Loading...

Follow Gluten is my bitch on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Do you guys ever get an Italian food craving so intense you’re like, “I MUST HAVE RED SAUCE, PASTA, CHEESE AND ANY OF THE MEATS RIGHT NOW!!!!!” I do, and way too often. I love myself some Italian food and as we know it’s chock full o’ gluten so we have to find decent substitutes and make our own.* Phhhhpt.

It hit me hard last week and I was also feeling overwhelmed and did NOT want to spend the night in the kitchen. I was cranky, hungry, and not in the mood. And then I had one of those a-ha moments. It was like Oprah herself entered into my head and changed my life. What if I don’t have to fry my own chicken? Girl, you know I had gluten-free chicken parm in my belly in half an hour. 

I love the gf chicken tenders from Bell & Evans. They make great lunch box items for the kiddos, and an excellent addition to my annual gluten-free Snackadium. Knocking out the fried chicken portion of this dish made it ridiculously easy. Here are the few steps.

Bake that chicken.

Put marina sauce on that chicken.

Put mozzarella on that chicken.

Put it back in the oven until cheese is melty and brown’ish.

Cook your gluten-free pasta (I love the fresh/frozen kinds, but you do you) and serve.

BAM.

How easy and delicious is that? Dinner is served, my friends.

*some of you live near amazing gluten-free Italian restaurants. I, sadly, do not. 

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It happened. My girl who has had stomach issues on and off since she was 6 years old, has been tested for celiac and told she has the gene, but hasn’t developed it yet, got hella’ sick while we were on vacation because she was hoovering as much gluten as she could put in her gluten hole, since every meal wasn’t prepared by moi. I realize it looks like we’re having fun up there, but soon after things were not pretty. In the poop department. You know what I mean.

Back to the GI doc we went, and what we discovered was while the celiac is still not there, she most likely has non-celiac gluten sensitivity. And the doc recommended 3-4 weeks of the FODMAP diet to see if that was helpful.

Always one to throw diet changes at a problem (I’m a slow, but consistent, learner) I hit my own books to find one FODMAP-friendly recipe (in Bake Sales are My B*tch) and then grabbed my book o’ over 100 recipes (The Gluten-Free Cheat Sheet) and adjusted for FODMAP. All of these are going to be listed below.

So I whipped up lots of healthy dinners, went to the FODMAP store for these staples –

I know! Theres a store for everything! And for lunches, I got the girl some berries, no more than 10 nuts (I know, what happens if she has 11? What happens????), got some rice and chicken, and forbade any processed foods (above chips excluded) come within 1 mile of my girl. I also apologized to her for massive repeats over the next few weeks. And we (mostly) did it. She did have a birthday party where we adhered strictly to the no gluten rule, but bent it hard on the sugar and dairy.

Does she feel better? Well, of course. But we also completely eliminated gluten from her diet and cut way down on the dairy and sugar. Naturally she’s going to feel better. And while I’m happy we’ve got her tummy issues back on track, and her skin is doing better too, I’m also questioning this whole FODMAP thing and why it’s being prescribed. I mean, it’s not a diet that one can consistently maintain and live in the world. You would have to eat every meal at home and be happy with the same sh*t, different day. Having gone through it, I don’t get it.

I do understand an anti-inflammatory diet for healing your gut. I obviously understand the value of a very strict gluten-free diet. But how in the hell does someone having a gluten problem benefit from eliminating beans, onions, apples, and on and on and on? Again, I’ve written about it and cooked within its confines and know it’s a *thing* but I’m lost on its usefulness.

Can anyone fill me in on how this is a solution? Oh, and if you’re a FODMAPer 4 Life, please check out these recipes. (And know that I may be super cranky due to having to come to terms that I most def passed on these crazy genes to my daughter, AND I just had gall bladder surgery and am now having a massive pain in my neck/back from all the weird propped up sleeping. AND JUST FUCKING CRANKY.)

XO, GIMB

Kung Pao Chicken

The first thing I had to do was remove the onions and garlic from this recipe, which was totally cool. I mean, I missed the flavor but there’s enough going on so that if you have to do it, you can. Also, the instructions that you can only eat 10 nuts meant that I was picking nuts off my daughter’s plate. You could eliminate the peanuts from this recipe, but I kind of think they make it.

From The Gluten-Free Cheat Sheet

Prep time: 35 minutes  Cook time: 10 minutes

6 cups cooked rice
1 tablespoon sugar
3 tablespoons water
4 tablespoons wheat-free tamari, divided
2 tablespoons dry sherry
1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
1½ teaspoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon cornstarch
¼ teaspoon salt
1 pound pork tenderloin, cubed in 1-inch pieces
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
8 dried whole red chiles
½ thinly sliced onion
1 teaspoon ginger, grated
½ cup unsalted dry roasted peanuts

1. Cook rice according to directions while preparing pork.
2. In medium bowl, mix sugar, water, 3 tablespoons wheat-free tamari, sherry, rice wine vinegar, sesame oil, 1 teaspoon cornstarch, and salt. Mix thoroughly.
3. Add pork to mixture. Then add 1 tablespoon cornstarch and 1 tablespoon tamari and mix until pork is covered. Cover, and allow to marinate for 20 minutes.
4. Heat vegetable oil in large skillet on high heat. Add chiles and onion cook until chiles are blackened, approximately 1 to 2 minutes. Remove chilies and set aside.
5. Remove pork from bowl, leaving mixture aside, and add pork to skillet. Cook on medium-high heat, turning frequently, for 2 to 3 minutes. Add onion and ginger and cook until crispy, approximately 1 to 2 minutes.
6. Add sherry, cornstarch, and vinegar mixture and cook until it thickens and is bubbly. Add peanuts and chiles and remove from heat. Serve over rice.
Makes: 6 servings

Smoky Sweet Potato Soup + Steak

It’s true anytime I’m stumped for a gluten-free meal I go steak and veg. Same goes here, I just have to adjust for the FODMAP biz. Luckily my smoky sweet potato soup (recipe in The Gluten-Free Cheat Sheet, and below) is already FODMAP compliant, and steak is, well, steak.

I also tried this non-grill way of making these steaks and I have to say they were some of the best steaks I’ve ever made. So do this if your grill is put away for winter. But can we just take a moment to appreciate the most beautiful avocado I used to top the yummy soup?

I get a farm box from Good Life Organics every week, and their bacon avocados are just the bomb. They do take forever, like a week, to ripen, but when they do they are the absolute best.

From The Gluten-Free Cheat Sheet

Prep time: 15 minutes Cook time: 30 minutes

1 large baked sweet potato
¼ cup almond milk
¼ cup gluten-free chicken broth
1 chipotle pepper, sliced and in sauce
salt
fresh black pepper
1 avocado, cubed

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
2. Bake sweet potato for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until it’s no longer firm to the touch. Remove from oven and carefully remove skin. Place skinned potato in blender or food processor.
3. Add almond milk, gluten-free chicken broth, and chipotle pepper, and blend to liquefy. Add more gluten-free chicken if you wish to have a thinner soup. Add salt and pepper to taste.
4. Pour soup into two bowls if it’s still warm from baking; otherwise heat up on stovetop or microwave to desired temperature. Serve immediately with avocado garnish.

Makes: 2 servings

Quinoa, Chicken & Goat Cheese Salad

While raw vegetables are not ideal on the FODMAP diet, I did add the carrots and nixed the green beans to give it a little diversity. Again, this is low-FODMAP, so not everything in this mix is free of all FODMAPs. It is, however, very low in those irritants and very high on the yummy scale.

(from Bake Sales Are My Bitch: Win the Food Allergy Wars With 60+ Recipes to Keep Kids Safe & Parents Sane)

Prep time: 15 minutes • Cook time: 30 minutes • makes: 6 servings

1⁄2 cup quinoa
8 ounces skinless, boneless chicken breast, cut into 1″–2″ pieces
1 tablespoon wheat-free tamari
Juice of half a lime
Salt and black pepper
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
12 ounces green beans, trimmed and cut into 11⁄2″ pieces
2 cups cooked corn kernels
1 tablespoon minced fresh marjoram
1⁄2 teaspoon coarse kosher salt

1. Prepare quinoa according to instructions, and allow to cool. Marinate chicken in tamari, lime juice, salt, and pepper.
2. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in heavy medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add chicken to skillet; cook until golden brown and cooked through, about 8 minutes.
3. Cook green beans in large saucepan of boiling salted water until tender- crisp, about 4 minutes. Drain. Rinse under cold water to cool; drain. Transfer beans to kitchen towel and pat dry.
4. Mix quinoa, chicken, green beans, and corn in large bowl.
5. Combine remaining 2 tablespoons oil, marjoram, and kosher salt in
small bowl.
6. Pour over salad and toss to coat. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Serve.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It happened. My girl who has had stomach issues on and off since she was 6 years old, has been tested for celiac and told she has the gene, but hasn’t developed it yet, got hella’ sick while we were on vacation because she was hoovering as much gluten as she could put in her gluten hole, since every meal wasn’t prepared by moi. I realize it looks like we’re having fun up there, but soon after things were not pretty. In the poop department. You know what I mean.

Back to the GI doc we went, and what we discovered was while the celiac is still not there, she most likely has non-celiac gluten sensitivity. And the doc recommended 3-4 weeks of the FODMAP diet to see if that was helpful.

Always one to throw diet changes at a problem (I’m a slow, but consistent, learner) I hit my own books to find one FODMAP-friendly recipe (in Bake Sales are My B*tch) and then grabbed my book o’ over 100 recipes (The Gluten-Free Cheat Sheet) and adjusted for FODMAP. All of these are going to be listed below.

So I whipped up lots of healthy dinners, went to the FODMAP store for these staples –

I know! Theres a store for everything! And for lunches, I got the girl some berries, no more than 10 nuts (I know, what happens if she has 11? What happens????), got some rice and chicken, and forbade any processed foods (above chips excluded) come within 1 mile of my girl. I also apologized to her for massive repeats over the next few weeks. And we (mostly) did it. She did have a birthday party where we adhered strictly to the no gluten rule, but bent it hard on the sugar and dairy.

Does she feel better? Well, of course. But we also completely eliminated gluten from her diet and cut way down on the dairy and sugar. Naturally she’s going to feel better. And while I’m happy we’ve got her tummy issues back on track, and her skin is doing better too, I’m also questioning this whole FODMAP thing and why it’s being prescribed. I mean, it’s not a diet that one can consistently maintain and live in the world. You would have to eat every meal at home and be happy with the same sh*t, different day. Having gone through it, I don’t get it.

I do understand an anti-inflammatory diet for healing your gut. I obviously understand the value of a very strict gluten-free diet. But how in the hell does someone having a gluten problem benefit from eliminating beans, onions, apples, and on and on and on? Again, I’ve written about it and cooked within its confines and know it’s a *thing* but I’m lost on its usefulness.

Can anyone fill me in on how this is a solution? Oh, and if you’re a FODMAPer 4 Life, please check out these recipes. (And know that I may be super cranky due to having to come to terms that I most def passed on these crazy genes to my daughter, AND I just had gall bladder surgery and am now having a massive pain in my neck/back from all the weird propped up sleeping. AND JUST FUCKING CRANKY.)

XO, GIMB

Kung Pao Chicken

The first thing I had to do was remove the onions and garlic from this recipe, which was totally cool. I mean, I missed the flavor but there’s enough going on so that if you have to do it, you can. Also, the instructions that you can only eat 10 nuts meant that I was picking nuts off my daughter’s plate. You could eliminate the peanuts from this recipe, but I kind of think they make it.

From The Gluten-Free Cheat Sheet

Prep time: 35 minutes  Cook time: 10 minutes

6 cups cooked rice
1 tablespoon sugar
3 tablespoons water
4 tablespoons wheat-free tamari, divided
2 tablespoons dry sherry
1 tablespoon rice wine vinegar
1½ teaspoons sesame oil
1 tablespoon + 1 teaspoon cornstarch
¼ teaspoon salt
1 pound pork tenderloin, cubed in 1-inch pieces
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
8 dried whole red chiles
½ thinly sliced onion
1 teaspoon ginger, grated
½ cup unsalted dry roasted peanuts

1. Cook rice according to directions while preparing pork.
2. In medium bowl, mix sugar, water, 3 tablespoons wheat-free tamari, sherry, rice wine vinegar, sesame oil, 1 teaspoon cornstarch, and salt. Mix thoroughly.
3. Add pork to mixture. Then add 1 tablespoon cornstarch and 1 tablespoon tamari and mix until pork is covered. Cover, and allow to marinate for 20 minutes.
4. Heat vegetable oil in large skillet on high heat. Add chiles and onion cook until chiles are blackened, approximately 1 to 2 minutes. Remove chilies and set aside.
5. Remove pork from bowl, leaving mixture aside, and add pork to skillet. Cook on medium-high heat, turning frequently, for 2 to 3 minutes. Add onion and ginger and cook until crispy, approximately 1 to 2 minutes.
6. Add sherry, cornstarch, and vinegar mixture and cook until it thickens and is bubbly. Add peanuts and chiles and remove from heat. Serve over rice.
Makes: 6 servings

Smoky Sweet Potato Soup + Steak

It’s true anytime I’m stumped for a gluten-free meal I go steak and veg. Same goes here, I just have to adjust for the FODMAP biz. Luckily my smoky sweet potato soup (recipe in The Gluten-Free Cheat Sheet, and below) is already FODMAP compliant, and steak is, well, steak.

I also tried this non-grill way of making these steaks and I have to say they were some of the best steaks I’ve ever made. So do this if your grill is put away for winter. But can we just take a moment to appreciate the most beautiful avocado I used to top the yummy soup?

I get a farm box from Good Life Organics every week, and their bacon avocados are just the bomb. They do take forever, like a week, to ripen, but when they do they are the absolute best.

From The Gluten-Free Cheat Sheet

Prep time: 15 minutes Cook time: 30 minutes

1 large baked sweet potato
¼ cup almond milk
¼ cup gluten-free chicken broth
1 chipotle pepper, sliced and in sauce
salt
fresh black pepper
1 avocado, cubed

1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees.
2. Bake sweet potato for 45 minutes to 1 hour, until it’s no longer firm to the touch. Remove from oven and carefully remove skin. Place skinned potato in blender or food processor.
3. Add almond milk, gluten-free chicken broth, and chipotle pepper, and blend to liquefy. Add more gluten-free chicken if you wish to have a thinner soup. Add salt and pepper to taste.
4. Pour soup into two bowls if it’s still warm from baking; otherwise heat up on stovetop or microwave to desired temperature. Serve immediately with avocado garnish.

Makes: 2 servings

Quinoa, Chicken & Goat Cheese Salad

While raw vegetables are not ideal on the FODMAP diet, I did add the carrots and nixed the green beans to give it a little diversity. Again, this is low-FODMAP, so not everything in this mix is free of all FODMAPs. It is, however, very low in those irritants and very high on the yummy scale.

(from Bake Sales Are My Bitch: Win the Food Allergy Wars With 60+ Recipes to Keep Kids Safe & Parents Sane)

Prep time: 15 minutes • Cook time: 30 minutes • makes: 6 servings

1⁄2 cup quinoa
8 ounces skinless, boneless chicken breast, cut into 1″–2″ pieces
1 tablespoon wheat-free tamari
Juice of half a lime
Salt and black pepper
3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
12 ounces green beans, trimmed and cut into 11⁄2″ pieces
2 cups cooked corn kernels
1 tablespoon minced fresh marjoram
1⁄2 teaspoon coarse kosher salt

1. Prepare quinoa according to instructions, and allow to cool. Marinate chicken in tamari, lime juice, salt, and pepper.
2. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in heavy medium skillet over medium-high heat. Add chicken to skillet; cook until golden brown and cooked through, about 8 minutes.
3. Cook green beans in large saucepan of boiling salted water until tender- crisp, about 4 minutes. Drain. Rinse under cold water to cool; drain. Transfer beans to kitchen towel and pat dry.
4. Mix quinoa, chicken, green beans, and corn in large bowl.
5. Combine remaining 2 tablespoons oil, marjoram, and kosher salt in
small bowl.
6. Pour over salad and toss to coat. Season, to taste, with salt and pepper. Serve.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Hey gang! I just spent a bit of time in London and am now thinking about moving there. I’m kidding. Kind of. I mean it was fun, urban, safe—except for me never knowing which way to look for oncoming traffic—and we had an amazing time. Loved it. LOVED IT.

I checked a few sites to find out what was great and gluten-free and I also found some places on my own that worked. Because, as we know, sometimes you find yourself in a location that is nowhere near the best reviewed gluten-free fish and chips shoppe, and you’ve just got to make it work. It was not that hard, ya’ll.

My most favorite thing about gluten-free dining in London was how educated the staff were (in 99% of the places I dined) and clear on cross-contact. One rainy night we found ourselves at a local pub where it appeared the gf options were limited. They were, and became even more so when the waitress cancelled my order because the chef had accidentally put something in the dedicated fryer that had gluten on it. ACCIDENTALLY PUT SOMETHING IN THE DEDICATED GLUTEN-FREE FRYER. Have you ever had someone admit there was a mistake in the kitchen? And then say, “You can’t have this. It’s not safe.”? I have not, and even though I was sad about what I was left with, I was super relieved to never get sick the entire time I was in the UK.  That makes for a pretty great vacation, you guys. 

I feel like I don’t even need to write this. Just go to London and be all, “Where’s the g-free at?” Everyone will wander out to offer you fish and chips and muffins. Like this spinach one, from an adorable cafe called Ripe Kitchen close to where I was staying.

That was a good muffin, ya’ll. And a great flat white. They had a few other options as well, but a load of gluten’y pastries for those traveling with you.

The Thomas Cubitt House

We spent Christmas in London, which was delightful. Even more delightful was this Christmas lunch at the Thomas Cubitt. I contacted them when I made the reservation for the prix-fixe Christmas luncheon and asked about gluten-free options. They had a special gluten-free menu for me when I arrived, but many of the options were naturally gluten-free like that delicious turkey au jus, pumpkin soup with pesto and pomegranate sorbet with a il’ ol vodka shot. I KNOW. Amazing.

The National Theatre

Here’s some more good news—the super fun tradition of afternoon tea in the UK can be found in the most interesting places, and most of them can be made gluten-free. I have a theater-loving daughter, so we opted to go on a tour of the National Theatre and top it off with a theater-themed tea. The current show was Pinocchio (although sometimes they throw in a mix of play-themed foods) and here’s what we had:

Rainbow Candy Floss

Candy Pops

White Chocolate & Vanilla Ice Cream Cone

Blue Fairy Cakes

Fruit Scones & Strawberry Jam

Finger Sandwiches

Stromboli Pastries

Pink Lemonade

Again, when I made the reservation I asked about gluten-free options and they had a replacement FOR EVERYTHING. You guys. I love London.

Harrod’s – Galvin Demoiselle at The Conservatory

This is one of those examples where we were out somewhere (Harrod’s) and half of us had eaten breakfast and the other half hadn’t, and I just was like, “What’s gluten-free?” It was this creme caramel and I loved everything about it except the raisins. Ewww, raisins. That terrace, tho.

Cereal Killer

Probs Not Gluten-Free

With a bazillion cereal options at this all cereal restaurant, you’re going to find your gluten-free options as well. They also have a variety of non-dairy milks, so everyone can find something super delicious and sickeningly sweet. It’s a dessert place, which reinforced what I’ve been telling my kids for years: “Cereal is not a healthy breakfast.” Nope, not even that one. Still, FUN.

Thai Square

Many members of my family (okay, there are 4 of us and 2 said this) gave Thai Square the “best restaurant in London” award. It was amazing, and the menu was clearly marked with gluten-free options. Which was fantastic, as the server did not know a lot of English, and it was much easier to avoid making a mistake when ordering when you could read it in front of your face.

Hobson’s Fish & Chips

I don’t know why I thought I would find more gluten-free fish and chip options in London, but I thought they’d be throwing them at me when I landed at Heathrow. Still, hunting down the best meant I was super stoked once I sat down and ordered at Hobson’s. Their fries (chips) are always gluten-free, and they have their own batter to make your fish nice and crispy and safe. It was soooo gooooood.

Namaaste

My most favorite meal in London was so nice I had it twice. Or some version of it, twice. We had Indian takeaway one hungry night from Namaaste in Camden, and all of us declared it to be the best Indian food we’d ever eaten. So we booked our New Year’s Eve dinner at the restaurant and wow, still the best. So much is naturally gluten-free, and they understood pitfalls as well. I’m still thinking about the coriander and lime chicken tikka, dal, and the tikka masala both chicken and lasooni paneer. Oh. My. Gerd.

Wagamama

A lot of you fine people recommended the gluten-free ramen at Wagamama, and that’s why I’d totally go back even though my noddles were not quite cooked. The flavor was fab, and again, on a cold rainy day ramen is the shizzle. I also just read this chain has opened in NYC and Boston. Anyone checked out those locations? I do love some ramen, even better if it allows me to eat it without pooping my pants.

I missed a lot, I know. Which means I have to go back to the UK, ASAP, and eat everything else.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

My mom did not love to cook. She had her standards that were delicious — mashed potatoes, chicken fried steak, Sunday roast — and the holidays were always filled with the best sweets when she toiled over divinity, whipped up some fudge and on my birthday, always the Oreo ice cream cake. But still, she didn’t love the job that was given to her by virtue of her time and gender.

One thing my mom did love to make, and was very, very good at were pies. Unfortunately for a very picky daughter, I did not like, and still do not, cooked fruit. So while I would chow down on her pecan pie at Thanksgiving, most of the time she focused on peach (her favorite), apple, apricot, and anything else that was in season. My mom did always throw me a bone, however, when she was making her favorite pies. And that is something I’ve been craving, pondering, and eventually, crying over.

When you make a homemade pie crust, after fitting it into the pie pan, you trim the edges leaving you with extra pie dough. My mom would always butter up the extras, sprinkle cinnamon sugar on top and bake it up so we could enjoy it before the pie was baked and cooled. And for me, it was usually the only part of the pie I would eat.

I started thinking about that cinnamony-sugary-buttery goodness a few days ago and as I’ve been doing ever since I was diagnosed with celiac, thought about how I could make it gluten-free. And I stopped pretty quickly because a) gluten-free pie crust just doesn’t flake like the regular stuff, and b) I hate making gluten-free pie crust. Even from a box, I hate wrestling with the gf stuff that doesn’t stick together well, falls apart, and is constantly in danger of being over handled and coming out thick and unappealing. So when I do want a pie, I buy the gluten-free pre-made from Whole Foods. While this has solved my Chess, chocolate and pecan pie challenges, there’s nothing left over for the special treat my mom always made me. Yesterday I came to the conclusion that I would never, ever, have my mom’s pie crust treat ever again for the rest of my life.

I’m slow. The longing and sadness I was feeling over cinnamon-sugar pie crust bites, and my feeling that the loss is permanent coincides with the death of my mother three years ago today. Right.

I’ve always talked about food meaning more than sustenance for your body. It’s emotional, it’s love. So it’s not surprising the memory of a tasty gluten-filled snack my mom made just for us triggered such sadness at this time of year. No, my mom won’t be able to cut off the extra crust and put the little pieces of pie dough into a separate pie pan, coat them with butter and sprinkle a cinnamon-sugar mixture on top for me ever again. But I’m going to give it one more shot.

A pie-sized treat this time, because as I said I HATE MAKING GLUTEN-FREE PIE CRUST. Instead, I defrosted the Whole Foods one and just sliced it up.

Melted some butter, brushed it on. Sprinkled a mixture of sugar and cinnamon (3 parts sugar, 1 part cinnamon) on top.

Baked on 350 for 20 minutes.

The thing about gluten-free pie crust is that it doesn’t brown up. But it is tasty. So I immediately shared it with my own kids, who loved it.

It’s not my mom’s special treat made for me, it will never be, but it will carry on.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I am a lucky lady. So lucky I just spent 9 days in England and France. More if you count the endless flights, but that does not count and I’d also like to forget being crammed into a tiny space for 12 hours.

If you’ve read my book, you know that I stumbled my way through Paris the last time I was there and while this time I did better, well, let’s just say I was happy the focus of my gluten-free time was mostly London.

Since my diagnosis I have not visited England, and I was super stoked to go as it seems they know what’s up in the gluten-free world. Readers, I was not disappointed. London, Bath and beyond (see what I did there?) was enchanting not only for the food, but for the atmosphere and delightful history. We had so much fun, and I ate so well and SO safely. But more on that later. Right now, I’m going to focus on the 2 1/2 days I bravely returned to Paris, to try to redeem myself from my last visit. Le sigh.

My biggest mistakes in my return to the land of brioche were in not reviewing my French, and not following my own advice that I WROTE IN A FREAKING BOOK. If it’s important, write it down. Just remember to actually READ IT. D’oh. Just goes to show, life happens. Maybe you’ve been traveling every week for two months, wrapping up holidays before you leave town, and have two kids who have like, needs and stuff, and you don’t do your vacation prep. Maybe you think you’ll just bring a load of gluten-free chips from Jolly Old England on the Eurostar and everything will be fine.

Pro tip: Probably won’t be fine.

Still, I did manage to find some fabulous gluten-free food in Paris, which is very exciting. I also managed to get glutened within about 3 hours of my arrival. It’s what happens when you’ve been walking around for hours and are starving and pop into a cafe and order a drink and they nicely put down house made chips that you eat without asking one damn question because you KNOW what the answer will be. That’s just how I roll. Apparently.

So, the good stuff.

Eric Kayser

I had high hopes for Eric Kayser, especially since one was located 1 1/2 blocks from my Air BnB, but I discovered the take away bread is gluten-free, but everything else inside is not. I did find a lovely potato soup I could dip my gluten-free bread into and I decided that was enough. Because I was in Paris, goddammit, and I was at least having carbs.

Noglu

I haven’t made it to Noglu in New York, but now I’ll make it a point when I’m back because, OMG, I had a mother scratching almond galette and I never want to eat anything else again for the rest of my life. I also ate the lemon tart, madeleines and a mini Buche de Noel. I made my time work for me, people.

This all gluten-free bakery and restaurant, which is across the alley, are reason enough to go to Paris. And since I was on limited time, I’m so glad I made it there for lunch and take home dessert.

While the pastries were clearly the best part, the entirely gluten-free restaurant was also delish. I couldn’t help it and got a burger, though the lasagna looked off the hook. I was just thrilled to be eating somewhere I could order in broken French and not be assured of getting a side of gluten with whatever landed on my plate.  It was heavenly. I also met a lovely family from Cleveland with a teenager’ish daughter who’d been diagnosed with celiac as a baby. I bet she was even more psyched to be there since that kid has been chowing down on crumbly bread for decades. I hope she also got a galette from across the street. Or five.

Margherita

Not at all a gluten-free restaurant, we stumbled onto this gorgeous, perfect restaurant when I was looking for the now closed, George (or hidden, I never did find the exact address) that used to offer a gluten-free menu. When we walked by Margherita with the warm outdoor seating (and this was winter, ya’ll) all four of us turned our heads and stared at the bespoke benches and picnic tables, filled with turines, wood oven baked pizzas, and a pile of juicy meats like you see above. The three-leveled restaurant also had games and artisanal cocktails –

I’m a spritz, you guys!

And this was the door to the ladies, so you know I was in.

The staff was also very helpful, which was hard to find at times in Paris, so I felt completely comfortable dining on the few options they had that were gluten-free (very few, so love meat and cheese or skip it). I was even more comfortable after shoving some of this truffle covered burrata in my burrata hole.

Jeez, louise.

After that we kind of grazed around, so I don’t have a specific restaurant recommendation. Mostly because I discovered many places may offer one pastry that’s gf, like Cafe Marlette and this gorgeous gluten-free cake.

It was as good as it looks. While the rest of the family ate avocado toast and salmon and other delicious things, I continued my tradition of going with dessert when that’s all you’ve got. Macarons are everywhere in Paris, and most of them are gluten-free.

Oh, and cheese. There’s always cheese in Paris.

And highly entertaining American movie posters translated into French.

It may have been the jet lag but we could not stop giggling at this.

I hope your holidays were as fab as ours, even with the struggle that is Paris.

More on London to come!

XO, GIMB

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Hey gang! I just spent a bit of time in London and am now thinking about moving there. I’m kidding. Kind of. I mean it was fun, urban, safe—except for me never knowing which way to look for oncoming traffic—and we had an amazing time. Loved it. LOVED IT.

I checked a few sites to find out what was great and gluten-free and I also found some places on my own that worked. Because, as we know, sometimes you find yourself in a location that is nowhere near the best reviewed gluten-free fish and chips shoppe, and you’ve just got to make it work. It was not that hard, ya’ll.

My most favorite thing about gluten-free dining in London was how educated the staff were (in 99% of the places I dined) and clear on cross-contact. One rainy night we found ourselves at a local pub where it appeared the gf options were limited. They were, and became even more so when the waitress cancelled my order because the chef had accidentally put something in the dedicated fryer that had gluten on it. ACCIDENTALLY PUT SOMETHING IN THE DEDICATED GLUTEN-FREE FRYER. Have you ever had someone admit there was a mistake in the kitchen? And then say, “You can’t have this. It’s not safe.”? I have not, and even though I was sad about what I was left with, I was super relieved to never get sick the entire time I was in the UK.  That makes for a pretty great vacation, you guys. 

I feel like I don’t even need to write this. Just go to London and be all, “Where’s the g-free at?” Everyone will wander out to offer you fish and chips and muffins. Like this spinach one, from an adorable cafe called Ripe Kitchen close to where I was staying.

That was a good muffin, ya’ll. And a great flat white. They had a few other options as well, but a load of gluten’y pastries for those traveling with you.

The Thomas Cubitt House

We spent Christmas in London, which was delightful. Even more delightful was this Christmas lunch at the Thomas Cubitt. I contacted them when I made the reservation for the prix-fixe Christmas luncheon and asked about gluten-free options. They had a special gluten-free menu for me when I arrived, but many of the options were naturally gluten-free like that delicious turkey au jus, pumpkin soup with pesto and pomegranate sorbet with a il’ ol vodka shot. I KNOW. Amazing.

The National Theatre

Here’s some more good news—the super fun tradition of afternoon tea in the UK can be found in the most interesting places, and most of them can be made gluten-free. I have a theater-loving daughter, so we opted to go on a tour of the National Theatre and top it off with a theater-themed tea. The current show was Pinocchio (although sometimes they throw in a mix of play-themed foods) and here’s what we had:

Rainbow Candy Floss

Candy Pops

White Chocolate & Vanilla Ice Cream Cone

Blue Fairy Cakes

Fruit Scones & Strawberry Jam

Finger Sandwiches

Stromboli Pastries

Pink Lemonade

Again, when I made the reservation I asked about gluten-free options and they had a replacement FOR EVERYTHING. You guys. I love London.

Harrod’s – Galvin Demoiselle at The Conservatory

This is one of those examples where we were out somewhere (Harrod’s) and half of us had eaten breakfast and the other half hadn’t, and I just was like, “What’s gluten-free?” It was this creme caramel and I loved everything about it except the raisins. Ewww, raisins. That terrace, tho.

Cereal Killer

Probs Not Gluten-Free

With a bazillion cereal options at this all cereal restaurant, you’re going to find your gluten-free options as well. They also have a variety of non-dairy milks, so everyone can find something super delicious and sickeningly sweet. It’s a dessert place, which reinforced what I’ve been telling my kids for years: “Cereal is not a healthy breakfast.” Nope, not even that one. Still, FUN.

Thai Square

Many members of my family (okay, there are 4 of us and 2 said this) gave Thai Square the “best restaurant in London” award. It was amazing, and the menu was clearly marked with gluten-free options. Which was fantastic, as the server did not know a lot of English, and it was much easier to avoid making a mistake when ordering when you could read it in front of your face.

Hobson’s Fish & Chips

I don’t know why I thought I would find more gluten-free fish and chip options in London, but I thought they’d be throwing them at me when I landed at Heathrow. Still, hunting down the best meant I was super stoked once I sat down and ordered at Hobson’s. Their fries (chips) are always gluten-free, and they have their own batter to make your fish nice and crispy and safe. It was soooo gooooood.

Namaaste

My most favorite meal in London was so nice I had it twice. Or some version of it, twice. We had Indian takeaway one hungry night from Namaaste in Camden, and all of us declared it to be the best Indian food we’d ever eaten. So we booked our New Year’s Eve dinner at the restaurant and wow, still the best. So much is naturally gluten-free, and they understood pitfalls as well. I’m still thinking about the coriander and lime chicken tikka, dal, and the tikka masala both chicken and lasooni paneer. Oh. My. Gerd.

Wagamama

A lot of you fine people recommended the gluten-free ramen at Wagamama, and that’s why I’d totally go back even though my noddles were not quite cooked. The flavor was fab, and again, on a cold rainy day ramen is the shizzle. I also just read this chain has opened in NYC and Boston. Anyone checked out those locations? I do love some ramen, even better if it allows me to eat it without pooping my pants.

I missed a lot, I know. Which means I have to go back to the UK, ASAP, and eat everything else.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

My mom did not love to cook. She had her standards that were delicious — mashed potatoes, chicken fried steak, Sunday roast — and the holidays were always filled with the best sweets when she toiled over divinity, whipped up some fudge and on my birthday, always the Oreo ice cream cake. But still, she didn’t love the job that was given to her by virtue of her time and gender.

One thing my mom did love to make, and was very, very good at were pies. Unfortunately for a very picky daughter, I did not like, and still do not, cooked fruit. So while I would chow down on her pecan pie at Thanksgiving, most of the time she focused on peach (her favorite), apple, apricot, and anything else that was in season. My mom did always throw me a bone, however, when she was making her favorite pies. And that is something I’ve been craving, pondering, and eventually, crying over.

When you make a homemade pie crust, after fitting it into the pie pan, you trim the edges leaving you with extra pie dough. My mom would always butter up the extras, sprinkle cinnamon sugar on top and bake it up so we could enjoy it before the pie was baked and cooled. And for me, it was usually the only part of the pie I would eat.

I started thinking about that cinnamony-sugary-buttery goodness a few days ago and as I’ve been doing ever since I was diagnosed with celiac, thought about how I could make it gluten-free. And I stopped pretty quickly because a) gluten-free pie crust just doesn’t flake like the regular stuff, and b) I hate making gluten-free pie crust. Even from a box, I hate wrestling with the gf stuff that doesn’t stick together well, falls apart, and is constantly in danger of being over handled and coming out thick and unappealing. So when I do want a pie, I buy the gluten-free pre-made from Whole Foods. While this has solved my Chess, chocolate and pecan pie challenges, there’s nothing left over for the special treat my mom always made me. Yesterday I came to the conclusion that I would never, ever, have my mom’s pie crust treat ever again for the rest of my life.

I’m slow. The longing and sadness I was feeling over cinnamon-sugar pie crust bites, and my feeling that the loss is permanent coincides with the death of my mother three years ago today. Right.

I’ve always talked about food meaning more than sustenance for your body. It’s emotional, it’s love. So it’s not surprising the memory of a tasty gluten-filled snack my mom made just for us triggered such sadness at this time of year. No, my mom won’t be able to cut off the extra crust and put the little pieces of pie dough into a separate pie pan, coat them with butter and sprinkle a cinnamon-sugar mixture on top for me ever again. But I’m going to give it one more shot.

A pie-sized treat this time, because as I said I HATE MAKING GLUTEN-FREE PIE CRUST. Instead, I defrosted the Whole Foods one and just sliced it up.

Melted some butter, brushed it on. Sprinkled a mixture of sugar and cinnamon (3 parts sugar, 1 part cinnamon) on top.

Baked on 350 for 20 minutes.

The thing about gluten-free pie crust is that it doesn’t brown up. But it is tasty. So I immediately shared it with my own kids, who loved it.

It’s not my mom’s special treat made for me, it will never be, but it will carry on.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

I am a lucky lady. So lucky I just spent 9 days in England and France. More if you count the endless flights, but that does not count and I’d also like to forget being crammed into a tiny space for 12 hours.

If you’ve read my book, you know that I stumbled my way through Paris the last time I was there and while this time I did better, well, let’s just say I was happy the focus of my gluten-free time was mostly London.

Since my diagnosis I have not visited England, and I was super stoked to go as it seems they know what’s up in the gluten-free world. Readers, I was not disappointed. London, Bath and beyond (see what I did there?) was enchanting not only for the food, but for the atmosphere and delightful history. We had so much fun, and I ate so well and SO safely. But more on that later. Right now, I’m going to focus on the 2 1/2 days I bravely returned to Paris, to try to redeem myself from my last visit. Le sigh.

My biggest mistakes in my return to the land of brioche were in not reviewing my French, and not following my own advice that I WROTE IN A FREAKING BOOK. If it’s important, write it down. Just remember to actually READ IT. D’oh. Just goes to show, life happens. Maybe you’ve been traveling every week for two months, wrapping up holidays before you leave town, and have two kids who have like, needs and stuff, and you don’t do your vacation prep. Maybe you think you’ll just bring a load of gluten-free chips from Jolly Old England on the Eurostar and everything will be fine.

Pro tip: Probably won’t be fine.

Still, I did manage to find some fabulous gluten-free food in Paris, which is very exciting. I also managed to get glutened within about 3 hours of my arrival. It’s what happens when you’ve been walking around for hours and are starving and pop into a cafe and order a drink and they nicely put down house made chips that you eat without asking one damn question because you KNOW what the answer will be. That’s just how I roll. Apparently.

So, the good stuff.

Eric Kayser

I had high hopes for Eric Kayser, especially since one was located 1 1/2 blocks from my Air BnB, but I discovered the take away bread is gluten-free, but everything else inside is not. I did find a lovely potato soup I could dip my gluten-free bread into and I decided that was enough. Because I was in Paris, goddammit, and I was at least having carbs.

Noglu

I haven’t made it to Noglu in New York, but now I’ll make it a point when I’m back because, OMG, I had a mother scratching almond galette and I never want to eat anything else again for the rest of my life. I also ate the lemon tart, madeleines and a mini Buche de Noel. I made my time work for me, people.

This all gluten-free bakery and restaurant, which is across the alley, are reason enough to go to Paris. And since I was on limited time, I’m so glad I made it there for lunch and take home dessert.

While the pastries were clearly the best part, the entirely gluten-free restaurant was also delish. I couldn’t help it and got a burger, though the lasagna looked off the hook. I was just thrilled to be eating somewhere I could order in broken French and not be assured of getting a side of gluten with whatever landed on my plate.  It was heavenly. I also met a lovely family from Cleveland with a teenager’ish daughter who’d been diagnosed with celiac as a baby. I bet she was even more psyched to be there since that kid has been chowing down on crumbly bread for decades. I hope she also got a galette from across the street. Or five.

Margherita

Not at all a gluten-free restaurant, we stumbled onto this gorgeous, perfect restaurant when I was looking for the now closed, George (or hidden, I never did find the exact address) that used to offer a gluten-free menu. When we walked by Margherita with the warm outdoor seating (and this was winter, ya’ll) all four of us turned our heads and stared at the bespoke benches and picnic tables, filled with turines, wood oven baked pizzas, and a pile of juicy meats like you see above. The three-leveled restaurant also had games and artisanal cocktails –

I’m a spritz, you guys!

And this was the door to the ladies, so you know I was in.

The staff was also very helpful, which was hard to find at times in Paris, so I felt completely comfortable dining on the few options they had that were gluten-free (very few, so love meat and cheese or skip it). I was even more comfortable after shoving some of this truffle covered burrata in my burrata hole.

Jeez, louise.

After that we kind of grazed around, so I don’t have a specific restaurant recommendation. Mostly because I discovered many places may offer one pastry that’s gf, like Cafe Marlette and this gorgeous gluten-free cake.

It was as good as it looks. While the rest of the family ate avocado toast and salmon and other delicious things, I continued my tradition of going with dessert when that’s all you’ve got. Macarons are everywhere in Paris, and most of them are gluten-free.

Oh, and cheese. There’s always cheese in Paris.

And highly entertaining American movie posters translated into French.

It may have been the jet lag but we could not stop giggling at this.

I hope your holidays were as fab as ours, even with the struggle that is Paris.

More on London to come!

XO, GIMB


Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

It’s still hot in LA, which always makes me long for the season changes. Yes, I know I’m romanticizing fall weather and many of you are angrily wearing rain boots and cursing. But here in LA it’s still hot enough to have a summer salad for dinner and go to bed naked.

I’m a fan of the traditional Cobb Salad, but not a fan of the hard-boiled egg element, so I’ve picked my favorite Cobb Salad ingredients (and I encourage you to do the same) and added some extra crunch via the homemade gluten-free croutons you can see hanging out at the bottom of the bowl up there. Jeez, I miss having croutons on a salad. Do you? Well, you don’t have to any longer if you whip up some super easy gluten-free goodness in your own dang home. Bring them to your favorite salad purveyor and toss them on! I don’t care! The restaurant might, but maybe they should just leave you alone with your croutons.

Everyone in my family loves it when I make homemade croutons because they’re fresh, crunchy and satisfying. Using Schär’s* new 10 Grains & Seeds Bread, it’s super easy to make tasty and with a nutritional punch from the 10 grains and seeds that are sourced from certified gluten free farms: rice flour, quinoa seeds, chia seeds, amaranth four, quinoa flour, buckwheat flour, millet flour, flax seeds and sunflower seeds. Add this goodness to a delicious sourdough recipe, toss in some agave and honey and you’ve got a dang good slice of bread that Schär also gives the old ELISA R5 test to make sure it’s celiac safe.  (Also no GMOs or preservatives, just to make it that much more awesome.)

To make this big bowl of yum I fried up some bacon, chopped up some tomatoes and a big ol’ avocado, threw on some little nuggets of goat cheese on top of some chopped Romaine and we called it a day. A very delicious, gluten-free day. Do it!

Gluten-Free Cobb Salad

1 head of Romaine lettuce, chopped

1/2 cup cherry tomatoes, halved

1/4 cup crumbled goat cheese

1/4 cup freshly cooked corn

1 avocado, diced

4 slices bacon, diced and cooked

1/2 cup gluten-free croutons

Gluten-Free Croutons:

8 slices Schar GF 10 Grains & Seeds Bread

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 cup olive oil

Combine olive oil, garlic cloves, salt and pepper. Mix bread crumbs covering well. Allow the bread to sit for up to 30 minutes or longer. You want them really good and soaked through.

Bake on 425 for 10-15 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes.

Allow your croutons to cool off as you assemble your salad.

I have ranch on the side as a dip, because otherwise my little one would drown the whole dang salad in it. I know this because I, as a child, would have done the same but probably with queso, and he’s inherited my indulgent side.

*Schär also gave me a load of delicious bread and some cash money to cook and write about all of this. 


Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview