Loading...

Follow Fit Dad Fitness Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
Or

Valid


At the summit of Mount Sneffels near Ouray, Colorado, taken by my friend, Lee Nemes.

If you’ve followed me on social media, you might have noticed that several times over the past couple of months, I’ve shared that I was struggling to land on my next fitness goal.

I think having goals is essential to a fulfilling and successful fitness journey, but after my Holiday Shred wrapped up at the end of 2017, I was at a loss when it came to deciding what to do next.

The past few years, I’ve done a Warrior Dash and two Spartan Races as a way to test myself physically. I’ve set and met goals along my fitness journey related to building muscle and losing body fat percentage.

But I wanted something different. Something bigger.

For a while, I strongly considered stepping on stage to compete in a physique show. I had never really wanted to compete, but I was definitely feeling a tug in that direction. In the fitness world, competing and stepping on stage is typically the next step in a bodybuilder’s progression — it’s just kind of “what you do.”

But I gave it a ton of thought, and eventually told myself “no.” Physique competitions are not a healthy thing, and while the challenge would be extraordinary, I didn’t want it to come at the expense of my well-being, both physically and mentally.

So what, then?

I thought about the characteristics I wanted in my next challenge.

  • First, I want it to be something I’ve never done before
  • Second, I want it to be something outside of the gym and beyond the measure of a new PR or weight/muscle gained
  • Third, I want it to be something that inspires me, challenges me, and holds a deeper meaning

As I thought about these things, I realized my next goal was literally right in front of my eyes.

Mountains.

I live in Colorado, home to 53 mountain peaks that tower more than 14,000 feet in altitude. Fourteeners, as Coloradans call them.

From where I live, I see at least four of them peaking over the foothills, and right now, they’re capped in a brilliant white layer of snow.

I looked at these mountains as I was leaving the gym last week and my next goal came to me.

In 2018, my goal is to summit at least three of Colorado’s Fourteeners.

It makes so much sense to me. I spend a majority of my fitness time training in a gym, but I absolutely love getting out of that element and into nature, where my body is tested in new and unnatural ways.

The highest I’ve hiked so far after living in Colorado for three years is about 12,000 feet, so not only is it something I’ve never done before, but it will challenge me in completely new ways to train to climb not one, but three, Fourteeners this year.

The three peaks I’ve chosen:

I am so excited about this goal. I envision what it will be like standing at the summit of each of these peaks, looking down on the world below, and that inspires me. My goal in 2018 is to reach new heights, and if I succeed, I will have quite literally accomplished this three times over.

I’m also particularly excited that this goal has nothing to do with my physical appearance; but rather, it has everything to do with stamina, endurance, mental toughness, and determination. Health and fitness is about more than aesthetics and appearance — even the most ripped, muscular people in the world can be unhealthy.

Right now, I’m planning to attempt my first summit in late June, with another in July and another in August. If you live in the Denver area and want to join me on this journey, email me at fitdadfitness15@gmail.com and we’ll coordinate!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This week’s Fit Dad Fitness Podcast guest, Craig Capurso, has been one of the most recognizable faces and names in the fitness industry over the last few years. As a Bodybuilding.com spokesmodel and IFBB pro, Craig has become a staple in fitness magazines, in competitions, and in producing some of the best workout content out there.

In this week’s interview, Craig and I discuss all of the many ways he has sought and faced new challenges in his life — from leaving his job as a Wall Street commodities trader to enter the fitness world full-time, to starting a variety of businesses (most recently, Metron), to becoming a dad, to rediscovering his faith, to venturing in CrossFit.

This wide-ranging interview ends with some powerful words of wisdom from Craig — be willing to step out and do the work, and don’t let someone else get your kudos. Enjoy!

Don’t forget to check out this week’s episode sponsor, Flapjacked. Now through May 31, 2018, when you go to Flapjacked.com and make an order, you can use the code “fitdad” at checkout for 20% off your order! They just released a new Mighty Muffin flavor — blueberry muffin! You’ll never want another kind of protein pancake or muffin again.

Listen to this episode!

The Fit Dad Fitness Podcast is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and SoundCloud, and Spotify. Please give it a listen and subscribe, and let me know what you think. I can always improve, so any feedback is greatly appreciated! Thanks everyone!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

A lot of the content I create for Fit Dad Fitness focuses on gym or fitness center workouts, because that’s what I do and like the most.

However, I understand there are plenty of dads out there that, for a variety of reasons, workout at home.

I feel like the stereotype is that you can’t get in a great workout at home — that you have to settle for a subpar workout. Not true!

But, you do have to pay more attention to some basic elements of your mindset and environment at home to make sure that you’re setting yourself up for fitness success.

Here are 5 home workout tips for fit dads, plus an example home workout at the end:

1. Have a dedicated workout space

If you’ve ever worked from home, you know the value of having a set-aside space for you to perform your job. It helps you focus, helps to avoid distractions, and makes you feel like you’re actually at work trying to accomplish a task.

Some people can accomplish this while sitting on their couch with the TV on in the background, but most of us cannot.

The same is true with home workouts.

If you want to feel like you’re actually there to accomplish your goal of getting fit, create a space for yourself where you can focus solely on your workouts. As dads, this can be hard with curious children constantly vying for our attention. But the more you can cordon off a little workout space — in your basement, in the backyard, in your garage, in a spare bedroom — the more focused you’ll be on the task at hand … living that fit dad life!

2. Set aside a designated time to workout

In the same vein as setting aside space to workout, you should also set aside a time each day as your workout time. Treat it the same way you would treat going to the gym at a certain time each day — before work, or after you get off work, or after the kids have gone to bed.

Don’t leave squeezing in a workout to chance. Because the more you do, the greater the chances are that the call of the couch will be louder than the call of your workout.

The great thing about home workouts is that once you’re done, you’re already home!

3. Invest in some basic equipment

You don’t need to drop thousands or even hundreds of dollars on pricey home workout equipment to get results.

You can absolutely get in great workouts with just a few items costing less than $100:

  • One or two sets of dumbbells
  • Exercise bands of varying tension
  • An exercise ball

Any trainer worth their weight should be able to create a killer workout program with just these few items (I can help you with that).

If you want, you can add to your collection over time, adding more weights, or a bench, or perhaps even a weight rack. Craigslist or the Facebook Marketplace are great places to find deals from people looking to offload used gym equipment, sometimes for pennies on the dollar of what they originally cost brand new.

4. Dress the part

Just like you would change into gym clothes and put on athletic shoes if you were heading into the gym for your workout, do the same if you’re working out at home. Get in the mindset that you are getting ready to exercise by looking and feeling the part.

Don’t saunter into your workout area wearing the jeans you wore to work, or wearing socks on your feet without shoes.

Take your home workouts seriously.

5. Have a plan each day

This is true no matter where you’re working out. You won’t fully achieve the results you’re looking for if you simply try to wing it every time you workout.

Set a specific goal for yourself, and then do your research or work with someone to create a plan of attack for each and every workout you do. Take working out at home just as seriously as you would walking into a gym away from home.

As I mention in my latest eBook, 14 Rules for Fit Dads, Rule No. 1 is that for any exercise program, you must train in the correct way to achieve your desired results. Training to maximize weight loss is very different from training to building big muscles, for instance.

Your success — or failure — depends on the level of effort you put into planning how you intend to achieve your goals.

25-Minute Home Workout

Here’s an example workout that you can do at home with minimal space and minimal equipment.

This workout really only requires one set of dumbbells — 15-pounders will easily do the trick.

Perform four rounds of the following circuit, with 2 minutes of rest in between rounds:

  • Dumbbell reverse lunge, balance, to curl – 10 reps each leg
  • 3-second hollow-body holds – 10 reps
  • Dumbbell push-ups to renegade rows – 10 reps
  • Mountain climbers – 30 seconds
  • Dumbbell chest press (on an exercise ball or on the floor) – 10 reps
Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Growing up, I wanted to be a fighter pilot. What little boy didn’t, right? Specifically, I wanted to fly the F-15 Eagle, widely considered the greatest fighter jet ever with its undefeated record in aerial combat.

Today’s Fit Dad Fitness Podcast guest lived my childhood dream. Joel Neeb was a F-15 pilot. But that doesn’t even begin to tell his story.

In 2010, Joel was diagnosed with Stage 4 cancer. Rather than fighting his battles in the air in the cockpit of a faster-than-the-speed-of-sound jet, Joel fought for his life in a hospital. His particular form of cancer was so gruesome, doctors didn’t bother giving him a prognosis.

Eight years later, and Joel is the father to three beautiful children, has stepped on stage as a physique competitor, has competed in the IronMan Triathlon, is training to try to compete on American Ninja Warrior, and is the President of the consulting group, Afterburner, Inc. And his cancer? Well, you’ll have to listen to the episode to hear the rest of the story.

Joel brings a new perspective on life that only a man who has experienced what he has experienced could deliver. This episode is absolutely stunning. Enjoy!

Don’t forget to check out this week’s episode sponsor, Flapjacked. Now through May 31, 2018, when you go to Flapjacked.com and make an order, you can use the code “fitdad” at checkout for 20% off your order! They just released a new Mighty Muffin flavor — cinnamon roll — and it rocks! You’ll never want another kind of protein pancake or muffin again.

Listen to this episode!

The Fit Dad Fitness Podcast is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and SoundCloud, and Spotify. Please give it a listen and subscribe, and let me know what you think. I can always improve, so any feedback is greatly appreciated! Thanks everyone!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This week’s guest on the Fit Dad Fitness Podcast is the Co-Founder of Flapjacked, Dave Bacon. Flapjacked is food you love with protein you need, and Dave and his wife, Jennifer, founded the company to provide themselves and their five children the healthy, nutritious fuel their bodies needed for their active lifestyles. In particular, they wanted to give their son Jace, who has autism, a healthy, protein-packed way to have one of his favorite meals — pancakes.

The cool thing about how Dave and Jennifer founded the company was that they involved their kids in the creation of the company, from ideas for products, to branding, to helping pack orders.

And of course, Dave is a Fit Dad himself and loves to get his day started with a Mighty Muffin and a solid workout in the gym.

Huge thank you to this week’s episode sponsor, Flapjacked. Now through May 31, 2018, when you go to Flapjacked.com and make an order, you can use the code “fitdad” at checkout for 20% off your order! They just released a new Mighty Muffin flavor — cinnamon roll — so get on board that train! You’ll never want another kind of protein pancake or muffin again.

Listen to this episode!

The Fit Dad Fitness Podcast is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and SoundCloud, and now Spotify! Please give it a listen and subscribe, and let me know what you think. I can always improve, so any feedback is greatly appreciated! Thanks everyone!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Credit: NBC / Ron Batzdorff

I don’t watch a ton of TV. Unless its live sports or Big Bang Theory re-runs after the kids have gone to bed, if the TV is on in our house, I’m usually only casually paying attention.

However, there is one show I do not miss: This is Us.

I appreciate this show so much not just for its storytelling, which is about as compelling as any show I’ve ever watched, but also for how the husband and father, Jack (played by Milo Ventimiglia), is portrayed.

Jack is beloved by his family, loves his wife and children, makes mistakes and owns them and works hard to correct them, fights for what’s right, is patient, is positive in the face of adversity, and is loyal.

After years of sitcoms that showed husbands and fathers as bumbling idiots who couldn’t get out of their own way (King of Queens), who constantly exasperated their wives and embarrassed their children (Everybody Loves Raymond), who made mistake after mistake and tried to haphazardly cover it up before finally admitting defeat (Home Improvement), I commend the writers of “This is Us” for finally giving us an example of a good family man on TV.

Perhaps what I like most about the character is how in life and (spoiler alert) in death, Jack still has a positive influence on his wife and childrens’ lives. It also is a painful reminder of the struggles a family experiences when a husband and father is no longer present.

The children characters Randall (Sterling K. Brown), Kate (Chrissy Metz), and Kevin (Justin Hartley), have all at some point in the show’s two seasons expressed that their fathers’ influence makes them what to be better people, to try harder, to “make their father proud.” Though Jack is a TV show character, the message still rings true: an involved father leaves a legacy, not just in the physical sense of bringing children into the world, but in how those children grow up and see their own value.

In the case of Jack’s character, he did not abandon or leave his family by his own will. As the Super Bowl Sunday episode showed us, Jack suffers a massive heart attack after saving his family from their burning house.

The damage left in the wake of a man that walks out on his family is perhaps even greater, and families must try to comprehend why they “weren’t good enough” to keep him from leaving.

If you don’t watch “This is US,” I recommend that you do. Because there’s finally a TV show that portrays a husband and father as a dedicated family man, and truth be told, Jack’s character makes me take stock of my own life and reflect on how I can be better as well.

When a TV character has you thinking about your own legacy, you know it’s good.

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

One of the defining characteristics of the “dad bod” — besides the belly that hangs over your pants’ waistline — is a nearly non-existent, flat-as-a-pancake butt.

Let’s face it, most don’t pay attention to the shape of their butt … gut or no gut.

Even for the guys who workout, hitting legs even once a week is a stretch. There’s a reason “don’t skip leg day” is a commonly used phrase in the fitness world. Lots of dudes skip it, or only sprinkle it in every now and then just to say they work their legs.

I’ve never been one to skip leg day, but for nearly a year now, I’ve actually ramped it up. Five and a half years into my Fit Dad journey, I now do two leg workouts a week.

Here’s why:

  • The lower half of your body contains some of the largest muscles in your body — including the largest in your gluteus maximus. So why would you only work your legs once a week and the muscles in the top half of your body three, four, sometimes five times a week?
  • Strong legs and glutes provide a strong foundation for the rest of your body and can help prevent injury, naturally raise your testosterone levels, and can even help you in your other lifts — even your upper body lifts.
  • Having an underdeveloped lower body and a well-defined upper body might look OK when you’re wearing a tight shirt and some pants, but when you’re in shorts at the park or in trunks at the beach, you look like a lollipop — top heavy.

I don’t want to look like a lollipop, so I train legs twice a week. And I love it. Call me weird, but leg day is my favorite day.

There are a couple different ways I tend to split out my two leg days each week:

  • One day is a day for lifting heavier weight with fewer reps, and one day is a volume day where I lower the weight and bump the reps significantly.

Or

  • One day is a quad-focused day and one the other day is a hamstring- and glute-focused day.

Either way you split it out, it’s best to mix up the exercises so that you’re not repeating movements in a single week.

My top-5 favorite leg day exercises:

  • Hungarian split squats (with barbell or dumbbells)
  • Elevated sumo squats (with kettlebell or dumbbell)
  • Hip thrusts (with barbell)
  • Walking lunges (with barbell or dumbbells)
  • Stiff-legged deadlifts (with barbell or dumbbells)

What are your favorite leg day exercises?

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This week’s episode is, to date, the hardest one I’ve ever done. As a former journalist, it is the most challenging interview I have ever completed. There’s simply no other way to describe what its like speaking to a fellow father who has been through what no parent should ever have to experience — the loss of a child.

My guest this week is David Steele, father to Madelyn and step-dad to Ellie. David runs the website DadsofSteele.com, with an aim of “bringing dads together to inspire, encourage, and motivate each other. Dads of Steele came about after David and his wife, Colleen, had to say goodbye to their newborn baby girl, Aubrey Violet, after complications arose after Aubrey was born.

David’s health waned in the months afterward as he dealt with the emotions of losing his daughter. But after hearing a song on the radio, he dedicated himself to getting back in shape in the memory of Aubrey Violet. His fitness comeback story was so inspiring that he was featured in Men’s Health magazine, and he’s now using his experience to inspire and motivate other dads to be the best versions of themselves.

Prepare yourself for an incredibly deep, emotional, and ultimately uplifting episode.

Be sure to check out this week’s show sponsor, HealthIQ. HealthIQ is a great company that my wife and I recently used to double our life insurance coverage and reduce our monthly premiums by about 20 percent. If you take care of yourself and care about your physical health, and you want to make sure that your family is set up to be taken care of should the worst happen, then you have to check out HealthIQ. Go to HealthIQ.com/FitDad to get the process starting with your free quote.

Listen to this episode!

The Fit Dad Fitness Podcast is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and SoundCloud. Please give it a listen and subscribe, and let me know what you think. I can always improve, so any feedback is greatly appreciated! Thanks everyone!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

This week’s episode is a bit different, as my guest is not a dad, and we don’t talk a whole lot about fitness specifically — although there is some gym talk.

My guest this week is Lee Moffie, one of the co-founders of State & Liberty Clothing Co., whose mission is “to provide athletes the fit, feel and professional look they deserve in a dress shirt.” An often overlooked consequence of becoming a fit dad is that as you lose weight and put on muscle, your clothes no longer fit the same way. Especially as waistlines shrink and shoulders become broader.

Many dads work in jobs that require dress shirts, and if you have an athletic body type, getting a dress shirt that fits right can be a tall task. Enter a company like State & Liberty.

I wanted to bring Lee — who played college and minor league hockey — on the podcast to talk about how State & Liberty came to be, as well as provide some fashion tips for us dads. And be sure to listen to the end for a special deal for the Fit Dad Fitness Podcast listeners.

Please share the podcast with a friend or two, and be sure to leave a rating or review.

Listen to this episode!

The Fit Dad Fitness Podcast is available on iTunes, Google Play, Stitcher, and SoundCloud. Please give it a listen and subscribe, and let me know what you think. I can always improve, so any feedback is greatly appreciated! Thanks everyone!

Read Full Article
Visit website
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 
Fit Dad Fitness Blog by Fitdadfitness15 - 1M ago

I was listening to a podcast a few days ago, and the host asked his guest why he thought obesity rates had gone up so significantly and why so many people are out of shape.

The discussion dove into the convenience and availability of fast food and the fact that people are spending more time seated at a desk at their jobs and on their butts while they commute in their car.

I can’t argue with these reasons.

But as I listened to the podcast host and his guest discuss this topic, it felt a bit too surface-level. The problem goes deeper than that.

The problem is comfort.

Over the last 70 years we have poured our physical and mental energies into trying to create comfort in our lives.

I think its fair to say that since World War II ended, most of our technological advances have focused on making everyday life easier.

Microwaves. iPhones. Drive-thru restaurants. Email. Commercial air travel. Amazon.com. We’ve even modified our food to make it easier to grow with as little intervention as possible.

We barely have to leave the house if we want something. We no longer have to work our bodies to grow or raise our own food — heck, we don’t even have to cook our own food if we don’t want to.

70 years ago — and in some cases even just 30 years ago — if you wanted something, you either had to get up, get out, and go get it, or you had to make it/build it/create it yourself. In many instances, your life depended on you physically working hard just to get the basics.

Convenience and comfort have dominated our thoughts and actions, and along the way, we as a society in total never committed to replacing the physical work that life demanded of us 70 years ago.

In my grandparents’ old photos, I rarely see an overweight person. Both of my grandfathers fought in WWII and were strapping young men, strong as all get-out, and worked hard with their bodies all their lives. And they both lived to be over 90 years old.

And now? Well, just last month, it was reported that life expectancy in the U.S. dropped for the second year in a row. The average life expectancy in the U.S. is 78.6 years, and nearly all of the top 10 leading causes of death — heart disease, cancer, chronic lower respiratory disease, stroke, diabetes, influenza and pneumonia, and kidney disease — can be attributed to poor physical fitness.

Ok, Ok. You get the point. So what’s THE point?

I realize this might sound a bit nostalgic and like I’m wishing for the “good ol’ days,” but that’s not the case. I love modern conveniences. I’m glad I no longer have to work to grow my own fruits and vegetables and raise my own meat and make my own clothes. I love ordering something off Amazon and getting it on my doorstep two days later.

But I am concerned that over the last 70 years or so, a vast majority of people replaced hard work for comfort without making it a point to supplement their daily routines with physical activities to keep their bodies healthy, fit and active. Now more than ever, we need the gym. We need exercise. We need physical fitness.

This, to me, is THE reason why more than 70 percent of the U.S. population is overweight and one-third is considered obese. This is why chronic, preventable diseases are killing us at younger and younger ages. This is why the term “dad bod” even exists.

It’s not simply because fast food is more available. It’s not simply because we sit at a computer for our job.

It’s because we sought comfort over everything else.

Read Full Article
Visit website

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free year
Free Preview