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Therapy is a place where you’re going to work out your problems and get help for mental health conditions such as anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or PTSD. There may be other issues that you’re getting help with such as relationship problems if you’re going for couples counseling or phobias. But if you’re not getting benefits from therapy, there may be something wrong with your therapist or the connection that you have with them. How do you know if you need a different therapist? Here are some ways to find out the truth.

1. Your therapist is not listening to you

If you go to therapy and get the sense that your therapist is zoning out or that you’re not being listened to, that is a sign that they’re not a good provider and you need to switch. Another way to tell if they might not be listening is if you say something and they try to paraphrase it back to you, but it’s entirely off base. For example, if you say “I’m having trouble getting over my ex, and I need help,” and they say “so, it seems like you’re in love with this person and want to get back together with them, it’s not that you want to get back together with them – it’s that you want to move on and don’t know how. That’s an example of a therapist not listening to you.

2. You and your therapist don’t click

There are a ton of mental health providers out there, and every single one of them is unique. You may have a compassionate personality, and you might be working with someone who is extraordinarily blunt and harsh. Sometimes, that’s what we need, and that therapist might be an excellent fit for someone else. However, this style isn’t always an excellent fit for someone highly sensitive. It could be that you are someone who is working with specific phobias, but your therapist doesn’t understand the gravity of your phobia, and they’re pushing you too hard. There are different styles of therapy, and every person needs to choose what works for them. Let’s say that you’re very blunt, but your therapist is soft-spoken and sensitive. That’s another example of a not-so-great fit. So, different styles work for different people.

3. The kind of therapy your therapist practices isn’t what you’re seeking treatment for

Let’s say that you’re going to therapy for an eating disorder, and your therapist practices a form of treatment such as psychodynamic therapy or analysis. It isn’t something that’s behaviorally based, and it might not be what someone with an eating disorder needs. Maybe, you’ll find that although talking about your childhood might be helpful in some ways; you’re not getting the benefit of this form of treatment because you need someone that specializes in your condition and practices a more suitable method of therapy. Another example is that maybe, you need to work through trauma or go for trauma-informed treatment, but you chose or got paired with someone who practices CBT, which is behavioral. You’re not getting the benefit of trauma relief and recovery; instead, you’re getting behavioral therapy, which doesn’t fulfill your needs. That would mean that you need a new therapist.

4. You do not see the benefit of therapy in your life, and your life is not improving

One of the signs that you need a new therapist is if you’re working as hard as you can in therapy and you’re attending every session, but your life is not improving. That’s a surefire sign that you need a new therapist. It’s time to figure out what kind of therapy you need and how you can find the right fit for you. So, what steps come next?

Online therapy

Consider online therapy if you’re a busy professional or if you’re someone who lives in a remote area. It can be a life-changing mode of treatment if you’re looking for somebody who can help you and you’re in one of these places. Online therapy is great for anyone who needs a convenient way to access mental health treatment and is on the go. It’s excellent for couples counseling as well. So, search for an online therapist who suits your needs. You might be interested in BetterHelp or another company, but you can get the help that you need and find a therapist that works with your particular concerns.

This is a featured post by site sponsor Better Help.

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The post How Do You Know If You Need a New Therapist? appeared first on The Good Men Project.

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IDEA, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, our country’s federal law guaranteeing students with disabilities a free and appropriate public education in the least restrictive environment, has been on the books since 1975. In the forty-five years this has been law it has been revised and updated many times, most recently in 2004.

After having been law for so long, you would ting that most states would be in line with what the law guarantees the students of the United States, but you would be wrong.

During the 2017-18 school year, less than half the states met the requirements of IDEA, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Just twenty-one states have been designated as, Meet Requirements, which means that twenty-nine states plus the District of Columbia fall into the, Needs Assistance category.

Those states have failed in their efforts to provide students age 3-21 the education they’re guaranteed under IDEA. The ramifications for not meeting the guidelines can be significant as states who do not meet the requirements two years in a row are forced to have their special education departments taken over by the U.S. Department of Education (U.S.D.O.E.).

The actions taken by the U.S.D.O.E. can include directing how a state spends its federal funds, withdrawing funding, requiring corrective actions through an action plan, and even bringing in the Department of Justice.

On a positive note, Arizona, Connecticut, Florida, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, North Dakota, Nebraska, New Jersey, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin and Wyoming have all met the requirements of IDEA statewide.

No state met the more severe designations of, Needs Intervention or Needs Substantial Intervention.

That’s not to say that individual school districts in the passing states don’t have work to do, just that overall as a state they are fulfilling the requirements of IDEA.

We owe it to the students of this country, whether having a disability or not, to provide them with the best education possible and helping them in any way possible to become productive citizens after their high school education is complete.

We need to keep in mind that these children are the future of our country and whether or not they have a disability, these are the people who will grow up to run the country that we live in. We owe it to these students to provide them with the best education we can give them.

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The post States Fail to Meet Educational Requirements of IDEA appeared first on The Good Men Project.

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Today marks the end of a nine-part series on my column. Back in the early spring, I asked my social media followers a simple question—“Why don’t men discuss their health?” After gathering all the responses, I shared them here and how I suggested fixing it.

In total, I identified the following eight themes:

  • They said: “Men aren’t told to check themselves at doctor’s appointments.”
    • I said: “Do guys actually regularly attend their appointments? But yes, I agree. It’s not as discussed as it must be.”
  • They said: “It’s awkward to talk to my mom about it.”
    • I said: “She’s seen your junk plenty. Try again.”
  • They said: “Talking about your health isn’t ‘masculine/manly/macho.’”
    • I said: “The Rock does it, so can you.”
  • They said: “There is no Susan G. Komen for men.”
    • I said: “Yes there is. It’s called Susan G. Komen as well as Movember and more.”
  • They said: “Men think they are invincible.”
    • I said: “Spoiler alert—they’re not. Females actually outlive men by a large degree.”
  • They said: “Men keep it light out of fear and/or embarrassment.”
    • I said: “There’s a time and a place for humor. Health isn’t always one of them.”
  • They said: “Social norms and stigmas tell us not to talk openly about our health.”
    • I said: “Who set these norms? We can break them.”
  • They said: “Being sick is seen as a sign of weakness.”
    • I said: “See previous response.”

This isn’t just a compilation of my past two months of musings on men’s health. That would be quite a lazy way to get out of writing a weekly article, and I am pretty sure my editor wouldn’t like that. Rather, I compiled all the articles and responses here so we know what’s been addressed already. In this last post in the series, I want to ask one last time.

“Why don’t men discuss their health?”

I’m one man, with one column, and one ball. My personal combined social media following is roughly 11,000 people, but The Good Men Project community has well over ten times that amount. I want to leverage that audience and get as many responses as possible.

Ask the men in your life why they don’t want to talk about their health. Report back in the comments below, email them directly to me, or send them in a Tweet/DM/Facebook message/carrier pigeon.

Once we’ve identified all the reasons guys don’t want to discuss their health, we can continue breaking them down. Consider me the Mythbuster of men’s health.

Or more appropriately: the Ball Buster.

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The post Why Don’t Men Talk About Their Health? (Part IX) appeared first on The Good Men Project.

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Meditation was first developed in India many years ago (around 5000-3500 BCE). It took quite some time to become popular in the western world, but today it is celebrated as a therapeutic tool to ease stress, anxiety, depression, and addictions. In the past years, it has also become recognized to improve mental performance, and it consequently became a multi-billion dollar business.

If you’ve never tried it, you may be wondering how something so simple as sitting with your eyes closed could deliver such incredible benefits.

How meditation works

Meditation is about training in awareness and getting a healthy sense of perspective over one’s thoughts. Many think that meditating is about trying to achieve a zen state of mind, but that’s not the point. Observing one’s thoughts, and then letting go of them – so that eventually you may start to better understand them – is the real goal of each meditation practice.

There are different techniques to go through this mental process. Some focus on the breath and bodily sensation, others make you visualize an object, and others help you to channel your thoughts towards acts of love and kindness.

A typical meditation session involves you sitting on a chair or cross-legged on the floor with eyes closed. Once you assume a comfortable position and focus on your breath, you should start noticing your thoughts. At this point, according to what type of technique you’re using, you will try to let those thoughts go away by focusing on something else (this could be your breath or a mental image you created).

With time and practice, you may be able to reach a state of mind where very few thought (or none) are present.

Despite the simplicity of this process, meditating for more than ten minutes is extremely tough for most. Many people that try meditation get discouraged by the fact that “they can’t stop thinking”. In fact, it has been proven that people spend most of their days being anything but mindful and peaceful.

In a 2010 study,(1) Harvard researchers asked more than 2000 adults about their thoughts and actions at random moments throughout their day via an iPhone app. People’s minds wandered 47% of the time, and mind wandering often triggered unhappiness, the scientists reported.

They also observed that spending time observing our thoughts, without getting stuck on them, may help to better understand oneself, and possibly being able to reduce the number of negative thoughts one experiences.

What science says about meditation

People have practiced meditation for thousands of years, but scientists have studied its effects for only a dozen. In the past few years, many studies have been published about the neurological benefits of meditation, proving it to improve brain function in many different ways.

These benefits range from preserving the aging brain(2), to improving happiness by reducing the activity of the brain’s “me center” (3) (monkey mind), and a more recent study has even proven that meditation is as powerful as antidepressants in treating depression, anxiety, and pain. (4)

Many more studies are being conducted every day on meditation, and we can expect to gain a lot more insight in the near future.

Can anyone meditate?

Millions of people are practicing mindfulness meditation every day with great results, but there are also as many people that have tried meditating and didn’t like it or didn’t manage to be consistent with their practice.

The most important part of developing a meditation practice is consistency. You don’t have to meditate every single day in a row, but the benefits are tied to regular, consistent practice.

Some studies (5) claim that some benefits of meditation such as improved mood, decreased stress and decreased blood pressure can be felt after a single session. Some other benefits like increased focus and decreased anxiety may be experienced after a few weeks and others take longer to develop.

Some people claim that as little as five minutes of meditation per day can make miracles, but research shows that a regular practice associated with benefits involves 10-20 minutes of meditation at least three times per week.

What’s the best way to begin a meditation practice

A good place to start for aspiring mediators is Headspace.  Andy Puddicombe, a former English student in sport science, that dropped his studies to travel to Asia and trained as a Buddhist monk, created Headspace with the goal of helping millions of people to live a more mindful life. Over 30 million people have downloaded and use headspace. This is due to his simplicity and its beautiful design and animations.

References https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2010/11/wandering-mind-not-a-happy-mind/ https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fpsyg.2014.01551/full https://www.pnas.org/content/108/50/20254.short https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/1809754 https://www.headspace.com/science/meditation-benefits

What’s your take on what you just read? Comment below or write a response and submit to us your own point of view or reaction here at the red box, below, which links to our submissions portal.

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The post Does Meditation Work? appeared first on The Good Men Project.

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When I’m sad I act differently depending on the circumstances and the nature of the sadness. If I had a bad day at work, for example, I might reach out to a friend for support. But, if something extreme happened and I was extremely sad, like a traumatic event, somebody got hurt or (God forbid) died, I would probably not reach out to a friend or loved one right away. The first thing I would experience would likely be shock followed by denial and then sadness. I’d need to get to the point where I was actually sad to figure out what was happening with me internally.

Trauma in particular can bring on intense emotions and confuse us. We may be feeling many emotions, one of which is sadness. Feeling sad after you’ve experienced a traumatic experience is normal. Then, there is (of course) the difference between sadness and depression. Depression is a persistent feeling of sadness that won’t lift for at least two weeks of time. Sadness is transient, but it should still be dealt with rather than repressing it. It’s unhealthy to push sadness down and pretend like it doesn’t exist.

When I’m sad, I sometimes isolate. I want to process those feelings and be by myself. I don’t want to talk to anyone because I don’t necessarily know why I am sad yet. Maybe I’ll journal or cry into a pillow. Sometimes that intense crying into a pillow and having my body fall apart on the bed is just what I need at that moment. It feels great to get that energy out of my body. Once I let it all out, I feel like I can function a little bit better.

There are other times when I’m feeling sad when I would rather not be alone. I love to hug people I’m close to and receive hugs. When I’m feeling down, I want comfort. I want to know that there’s someone out there who cares about me. And there’s absolutely nothing wrong with that. Human beings need to be loved. It’s a basic need and I’m not ashamed to ask for what I want. I will even say to a friend “I need a hug.” My good friends will always give me the hug that I ask for. They know that if the roles were reversed I would do the same for them.

People respond to sadness in different ways. They may isolate or they want to be around people who understand them in order to seek comfort. There’s no right or wrong way to handle sadness. It’s about acknowledging that sadness as real and knowing that it will pass given time. It’s also helpful to discuss these feelings in therapy, especially if they worsen or seem like they are turning into depression.

Don’t be afraid to reach out for help if you’re feeling sad and you can’t seem to shake it. You don’t have to go through it on your own. Many of us have struggled with sadness and we understand.


This post was previously published on www.huffpost.com and is republished here with permission from the author.

Photo credit: Istockphoto.com

The post What Do You Do When You Are Sad? appeared first on The Good Men Project.

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Every year worldwide, more than 50,000 otherwise healthy people with epilepsy suddenly die—a condition known as SUDEP. These deaths may be largely preventable, says AI researcher Rosalind Picard. Learn how Picard helped develop a cutting-edge smartwatch that can detect epileptic seizures before they occur and alert nearby loved ones in time to help.


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This post was previously published on www.ted.com and is republished here with permission from the author.

The post An AI Smartwatch that Detects Seizures appeared first on The Good Men Project.

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Animal therapy is an intervention that incorporates different kinds of animals to help people with a variety of mental and physical health conditions. The animals included in your treatment could be cats, dogs, horses, pigs, birds, and more. It’s something that can add to and enhance an individual’s treatment plan, and it’s incredibly cathartic and helpful for many. Animals have a way of making us feel at ease. They don’t ask for anything but love. When you pet a cat or dog, you know they appreciate your affection. Cats let you know that they love you by purring. Dogs communicate their warmth by licking you. Animals are sensitive like people are. They show their sensitivity in different ways, but it’s there. Animal therapy can teach us a lot about different creatures and ourselves.

When animal therapy is used

Animal therapy is used in conjunction with other forms of mental health treatment. For example, a person who is suffering from severe anxiety or agoraphobia might have an emotional support dog so they can deal with leaving the house. In addition to having their ESA, they will also go to individual therapy. Animal therapy can be incorporated for those living with autism spectrum disorder, a variety of behavioral issues, depression, schizophrenia, addiction, and more. It can even help those with dementia. Animals have a way of making you feel relaxed, and animal-assisted therapy may help to decrease your stress levels or boost your mood. It has proven health benefits, including decreased blood pressure and heart rate, decreased aggression and stress, improved self-regulation, and more. If you want to learn more about who animal therapy can help and how it works, keep reading.

What to expect in animal therapy

Depending on the type of therapy you’re seeking, who you are, and who your therapist is, you might encounter a dog, cat, horse, or another kind of animal. Therapy horses are game-changers for many. So helpful that some residential treatment facilities incorporate equine therapy into their programs. If you’re pursuing horse therapy specifically and you’re nervous, it’s important to note that a mental health professional will always be present during equine therapy and that equine treatment doesn’t necessarily or even usually involve riding the horse. If you’re in the hospital, you might experience animal therapy there, but it’s often used in conjunction with other forms of treatment. Don’t be afraid of receiving animal therapy – the animals are well-behaved, calm, and prepared for what they do.

How animal therapy works

Especially when it comes to helping those with anxiety, animals have a way of calming people. They can distract an individual’s attention away from panic, can help people feel loved or bonded, and they can help people with communication or social skills as well as a variety of other skills. According to the ADAA, 74% of pet owners noted an improvement in their mental health as a result of owning a pet.

What to look for in an animal therapist

Whenever you look for a therapist, first make sure that they’re a licensed therapist. Animal therapists must be experienced. They need to know how to work with animals, they need to know what the benefits of working with animals are, and they need to understand what an emotional support animal is. An emotional support animal is one that can help people with various health conditions such as cancer, heart problems, anxiety, and other mental or physical diagnoses.

Getting help

Getting help for your problems, whether you seek animal-assisted therapy or not, is vital. Pet therapy can help you improve your mental health. Whether you’re searching for a mental health professional online or in your local area, don’t be afraid to reach out for help.

This is a featured post by site sponsor Better Help.

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The post What is Animal Therapy and How Can it Help Me? appeared first on The Good Men Project.

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Why do people fail at committing and sustaining an exercise program? It is a question that I have thought about extensively, especially since writing my eBook, The Mindset Fitness Connection. Maybe I am overly introspective and think about stuff like this too much. I am not sure, but I do know there are some things we can do to put ourselves in a better place mentally before, during, and after exercise to want to repeat it week after week.

1. It needs to purposeful. We need to develop a set of reasons that genuinely inspire us to commit to a lifestyle of health and fitness. Take a few minutes and write down the reasons why you would like to be fit. What is the payoff to feeling and looking good? How will it benefit you? What will it do for your family? There are many questions you can ask yourself, but the bottom line is that you need the right reasons to do it day after day. One of my purposes or reasons for exercising is that it fits into my job description as a physical education teacher, wrestling coach, and personal trainer. I could still be effective in those duties based on my knowledge alone, but how much would they listen to me if I wasn’t in good shape? I also want my children to be fit and live a healthy lifestyle, so I have to model the correct behavior to them. I want my kids to see that their dad works hard at being in good physical condition. The third reason for me is that I feel so much better when I exercise. I have more energy. I think better and have more clarity in my day to day living. Most importantly, I feel more at peace after I work out. Exercise calms the mind and is a meditative experience.

2. We need to tell ourselves the right things. What we say to ourselves is a direct reflection on our attitudes, effort, and habits. Are you telling yourself that exercise is “fun” or are you saying to yourself that it is boring, painful, or hard?” If you are saying those negative statements to yourself, you need to start telling yourself more resourceful things. “I feel so good after I exercise.” “Exercise helps me to sleep better at night.” “After I work out, I feel a sense of accomplishment, and I am proud of myself for doing it.” Any long-term behavior starts in your mind. At first, it is repeatedly telling yourself the right things to get you going. After a time, it becomes a habit.

3. Exercise needs to be in your schedule. When we schedule anything, it is a priority for us to complete. We all begin our day thinking about what is on our “to-do” list. A work out needs to be one of those items on your list. If it is scheduled, it becomes essential for you to get it done — the more specific you are, the better. What time will it be? Where will it be (if you workout at multiples locations)? What will you be doing in the workout?

4. Visualize your success. What does it look like to have the body you want? How does it feel to be in great shape? What do your loved ones say to you about your improvement? When we spend a little time in our mind imagining our success, we move in the direction of what we repeatedly see ourselves becoming. Take a few minutes each night before falling asleep, visualizing the person you want to be. Hear the voices of those around congratulating you for your achievements. See yourself exactly as who you want to be. With repeated “training,” your mind will move your physical body in the direction of what you consistently imagine.

5. Find an accountability partner. This person can be a person you work out with each day or someone who holds you accountable for what you say you are going to do. I regularly have 200 accountability partners. They are my students, and when I say I am going to do something, believe me, they will hold me accountable. It is a powerful motivator when we know someone is keeping “tabs” on us. None of us like to have that conversation telling someone we did not follow through with a commitment. Someone who cares about us, a true accountability partner, will keep you to your word and not allow you to bail on what you say you want to do.

6. Decide to take 100% responsibility for your health and fitness. Taking responsibility means we will not make excuses or blame others. If you say you are going to do something, do it. If you don’t, do not blame someone else or make an excuse. A mindset of strength includes holding ourselves accountable and looking in the mirror and being honest with things in our lives. If you do not like how you look, it is your problem, and you are the only one who can solve it. Excuses, blaming others, or rationalizing will not fix the problem. Only you can fix the problem.

Everything, I mean everything, begins in our minds. A little mindset training each day pays big dividends in your health, fitness, and personal life.

What’s your take on what you just read? Comment below or write a response and submit to us your own point of view or reaction here at the red box, below, which links to our submissions portal.

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The post 6 Ways to Develop the Fitness Mindset appeared first on The Good Men Project.

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The three most important things that we as humans do to stay alive (self-preservation) are breathing, drinking water, and eating. Let’s take a closer look at each of these:

Take a Deep Breath and Relax

Our breath is a major source of energy. Eastern cultures have explored the power inherent in the breath and speak of that energy as “chi” or “prana.”

In Latin, the word for “breath” and “spirit” is the same: spirare. The term “spirit” or “life force” in the Hebrew language can be translated into the word “breath.” About sixteen to seventeen times per minute, we say yes to continuing our life here on Earth by taking another breath. Our breath is quite literally our life force. We breathe about ten thousand quarts of air per day, oxygenating some twenty-seven trillion cells.

Breathing is paramount to survival and self-preservation. Our body can go without food and water for a few days—at best—but it can’t go without oxygen for more than a few minutes. Oxygen is the source of our sustenance. Within the breath, we encounter the rhythm of energy that all life emits.

We breathe in and out some twenty-two thousand times per day—inhalation followed by exhalation. The actual job of breathing is done mainly by the diaphragm, the sheet of muscles between the chest and the abdomen. These muscles contract when we breathe in, expanding the lungs and drawing in air. We breathe out simply by relaxing the diaphragm; the lungs deflate like balloons.

Deep, circular breathing—belly breathing—happens when we inhale through our nose and exhale through our mouth. However, the ideal breath isn’t quite as simple as that. A true, cleansing breath is one that directs the breath energy all the way down into the lower belly, about two inches below the navel. This area is known as the lower tan tien, meaning “stove,” “furnace,” or “cauldron.” Follow this inhalation by expelling waste products up and out through the mouth with a long, slow exhalation.

The key to healthy breathing is to have longer exhalations than inhalations. In fact, they should be twice as long. This not only purges toxins but promotes vital energy, relaxation, and healing. The average adult utilizes only about one quart of their six-to-seven quart lung capacity.

Inhaling slowly, deeply, and evenly through both nostrils and exhaling through the mouth—mindful breathing—helps to synchronize both hemispheres of the brain. It promotes whole-body integration of our physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual states of being. When we don’t use our breath effectively, our other systems have to work overtime to compensate. This overwork can set the stage for serious illness.

Healthy breathing increases vitality, lowers blood pressure, enhances mental concentration and the ability to retain information, unleashes creativity, improves circulation, diminishes anxiety, and promotes relaxation.

Mindful breathing can be used anytime, anywhere. If you sit in front of a computer all day or have a long commute, lower your shoulders periodically and breathe mindfully. The difference in your energy and stress level at the end of the day will be noticeable.

With regular practice, mindful breathing becomes our natural way of breathing: relaxed, rhythmic, flowing, and open.

So sit back, relax, and inhale deeply through your nostrils, drawing the breath fully into the pit of your stomach. In doing so, you just sent a powerful dose of oxygen to your brain and every single cell in your body and rid yourself of some excess baggage.

Water: The Elixir of Life

Water is the main component of all living beings and the major constituent of human cells. It’s vital to survival and self-preservation.

How can we know how much water is the right amount of water to drink? It’s easy: simply divide your body weight by two. The resulting number is the number of ounces of water you should drink every twenty-four hours.

Next to the air we breathe, water is the most important thing we’ll ever put into our body. Here are some of the benefits of drinking the right amount of water every day:

  • Reduces back pain
  • Slashes cancer risk
  • Provides a whole-body cleanse
  • Diminishes digestive problems
  • Boosts energy
  • Enhances the effectiveness of exercise
  • Diminishes the frequency of headaches
  • Enhances heart health
  • Improves memory
  • Enhances skin health
  • Promotes weight loss

Dr. Masaru Emoto, author of The Hidden Messages in Water, found that water from clear springs and water that has been exposed to loving words shows brilliant, complex, and colorful snowflake patterns.

In contrast, polluted water, or water exposed to negative thoughts, forms incomplete, asymmetrical patterns with dull colors. The implications of this research create a new awareness of how we can positively impact the earth and our personal health.

Diet: A Four-Letter Word

You’ve heard the saying “you are what you eat.” That sentiment isn’t far from the truth. A more accurate statement is “you are what you assimilate.” A body that’s not healthy can’t assimilate all the nutrients it needs from the foods and supplements it ingests.

Research shows that people who eat a variety of brightly colored fruit, leafy vegetables, certain fish, and nuts packed with omega-3 fatty acids can improve focus and decrease their risk of getting Alzheimer’s disease.

Eating well is also one of the keys to a positive outlook, emotional balance, and a joyful life. The benefits of healthy eating include increased mental acuteness, resistance to illness and disease, higher energy levels, a more robust immune system, faster recuperation times, and better management of chronic health problems.

Good nutrition keeps muscles, bones, organs, and other body parts strong for the long haul. Eating foods that are rich in vitamins and minerals boosts immunity and fights illness-causing toxins. A healthy diet reduces the risk of heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, bone loss, cancer, and anemia.

The American Institute for Cancer Research recommends, “People concerned with reducing cancer risk and managing their weight cover two-thirds (or more) of their plate with vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and beans, and one-third (or less) with animal protein. One of the best possible choices for that ‘one-third or less’ is fish.”

Top Ten Anticancer Foods:

  • Cruciferous vegetables—broccoli, cabbage, and Brussels sprouts
  • Tomatoes
  • Berries—blueberries, açaí berries, raspberries, cranberries, and strawberries
  • Onions and leeks
  • Red beets
  • Spinach and watercress
  • Garlic
  • Whole grains
  • Oranges
  • Beans—all types of beans, including soybeans and lentils

Other fruits and vegetables that help to protect against cancer include pumpkin, pineapple, rhubarb, apples, carrots, sweet potatoes, squash, red onions, radishes, apricots, grapefruit, red grapes, lemons, mangoes, papayas, peaches, and persimmons.

In the United States, we tend to live in the fast lane—hurry, hurry, hurry!—and often eat on the run. How and what we eat affects the pleasure we take, or miss, in the eating experience. Many of our global neighbors have already discovered this and have offloaded “food baggage” by treating food with healthy respect and joy. They share meals with others, lingering over each course and savoring the taste, thus fostering a deep appreciation for the pleasure of eating wholesome and delicious foods.

Our food choices, our attitude, and the environment we’re eating in all affect healthy digestion and our assimilation of nutrition. Bringing more attention and thought to our meals helps us to make healthier food choices and enhances our eating pleasure.

Originally Published on Unbound Northwest

 ID: 568890457

The post Getting Back to Health Basics appeared first on The Good Men Project.

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Life is a rocky landscape

It’s a battlefield shorn by love

It’s a pockmarked desert

It’s caverns of hope

It’s the skies raining down from above

Life, it’s luminous

if you let it

And if you don’t

Dark swallows you whole

You must uplift your life

You must seize it

You must grab by the horns then let go

For your life, you have to illuminate it

Center stage and ready to go

The curtain is rising—and now there you are

In life,

the ever afterglow

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This post was previously published on Nerve 10 and is republished with the permission of the author.

Photo courtesy Pixabay.

The post The Ever Afterglow appeared first on The Good Men Project.

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