.

And I think people are increasingly noticing like, this is like this is hard this year, and looking out three, four years. So like, what am I going to do when I have to pay 40%? More for traffic? And I? Yeah, so I think that’s so traffic, Amazon. And then the third one is just sales tax. I know you’re in Australia, the sales tax issue in the United States is just an absolute disaster. And that’s causing a lot of pain and headaches for people and it’s scaring them too.

Ilana:
Yeah, it’s interesting, you know, talking about those three behemoth companies, Google, Facebook and Amazon owning 80% of the web traffic. I mean, I know from running so many ad campaigns that you know, those three companies are the judge and the jury when it comes to traffic. I mean, who are you to dispute what Google or Facebook tell you in terms of the data of how much you paid for a click, you can’t dispute it, there’s no way of verifying it. I know when I’ve run lots of campaigns to act from Facebook, let’s say to Amazon, and Facebook tells me I got this many link clicks at a certain cost per click. And then I go in the back end of Amazon, and the numbers are wildly different. It’s you know that these guys, these companies are the judge and the jury in terms of the data they provide, which is pretty crazy when you think about it.

Andrew:
Yeah, it is crazy. And I mean that the model that Google rolled out with, I don’t know if they were the first one, they must have been one of the first if not the first of an auction based system for advertising was really brilliant, because it’s a great pricing strategy, because they can extract all of the surplus value from the market, right? Like when you didn’t have many people on, it was cheap all the days that Oh, miss the days of AdWords for five cent clicks, because there’s nobody on it right.

And so that was the most people you know, that was the market price. But it’s a really brilliant system, from their point of view, and I got to credit, whoever designed it, but it doesn’t leave a whole lot of surplus on the table, because people will pay just enough, you know, that almost pull all of their margin all their goodwill, all of their profit out of there. And it’s, it’s brilliant for them, but it’s tough for merchants.

Key Ways He Built His Membership Site

Ilana:
Definitely. So let’s talk a little bit about your how you’ve grown your ecommerce full membership, because 1000 members is an amazing achievement, Andrew, so well done on getting to that level of success? What would you say are some of the key ways that you have built that membership? Because building membership is not easy? So what are some of the ways that you’ve done that?

Andrew:
So I think one is just taking a really long term approach. The first year, the community, I started a blog that I spent blogging on for a year before I started the pot, before I started the community and, and taking a long term approach, I think is really important for something like that I didn’t have any network to speak of in the ecommerce space, a few friends that were doing it but you know, less than 10. And, and so I spent a whole year doing nothing but writing really in depth articles and trying to build relationships.

And I spent the first two weeks of I launched the site and then spent two weeks sequestered in a cabin in Arizona, eight hours a day doing nothing but writing a guide and how to pick a niche, which has become pretty woefully outdated at this point, you know, but at the time, I felt like it was a fairly something I felt like I could have charged 100 couple hundred bucks for and the idea was to give it away for free to help drive traffic. And so yeah, big one was just putting out as much value as I could for a year to build connections, build traffic, and build a little bit of a reputation. So that was a big one. The last blog posts were really long, very in depth. And yeah, that was that was kind of the foundational part of it.

Second one, I think was word of mouth. When I think about today, where we get most of our, our leads, like whenever people sign up for our community, our paid community, it’s, they tell us where they came from. And two, there are two that stand out probably attribute to 70, or probably 80% of our referrals, and one is the podcast, I think podcasting is still a pretty good place to be able to connect with people and market your business. second one’s word of mouth referrals.

And just those two I on the podcast, I think you can unless you build rapport with people at a, you know, at scale in a way that’s pretty unique. And word of mouth referrals, I have the fear theory that, obviously that those are the best kind of, you know, the best kind of advertising in the world. But I don’t think people focus on a great product and word of mouth referrals. And I think as online marketing channels get so packed, and crowded and expensive, like we’ve been talking about having just a rock solid, phenomenal product that people can recommend, I think it’s gonna, people are going to start focusing on that, again, more in terms of just especially on marketing jargon perspective.

And the third one is kind of some of those marketing stunts, I don’t know how much you want to get into those. But anytime you can do, there’s been two or three things I’ve done that have been very different and unique and all scary. But they I think they got some pretty big visibility, at least for a short period of time, which, which helped with link building, building up the authority of the ecommerce domain, and also maybe getting the word out there to people.

Digging Deeper with Stunt Marketing

Ilana:
Well, you definitely piqued my curiosity with number 3! (laughs) So well done there. You must be a very good writer. So maybe do you want to kind of give us some ideas of what you mean with that sort of guerilla kind of marketing? start marketing?

Andrew:
Yeah, I think anything you can do that’s totally unusual and different, and puts you in a position of vulnerable is, is good for marketing. And so I’ll give you a couple examples.

One, my trolling motor business, the way I sold, that it wasn’t a real big business, and I decided I wanted to sell it to focus on the other two. And I thought, you know, I could just sell this and kind of go on my merry way. Or maybe there’s some potential here from from something I could do fun on the marketing side. So I thought like, how can you? How could you sell a business in a way that would get a lot of attention and be unusual. And so the idea came up with was to do a totally public sale, everything about the business public, from the you know, the traffic to the financials to the profitability, a few things, I kept private, you know, like our best selling items, things where people could just completely rip off the niche, but for the most part, pretty visible, very visible sale process. And then I ran a reverse auction. So I said, I’m going to start the business at x price, I think I sold it 485,000 bucks, every day, or every week, I don’t get a bid, I’m going to lower the price by $10,000. And the first person to bid on this and accept the price. It’s going to get it and so was able to write it up, it was unusual in those kind of those kind of two regards, it was really scary too.

Because ultimately, like you could sell a really expensive asset. And if nobody bids on it, I mean, it can drop them, you really lose your you lose a lot of money. Anyway, having a little bit an email list and Hacker News and a few other things was able to do that and really blew that up and got a ton of great backlinks. A lot of discussion. It’s you know, it’s something was probably one of my most of my most popular blog posts ever. And I think the ripple effects from from that really helps with marketing in a tremendous way. So things like that you can do that are kind of crazy, totally unorthodox, and obviously, very basically was positioned a niche by niche. But usually I feel like some of the I don’t know if you’ve heard this before, but the best content outline, you gotta be careful here. But a lot of times, like the best stuff, the stuff that does the best for you get the most traction is using stuff you’re the most scared to hit publish on. And I think that’s to some extent true.

Ilana:
That’s really interesting. So did you have a reserve price or a floor price that you were willing to not go under? We willing to go down to like $10?

Andrew:
I did. So it was like I think it was about $100,000 plus or minus right around there. So I did have a reserve price on it. But it was way below if I sold it for that. I mean, it would have been rough, I would have been a terrible, terrible place to sell it at. So I did I did have a little bit of insurance on the downside.

Ilana:
Interesting. I’m just curious, would you do that again? Like was it that effective that you’d probably do that again? No, I guess having done that is the kind of thing that you kind of have to do something different.

Andrew:
I think it would depend on the size of the sale for the size of so there, I was willing to take the risk and willing to give up the information and potentially scare off some buyers who some people saw it and love the approach. Some people are like, I don’t want that business. That’s totally been, you know, aired out in the public. No, thank you.

If the business was in the same size, I would potentially consider doing it again. If it was meaningfully bigger, like let’s say, you know, two to three x bigger or larger, I will probably be a little more careful about especially given that I’ve done it know, it you would depend.

What Would Andrew Do Differently Today

Ilana:
Interesting. So let me ask you this question and might be a bit of a tough question. If you were starting your ecommerce fuel membership from scratch now in 2019, with a sort of no email list or no traffic, what’s something that you would do in 2019? That taught to start it from scratch? Like if you were starting again? What would you do? Sorry, if that’s an unfair question. (laughs)

Andrew:
No, no, it’s a great question. I think…do I have? Do I have a network of people? Or am I starting in my..

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In the Podcast:

03:03 – Introduction
07:55 – How Appearing into Mainstream Media Does to your Authority
11:27 – Quantifying Authority
15:34 – Certain Types of Business that Media Outlets are not Interested In
17:27 – Good Starting Point To Leverage Media
33:07 – Next Step for the Outreach into Mainstream Media
38:49 – Importance of Social Media Profiles
45:24 – Further Steps to Get into Media
53:11 – Content Ideas On the Media
56:22 – Closing and Where You Can Learn More About Josh Elledge

Josh Elledge knows a thing or two about being featured in mainstream media – he has been on TV over 2000 times! In this episode, I ask him what are some of the best ways business owners can also get featured on traditional media platforms and the best steps to take.

How To Get Featured In Mainstream Media with Josh Elledge in PDF


Ilana:
So today’s episode is a little bit different. Actually, I’m interviewing a guy called Josh Elledge, who runs upmyinfluence.com an agency, I guess you could call him an agency. Well, his business helps people gain authority and influence by getting on traditional media, be it TV and radio. So I thought it’d be interesting to talk to him because although the work that I do, and the strategies that I talked about on these podcasts is all about paid media, and online advertising and all that kind of stuff. The work that Josh does, I could see is really tying in very closely to paid media as well. So using mainstream media, in conjunction with online advertising. So Josh is an interesting guy. I actually met him recently in San Diego, and he’s been featured on TV radio more than 2000 times. So he certainly knows a thing or two about how to get on such Television shows. And I kind of press him quite hard in this interview in terms of what are some actionable steps that people can take to improve their chances on getting picked up by mainstream media, and getting the opportunity to illustrate their expertise in such media that would really, I think, do wonders for their online advertising as well. So I don’t think it’s one or the other, I actually see how the work that Josh does can really be used side by side with the stuff that we talk about. So let’s not waste any more time. Let’s get stuck straight in today’s show.

Josh:
Ilana, thank you so much for having me!

Introduction

Ilana:
The pleasure is definitely mine. We met recently, or a few months ago, in San Diego, we were both speaking at Social Media Marketing World, talking about different topics, but related topics. So I thought this is exactly the person that I want to interview because you are all about how to leverage mainstream media for against building authority and revenue, etc. And I can really see how that would tie in beautifully into paid traffic campaign. So that’s what we’re going to be talking about today. Do you want to kind of give me I guess, a quick, high level overview of kind of who you are and what you do?

Josh:
Yeah, so about 11-12 years ago, I started a company called Savings Angel. And when I started that company, this actually, I think, predates the rise of Facebook. And so I was in a dilemma where I needed visibility, we’d created a website that would help consumers cut their grocery bill in half. But, you know, as I mentioned, I just didn’t have any money for advertising. And so what do you do when you want to get visibility, but you don’t have any money? Well, that’s a pickle. And so what I did is I just started reaching out to anyone I could who had an audience, and I said, Look, I’d love to advertise. But I don’t quite have the budget for that, is there any way that I could create content, and that there would be content would be so good, that the audience would just love it. And you know, we could really focus on delivering super high value that way. So I reached out to radio stations, news magazines, newspapers, TV stations, blogs, you know, influencer, blogger, influencers at the time, really anyone I could, who would be willing to work with me.

And so I would do segments where I would come up with, for example, you know, how to get Cheerios for 50 cents a box, how to get breakfast cereal for 50 cents a box, how to get, you know, laundry detergent for 90% off. And so if I explained how to do that each and every week, I would say, okay, well, you know, just go to this website, grab this coupon, bring into this store, and you get your groceries for pennies on the dollar, it became actually a very popular segment. And so I actually did that. And it actually started making a lot of money for me. And I was thrilled at that, because, you know, flash forward many years later, and we’ve now generated over $6 million in revenue, and I’ve spent less than $500 in advertising, I just have never needed to do paid ads, I could, you know, we boost and we you know that $500 maybe we boosted a couple of posts or something like that. But But really, it’s just all about, you know, how can I really step up my game and become an indispensable source for audiences.

And if I do that enough, then I start to build my authority, and I start to build my own brand and my own name. And so then when I do get more visibility opportunities, I kind of leverage the fact that the audience kind of already knows me. And so I can start at a higher level, right, rather than having to start from scratch with everybody, which you know, and again, in the world of paid advertising, this lends itself quite a bit to that subject. Because, you know, you can pay a lot per lead, or you could pay a little per lead. And if, if that audience has already kind of warmed up to you, they’ve already built up a little bit of know, like and trust for you, then you’re just simply not going to have to pay as much and that’s my goal is I now, I’m in a position, you know, I’ve been in the media Now, over 2000 times, I started serving pro bono in our local startup community. And just over five years ago, I started a company called Up My Influence, where that’s our focus is we turn entrepreneurs and executives into media celebrities. And the reason why we want to do that is because we want them to just experience what it’s like to be celebrated everywhere they go. And Ilana you and I had the pleasure of seeing Mark Schaefer, you may be familiar with Mark Schaefer, Marketing Rebellion and if you look at the latest research for advertisers, it’s, you know, it’s a different world when it comes to consumer behavior. And, you know, 11-12 years of background in studying consumer behavior and leading consumer behavior, I can tell you exactly what’s going on, and why it’s happening, and why advertisers really need to pay attention to their authority. And it’s just not enough to design better and better ads today.

How Appearing into Mainstream Media Does to your Authority

Ilana:
I couldn’t agree with you more, which is, I guess, a huge admission from someone that like me, who runs a paid, who’s done a lot of paid advertising. And I guess I kind of see the merits in building authority and then leverage that authority with paid advertising, I kind of see them working really well together rather than one or the other, you know, using authority and using media outlets to try and send people to your website to then build the retargeting list. And it’s a completely different remarketing campaign when you’ve got authority, and it’s like fanning that fire, you know. So, you know, I think everyone could agree they can see the merits as to why you would want to do this, they kind of seem obvious. If you’re starting out, what would be the first step, I guess, I mean, is it really just as straightforward as contacting some radio stations? I would imagine these people like inundated with requests.

Josh:
No, no, it’s even further back Ilana and let me kind of shift someone’s thinking here a little bit. Because most people when they think of being in the media, or public relations, or visibility, they think about it from the perspective of, I’m going to get in front of audiences, and I’m going to get a bunch of people that are going to buy my stuff as a result of it. They look at it as a way of lead generation. Listen, yes, when you get on stages, and you get in front of people, are you going to be exposed to new audiences? Yeah, absolutely. However, that is only just one of maybe five or six areas where you as a personal brand, or you as your company, are getting value, you know, some other areas of values, you’re building a relationship with an influencer, if you’re working with a producer or writer, you know, an Instagram macro influencer, a YouTuber that’s got a big audience. It’s really, you know, when I talk about working with the media, it’s really a function of connecting with influencers.
And those influencers could be in traditional media, they can be in social media, it’s really irrelevant, the rules are pretty much the same. So one of the areas that I really think is the most undervalued aspect of working on large stages is what it does to your authority. And if we, as entrepreneurs, and executives and professionals were to focus on and just say, everything needs to lead toward growing my authority, what would happen a year from now, what’s going to happen a year from now, if you’ve invested everything into growing your personal brand, and growing the brand of your business, is you’re going to find that everything in life is just easier. So for example, you know, you Ilana you had the opportunity to speak at Social Media Marketing World and I suspect that you’ve also gone to conferences, where perhaps you’ve been just another face in the crowd. And it’s a completely different experience. I’ve gone and I’ve been a keynote speaker at conferences, and let me tell you, you just get treated differently. So your opportunity for partnerships for new clients, it just goes way up. When you get that celebration of who you are. That’s what our focus is on.

Quantifying Authority

Ilana: I guess it’s also somewhat hard to quantify. How do you quantify your authority? How is one media outlet more authority building than another? Yeah. How does one decide, you know, that your starting point?

Josh:
Well, so there is media and visibility, like working with influencers, there’s stuff that you do for visibility, like, I’m going to do this and this would be particularly like, let’s say, you’re working with an Instagram influencer, for example, you’re not going to get a lot of authority out of that, you’re not going to get a lot of authority out of being on Facebook. Why? because anybody can be on Facebook, anyone could technically work with an influencer. However, those are actually good avenues to get immediate sales. But what we ultimately want to do is we want to do that while we are working on our authority, because your authority is going to make your sales funnel actually work so much better. And so and here’s how you quantify it. So let’s say that your paid traffic is going to a lead capture page. And so this is something you can test. What would happen, if you had, you know, let’s say, for example, Sydney’s biggest newspaper for, you know, you were quoted there, you were quoted on the morning TV news, you were quoted in TechCrunch. And, a number of other, you know, popular and respected news outlet online. Well, if you put, let’s say, you put five or six logos on your lead capture page, you could do an A B test on that. And I can tell you, from my experience, that it is almost always going to improve your conversion rate by 10,15,20% and so now you look at increasing your bottom line by 10,15,20% that makes a difference.
And I’ll tell you, that when you can lead with your authority and Ilana if you do this, right, you’ll actually get people like, I’m going to talk specifically to people who do eventually, they need to talk with somebody on a call or on zoom or something like that. And they need to have like part of a sales process. So like, you’re going to be talking with somebody before they purchase your product or service. When somebody, we have a potential client who respect to you because of you, you’ve gotten those indicators of authority, you’re just going to experience a different kind of call, like I’ve done Facebook advertising way back when I absolutely had no authority. And it was, you know, targeting a new audience. They didn’t know who I was, it wasn’t using my authority wasn’t leading with my authority.

And I literally had people on the call, they’re like, okay, well, what are you selling, and they just, they had almost like, it’s such a difference for me. And then I’ve had people in Ilana, I’m sure you’ve had this as well, where somebody is actually seeing you on stage, or they they’ve seen you profiled somewhere. And when you get on the phone with them, they’re almost a little star struck to talk with you. I want that for people, I want that certainly for our clients. But I want everybody to be celebrated for the work that they do. And so if you communicate because, again, people are going to follow your lead. People don’t know whether or not they don’t know, what category to put you in? Are you you know, an a-list in the world of business, are you B, C, D, you know, or maybe F. And so, if you’re an active listener, you know, again, be prepared for very difficult phone, sales conversations. Again, if you’re respected, you’ve got and we’ll talk about where there’s where that authority comes from, there’s actually three different areas. But when people can sense it, it’s just you don’t have to be very good at sales, people just naturally are gravitated towards you because they feel like you’ve got the momentum. And they want a part of it.

Certain Types of Business that Media Outlets are not Interested In

Ilana:
Okay, so here’s a question. Are there any certain types of businesses that you think media outlets would not be interested in?

Josh:
No, no, I don’t, because and the reason why is we could break down media, again, into several different categories. So you’ve got and again, I think the more appropriate word that we’ve learned to use is, because when we started off, we were like, well, Josh has been in the media over 2000 times will focus on media, well, that’s kind of a loaded term, when in fact, all we really want is we want to be celebrated on stages of some sort. And so again, those can be virtual, they can be social media, YouTube, whatever it is, we don’t I mean, we’ve made connections with huge YouTubers, we’ve made connections with getting our clients on reality TV shows we’ve made, you know, we’ve gotten our clients on every possible type of traditional media you can think of, you know, in big Instagramers, and so no, I don’t think there’s anybody that is, you know, would be hands off. Now, you could even look at maybe specific industry, niche news websites, for example, some, there is a stage for you somewhere, I don’t care what it is that you do, there is an audience that wants to hear what you have to share.
And so my job is to work with that person, get them from behind their computer screen, I’m sorry, you can get up to a certain level, I think it’s very, you know, in today’s economy, you can absolutely get up to a six figure income behind your computer screen. But eventually, if you want to get to seven figures, you’re going to need to get out from behind your computer screen. And you’re just going to need to start being an industry thought leader, an industry expert, and start serving the broader community and start serving other audiences.

Good Starting Point To Leverage Media

Ilana:
Okay, I totally see your point. So say, someone who’s got a training business, what would be a good starting point for the leverage media?

Josh:
Well, okay, so there’s a couple things I want to talk about number one is going to be audience selection. So I’m going to talk about that first. And then number two, don’t let me forget this is I want to talk about, you know, kind of these first steps on what someone will say their early stage in their business, what should they be doing first? So the first thing I’m going to talk about here is audience selection. How do you know where to go? How do you know who to serve? So the idea here is that you want to go where your audience is already pre congregated. So somebody, yeah, somebody’s already done the work for you. They’ve already pulled together, as long as you know who your audience is. You want to say, Where did these people go? So for example, Savings Angel, my audience, moms in the suburbs, I’ve been working with moms for 12 years. I love working with moms, I love, you know, even as a guy, even as a dad, you know, I just I absolutely love serving that audience have a heart for it. Like it’s just part of my calling. So I have learned that to reach that audience. I need to be on local TV, I need to work with mom bloggers, I need to work with bloggers that focus and social media celebrity, you know, social media influencers, who talk about shopping, saving, makeup, you know, mom things, parenting type things. And and I found that regards to TV, it’s that 9am to 10am hour. And that, let me tell you Ilana that has been my sweet spot for 12 years, is I have done over 700 TV segments in that 9am to 10am hour because that is when apparently my audience watches TV. They’re home with the baby. You know, I generally work with moms that are kind of getting into that nesting phase of life. And so that is absolutely been perfect audience for me. Okay, so that’s just my example of audience selection. And that’s an important concept to know. Because, again, you don’t want to spend your wheels waste your time talking to an audience that could care less about what you have to say.

So that’s an important question you have to remember, now let’s talk about the first things you should do. And what’s really important to understand before I get into that is where authority comes from, where are today’s indicators of authority, and they come from three places. Number one, it is going to win, this is what people are going to look for and Mark Schaefer talks about this. in Marketing Rebellion, you have to understand that consumers have become more guarded more protected, more protective of themselves than ever before. It’s because we’ve all wasted time with them. You know, we’ve all bought courses or whatever that, you know, we’ve just wasted money, we’ve wasted time, and we’re bombarded with advertising messages. So in the United States, the American Marketing Association, has estimated that consumers are actually exposed to up to 10,000 marketing messages every single day. And so we have learned to really shield ourselves from being sold to so anything that sounds feels, looks or smells like an ad, instantly, our guard goes up. And so how do we get beyond that? Well, we have to, we have to earn trust. And so that comes to we call indicators of authority. And this is what people are going to look look for. So let’s say for example, Ilana you send me an email, and I don’t otherwise know you, and your offers not bad. It’s, you know, it’s a fine offer, you’re just like, Hey, you know, notice that you know, you’ve got some visibility going on, you’re doing some good things, you’re just wanting to find out if you happen to be doing paid advertising right now, would love to see if I could offer you maybe some free tips or, you know, love to chat with you just to see if there’s any, any way I could help you. That’s it’s a very benevolent offer. There’s nothing wrong with that offer. And so, here’s what I’m going to do.

And this is what everybody does. And we all think that we’re unique in this. And we all think that we have this superhuman skill to read other people, but we’re all doing the same thing. Okay, so number one, here’s what we look for. We look for indicated, first thing, we look for our indicators of success. And so I’m going to look at your signature, I’m going to click on your website, I’m going to look at your website, and I’m going to look for a you know, is Ilana actually successful at what she does? Or is she brand new at what she does? And there’s no right or wrong year. But it’s going to start building this picture. And it’s amazing, because people will actually spend, like, 10-20 minutes checking somebody out. When they could very, you know, again, it take like five seconds to hit reply and say, Okay, sure. You know, again, because we want to protect ourselves, we want to kind of do some sleuthing, before we engage with anybody. So we look for indicators of success.
So how do we figure that out? We’re looking for reviews, we’re looking for testimonials we’re looking for, you know, is there some kind of is, are there handshakes going on? is there some award some kind of success, we’re going to look to see if your business is actually thriving in some way. So we’re going to just look for clues. And and Ilana you, I, all of us, we give off what I call poker tells, right? Like there’s, it’s really easy to figure somebody out today on the internet. And so number one, again, is those indicators of success. Number two, everybody looks for social proof. So generally, what I do, lot of people do the same thing is I go to a website, and I’m like, okay, looks pretty good. And then what I do is, so I click on, maybe I click on your social media and again, maybe marketers do this a little bit more than other people. But I will generally make a decision about somebody based on what kind of follower count and what kind of engagement they have going on. And so I’ll click on a Twitter account. And it’s amazing how many social media marketing agencies, I’ll click and look at their social media. And it’s under 1000. And, you know, that’s not a bad thing. I mean, we all start at some point, but it just starts to paint this picture. And so we develop an idea of what somebody is worth today, based on this new digital currency. So I click on Twitter, Facebook, Instagram, YouTube, you know, whatever is available, I’m gonna check it out. And then I’m going to say, okay, they are probably earlier in their business.

And so unfortunately, someone may make a decision that that that person isn’t worth as much. And by the way, Ilana I need to let you know, a lot of what I’m talking about, it sounds very superficial, and you’re right, it is. But we all do it. And so, you know, don’t hate the you know, what’s the expression, don’t hate the game with don’t hate the player hate the game. It’s just the way that it is. But this third thing is, would be associations. And so you have an association with Social Media Marketing World, that is a huge feather in your cap, that when somebody learns that you out of all of the marketers on the planet, were hand selected, to talk about this area of expertise that is a huge association bump. So, you know, and I think we should all do it, you know, again, if we’re responsible for, you know, marketing or growth of our company. You know, sometimes we struggle with celebrating our successes, or celebrating our, you know, some of these things. And, you know, a lot of times, it’s important for someone like me to come along as say, No, no, that logo really needs to be on your front page, people need to know that about, you know, know that actually, you need to talk about that in your social media. People want to know that about you. This isn’t bragging it, what it is, it’s trust building,..

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In the Podcast:

00:46 – Intro
05:41 – Which Type Of Business LinkedIn Ads Are Perfect For
07:41 – Difference of LinkedIn Ads vs. Facebook Ads
11:14 – How to Distinguish Leads from Different Platforms
12:00 – What Types of Offers Works Best in LinkedIn Ads
16:14 – How is LinkedIn in terms for Retargeting
18:22 – Recommended Ad Types in LinkedIn
20:12 – Paying for Impressions
21:38 – Recommended Ad Format
27:12 – LinkedIn Ads Still Needs Catching Up
29:54 – Why LinkedIn Ads are Expensive
31:37 – What Type of Ad Copy Works
35:42 – Experimenting with Ad Copy and Addressing The Pain Points
38:28 – Ideal Audience Size
41:41 – Optimizing Ads in LinkedIn
43:24 – Elaborating Further With The Offers

AJ Wilcox and I discuss all about LinkedIn Ads. We discuss who the platform is best for, which ad placements are best and also which ad types convert the best. If you’ve thought about running LinkedIn ads, you definitely don’t want to miss this episode. AJ shares lots of nuggets of gold.

All You Need To Know About LinkedIn Ads With AJ Wilcox in PDF


Intro

Ilana:
Welcome back to another episode of Talking Web Marketing. Today, I have a very interesting episode and I interview a guy called AJ Wilcox. And if you’ve been in this space for a little while, you might have heard of AJ, because He is an expert in LinkedIn ads, he runs a dedicated LinkedIn ad agency called https://b2linked.com/. And that’s all they do. So I thought I had a specialized agency doing Google ads and Facebook ads. And that’s it, AJ is gone even more specialized, and he only does LinkedIn ads. So if you’ve thought about running LinkedIn ads, or if you’re currently running any LinkedIn ads, you definitely want to listen to this episode, because AJ is definitely an expert in it. And we talk about lots of nuggets of gold, which I’m sure you can apply to your existing campaigns, if you’ve got them running, or also apply to your new campaigns that you might be thinking of implementing. We talked about a ton of information. So don’t worry about making writing down notes and and jotting down the information, you can just download the show notes that we are going to prepare for you on our website, you can go to https://greenarrowdigital.com/, and find the episode on our website. And you can download the show notes there. So let’s not wait any longer. Let’s get stuck in today’s episode.

AJ:
Thanks so much a lot. I can’t tell you how thrilled I am to be chatting with you today!

Ilana:
This really is for me, let me tell you, because I’ve been wanting to talk to someone about LinkedIn ads, and you by world renowned expert on LinkedIn ads, and the number one person to talk to you. So thank you for taking the time to come on our show. The thrill is mine to have you on. So you want to give us a quick background about you and what you do and how you got into this.

AJ:
Yeah, sure thing. So I’m a long time digital marketer, I mean, long time in our industry is 12 years. I started out as an SEO guy, I really liked search. And then I kind of stumbled onto business to business about seven years into my career. And on my very first day of a job as a digital marketing manager, I was talking to my CMO and laid out all my digital marketing strategy. And she was like, Okay, that sounds great. Go ahead and execute it. But just so you know, we just started a pilot with LinkedIn ads. So see what you can do. And I saluted and said, Yes, ma’am. But I walked out of her office and went, What is a LinkedIn ads, I’ve never I certainly didn’t want to look stupid to my new boss. So I jumped in. And I did my due diligence in the platform. And about two weeks later, I had a new sales rep come up to me, and who said, Hey, AJ, we don’t know what you’re doing over here. But we’re fighting over your leads, keep it up. And so I went and started doing my research trying to figure out what what leads is this guy talking about. And I found them, every single one of them was sourced from LinkedIn ads. And that was not the only channel I was running.

So that was like my first glimmer of, ooh, maybe there’s something more here that I should be paying attention to. Long story short, just kept investing, kept investing and growing that account until I grew it to become LinkedIn largest spending customer worldwide. And after running that account for about two and a half years, I actually ended up getting laid off. And so after getting laid off, I kind of went to my wife with three kids and one on the way. And I was like, I’m a breadwinner without any bread. No, what do we do? And she was like, I’d like you to go get another job. And so I I interviewed got four job offers. Yeah, we’re, we’re pretty religious people. And so we actually ended up praying about the opportunities and just felt prompted to like, turn them all down, which was kind of sad, because two of them for for way more money than I was making before. But, you know, then I started thinking like, well, I’ve got this skill around LinkedIn ads, and no one else in the world seems to be doing anything about this. Maybe that should be me. And so we prayed about that opportunity. And it was like, yeah, that’s what you’re supposed to be doing. So I call myself an accidental entrepreneur. I never thought I would be out on my own. But here I am, you know, four and a half years later, we started bt, LinkedIn. It’s an ad agency that literally, the only thing we do is LinkedIn ads.

Ilana:
Yeah. Interesting. I mean, that’s amazing, I guess, journey and specialty. And I guess I also kind of call myself, the accidental entrepreneur as well, where I also had zero intention of starting my own business, but the decision was made for me three different circumstances. But that’s okay. We all got there in the end, right?

AJ:
That’s right,

Which Type Of Business LinkedIn Ads Are Perfect For

Ilana:
and never, never looked back. So as somebody who also has a very specialized agency, like we only do Google ads, and Facebook ads, it’s interesting to talk to someone like you only does LinkedIn ads. And I can definitely see the merits in becoming a specialist in just one platform. Maybe the best place for us to start, because I’ve actually talked to lots of clients who’ve sort of had the idea of maybe LinkedIn ads could could be good for our business. Who do you think LinkedIn ads is perfect for? And who is it not perfect for?

AJ:
Perfect. So whenever I’m talking to someone, usually, these are people who are coming to seek me out because they want to do LinkedIn ads. And some of the very first questions I’m asking them is, you know, number one, who is your target audience, because the whole beauty behind LinkedIn ads is the targeting. And if they bring a targeting, that doesn’t make sense, it’s not an exact fit, then I know, kind of like one strike against them, like maybe this isn’t the right channel for them. The next thing is, they’ve got to have a pretty high lifetime value of a customer, or a large deal size. Because as many of you probably know, LinkedIn ads are just really expensive. Here in the US the average cost per click somewhere between about $6-$9, depending on an audience, and some people are paying more like 11 to 13. You know, if they’ve got really competitive audiences, so..

Ilana:
that’s not much compared to Google search.

AJ:
Oh, it’s true. But then on Google search, you’ve got this intent behind it, like someone sought you out because they’ve, they have a problem that you can solve. And so you can send them right to a contact page, or right to a buying page. But on LinkedIn, we’re trying to get their attention. And we don’t know where they’re at in the buying cycle. So the the deal sizes take longer to close. So I really do like search in conjunction with social, just because there’s some variety there and, and kind of a very different type of lead. But, but yeah, lower than, than a lot of search. But it’s also lower intent. So you know, there’s some gives and takes for sure.

Difference of LinkedIn Ads vs. Facebook Ads

Ilana:
So it’s kind of like Facebook ads, in that it’s some interruption type marketing, but without the cheaper cost per click.

AJ:
Exactly, Facebook is a much closer analogy to LinkedIn, it’s, it would be like Facebook, with a much better b2b targeting set. But with the cost being higher, the one advantage that LinkedIn does have is that when you’re on LinkedIn, you’re in the right mindset, you’re thinking about work. Whereas on Facebook, someone could easily be off to look at pictures of grandkids, or, you know, trying to play Farmville or something along those lines. But LinkedIn, there’s usually very few other purposes aside from just work.

Ilana:
Yes. It’s funny, because I have, obviously dabbled with trying to accommodate Facebook ads for b2b, you know, and sort of targeting people by job title, etc. And it’s not entirely accurate. For example, I was once trying to target people by the job title, CEO. And this is quite a large audience that fits into that sort of targeting criteria. And I could see these people that were engaging with the advice, like, who liking it. And so you sort of have a look at these people, we have a look at their profile, and like, they didn’t really look like CEO, like I can’t articulate it without kind of graphically showing you. And then I sort of look what’s going on here, Facebook, why? Why are you showing my ads to people like this? And then I look in their profile, it says, CEO of Love. So I would imagine at least that people’s LinkedIn profile job titles would be somewhat more accurate than Facebook.

AJ:
Yeah, so that’s absolutely correct. I mean, people will tend to kind of play around in the business section of Facebook, but on LinkedIn, you know, these are your colleagues. So you’re pretty straightforward about what your job title is, and what your experience look like. And so what we see is people are right now in business to business paying between about $1 to per click to be on Facebook, and the sales team is telling them, Hey, guys, the leads here aren’t that great. And that’s usually because the targeting isn’t amazing for b2b. And so if you’re paying one to $2, click on Facebook, or you’re paying six to nine on LinkedIn, but the LinkedIn quality of leads is, you know, at least three to 10 times higher than all of a sudden that makes sense to start exploring.

Ilana:
Yeah, hence, I guess, the need to look at the entire funnel, etc. To see the you know, I guess you can perhaps distinguish between the leads that you’re getting from LinkedIn and leads from Facebook to compare the quality because it is all about quality, not quantity, really.

AJ:
Yes. And that really is gold that you just brought up. Because if you are not tracking your leads all the way down the funnel, if you’re not tracking to at least like a cost per sales, qualified lead, you’re going to absolutely miss the whole value of of what LinkedIn provides. And, and I’m okay with that. I mean, if if the less sophisticated advertisers are looking at it going, ooh, our cost per lead was three times higher on LinkedIn, let’s shut it down. They’re staying out of my auctions. And I’m getting lower cost per click on my other clients. So please feel free. But if you are a sophisticated marketer, you want to to, you know, track all the way down the funnel and actually see what’s leading the business. Most of the time, LinkedIn starts looking really good, especially if you’ve got that large deal size, and the audience that’s that’s, you know, easily definable by who they are professionally.

How to Distinguish Leads from Different Platforms

Ilana:
Yes. What would you say is the simplest way for people to distinguish their leads from the different platforms? Do you create separate landing pages, or do you do more do it on the back end, tagging wise,

AJ:
We pretty much handle it, however, the client wants to handle it. But I really like going off of a single landing page, that way, we know that all traffic from all channels is going to the same place. And so that’s a standard that’s a, you know, something we can hold, hold a steady. And then all of our traffic we’re sending with custom UTM parameters, even unique to every single ad that we publish. So as long as their landing page is passing that information into the CRM, then we’ve got a really accurate method of tracking we can use.

What Types of Offers Works Best in LinkedIn Ads

Ilana:
Awesome. So as we both know, that perhaps others don’t so intimately know like you and I do that your ads are as good as your offer. So it is all about getting an offer that converts and therefore obviously putting in front of the right people, but no amount of good targeting. And no amount of amazing ad copy is going to work if your offer is not compelling to people. So given that, what do you say working on LinkedIn as in terms of an offer,

AJ:
Oh Ilana, you are speaking my language here. You preach sister. Yeah. So I mean, you couldn’t have said it better than than that. When a client brings us a bad offer. There’s only so much lipstick that we can put on that pig, there’s only so much performance that we can sway by just the message the the ad copy itself. But client brings us a great offer, we can do no wrong, we can put misspellings, we could you have not even put a call to action in there. And and even then it’s still going to perform really well. So you can cover a multitude of sins with a good offer, the best kinds of offers we found. So I like to picture this, this scale, in my mind of offers from least amount of friction to the most amount of friction. And those at the very least amount of friction would be like here, just come read this blog post we wrote or come look at this infographic. And we know that that provides a lot of goodwill to the, to the visitors. But on the other hand, you’re paying $6-$9 to send someone to something that has a an inherently weak call to action.

And so eventually, at some point, you’re gonna have to look at the metrics and say, ooh, we’re paying $1,000 per conversion here, maybe that’s not sustainable. And on the absolute opposite end of the spectrum, you have offers like talk to a sales rep, open up your wallet, for any reason, take a take a demo, we’re trial some software. And these are things that because LinkedIn is interrupted, they provide no inherent value to the prospect. And so there’s no reason for them to click on the ad. And so what happens then is just that one clicks your ads, and so LinkedIn just kind of shuts them off. So the goal then of your asset is to be somewhere in between somewhere in kind of the mid friction level, where you’re at least going to get an email address out of them for your money. But it’s also not so friction prone that people aren’t willing to do it. The types of content that we’ve seen work really well are things like, here’s a free checklist or a cheat sheet, a free guide had a webinar, a free in person event, a white paper webinar, things like that work really well.

Ilana:
Okay. And then obviously, on the webinar, the goal of the webinar is to move them to the next point. Do you think people that were in that frame of mind when they’re on LinkedIn, to watch a webinar? I mean, would it be something that what straight away or will register for a webinar at a later date?

AJ:
You know, I think it has to be register at a later date. And it doesn’t have to be like a certain amount of time in the future. What we found is, if we put up a webinar, if we put up ads for a webinar, that’s a month out, we’ll have a chunk of registrations right at the beginning, from people who are like, Ooh, this looks interesting. Let me get it on my calendar. And then we’ll have a nice lol, and then a chunk of registrations at the last minute right there at the end. And the reason why we want to run it for an entire month is because people on average, only login to LinkedIn, like one to four times a month. And so you know, make sure that you give them enough time, like give everyone a chance to see it. But yeah, that’s that’s the goal, get someone to register. If you have something that’s on demand, like, Hey, you registered, you can watch it right now, if you want, all of a sudden all of the urgency goes out the window, and your conversion rates go down. So as a annoying it is as it is because we have the technology to do these on demand webinars, I would say actually do an a webinar at a certain time. And, you know, put it on, don’t try to just let people watch it in their own time because they won’t do it.

How is LinkedIn in terms for Retargeting

Ilana:
Interesting. How is LinkedIn in terms of their retargeting so could you say, you know, social ad to register for the webinar? Let’s say in five days time, could you then re target to them saying hey, you know, we thought to the day.

AJ:
LinkedIn retargeting is not very good right now. So I don’t, I don’t think I would go that direction. And the limitations are pretty simple. It’s a cookie based type of retargeting, which means that your browser has to be able to accept a cookie, and you have to keep it in order to be in that audience. And we know that half of pretty much everyone who interacts with our ads is on an iOS device, like iPhone or iPad. And so immediately how our audience has gone, we also know that the cookies only live for about 90 days. So that’s a lot of money to invest into something that just evaporates after a quarter. So my recommendation then is go ahead and send the traffic from LinkedIn because it’s the best targeting in the world we can make sure exactly the right people are seeing it. But then rely on both your Google that the Google Display Network and Facebook custom audiences retargeting to then nurture those leads, and then you really could get that specific.

Ilana:
Interesting. I did not know that their retargeting was so bad. That’s really, I guess it’s an area that they will hopefully be developing because as somebody who does a lot of retargeting on Google and Facebook were huge amounts of ROI are captured like that would be serious, low hanging fruit for LinkedIn.

AJ:
Absolutely. And I think what it really comes down to is that retargeting is all about staying top of mind. And on a platform like LinkedIn, where people are logging in one to four times a month, there’s not much of an opportunity to actually stay top of mind with people. But across the entire GDN. Yes, please. And across all of Facebook and Instagram. Absolutely. I think the opportunities are simply better. So even if LinkedIn is retargeting was top shelf, amazing, I would probably still say, Yeah, I’d still rather augment it with both Google and Facebook.

Recommended Ad Types in LinkedIn

Ilana:
Cool. Okay, so we’ve talked about what would be a good offer. So something which we could definitely exchange some content for an email address, as you said, now that we’ve kind of identified what offer we’re going to show people, what are some of the different types of ad types that you would recommend for that type of offer? I know LinkedIn has a number of different ad types, some which you recommend is a, which you definitely don’t recommend to maybe touch on on that.

AJ:
Absolutely. So let’s start with what I recommend most of the time, there’s an ad format called sponsored content. And it shows up just right in your newsfeed. So think of it like a like a Facebook promoted post. And it has quite a few different flavors, they have video, they have carousel and just the single image. If I were you and you are just getting started, I would start out with single image because it’s the easiest to troubleshoot. And it’s the simplest just to understand. So if you can start out with your absolute core audience, the people who have the bleeding next that you have the the bandage to solve with the right offer. And the simplest message, I think you’re setting yourself up for a really solid test. And the sponsored content, you’ll expect to have a click through rate anywhere, probably in the range of about a half of a percent. It’s technically like point three 9% is average. But most of what our team launches lands anywhere between about a point eight and a 1.2%. So it’s really not that hard to outperform the average, there must be some bad advertisers out there. And you’ll probably end up paying 6$-$9 a click for that traffic. But it’s just a really happy medium. It’s LinkedIn most versatile ad format, and kind of middle of the road cost with a good deal of reach, that’s probably a great place to start.

Paying for Impressions and Recommended Sponsored Content

Ilana:
Okay. Do you pay for impression?

AJ:
You can choose to pay by the impression, I would recommend starting paying by the click though. The reason why is because LinkedIn auction isn’t that kind to the impression. So what I found is, as soon as you beat the click the sorry, the average click through rate of the network by two and a half to three times, that’s when it becomes cheaper to bid by the impression than it does by the click. So we will start out bidding cost per click. And as soon as we see a click through rate over like 1%, then we go cool. This is right for for bidding CPM, and getting a nice little discount on our effective CPC’s.

Ilana:
But I guess that’s a good strategy. Because if you been whatever is that range, the $6-$9 per click, can you get no clicks, then you know something’s wrong with either your offer or your copy.

AJ:
Exactly. Yes, the easiest way to troubleshoot something, it’s like you just go top to bottom, you look at am I getting impressions from the network? Cool. And then now am I getting enough clicks? And are those clicks? cost effective enough? Okay, cool. And then you start getting conversions. And then after you get conversions, then you start seeing, like marketing qualified leads get enough of those, you get down to sales qualified leads. So at any step of the way, if there’s an inefficiency, you can spot it just by you know, just watching that data aggregate.

Recommended Ad Format

Ilana
Interesting. Okay, so you..

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Google Ads' Latest Update: Pay For Conversion - YouTube

Timestamps:
00:19 – Intro
00:43 – Pay for Conversions
01:11 – Account Demo

Google have recently innovated, and released a new update, which I do believe is going to be a bit of a game changer in the Google ad space. So typically, Google has strictly being a pay per click platform. That means that you don’t pay for people to see ads, you only pay when people click on your ads, hence, pay per click advertising, right? Well, Google have recently rolled out an update, which is a game changer in the Google ad space.

And what it is, it’s called “Pay For Conversions”. So essentially, you are only paying Google for the conversions or the leads that that campaign has generated. So you don’t pay for impression. You don’t pay for a click, you only pay Google for the leads that it has generated. Sounds a little bit too good to be true, right?

Well, let me show you in an account exactly what I mean. So here we are in an account where the target cost per lead is $35. Now that’s just relevant to this particular business, you would choose whatever target cost per lead is relevant for your business. So here we are, where we have set the target CPA for $35. We’ve had 842 impressions. So 842 people have seen the ad, five clicks, and there’s no lead so we haven’t paid anything completely free. Pretty crazy, right?

Let me show you in another account. Here we have a different account, which has a different target CPA. This one has a target. See, I have $30. We’ve had hundred and 82,000 impressions, about 1200 odd clicks, and we’ve generated three conversions. So we only paid $90, we’ve only paid $90. For those three leads. We didn’t pay for the clicks, only the leads that it generated. So I thought I’d share this with you. Make sure you roll this out into your account. And if you need a hand, you can just give me a shout. Hope you enjoy!

The post Google Ads’ Latest Update: Pay For Conversions appeared first on AdWords & Facebook Ad Management - Green Arrow Digital.

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In the world of Google Ads, change is the ONLY constant. So in this episode I talk about what is working right now in for our clients in our agency and also our coaching students.

Check out this episode!

The post 45 – Google Ads – What’s Working Right Now In Our Agency – May 2019 appeared first on AdWords & Facebook Ad Management - Green Arrow Digital.

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In the world of Google Ads, change is the ONLY constant. So in this episode I talk about what is working right now in for our clients in our agency and also our coaching students.

Check out this episode with Scott and learn how he built his YouTube channel to over 350,000 subscribers!

The post 45 – Google Ads – What’s Working Right Now In Our Agency – May 2019 appeared first on AdWords & Facebook Ad Management - Green Arrow Digital.

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0:27 – Introduction
1:31 – Target CPA Bidding
3:47 – Responsive Search Ads
5:02 – Google Display Network Target CPA
5:25 – Google Display Network Responsive Display Ads

In the world of Google Ads, change is the ONLY constant. So in this episode I talk about what is working right now in for our clients in our agency and also our coaching students.

Google Ads – What’s Working Right Now In Our Agency – May 2019 in PDF


Hi! Ilana here from Green Arrow Digital. And today, we’re going to be talking about what’s working right now in the world of Google ads, what’s working for our clients in our agency, and what’s working for our coaching students in our membership. So we’re going to be talking about the world of Google ads, which is generally broken down into Google search, Google Display Network, and YouTube, there is Google Shopping thrown in there. But that’s kind of ads on Google search. So I kind of loved them together in that respect. And as you know, change is the only constant in this industry. So it’s super important to stay ahead of your competition by implementing the latest and greatest things that are rolled out by Google. So we have exposure to so many different accounts, we test so many different things. So we kind of know what works. And we really know what does not work. That’s what this episode is about, kind of telling you what we find is working across the board.

Target CPA Bidding

So you probably know that there’s been a big, big shift in the Google sphere, towards AI and, and machine learning where Google is kind of really joining the dots in all the data I have on people and leaning on their algorithms to get in front of target audiences. So on the Google search side of things, what we’re finding works really well is what’s called target CPA bidding so that basically, when you are handing over the controls to Google from a bidding point of view, and saying Google, hey, Google, you decide how much you should pay, or you can charge me when somebody is searching for my particular keyword.

And here is what I’m willing to pay for a lead, hence that target CPA, which has target cost per acquisition. So if I’m a dentist, let’s say my target CPA, or how much I’m willing to pay for a customer is $50. I say to Google, my target CPA is $50. And it bids will change based on the type of people that are searching for whatever terms that I’m bidding on. And they’ll be more for people who they think are more likely to convert an equally important, they’ll be less on the people who they think are not really likely to become a lead. So it’s pretty cool if you think about it. And it makes your job as an advertiser, obviously, much easier. Because you don’t have to start fiddling around with beads, you don’t have to think do I increase my bids or decrease my bids? Google is handling all the bidding on their side, I would say before you switch over from manual bidding to target CPA bidding, that you run what’s called an experiment, whereby you’re saying Google had a portion, a fraction of my budget to the target CPA bidding. So we can split tested it. And you can compare the performance of your manual bidding versus your target CPA bidding. And you can see the difference in conversion rate. And if it’s good, then you can switch over entirely to this target CPA bidding. That’s pretty cool.

Responsive Search Ads

The second thing that’s working really well in the world of Google search, and what’s called responsive search ads. And that is also leaning on Google’s machine learning and AI capabilities, whereby you give Google a whole bunch of different headlines, a whole bunch of different descriptions. And Google will mix and match the various combinations together. So you actually give Google up to 15 different and possible headlines that they can use in the ad, they use three headlines. So they will take three out of your possible 15 that you’ve given them. And they will take two out of the possible four descriptions that you give them, and mix and match them until they find the best combination. So you can imagine the infinite number of combinations and variations that can be possible with 15 headlines and four descriptions. So Google does all the heavy lifting in that respect as to which is the right one. And we are also getting really good results with that, too. So these are, those are our two tips for the Google Search Network. right in your account.

Google Display Network Target CPA

Let’s talk about the Google Display Network. So once again, target CPA is also working well, on the Google Display Network, the same principle, you tell Google how much you want to pay for a lead. And they handle all the bidding on that respect. So I don’t need to explain it. Again, it’s the same concept. It’s just on display.

Google Display Network Responsive Display Ads

And the Google Display Network also has their equivalent of the responsive search ads, whichthey call responsive display ads, where once again, you give Google a whole bunch of variations of headlines, descriptions, but because it’s display, you can also give them a bunch of different images, and logos, and even a video URL. And it will mix and match all the variations there as well. And we are finding that responsive display ads are really good. The extra benefit with responsive display ads is also that Google will adjust the size as in the dimensions of the banner to fit the available ad unit. So back in, you know the old days, not the old days, you can still do it. But back, when used to manually do it used to have to upload all the different banner sizes. So you know, 300×250, and 728×90 and all the different banner size variations, you have to upload them manually to Google.

For all the available ad units, which was really quite a time intensive for a graphic designer and for many business owners is turned out to be quite expensive. Multiply that by all the different headlines and images you want to test. And suddenly you’re looking at lots of ads, and quite an expensive exercise. So this way, Google will do all the different sizes and all the different variations of images and headlines. And we are finding that they are also working really well.

So there you have it, a couple of quick tips that are working well in the world of Google ads in our agency. Give it a try and let me know what you think. Thanks for listening. You have been listening to the talking with marketing podcast. For more information or resources on today’s episode, head on over to TalkingWebMarketing.com

The post Google Ads – What’s Working Right Now In Our Agency – May 2019 appeared first on AdWords & Facebook Ad Management - Green Arrow Digital.

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Buying an existing website which is already getting traffic is a quick and easy way to enter a market. However, you need to do proper due diligence first. In this episode, I chat with Liz and Matt Raad about the metrics and key things you need to look at before you jump in and buy a website.

Check out this episode!

The post 44 – How To Buy An Existing Website The Right Way With Liz and Matt Raad appeared first on AdWords & Facebook Ad Management - Green Arrow Digital.

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