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Have you ever wanted to learn the first steps of repairing and cleaning headstones?  Are you interested in improving a private family burial site and don’t know where to start?  Learn the basics of headstone repair and restoration at a two-day Boardman Cemetery Restoration Workshop on Saturday, June 9 and Sunday, June 10.  Registration is free and limited to 30 participants.

The cemetery, located off Royce Road on Paxson Drive, is free and open to the public to visit during the restoration workshop weekend.

The workshop is designed as a two-day program with a welcome orientation at 9:15 am on Saturday, June 9 in Meeting Room A at the Fountaindale Public Library. The workshop will continue at Boardman Cemetery for the remainder of Saturday and all day Sunday.

This library-hosted program is funded in part by DuPage Township, the Village of Bolingbrook, and with a grant written by the Bolingbrook Historic Preservation Commission.  Breakfast and lunch are provided for both days of the program.

During the workshop, you’ll gain hands on experience identifying, cleaning and repairing grave markers with Christine Hillmann of Chris’s Cemetery Preservation INC.  To fully participate in the program, attendees should bring the following items:

  • Gloves (leather work gloves, jersey work gloves and rubber gloves)
  • Cell phone
  • Sunscreen and hats
  • Boots
  • Safety goggles
  • Long-sleeved shirt
  • Insect repellent
  • Tongue depressors, wooden paint stirrers or “popsicle sticks” (Buy these at a craft store)
  • Clean rags
    Soft Bristle brushes. Toothbrushes and denture brushes work well
  • Portable Camp Chair
  • OPTIONAL – D/2 or Keystone Biological Solution

Registration for the weekend workshop opens Tuesday, May 1, 2018.  Reserve your space by registering online at https://goo.gl/forms/QL4GtGa9Vsie8iKQ2  or by calling (630) 685-4201.  Look for workshop updates on the Fountaindale Public Library Genealogy Club blog and on the Boardman Cemetery Facebook Page.

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Did you miss your local genealogical society meeting this month? Fountaindale Public Library’s Genealogy Club March lecture is live and available for free through April 15, 2018. The webinar and handout are available online at https://fountaindalegenealogy.org/webinars/.

This month’s meeting “Passage to Chicago: Traveling the Illinois & Michigan Canal in 1860” is presented by Tom Willcockson. In this hour long program, Tom highlights the rich history of the I&M Canal, which helped connect people and goods to and from Chicago through a man-made waterway system dug along side the Illinois River.

Using period photographs, paintings, maps, and other resources, Tom’s hand drawn illustrations bring the experiences of one canal boat family back to life for a modern audience.

Check out our full schedule of free monthly programs and webinars on our events page: https://fountaindalegenealogy.org/events-schedule/.

Its time to mark you calendars and get your webinar reminder for our annual Genealogy Day 2018 streaming conference on Saturday, May 19 from 10 .m. to 3 p.m. CST.  This year’s theme “In Sickness, in Health, in Handwriting” is a free day-long in person and live stream conference open to researchers of all experience levels.
This year’s speaker schedule includes:

  • Dropsy, Quinsy, or Consumption: Just Exactly What Did My Ancestor Have? presented by Kimberly Nagy
  • Death Demystified: Understanding Coroner and Undertaker Records presented by Tina Beaird
  • Your Predecessor’s Personality on Paper: Using Handwriting Analysis in Genealogical Research presented by Gina Pommier

Sign up today for a free webinar reminder!

See You At The Library!
Debra

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It’s time to mark your calendars and get your registration in for Genealogy Day 2018 at the Fountaindale Public Library in Bolingbrook, Illinois!

This year’s theme “In Sickness, in Health, in Handwriting” will be held on Saturday, May 19 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.  As always, Genealogy Day is a free day-long conference open to researchers of all experience levels.  In addition to the in-person program, a live stream and recorded edition of the program is available free of charge.

This year’s speakers and schedule of lectures:

  • Dropsy, Quinsy, or Consumption: Just Exactly What Did My Ancestor Have presented by Kimberly Nagy
  • Death Demystified: Understanding Coroner and Undertaker Records presented by Tina Beaird
  • Your Predecessor’s Personality on Paper: Using Handwriting Analysis in Genealogical Research presented by Gina Pommier

NEW! ASK THE EXPERTS!
We’re trying something a bit different this year. We’re lining up experts to meet one-on-one with attendees during the conference lunch hour from 12:30 to 1:30 p.m. This ‘Meet the Expert’ session is meant to provide support and answers for genealogical questions, no appointment needed. Bring samples of photographs, records, or other materials with you.  Suggested time with experts: 5-10 minutes.

Experts Currently Available: Bruce Troyer (Photography and Photo Identification), Gina Pommier (Handwriting Analysis)
NEW! Studio 300 & Local History Room Tours!
If you feel the need to stretch your legs and explore the library, we have two great tours for you to try during the lunch hour. Our library staff will be giving tours of our amazing Studio 300 space and our Local History Room areas. Studio 300 staff will give you a tour of our lower level space, demonstrate some of the scanners and resources you can use, and answer questions about using equipment with or without a library card. Another staff member will be available in the 3rd Floor Local History Room to answer your questions about using the room, available resources, and let you take a spin on our digital microfilm machine.

Participants are asked to bring a brown-bag lunch or order a Box Lunch from Brooks Cafe.  Lunch order forms will be sent  place an order by calling (630) 685-4295. Due to limited parking, please carpool or make arrangements to be dropped off for this event.

For more information, please call Debra Dudek at (630) 685-4201.  Registration for Genealogy Day begins Wednesday, February 14.  You can register online or sign-up by phone at (630) 685-4176.

See You At The Library!
Debra

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If you take a walk through one of the many memorial parks in the United States, you’ll find monuments of every size, shape, and material.  Some are as simple as a large stone with a bronze plaque.  Others are grand and opulent buildings constructed of rare materials and marble.  The better known monuments celebrate the Revolutionary War, World War II, and in recent events, the Civil War.  There are more monuments of course, even in our country’s rather short two hundred odd year history, her citizens managed to scrape up a breathtaking collection of commemorative statues throughout the country.  From the Spanish-American War Monument in Arlington Cemetery, to the Great Swamp Fight Monument commemorating King Philip’s War in South Kingstown, Rhode Island, to the Military Working Dog Teams National Monument in Bexar County Texas, our country has a fascination with erecting stone and metal edifices as money and placement become available.

Somewhere in the muddle of towering figures and humble markers, is the story of two remarkable World War I statues by E. M. Viquesney.  Born Ernest Moore Viquesney on August 5, 1876, the American sculptor capitalized on then Secretary of War Newton Baker’s push for communities across the nation to erect memorials and monuments to honor Great War veterans.  Using a clever combination of patriotic marketing and self promotion, Viquesney mass produced his famous ‘Spirit of the American Doughboy‘ statue for towns and cities during the 1920s and 1930s.

The ‘Doughboy’ statue is anything but a sedate rendition of the past.  Take it off its stone pedestal, and you’ll see a fierce and hardened face of a man in battle, moving toward a target with a grenade held aloft in his right hand and a bayoneted gun clutched with his left.  At his feet are barbed wire and wood, potent symbols of the wide wasteland fraught by modern warfare.  His legs are protected by puttees, the recognizable ankle to calf wrappings wound tightly and spirally around each lower limb.  This is a man of action immortalized in a moment, his service in America’s first European based war immortalized in quiet parks, town squares, and college campuses across the country.

According to Doughboy enthusiast and researcher Earl Goldsmith, the ‘Doughboy’ statues are “believed to be the focal points of over ten-percent of U. S. World War I memorial statues.  Additionally, some believe that except for the Statue of Liberty, Viquesney’s Doughboy replicas have collectively been seen by more people than any sculpture in the U. S., even though many don’t realize they have seen them.”

Viquesney’s ‘Doughboy’ is a truly prolific statue.  Although no final accounting of this statue is fully known, there are over 140 known statues scattered throughout the United States, many of which are plotted and mapped by a memorial project sponsored by the World War I Centennial Commission.  Ever the salesman, Viquesney created a prolific army of miniature ‘Doughboy’ statues to sell to a patriotic public for as little as $5 a piece.

Given how numerous these monuments are around the country,  it’s strange how these statues are rarely mentioned in local guidebooks, or on historical tours.  In the years I’ve lived in the area, I honestly can’t recall seeing one in person apart from a particularly fine example in Cincinnati, Ohio.  Several of these statues are now the subject of a large scale restoration project to protect and preserve the monuments of the First World War.

Viquesney and his ‘Doughboy’ statue on the left; John Paulding  and his ‘Over The Top’ statue on the right

Viquesney’s ‘Doughboy’ has endured at the possible expense of another Great War statue entitled ‘Over The Top’ by John Paulding.  The two statues are uncanny in their similarities, the most obvious of which is the absence of a grenade in the hand of Paulding’s statue.  The feud erupted into a full blown copyright lawsuit and a prolonged advertising war.  Viquesney’s potent combination of branded marketing and lower costs ensured his statue would rise to prominence.  There are around 50 of Paulding’s “Over the Top” memorials scattered around the country, and its possible many of them are misidentified as one of Viquesney’s army of ‘Doughboys’.

I was in Naperville last Saturday dropping my sister off at the train station, which abuts the small green park of Burlington Square.  I nearly drove past the ‘Doughboy’ statue in the square, and luckily, I found a nearby parking spot to ditch the car and take a look at the statue up close.

What I didn’t realize until I turned around, was another statue standing stoically across on the other side of the square.  Perched atop of a tall granite column was a far different figure commemorating the Great War.

Where the ‘Doughboy’ statue may be the best known example of Viquesney’s artistic output, it is his fantastic ‘Spirit of the American Navy’ statue which has become the rare jewel of WWI memorials.  Designed by Viquesney in 1927, it was intended to be a companion piece to the already popular ‘Doughboy’ statue.  Like its brother the ‘Sailorboy’ statue features a male figure holding a naval hat high in the air with its right hand, while the left arm is held tight at the waist.  At the sailor’s legs, a large length of rope is organized smartly in its round spool. Only eight of these statues are known to exist.  One is in the possession of a private collector.  Seven of them (and one variant model) are erected in public areas across several states.  It’s auspicious then, that one of these rare statues is readily accessible near downtown Naperville.

Naperville acquired the ‘Spirit of the American Navy’ from an antique store in Pennwater, Michigan before it was erected in Burlington Square in 2013.  The antique store owners purchased ‘Sailorboy’ from a Chicago junkyard in the mid 1990s.  No former location information on this statue has been found.

The difference between the two ‘spirit’ statues is striking.  Where the ‘Doughboy’ is focused and fierce, ‘Sailorboy’ seems bright and optimistic by comparison.  The soldier is frozen in a moment of hardship and a rough form of bravery.  The sailor by contrast seems carefree and welcoming, as if the hat held aloft is being used to catch the attention of a far off friend.  There’s a lightness of heart from the naval statue, a celebratory air which is noticeably lacking in its sibling.  ‘Sailorboy’ seems almost too cheery to be a monument.  Its enthusiasm and lightheartedness distracts from the reality of the war which had just been fought.

Maybe it is this stark contrast between the two figures which when they were created, made them companion pieces in memorializing the experiences of World War I.  As both were created and erected in the two decades following the Great War, perhaps Viquesney wanted to celebrate the differences between war and victory.  What he may not have anticipated was how the doughboy statue would come to symbolize a war which subsequent generations would be hard pressed to understand or rationalize.  World War I isn’t a war most Americans really know.  It’s largely forgotten and unmarked during the window of its centennial by the public, even when there are historians, lecturers, and a highly organized commission fighting hard to bring this history to the consciousness of most Americans.

So it is ironic, that one of the most prolific of our American wartime monuments is also it’s most forgotten.  The ‘Doughboy’ and ‘Sailorboy’ statues in Naperville are prime examples.  Even with their proximity to a busy commuter train station, they’re largely ignored by the hundreds of people walking through and driving by Burlington Square.

But they are a delight to see in person.  So when you have a moment, and you’re finished watching our library’s five part WWI Military Genealogy webinar series, take a field trip to Burlington Square in Naperville.  Pick a warm weekend when the sun is shining, grab a few friends and meet at the park for a picnic.  Take some time to eat outside, share stories with your friends, and visit the monuments.  It’s a great way to connect the present with the past, and it just may start a conversation about the lost legacy of the Great War and how we can bring this dimly lit history back into the public consciousness.

See You At the Library!
Debra

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My family and friends spend the year constantly asking what I want for Christmas.  Yes, I want that absolutely amazing Mirror of Erised from Pottery Barn right now.  I know my chances of getting one are slim to none.

My wishlist of genealogy goodies is also quite long.  I tend to squirrel away some funds in my search for all those rare bits of paper, photographs, and resources in my ongoing quest for deceased relatives.  It’s a list, a last minute one if you wish, for anyone married, related, or in debt to a genealogist.

I should start with the disclaimer that I’m highlighting gift suggestions, and in no way making any money from endorsing the following items.  These are just some last minute remedies for anyone in a tough spot in finding a gift for the doggedly determined genealogist in their life.

What Genealogists Want: Smart Phone Organizational & Research Apps
Gift Ideas: iTunes, Android, or Google Gift Cards

Things, ABBYY Text Grabber, and Tiny Scanner Pro are just a few of the pay pay to use items available for purchase through your app store.  While there are lots of free apps, and I always advocate using free apps before making a purchase, your research materials can benefit from the boost a paid app can provide.

My three new pay to use apps, range from $4.99 to $9.99.  Not a huge chunk of change to be sure, and a quick $20 gift card could easily purchase both Things and ABBY Textgrabber.

What Genealogists Want: Subscription Services
Gift Ideas: HistoryLines, American Ancestors, Ancestry, MyHeritage, FindMyPast, RootsIreland

Subscription services are a huge investment for genealogists.  When looking at my budget, I would love someone to send a gift certificate or gift voucher to some of my most used subscription sites.  I’m not going to go in depth to each of them, they’re all awesome.  I will say it’s easier to request a gift voucher for RootsIreland than I expected.  As this is a pay-per-view site, I think they have a lot of gift voucher selling experience in their corner.

What Genealogists Want: Really Big Organizational Software
Gift Ideas: Evernote & Dropbox

At some point in your research, every genealogist takes a look around and realizes they have a mountain of information on so many deceased people it has become difficult to keep them all organized effectively.  That’s where Evernote comes into play.  Evernote is quick and powerful way to sort, organize, store, and share information across multiple devices.  Yes, it has a free version available on a smart device.  However, I use my smart phone and laptop during research trips and desktop computer at home to bring most of my research together.  I love having the ability to add information from multiple devices and have it sync, saved, and pulled up flawlessly between devices.  It saves A LOT of time and frustration.  If you haven’t seen Thomas MacEntee’s presentation on Evernote for Genealogists, you should definitely book him or check it out at a conference.

Dropbox is an easy and safe place to store and sync files and folders via online cloud storage. By storing files in the cloud, I can download them, share them, and utlize them just about anywhere in the world and on any device I have.  When I’m scheduled to speak at a conference, I always save my presentations to Dropbox so I can have them handy in case something happens to my portable flash drive or laptop.  When my friend Jennifer Holik published The Tiger’s Widow, A Woman Who Took Up The Fight, the story of Virginia Brouk, she sent a pre-published copy to me to read before hand, and Dropbox allowed me to read the file, add notes to the manuscript, and let Jennifer read them and make adjustments in real time.  Very cool.

What Genealogists Want: Cool Mugs, Wall Art, and Wearable Stuff
Gift Idea: Etsy Gift Card

Yes, it’s cool buying stuff off from large online retailers.  However, I have found some immeasurably cool and amazing stuff than I would ever to be able to afford on Etsy.  The amazing array and variety of artist designed items on the site never fails to impress me.  Here are a few of my top picks from the site this year:

  • Custom Family Tree Art Prints, 4 Generations, 5 Generations Poster –
    The very modern design of this wall print makes it a great gift for anyone who loves this type of non-fussy design. I’m buying one for my brother and his fiancee as a wedding gift. Four generations is the standard, but an upgrade can be ordered for five.  I’m a go big or go home sort of person, but it depends on how much you know about each couple’s overall family tree.  The print can be ordered in three colors – Green, Turquoise Blue, and Gray. Price starts at $29
  • Long Line of Dead People Mug – I have a few research mugs, venerated vessels of much needed green tea or caramel vanilla coffee which are used during long sessions of genealogical research. Flying solo at your computer is easier when a ready-made joke is clearly printed on your beverage holder – “Been Looking Into My Family Tree…Turns Out I Come From A Long Line of Dead People.” It goes well with the memorable All My Friends Are Dead T-shirt.
  • Mothers Necklace, 1-10 kids – I’m not a parent, and I don’t pretend to be one, but this is the sweetest little necklace I’ve seen for a parent.  The artist can customize the necklace to include parent and child initials, ensure the baby birds are either gold or silver, and offers several chain lengths.  The artist also offers single parent versions of the necklace as well.  I inquired into the possibility of ordering one of these as a bar pin for my mom, and unfortunately that’s not something they offer right now.  This was a bummer, but I’ll make sure to check back to see what new goodies they’ve added to the page in the next few months.

As a genealogist, these are just a few of the things I’d love to have in my stocking and under the tree on Christmas day.  There’s plenty out there to gift to your favorite genealogist, and these choices don’t have to break the bank.  Any sort of a gift, from biological headstone cleaner to a simple gift card makes their ongoing search for the people in their family tree a little easier.  Besides, what they are documenting today will be the Christmas gifts of future generations.

Wishing everyone a lovely holiday season,
Debra


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As we look back to the events of the Great War and the people who lived through it, what serves as a tether between that century was the significance of Christmas to Americans living at home and abroad.  For a majority of families, this Christmas would mark the first time since the Civil War where one or several members of their family were far from home serving in a wartime capacity.  Not just the men – husbands, sons, nephews, or uncles, but women as well – sisters, aunts, nieces, and sometimes mothers serving as nurses, clerks, yeomen, relief workers, telephone operators, chauffeurs, and messengers.

With volunteers and service personnel away from home, relatives were encouraged by local businesses to send care packages stuffed with the latest and greatest must-have items for the front lines.  Care packages proved to be a great theme for boosting morale at home and in Europe.  Clothing, boots, watches, jewelry, chewing gum, toiletry items, and cake were popular choices.  Stationary, fountain pens, compasses and the occasional pocket diary were also handy.

From the Richmond Times-Dispatch of 1917, most of the “Be Santa Claus to a Solider” ads for the season included a truly prodigious amount of tobacco ads:

Although the United States did not enforce a food rationing system within its boarders in World War I, it relied heavily on propaganda campaigns to persuade the public to limit and conserve food for the troops fighting abroad.

“Meatless Mondays” and “Wheatless Wednesdays” were just two of the slogans adopted cut food consumption at home.  In the spirit of these conservation efforts, companies sometimes elected to host recipe contests to promote food saving measures of the Great War homefront.

December 23, 1917 was a great day for Miss Gertrude Hayes, of Columbia, Missouri.  Her inventive Bean Loaf recipe was the winner of the C.B. Miller Shoe Store War Time Recipe Contest.  Her recipe, comprised of cooked beans, tomatoes, cheese, butter, flour, onion, and seasoning, is a tasting sounding substitute for a “Meatless Monday” dinner table.  The Miller quote at the bottom of the award announcement states “To Conserve is Stylish.  To Save Is to Live.”  A very haute couture slogan which befits Miller’s shoe store of the time.  Gertrude’s prize for the winning submission: a new pair of shoes of her choice.  An excellent prize to be sure!

Given how rationing was a voluntary affair, the meatless and wheatless dinner tables for most families was probably suspended on Christmas Eve and Christmas Day, 1917.  The traditional combination of what we identify as Christmas dinner was still getting top billing in cookbooks and in restaurants.  For the folks committed to the cause of conserving food, Marshall Fields released Forty-Four Ways to Win The War, a cookbook designed to exalt in voluntary rationing by providing straightforward instructions for main dishes, side dishes, breads, and desserts. The book is available for free on Internet Archive, a great place to search for new and unique stuff from the past.

Aside from the recipes, I really love the little informational sidebars, slogans, and tips included in the book.  This is really a little gem you’ll want to browse through and read.

I hope you all are looking forward to more World War I centennial commiserations in the new year.  If you haven’t checked out our webinar series on Tracing Your WWI Military Ancestors yet, all the handouts and videos are free thanks to the WWI and America grant.  Add this series to your list of Genealogical New Years Resolutions!

Happy Holidays,
Debra


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Ever since the discontinuation of microfilm lending via FamilySearch, our library has been fielding a lot of requests about access for a particular set of online records which are only available to LDS Family History Centers or affiliate libraries.  We are pleased to announce that registered FamilySearch users now have access to these highly desired record sets online in our 3rd Floor Local History Room and in our 2nd Floor Public Computer Commons.

To access to affiliate records on FamilySearch, you will need to register for a free FamilySearch account.  When you have logged in with your account, search the Catalog section of the website, and you will have access to all the newly uploaded digitized records.

Our Local History Room is a great place to conduct research.  Visit our 3rd Floor Reference Desk with a library card or photo ID to sign in.  The Local History Room computers offer links to genealogy databases including FamilySearch.  Printing is free, however, we ask patrons to keep their printouts to ten per per person.  To maximize your research, bring a flash drive and save your work electronically.

If you need any help with your research, FPLD card holders can book up to two hours a month of free genealogy assistance.  You can schedule an appointment by calling (630) 685-4201.

Good luck with your research, and may you find the records you’re looking for!

See You At the Library,
Debra


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Great news on the Try-It! Illinois Database trial!

Several of the big database providers are participating in this year’s trial, which means genealogists will have some new and interesting resources to try through November 30.

Here are some great resources to try this year:

Chicago Tribune
Churchill Archive
Digital Sanborn Maps
Sanborn Maps Geo Edition
FOLD3 Library Edition
Historic Map Works
Historical Chicago Defender 1909-1975
Historical Chicago Tribune 1849 – 1992
Historical Communist Newspaper Collection 1917-2013
Historical New York Times 1851 – 2012
Mango Languages
MyHeritage Library Edition
Newspapers.com Library Edition
Public Library eBook Collection from EBSCO (Genealogy Reference Books)
Religious Magazine Archive 1845-2015
Rosetta Stone
Vogue Archive 1892-2017
Women’s Magazine Archive

The next Fountaindale Public Library Genealogy Club Meeting will be held on Wednesday, November 8 at 7 p.m. in Meeting Room A. Discuss Illinois’ restrictions on mental health records with professional researcher Grace DuMelle as she shares strategies for genealogists and the rare records she’s uncovered on her quests!

All Genealogy Club meetings are free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For more information on Genealogy Club events, please call the Fountaindale Public Library District at (630) 685-4201.


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On the spookiest day of the year, visitors of all ages are welcome to explore one of the oldest pioneer burial sites in Will County.

The Bolingbrook Historic Preservation Commission will be hosting its annual Boardman Cemetery Halloween Open House on Tuesday, October 31 from 5-9 p.m. at Boardman Cemetery. Admission is free and open to the public.

In addition to Trick-or-Treating, hot chocolate and cookies will be served. Free tours of the cemetery will be available every 20 minutes.  The commission will provide free cemetery maps and have local history books available for sale. Donations gratefully accepted.

Established in 1832, historic Boardman Cemetery is the community burial ground created by Captain Harry Boardman, an early settler and veteran of the Black Hawk Wars. By 1846, several pioneer families in the area such as Barber, Freeman, Ingalls, Paxson, Royce, Standish, Strong, Wescott, and Whallon were interred at the site. Although active into the 1920s, the cemetery became overgrown and abandoned over time. Rediscovered in 1972 by 16 year old, Lois Michael, the cemetery was deeded and restored by DuPage Township and the Bolingbrook Historic Preservation Commission.

As the area grew, the Heritage Creek subdivision was built around the historic cemetery. The subdivision streets surrounding the cemetery are named after the early settlers who are buried in Boardman Cemetery.

The cemetery underwent a Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Project in June of this year to account for the full tally of individuals buried on the site.  Boardman Cemetery also played host to a hands-on cemetery restoration project presented by the Fountaindale Public Library, DuPage Township, and the Bolingbrook Historic Preservation Commission.  During the two day session, twenty-five headstones were repaired and cleaned on the property.  Results from the GPR investigation and the restoration workshop will be on display.

Boardman Cemetery is located off Royce Road on Paxton Drive in the Heritage Creek Subdivision.  Heritage Park is right across the street.   The cemetery is accessible from Paxson Drive.  Don’t forget to check-in at Boardman Cemetery on Facebook during your visit.

Have a Happy Halloween!


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It’s time to fall back into your research!

If you’re an Illinois resident with internet access of any kind, you are eligible to access the immense amount of information available during the this year’s trial. Thanks to the generous sponsorship of the Secretary of State and State Librarian Jesse White, the Illinois State Library, and numerous electronic resource vendors, Illinois residents can sample, evaluate, and utilize resources free of charge.

Every year, I like to highlight several of the databases for genealogical researchers. This is proving to be a bit of a difficulty at the moment, as both ProQuest and EBSCO, two of the biggest genealogy database vendors listed on this year’s trial, have not activated links to their resources.

Provided ProQuest and EBSCO activate their databases for this year’s trial, librarians and library users will have a lot of great resources to utilize this year.  Here is a list of what should be provided in this year’s trial:

African American History Online
Digital Sanborn Maps Geo Edition
FOLD3 Library Edition
Heritage Quest Online
Historic Map Works Library Edition
Historical Chicago Defender 1909-1975
Historical Chicago Tribune 1849 – 1992
Historical New York Times 1851 – 2012
Mango Languages
MyHeritage Library Edition
Newspaper Archive
NewspaperSource Plus
Newspapers.com Library Edition
ProQuest Obituaries
Slavery in America and the World: History, Culture & Law
Trench Journals and Unit Magazines of the First World War
Women’s Magazine Archive
Berg Fashion Library*

*Berg Fashion Library seems like a strange choice, but hear me out.  One of the titles available in this year’s library is New Raiments of Self: African American Clothing in the Antebellum South.  The book examines the clothing worn by African Americans in the southern United States during the thirty years before the American Civil War.  This book and others are available on Berg Fashion Library, and I can’t wait to explore more on this particular database.

I will provide further updates on the availability of resources on this year’s trial as they develop.

The next Fountaindale Public Library Genealogy Club Meeting will be held on Wednesday, October 11 at 7 p.m. in Meeting Room A. Tina Beaird will be presenting ‘Ghosts in the Graveyard’. This should be a fun and entertaining evening of genealogy research and stories of strange coincidences.

All Genealogy Club meetings are free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. For more information on Genealogy Club events, please call the Fountaindale Public Library District at (630) 685-4201.


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