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Going grocery shopping isn’t exactly the most exhilarating thing I can think of, but bring me to the farmers market, and I’ll browse for hours and spend like I’m the Barefoot Contessa on Friday morning before Jeffrey comes home.

In the Norah Ephron–directed version of my life, there are farmers markets everywhere, and I always have oodles of time to browse through the farm-fresh produce and to expertly squeeze every piece of fruit that catches my eye, no matter what time of day it is or what my work schedule looks like. In fact, nothing makes me want to call in sick more than getting off the train at 14th Street and walking through the Union Square Greenmarket (open Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays, and Saturdays, year round).

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Packing light is a sport. Or at least, that's how I justify being so sweaty at the end of an avid bout.

And between carry-on size restrictions, the avoidance of baggage fees, and an inescapable series of pre-vacation premonitions of me buried under a mountain of sensible walking shoes with not a single clean sock in sight, it's not exactly one I'll volunteer to play.

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A Big Little Recipe has the smallest-possible ingredient list and big everything else: flavor, creativity, wow factor. Psst—we don't count water, salt, black pepper, and certain fats (specifically, 1/2 cup or less of olive oil, vegetable oil, and butter), since we're guessing you have those covered. Today, we’re making a side dish that’s good enough to eat for dinner.

I love mayonnaise and I love pasta, but I don’t love mayonnaise-y pasta salad. Probably for the same reason that I don’t love mayonnaise-y potato salad: These side dishes often appear at warm-weather, crowded-backyard, sticky-sweaty occasions, where I’d always prefer something a little brighter and lighter.

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Good food is worth a thousand words—sometimes more. In My Family Recipe, a writer shares the story of a single dish that's meaningful to them and their loved ones.

My mother, Caroline Ragsdale Reutter of Caroline's Cakes, had a background in interior design, but good food was always a major ingredient in her life. And growing up in Lake City, South Carolina life revolved around entertaining. Caroline’s mother—my grandmother—was a fabulous cook and a gracious entertainer, and constantly entertained customers from my grandfather’s charcoal business, Ember’s Charcoal, with recipes that had been in our family for generations. There were weekly cookouts and delicious dinners with friends at Caroline’s childhood home, and whether it was a planned cocktail party or a last-minute barbecue, she quickly learned the enjoyment that food brings into everyone’s lives.

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There are a million ways to cook with eggs and we've partnered with Pete and Gerry's Organic Eggs—whose family-run, free-range farms produce delicious, all-organic eggs—to share a few of our favorites. Here, Assistant Editor Erin Alexander shares her riff on a next-level breakfast sandwich (think: hollandaise, sunny side-up eggs, lots of bacon, and more) she first discovered in college. Heads up: You're going to need a lot of fresh eggs!

I don't daydream often, but when I do, it is usually about something I've eaten at a restaurant: the ethereal lemon pasta from New York City's I Sodi, the ridiculously cheesy spinach and artichoke dip at virtually any Hillstone location, and a perfect chili cheese dog I tried recently in New Jersey, to name a few.

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Inspired by conversations on the Food52 Hotline, we're sharing tips and tricks that make navigating all of our kitchens easier and more fun. Today: Why you should start brining your meat—and how to start. Read on for how to brine chicken, turkey, pork chops, and more.

Have you ever suffered the travesty that is a dry, tasteless chicken breast? Or tried to cut into a pork chop, only to be rewarded with a bicep workout and a rumbling stomach? Or chewed your way through a turkey that tastes like it might've been made out of sand? 

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We've partnered with Crunchmaster crackers—makers of deliciously baked, snack-ready crackers with a satisfying crunch—to share our favorite party-friendly dip that just so happens to be vegan: Buffalo "chicken" dip.

Whether it's the Kentucky Derby or the U.S. Open, I'll turn any big sporting event into an equally big eating event. Case in point: the Super Bowl.

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Costco has been killing it in recent years with their house brand, Kirkland. According to Business Insider, 25 percent of their total sales (excluding gas) come from private-label items. That’s a total of $39 million dollars in 2018, Costco reports in their annual report. And the Costco consumer is a savvy buyer, so we know that means that there is quality in them there hills. No longer something to buy when you feel like saving a few bucks, Kirkland products are well known for their quality and value, and many shoppers are picking Costco products out of preference, not just out of frugality.

Many of these Kirkland goods are made by the very same manufacturers that make the name-brand items that have risen to the tops of their arenas. This means that the excellence you might expect from some brands is very much present in the Kirkland version. Sometimes the manufacturer is easy to discern, sometimes it’s a little more don’t-ask-don’t-tell, but suffice it to say that when you choose Kirkland, you’re often still getting a top-of-the-line item, just not paying extra for the brand name. (But hey! Kirkland is now a respected name in its own right.)

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Welcome to Recipe Off-Roading, where the recipe isn’t in charge—you are. In this series of articles, we’re celebrating how cooks take liberties in the kitchen, whether that’s substituting an ingredient, adapting a technique, or doubling the salt (because you’re wild like that). So buckle up and let’s go for a ride.

If I want a wonderful recipe for chocolate chip cookies, I ask Dorie Greenspan. And if I want a wonderful recipe for cherry crumb tart or mocha-marbled bundt cake or even butter-poached scallops, I ask...Dorie Greenspan.

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The five French mother sauces are: Béchamel, Velouté, Espagnole, Hollandaise, and Tomato. Read on to learn how to make each one.

In the 19th century, Marie-Antoine Carême anointed Béchamel, Velouté, Espagnole, and tomato sauce as the building blocks for all other sauces in his work L'Art de la Cuisine Française au Dix-Neuvième Siecle. Later on, Hollandaise got added to the family. Since then, many people consider others sauces—sweet and savory from all around the world—as unofficial extended relatives of these five sauces.

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