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This easy-to-make gluten-free sheet cake is rich and moist. And it only requires one bowl to make! Perfect for birthday parties, celebrations, baby showers, or a pot luck dessert.

What is is about a yellow sheet cake? For me, it’s the most comforting homemade cake. There’s just something homey about it. Sure, I love a towering gluten-free white layer cake and making a gluten-free chocolate cake always brings a smile to my face. But a sheet cake? That’s the cake I make for small family birthday parties, pot lucks, and, most importantly, just because.

How to Make a Gluten-Free Sheet Cake
  • Use One Bowl. This recipe comes together in one bowl! No need to whip egg whites or do anything fancy. Some folks call this a dump cake. But I don’t love the word “dump” applied to food. But that’s just me.
  • Cut in Softened Butter or Coconut Oil. For a boxed cake texture, softened butter is mixed into the gluten-free flour and sugar before the eggs, milk, and oil are added. This step creates a texture that’s soft and delicate.
  • Mix Until Smooth and Fluffy. Once you’ve cut in the butter, add the wet ingredients and mix until the batter is smooth and fluffy. This takes about a minute or so.
  • Bake in a Greased Pan. If you want to serve the cake right from the pan, simply grease a 9×13-inch pan with nonstick cooking spray. But if you want to remove the cake from the pan, line the pan with parchment paper. Be sure the paper hangs over the edge of the pan. This makes it easy to lift the cooled cake out of the pan.
  • Frost with Your Favorite Frosting. What’s your favorite frosting? Oh, that’s funny! That’s the perfect frosting for this cake. (My favorite frosting varies. Some days I love chocolate frosting. Other times I like to make the vanilla frosting. And, when I’m feeling jazzy, I’ll whip up a batch of cream cheese frosting for a sheet cake. That one always wins praise.)
The Perfect Gluten-Free Flour for Sheet Cake

This simple sheet cake uses Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten-Free Baking Flour. If you use another flour, the cake might turn out fine or…it might not. Gluten-free flours vary greatly. For the best results use Bob’s. If you don’t want to use Bob’s, use a blend that contains xanthan gum or add 1/2 teaspoon xanthan gum to the recipe.

FAQs: Gluten-Free Sheet Cake Can I make this into gluten-free cupcakes?

Sure can! Scoop the batter into 24 cupcake cups. Be sure to line the cups with paper liners or spray very generously with nonstick cooking spray.

Can I make this into a round gluten-free cake?

Yup! Divide the batter evenly between two 8-inch round cake pans.

Can I freeze the gluten-free sheet cake?

You can! Be sure to allow the cake to cool completely before freezing. And, bonus, you can frost the cake before freezing. Frosted cakes freeze really well. (The hardest part? You need room in the freezer for the cake.)

Can I omit the eggs?

Probably not. Cake recipes are hard to make egg-free. I don’t think this one would work without eggs. Sorry.

Can I make this without dairy?

Yes! Replace the butter with either softened coconut oil or softened dairy-free margarine. And replace the milk with dairy-free milk. (Just don’t use full-fat coconut milk. It’s too heavy for the cake.)

Gluten-Free Vanilla Sheet Cake

This easy-to-make gluten-free sheet cake is rich and moist. And it only requires one bowl to make! Perfect for birthday parties, celebrations, baby showers, or a pot luck dessert.

  • 2 1/4 cups Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten-Free Baking Flour
  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 cup softened butter or coconut oil
  • 1 cup milk
  • 1/4 cup canola oil
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla extract
1 batch gluten-free buttercream
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease a 9×13-inch pan with nonstick cooking spray Or if you want to remove the cake for serving, line the pan with parchment paper and grease with nonstick cooking spray.
  2. Whisk together gluten-free flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl. Add softened butter. Mix, on medium speed, until butter is incorporated. Very small pieces of butter should dot the mixture.
  3. Add the milk, oil, eggs, and vanilla extract. Mix until batter is smooth and fluffy, about one minute.
  4. Spread batter evenly into prepared pan. Bake until a cake tester inserted in the center comes out clean, about 30 minutes.
  5. Cool cake in pan. Frost cooled cake with your favorite frosting.

The post Easy Gluten-Free Vanilla Sheet Cake appeared first on Gluten-Free Baking.

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We asked the GlutenFreeBaking.com community for their best gluten-free travel tips and they didn’t disappoint. Here’s what you need to know when traveling while on a gluten-free diet. 

Some answers have been edited for clarity or length.

Gluten-Free Tavel Tip #1: Research Before You Go

My daughter recently traveled out-of-state for a week. She researched the location in advance and called a few places to verify things like separate fryer for fries, protected veggie and salad prep, etc. It was a small town, yet she found a totally gluten-free bakery that had awesome goodies, and pizza crust. It’s five hours from home, but she and her many gluten-free friends are planning to take turns driving there every couple of weeks with a big shopping list.
—Carol

I always read every review on “find me gluten free”. I take snacks, I have a Nima so that I can test my food. I travel to the same places (I know not as much fun) but once I learned what’s safe I stick with it. I try to make sure I know where grocery stores are in the area.
—Melissa

I always do lots of research where I’m going. I always make reservations, when possible, and note on the reservation “diner with celiac will require gluten-free options.” I usually limit dining choices to restaurants with confirmed gluten-free options.
—Michele

Gluten-Free Travel Tip #2: Bring Snacks

Take lots of snacks with you and have a note/card in the languages necessary that states ‘allergic to gluten’, even though it’s not an allergy that is better understood than gluten-free/celiac disease.
—Joanne

Always take snacks. Just in case. Then if you get caught out you don’t have to go hungry.
—Hollie

Bring lots and lots of snacks
—Amanda

Dried fruits and nuts. Larabars. Instant gluten-free oatmeal. Peanut butter packets, Protein shakes. Apples and Bananas. I never travel without these.
—Kim

Gluten-Free Travel Tip #3: Go to the local grocery store or Farmers’ Market

Before you travel, check what groceries are near you. I don’t eat in restaurants. I stay in Airbnbs, buy groceries and cook my own food. This is the best way I can keep myself safe.
—Alejandra

I locate grocery stores nearby where I will be and research what options they have in case I run out snacks that I have packed. If we’re staying in a place that has a kitchen, I buy foil to cover baking sheets so I can warm up bread, bagels etc.
—Michele

Hit up the local farmers’ market. Local fruits, cheeses, and sometimes gluten-free treats are easy-to-find. Plus it’s a fun way to get to know the place you’re visiting.
—Rose

Gluten-Free Travel Tip #4: Bring food for the Journey

Check if your airline has a gluten-free meal option but don’t count on it. Have a good meal just before going to the airport. In your carry on, bring a few gluten-free sandwiches and some trail mix. Put gluten-free crackers, sandwich bread, and pasta in your checked luggage.
—Jacqueline

Never fly without food. Ever. We got stuck on a runway for three hours. They handed out snacks, which I couldn’t eat. Thankfully I’d brought my own gluten-free snacks. If I hadn’t, I would have been out of luck. 
—Sally

Always travel with a packed lunch. I bring a peanut butter and jelly sandwich, some gluten-free chips, and fruit. It’s saved me on road trips many times. 
—Martha

Gluten-Free Travel Tip #5: Be Prepared

Have a second or third option. One time we went to a new city. I couldn’t wait to try a gluten-free restaurant I’d read about online. We got there only to find that it was closed that week. There weren’t other options nearby. I didn’t think I needed to bring food. I ended up getting potato chips and a mealy apple at a gas station while my family ate. Never again.
—Gabby

Always have a backup plan!! Weather, mechanical issues, traffic tie-ups, etc. can cause short or long delays. Never travel without food!
—Claire

Bring your own rolls to restaurants. Some have a gluten-free menu but no bread.
—Jessica

Gluten-Free Travel Tip #6: Use Dining Cards

Download and print the gluten-free language cards to be used in restaurants. Really helped us in China… both Mandarin and Cantonese.
—Sarah

Dining cards seem old-fashioned but they really help. 
—Bea

Gluten-Free Travel Tip #7: Trust your gut, not just what it says on the menu

When you’re in a restaurant and ask about gluten-free options, trust your gut feeling when listening to staff. My “BS” sensors have become pretty good over the years and I know when to ask follow up questions or when I can trust the staff.
—Micha

Many places now offer “gluten-free” options but they don’t really know how to prepare a safe meal. I ask lots of questions before ordering. I don’t just trust that gluten-free means it’s safe for me. I don’t want to get sick on vacation. I’d rather go without than get “glutened” and miss fun days.
—Jeni

Gluten-Free Travel Tip #8: Have Fun!

There are places out there that serve wonderful gluten-free food. Do some research and go out and have fun. Pack some snacks to cover yourself.
—Mary Jo

Learn how to travel gluten-free. It’s probably very different from how you traveled before your diagnosis but it’s worth it.
—Shelia

Don’t let your gluten-free diet stop you from seeing the world. Ask for help. Stay on your diet and go have adventures. Life is too short to always stay at home.
—Glenn 

The post 8 Essential Gluten-free Travel Tips You Need to Know appeared first on Gluten-Free Baking.

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This one-bowl gluten-free strawberry cake is so easy to make! It’s moist and tender crumb makes it a favorite for birthday parties and other celebrations. Frost with cream cheese frosting or vanilla buttercream. 

How to Make Gluten-Free Strawberry Cake
  1. Whisk together the dry ingredients. Don’t rush this step. You want the baking powder evenly mixed throughout the batter. (If you’re using a stand mixer, fit it with the paddle attachment. It works well to combine the ingredients.)

  2. Add very soft butter and a little oil. Most of the time, you don’t want to bake with butter that’s too soft. Not this time. Use butter that’s squishable-y soft but not melted.

  3. Add milk, eggs, and strawberry Jell-O. This is a retro-style strawberry cake. The flavor comes from strawberry Jell-O. Be sure to use regular strawberry Jell-O, not sugar-free. 

  4. Mix the batter until thick and fluffy. This takes about two minutes. And you don’t want to rush! At first, the batter will seem thin. After a minute of mixing, it thickens and gets fluffy.

  5. Divide between two greased pans. I prefer 8-inch cake pans because they make a high cake. But if you only have 9-inch cakes on hand, use them.

  6. Bake until set. This cake takes about 30 minutes to bake. It’s done when a cake tester inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean. 

  7. Cool the cake completely. The cakes are very delicate when they first come out of the oven. Allow them to cool in the pan for five minutes and then invert onto a wire rack to cool completely.

  8. Frost when cool. To avoid a “baking fail”, wait until the cakes are completely cool to the touch before frosting.

FAQs: Easy Gluten-Free Strawberry Cake Do I have to use Jell-O?

Yes. If you want this recipe to make a strawberry cake, you’ll need the Jell-O. I’m working on a recipe that doesn’t use Jell-O.

Is Jell-O Gluten-Free?

As of this post (5/2019), Jello is gluten-free. However, always check labels and contact the manufacturer if you have any questions. 

Can I add strawberries to the batter?

Maybe. I haven’t tested the recipe with added strawberries. If you decided to try it, I would not add more than 1/2 cup mashed strawberries. More than that might overwhelm the batter and cause the cake to sink.

What’s the best frosting for strawberry cake?

I like cream cheese frosting and included my favorite recipe below. Fluffy vanilla buttercream also works really well. And, if you like chocolate-dipped strawberries, frost the cake with chocolate icing. Yum!

 

Other Gluten-Free Cake Recipes You’ll Love

Easy Gluten-Free Strawberry Cake

One Bowl Gluten-Free Strawberry Cake Recipe. Easy to make. Perfect for Birthdays! 

  • nonstick cooking spray
  • 2 1/2 cups Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten-Free Baking Flour
  • 1 1/4 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup 1 stick butter, very soft
  • 1/8 cup vegetable oil
  • 1 1/4 cup milk
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1 (3-ounce ) package strawberry Jello
  • Cream cheese frosting or <a href=”https://glutenfreebaking.com/gluten-free-vanilla-buttercream-frosting/”>vanilla buttercream</a>
Cream Cheese Frosting
  • 1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese room temperature
  • 1/2 cup butter, softened
  • 3 1/2 cups powdered sugar, sifted
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
For the Gluten-Free Strawberry Cake
  1. Preheat the oven and prepare the pans. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Grease two 8- or 9-inch round cake pans with nonstick cooking spray.

  2. Make the Batter. Mix together gluten-free baking flour, granulated sugar, baking powder, and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment or a large mixing bowl. Run the mixer for 30 seconds to combine the ingredients. 

  3. Stop the mixer. Add softened butter and oil. Mix on medium-low speed until combined. The mixture will look crumbly, about 30 seconds.  Stop mixer. Add milk, eggs, and strawberry Jell-O. Mix on low speed for 30 seconds. Increase mixer to medium-high and mix for two minutes.

  4. Bake the Cake. Divide batter evenly between the prepared cake pans. Spread batter evenly into pans. Bake until a cake tester inserted into the center of the pan comes out clean, about 30 minutes.

  5. Cool and Frost. Remove pans from oven and place on a wire rack. Allow cakes to cool in the pan for five minutes. Invert cakes onto the wire rack to cool completely.

  6. Prepare the frosting. Frost cooled cake. Store cake, covered, on the counter for up to three days.

For the Cream Cheese Frosting
  1. Combine cream cheese and butter in a medium bowl. Beat on medium low speed until smooth. Stop mixer. Add powdered sugar and vanilla extract. Beat on low speed until smooth.

The Flour

For this recipe, I used Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten-Free Flour. I have not tested this recipe with another flour blend. Using a different blend will affect the final cake.

The Butter

For the cake, be sure the butter is very soft. It should blend easily into the flour mixture. 

The post Easy Gluten-Free Strawberry Cake Recipe appeared first on Gluten-Free Baking.

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On May 8th, Aldi’s gluten-free products hit the shelves. I decided to try some out and let you know what I thought. Please note this is NOT a sponsored post. I purchased all the products included in the review. Prior to the release, Aldi sent me a press release about the products. I was not asked to post about them. But I was curious. Would they be tasty? A good value? 

Our store put out the limited run “liveGFree: products early. If you’re reading this before May 8th, you might want to see if your local store already has them out because I have a feeling these are going to go fast. 

When I saw that Aldi had included gluten-free glazed doughnuts in their lineup this year, I almost squealed with delight. I love all doughnuts but glazed doughnuts are my favorite. 

These, like the gluten-free chocolate frosted doughnuts, are sold in the freezer section. At our store, they were in the small case that sits in the aisle, not in the freezer case up against the wall. 

I let the entire package thaw on the counter. There aren’t any directions for how to defrost the doughnuts. The box simply says “thaw prior to eating.” If you want to rush them, I think you could use the microwave but I’d be careful. These seem like the type of baked good that you could over-microwave quicky. 

They’re a nice size, about three inches across and an inch thick. The picture on the box made me think they’d be small. I was happily surprised when I opened the box and saw six full-size doughnuts. It’s always nice when gluten-free foods aren’t waaaay smaller than their wheat-counterparts, isn’t it?

Let’s talk about the texture of these doughnuts! Oh my goodness. I thought they were yeast-raised. The crumb is light and airy. They aren’t as soft as, let’s say, a Krispy Kreme doughnut (what is?) but they didn’t taste cake-like to me. A good cake doughnut tends to be dense. These aren’t. 

It was only after I re-read the ingredients that I realized these doughnuts don’t contain yeast. 

The glaze is the perfect thickness to add a hint of sweetness to the doughnuts. Like most glazed doughnuts, the glaze crackles a little as you bite into it. So grab a napkin. You might need it. 

I also loved how the texture wasn’t gritty at all. I know some folks hate it when people say, “You’d never guess these are gluten-free!” That description of gluten-free foods doesn’t bother me. Many people come to the gluten-free diet after years of eating wheat. So the gritty texture of some gluten-free foods is offputting. I’m happy to report that these doughnuts aren’t gritty at all! 

These don’t taste like freshly-fried doughnuts you’d make yourself or pick up at a bakery. They remind me of the type of doughnut you get at the supermarket. If you go in with that expectation, I don’t think you’ll be disappointed.  

Aldi Gluten-Free Glazed Doughnuts: Ingredients and Nutrition  

Aldi Gluten-Free Glazed Doughnuts Ingredients*: Gluten Free Flour (Corn, White Rice, Tapioca), Palm Oil, Sugar, Eggs, Water, Canola Oil, Baking Powder (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Sodium Bicarbonate, Corn Starch, Monocalcium Phosphate), Xanthan Gum, Salt, Pure Vanilla Extract, Sunflower Lecithin, Vanilla Glaze (Confectioners Sugar, WAter, Sugar, Canola Oil, Agar, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Sulfate, Pure Vanilla Extract, Salt.) 

Contains: Eggs

As with the gluten-free chocolate frosted doughnuts, these are dairy-free! 

*Please check the current package for up-to-date Ingredient and Nutrition Facts. Ingredients change frequently. Any ingredient or nutrition information provided by GlutenFreeBaking.com is included for educational purposes and may not reflect the current ingredients. 

I’m neither impressed nor surprised by the ingredient label. Traditional doughnuts are always a treat. And these gluten-free doughnuts from Aldi are no exception. The gluten-free flour base is a standard “white” flour base. I think this is fine for something like a doughnut. 

Aldi Gluten-Free Glazed Doughnuts: The Price

A box of six cost me $4.49*. For gluten-free doughnuts, I think this is a fair price. Is it as cheap as gluten-based doughnuts? Sadly, no.  But $0.75 per doughnuts feels reasonable for doughnuts you don’t have to make yourself. (And, as I type this, I remember recently paying more than that for a box of gluten-y doughnuts. Perhaps the price of doughnuts has risen for wheat-eaters?)

Aldi Gluten-Free Glazed Doughnuts: Stock Up or Skip?

I say stock up! I really enjoyed these doughnuts. The taste, texture, and price didn’t disappoint. If you’ve got space in your freezer, you can’t go wrong with buying a box or three. 

RATING: FIVE OUT OF FIVE. 

The post Review: Aldi Gluten-Free Glazed Doughnuts appeared first on Gluten-Free Baking.

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Aldi Gluten-Free Chocolate Frosted Doughnuts
 


On May 8th, Aldi’s gluten-free products hit the shelves. I decided to try some out. Please note this is NOT a sponsored post. I purchased all the products included in the review. Prior to the release, Aldi sent me a press release about the products. I was not asked to post about them. But I was curious. Would they be tasty? A good value? 

Our store put out the limited run “liveGFree: products early. If you’re reading this before May 8th, you might want to see if your local store already has them out because I have a feeling these are going to go fast. 

The two products I was most excited to try were the gluten-free glazed doughnuts and the gluten-free chocolate frosted doughnuts. Oprah loves bread. I love doughnuts. (shoutout to my friends who get my Oprah reference.)

When I first saw the box, I wondered if these were chocolate doughnuts with a chocolate glaze or vanilla doughnuts with a chocolate glaze. Perhaps this is obvious to you but it wasn’t to me and the box doesn’t make it clear. I love gluten-free chocolate doughnuts; so I was hoping they’d be chocolate. Heh.

You’ll find these in the freezer section of Aldi. At our store, they were in the small freezer on the floor. Not in the freezer case against the wall.

For the review, I let the entire package defrost. If you don’t want to thaw the entire box, you can pull out one or two and keep the rest frozen. 

As soon as I removed the tray from the box, I saw that these were vanilla doughnuts with a chocolate frosting. Mystery solved! 

They’re a good size doughnut. This surprised me a bit. For some reason, I expected them to be small. The picture on the front of the box looks a bit smaller than traditional doughnuts and, as anyone who eats gluten-free knows, sometimes gluten-free baked goods are smaller (and more expensive!) than their wheat counterpart. 

The doughnuts are huge but they’re a nice size. No complaints there. 

How yummy does that texture look? The first doughnut I tried from Aldi was the gluten-free glazed doughnut. I really thought it was a yeast-based doughnut because it was so light. Usually, cake doughnuts are pretty dense compared to yeast-raised doughnuts. 

Not these! The texture is very light and airy. Not too dry. Not too moist. 

Based on taste, texture, and ingredients, I think this doughnut is the same doughnut that’s in the Aldi Gluten-Free Glazed Doughnut but with a chocolate frosting. 

Speaking of that chocolate frosting…they call it frosting. I call it a glaze. 

It’s nice and thin. The chocolate isn’t overpowering and it isn’t frosting-like at all. And I like this! When I think of “chocolate frosting,” I think of something thick and heavy. This chocolate glaze is the perfect finish to the doughnuts. 

The funny thing about these doughnuts and the plain vanilla glazed is what appealed to me about them: they reminded me of inexpensive gluten-filled doughnuts. These don’t taste like fresh doughnuts from the bakery. They remind me of the doughnuts sold in bags at the grocery store. And I like those doughnuts.

If you’re looking for a gourmet doughnut, these aren’t for you. But if you miss supermarket-style doughnuts, you’re in for a treat. 

Aldi Gluten-Free Chocolate Frosted Doughnuts: Ingredients and Nutrition Facts

Aldi Gluten-Free Chocolate Frosted Doughnuts Ingredients*: Gluten Free Flour (Corn, White Rice, Tapioca), Palm Oil, Sugar, Eggs, Water, Canola Oil, Baking Powder (Sodium Acid Pyrophosphate, Sodium Bicarbonate, Corn Starch, Monocalcium Phosphate), Xanthan Gum, Salt, Pure Vanilla Extract, Sunflower Lecithin, Chocolate Glaze (Confectioners Sugar, Water, Sugar, Cocoa, Canola Oil, Agar, Calcium Carbonate, Calcium Sulfate, Pure Vanilla Extract, Salt.) 

Contains: Eggs

*Please check the current package for up-to-date Ingredient and Nutrition Facts. Ingredients change frequently. Any ingredient or nutrition information provided by GlutenFreeBaking.com is included for educational purposes and may not reflect the current ingredients. 

The happy surprise? These doughnuts are dairy-free! 

As for the rest of the ingredients, I think they’re fine. These are doughnuts. So they’re a treat. The flour base is a standard gluten-free mix of corn, white rice flour, and tapioca starch.) You’re not going to get any fiber from these doughnuts. But I’m guessing you weren’t looking for fiber from doughnuts. And if you are? Skip these.  

Aldi Gluten-Free Chocolate Frosted Doughnuts: The Price

A box of six cost me $4.49*. For gluten-free doughnuts, I think this is a fair price. Is it as cheap as gluten-based doughnuts? Not by a long shot. But $0.75 per doughnuts feels reasonable for doughnuts you don’t have to make yourself. 

*Prices vary depending on your location. 

Aldi Gluten-Free Chocolate Frosted Doughnuts: Stock Up or Skip?

I vote stock up! The taste, texture, and price are terrific for gluten-free doughnuts. Around here, gluten-free doughnuts aren’t easy to find. And when I’ve seen them, they’re usually much more expensive than $4.49. If you’ve got the freezer space, pick up a few boxes. 

Rating: Five out of Five. 

The post Review: Aldi Gluten-Free Chocolate Frosted Doughnuts appeared first on Gluten-Free Baking.

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Wondering what grains have gluten? Here are common grains that contain gluten and should be avoided by those following a gluten-free diet.*

Gluten Containing Grains Wheat

including the following wheat varieties

  • bulgar wheat
  • durum
  • einkorn wheat
  • emmer
  • farina
  • farro
  • freekeh/farik
  • graham
  • khorasan wheat (KAMUT®)
  • semolina
  • spelt
  • wheatberries
  • wheat starch*

*Some wheat starch will be labeled gluten-free. For wheat starch to be labeled gluten-free it must be processed to remove the presence of gluten to below 20ppm. If wheat starch isn’t labeled gluten-free, avoid it.

Rye Barley

Including malt products that are derived from barley. 

  • malt
  • malted barley flour
  • malt extract
  • malt flavoring
  • malted milk
  • malted milkshakes
  • malt syrup
  • malt vinegar
Triticale Oats*

Oats are a complex subject for two reasons: handling and reaction. Most oats are grown and processed in a way that exposes them to cross-contact with wheat. In addition, many people with celiac disease react to oats. If you decide to introduce them to your diet, select oats that are labeled gluten-free.

*The information provided on this website has not been evaluated by the FDA and is not intended to diagnose, treat, prevent, or cure any disease.

The post Gluten Containing Grains appeared first on Gluten-Free Baking.

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Easy Recipe for Gluten-Free Angel Food Cake. Follow this simple recipe for the best angel food cake you’ve ever made. Perfect served with berries and whipped cream. 


If you’ve baked angel food cake before, this recipe asks you to forget almost everything you know about the process. And if you’ve never baked an angel food cake, you’re in luck. This version is ridiculously easy–and you don’t need to forget any prior techniques!

Gluten-Free Angel Food Cake 101

Let’s start at the beginning: what’s an angel food cake? To an eater, it’s a sweet, billowy cake that’s a perfect canvas for ripe berries and whipped cream.

To a baker, it’s a cross between a chiffon cake and a meringue. Unlike my gluten-free chiffon cake, there’s nary a drop of fat in the recipe.

But it’s the meringue that’s really important. Without a perfectly whipped meringue, this cake simply doesn’t work. (If whipping egg whites isn’t your thing, I’d suggest making a gluten-free white cake. The texture is totally different but both cakes are yummy!)

Traditional angel food cake recipes require you to whip together egg whites with half the sugar called for in a recipe. Then, scoop by scoop, you add the remaining sugar and flour. Praying to the angels that the whipped egg whites don’t deflate. 

This technique makes sense, it’s rooted in a classic French meringue. It also makes sense when you remember that angel food cake was created at a time when stand mixers weren’t as common or as powerful as they are today. If you needed to whip the whites by hand, adding the sugar in stages makes sense. But it’s no longer necessary.

Enter the new angel of angel food cake: Stella Parks.

In her book, Bravetart, she writes:

“Problem is, angel food requires more sugar than a French meringue can handle, so the rest has to be sifted into the flour and folded in at the end. The sheer volume of dry ingredients makes that last step tricky, as over-mixing will deflate the fragile meringue (hence, many bakers are intimidated by angel food).

That approach, however difficult, was once a baker’s best bet, and the easiest method if whipping by hand. But with the horsepower of a modern stand mixer, it’s needlessly fussy, so I don’t fret over angel food. I throw the cold egg whites in a bowl, add my sugar all at once, and beat it. Just beat it.”


She just…beats together cold egg whites and sugar. When I read that, it gave me pause. Everything I’d learned about whipping egg whites with sugar had taught me that adding that much sugar to egg whites would mean the whites would never whip up light and fluffy.

I combined the sugar, cold(!) egg whites, and some cream of tartar. Turned on the mixer and stood there with delight as they whipped into shiny soft peaks.

So simple! So easy!

Adding the Gluten-Free Flour

After the egg whites whip to a soft peak stage, when they look shiny and glossy but nowhere near stiff, it’s time to add the gluten-free flour. During testing, I used Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten-Free Baking Flour. If you use a different flour blend, the cake might turn out differently from mine. For the best results, I strongly recommend using this blend. 

For the first few tests, I attempted to fold the flour into the whipped egg whites with a rubber spatula. This lead to some of the flour sinking to the bottom of the mixing bowl—causing the batter to deflated and bake with streaks of unhydrated flour throughout.

The solution to the problem was simple. I added the flour, in four additions, with the stand mixer running. As soon as the last bit of flour is incorporated, you’re done. It’s time for the pan.

Gluten-Free Angel Food Cake: The Pan


The pan is an integral part of the success of angel food cake. Here’s the lowdown: you need a 10-inch uncoated tube pan.

As the cake bakes, it needs to cling to the sides of the pan. If it can’t stick to the pan, the cake will sink and turn out heavy.

If you need to buy an angel food pan, look for one with legs. The cake is cooled upside down. If your pan has feet, you simply flip it over. If the pan doesn’t have legs, you need to find something, like a bottle or stack of cans, to rest the pan on while it cools. While this isn’t hard, it’s a bit of a pain.

Gluten-Free Angel Food Cake: The Old Rules (That you should follow!)

Don’t Use a Nonstick Pan

To achieve its full height, angel food cake needs to clings to the side of the pan as it bakes and cools. Use an uncoated pan. Nonstick pans just won’t work.

De-grease the Bowl and Whisk

Egg whites require a grease/fat-free environment to whip up to full height. Remove any greasy film from your bowl and whisk attachment prior to whipping the eggs.

Keep Egg Yolks Out the Mix

When separating the egg whites from the yolks, it’s a good idea to separate the egg white into an individual bowl. Then pour the white into the mixing bowl. This way if a little bit of egg yolk gets into the white, you can easily remove it. (To remove a little yolk, use half an eggshell. The edge of the shell cuts through egg whites.)

Cool Upside Down

Angel food cakes, like chiffon cakes, require an unusual step: you cool them upside down. As soon as the cake comes out of the oven, flip it over.

Many angel food cake pans have little legs on them, making it easy to flip the pan over and cool it on the legs. If your pan doesn’t have feet, carefully invert the pan onto the neck of a bottle or a stack of cans.

Gluten-Free Angel Food Cake: The New Rules


Use Cold Eggs

Don’t worry about bringing the egg whites to room temperature. Cold egg whites work just fine.

Use a Timer

The egg whites and sugar are whipped in three stages. For the best results, use a timer for each stage. Because, for step two, six full minutes of mixing is longer than you think and a timer keeps you honest.

Use a Standmixer

This recipe requires a stand mixer. (I’m working on a version that can be made with a handheld mixer. )

Gluten-Free Angel Food Cake Troubleshooting Why did my angel food cake fall out of the pan?

There are some common causes for this.

  1. The cake was underbaked. This is the most common problem. If the cake is underbaked, even just a little, the moisture remaining in the cake makes it heavy and the weight pulls it out of the pan. Bake the cake until the internal temperature reaches 205 degrees F. At this point, the cake will look golden brown.
  2. The pan was coated. Angel food cake needs to cling to the pan when cooling. If the pan was coated with a nonstick coating or if it was sprayed with oil before baking, it will slip from the pan.
  3. The Kitchen was cold. If your kitchen is 68 degrees for below, the cake can contact and fall from the pan before it sets. Stella Parks suggests this solution for cold kitchens: open the oven door and place the inverted cake on the stovetop, where drafts of warm air will stabilize its temperature.
Gluten-Free Angel Food Cake: Supplies

The list below includes affiliate links. GlutenFreeBaking.com earns a commission from sales made using the links.

KitchenAid Stand Mixer

10-inch Aluminium Uncoated Tube Pan

Bob’s Red Mill 1:1 Gluten-Free Baking Flour

Bravetart by Stella Parks (Note: this is NOT a gluten-free cookbook but it does contain gluten-free alternatives for many recipes.)

Gluten-Free Angel Food Cake

Easy Gluten-Free Angel Food Cake. Light and Tender.

  • 1 cup gluten-free baking flour ((5 ounces; 142 grams))
  • 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar ((11 ounces; 312 grams))
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons cream of tartar
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 12 large egg whites ((about 14 ounces; 113 grams))
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract
  1. Adjust oven rack to the middle position and remove the top rack. Preheat oven to 350°F (180°C). Sift gluten-free flour and set aside. Stir together granulated sugar, cream of tartar, and salt in the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment. Add egg whites and vanilla extract. Whisk on low to combine, about 1 minute.

  2. Increase speed to medium-high (6-8 on a KitchenAid) and whip 6 minutes.
  3. Increase speed to high (10 on a KitchenAid) and whip until the meringue is shiny, white, and thick. This takes between 2-4 minutes. The tines of the whisk should leave a pattern in the meringue. Stop the mixer and remove the whisk attachment from the bowl. The meringue clinging to the whisk should form a very soft peak. You want it to fall in a thick ribbon off the whisk. Replace the whisk and turn the mixer back on to high speed.

  4. Add the flour, 1/4 cup at a time, and mix until incorporated. Allow each addition of flour to incorporate before adding the next.

  5. Spoon batter into an ungreased 10-inch aluminum tube pan.
  6. Bake until the cake is golden brown and firm to the touch, about 50 minutes. (The internal temperature of the cake should be 206°F.)
  7. Remove pan from oven and immediately invert onto the legs of the pan. If the pan does not have legs, invert onto the neck of a wine bottle. Cool for at least 2 hours. If the kitchen is cold, place the pan on top of the oven to cool and prop the oven door open. 

  8. Slide an offset spatula around the sides of the cake to loosen. Remove the insert, and slide a spatula under the bottom of the cake.
  9. Gently lift the cake off the insert and place onto a serving dish. To serve, cut with a serrated knife. Store leftovers wrapped tightly in plastic for up to 1 week at room temperature.

The post Easy Gluten-Free Angel Food Cake Recipe appeared first on Gluten-Free Baking.

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This gluten-free chocolate mug cake packs a lot of flavor. Made from simple ingredients, this easy recipe is perfect whenever a chocolate craving hits. Top with whipped cream, ice cream, or an easy frosting.

This Gluten-Free Chocolate Mug Cake Is
  • moist
  • rich
  • chocolatey
  • easy-to-make

Even though you can make this mug cake in about a minute, it’s anything but basic. Like my gluten-free vanilla mug cake, this chocolate version is as easy-to-make as it is tasty. 

How to Make Gluten-Free Chocolate Mug Cake
  1. Whisk together gluten-free flour, cocoa powder, sugar, and baking powder in a large mug. Add egg, milk, and oil. (And, if you’re in the mood, a generous sprinkling of chocolate chips)
  2. Stir together until batter is smooth. (Make sure you run the spoon around the edges of the mug. Flour loves to cling to the edges.)
  3. Microwave on high for about one minute. 
  4. Top with whipped cream, ice cream, or frosting. 

FAQs: Gluten-Free Chocolate Mug Cake What size mug is best for mug cake?

A large (12 ounce) mug is best. The cake puffs as it cooks, which is why it’s so important to use a large mug. You want to make a cake, not clean your microwave from overflowing batter. 

What cocoa powder is the best to use?

In this recipe, natural or Dutch-process cocoa powder are interchangeable. Use whatever you have in the pantry. Just be sure not to use hot chocolate powder. It’ll make the cake too sweet and not chocolatey enough. 

Can I make this without an egg?

No. I’m working on an egg-free version. (probably as you read this.)

Can I make this dairy-free?

Yes! This gluten-free mug cake is easy to make dairy-free. Simply replace the milk with your favorite dairy-free alternative. You can even use chocolate or water if you’d like. 

Can I make this into a vanilla cake?

For a vanilla-version, follow the recipe for my easy gluten-free vanilla mug cake. It’s just as easy, moist, and tender as this one—only without the chocolate. 

Easy Gluten-Free Chocolate Mug Cake Recipe

  • 1/4 cup all-purpose gluten-free flour
  • 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 1 tablespoon milk
  • about 1 teaspoon mini-chocolate chips (optional)
Frosting
  • 2 tablespoons softened butter or dairy-free spread
  • 3 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon milk
Toppings
  • Whipped Cream
  • Ice Cream
  • Frosting
For the Microwave
  1. Spray a large (12 ounces) mug with nonstick cooking spray. Stir together gluten-free flour, cocoa powder, sugar, and baking powder in the mug. Add egg, oil, and milk. Stir until smooth with a fork or mini whisk. Stir in mini-chocolate chips if using.
  2. Microwave on high for 60-80 seconds or until cake pulls away from the sides of the mug and the top looks dry. Allow cake to cool in the mug. Top warm cake with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream, if desired. Or allow the cake to cool and frost.
For the Oven
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Follow step one above. Be sure to use an oven-safe mug. Place mug on a baking sheet. Bake until set, about 20 minutes.
For the Frosting
  1. Beat together the butter and powdered sugar until smooth with a spoon. Add milk. Mix until creamy. Spread frosting on cooled cake. If you put the frosting on the hot cake, it will melt.

The post Easy Gluten-Free Chocolate Mug Cake appeared first on Gluten-Free Baking.

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Want a quick gluten-free dessert for one? Make this mug cake. It’s soft, tender, and delicious. Add sprinkles to turn the simple vanilla cake into a gluten-free funfetti dream. 

This Gluten-Free Mug Cake is

Easy to make
Sweet and tender
Dairy-free
Perfect for one or two

To Make a Gluten-Free Mug Cake, You’ll Need

One large or two small mugs
A fork
A microwave (or oven)

Sometimes you just want dessert. Not an apple slice or a dry cookie from a package but something warm and yummy and slightly over-the-top.

If that craving hits when you’ve got no time to bake, a simple gluten-free mug cake answers the craving nicely.

At first glance, mug cakes look like a fad recipe that should have died eons ago. But there’s a reason they’ve stuck around for as long as they have: they’re dead-simple to make and decidedly yummy.

If you’ve never made one before, you’re in for a treat. You simply whisk together a few ingredients and hit start on the microwave. That’s it. (If you don’t own a microwave, there’s an oven variation below). After a minute, you’re rewarded with a gluten-free cake that’s soft and tender–that tastes like it was baked with love.

FAQs: Gluten-Free Mug Cake What’s the best flour to use for gluten-free mug cake?

For a recipe like this, it really doesn’t matter. Just don’t use a grain-free flour, like coconut flour or almond flour. Any gluten-free flour, such as your favorite blend or a finely ground white rice flour, works in this recipe.

Can you make this recipe without an egg?

No. Sorry. I’m working on a gluten-free/egg-free mug cake variation.

What size mug should I use?

Use a mug that comfortably holds about 1 1/2 cups (12 ounces) liquid.

What power setting should I use for mug cake?

High.

What topping goes best with mug cake?

Whipped cream, ice cream, or frosting.

Gluten-Free Vanilla Mug Cake

This gluten-free mug cake is soft, tender, and delicious. Add sprinkles to turn the simple vanilla cake into a funfetti dream. 

  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil or melted butter
  • 1/4 cup all-purpose gluten-free flour
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1 tablespoon milk
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • sprinkles, optional
Frosting
  • 2 tablespoons softened butter or dairy-free spread
  • 3 tablespoons powdered sugar
  • 1 teaspoon milk
For the Microwave
  1. Spray large (12 ounces) mug with nonstick cooking spray. Stir together gluten-free flour, sugar, and baking powder in the mug. Add egg, milk, oil, and vanilla extract. Stir until smooth with a fork or mini whisk. Stir in sprinkles if using. 

  2. Microwave on high for 60-80 seconds or until cake pulls away from the sides of the mug and the top looks dry. Allow cake to cool in the mug. Top warm cake with vanilla ice cream or whipped cream, if desired. Or allow the cake to cool and frost. 

For the Oven
  1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Follow step one above. Be sure to use an oven-safe mug. Place mug on a baking sheet.  Bake until set, about 20 minutes. 

For the Frosting
  1. Beat together the butter and powdered sugar until smooth with a spoon. Add milk. Mix until creamy. Spread frosting on cooled cake. If you put the frosting on the hot cake, it will melt. 

The post Easy Gluten-Free Vanilla Mug Cake appeared first on Gluten-Free Baking.

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