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The Edelkrone SliderONE version two is a small camera slider made to capture motion-controlled video, stop motion and timelapse shots. You can watch our video review below:

Edelkrone SliderONE V2 review & HeadONE – motorized timelapse gear - YouTube

The slider’s motion can be operated and adjusted by using Edelkrone’s phone application via Bluetooth. The app doesn’t require complicated pairing and is easy to understand and fast to setup. For real time motion you can simply drag your finger to the left or right and the slider will follow without a noticeable delay.

Edelkrone phone app slider settings

How fast the slider carriage is moving depends on how far the button in the app is being pushed to the side. Variable speed and range can be recorded and saved to repeat the same motion which can be handy for visual effects work.

The motion itself is super smooth both at minimum and maximum speed which makes this slider a reliable tool.

The SliderONE v2 mounted on to a tripod

Because of its short range of 27cm it’s important to either have something very close to the camera when using a wide-angle lens or to use a tele-photo lens for subjects further away to maximize the motion effect.

Especially impressive is the vertical setup which works without any issues. There are no changes in speed, sudden bumps or jerky motion. This kind of setup can be useful to reveal a subject or a product when doing a commercial shoot, moving slowly up or down.

Setting up timelapse shots is surprisingly easy and doesn’t require a lot of math. You can either specify every setting manually in the app, like interval, shutter count etc. or let the slider do its own thing automatically.

Edelkrone phone app timelapse menu

The easiest way to get good results is to set a starting and ending point, usually each at the opposite end of the slider and then choose the shooting time, let’s say 30 minutes as well as the shutter count, for example 240 frames which will be 10 seconds of video in a 24p timeline. The slider needs to be connected with the camera using a remote cable to trigger the camera’s shutter, otherwise the slider will move but the camera won’t take any photos. The slider’s carriage will then move a little in between shots and stop again to create motion which is especially important when shooting at longer exposures, to avoid a blurry image.

A useful add-on is the HeadONE which is a 360° panning device. Because of the speed variance it’s both useful for fast and slow real-time video as well as for timelapses. It can be connected with the slider to be used simultaneously to get a variety of motion effects such as parallax. The specific angle and keyframes can be set in the Edelkrone app both in video and timelapse mode.

Edelkrone HeadONE panning device

Both devices are powered by LP-E6 batteries which last two to four hours depending on the specific settings and use case.

The overall built quality is very high which is important when travelling a lot and shooting outdoors in different weather conditions. The slider can carry DSLRs or mirrorless setups of up to 2.3kg vertically which is pretty good considering the small size.

FLEXTilt Head 2 mounted on to the slider

Although it’s not always a good idea to only be able to use a product in combination with an app, the Edelkrone app works very well and I didn’t run into any issues during our test.

The Edelkrone SliderONE V2 is certainly not meant to be used for all kinds of shoots, because of its short range of less than 30cm and the compact size. Even though the noise of the motor is quieter compared to the original SliderONE it’s still audible which can be an issue for interview shoots. Another thing to keep in mind is that the slider comes without legs which means you need to mount it on to a small tripod to level it properly.

Edelkrone SliderONE v2 tripod timelapse setup

The main reason to get this slider is the compact size and the incredible smooth motion as well as the slow speed which is great for product and macro shots. It’s certainly meant for travelling and one-man bands because it doesn’t require a lot of accessories that need to be mounted first.

Another advantage of the small size is that you can mount it almost anywhere to get a unique angle which isn’t possible with bigger sliders.

You can purchase the products by using the links below!

SliderONE v2: http://edel.kr/dk
HeadONE: http://edel.kr/dl
FlexTILT Head 2: http://edel.kr/dm


Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch on April 8, 2019

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The Fujinon 8-16mm F/2.8 is a lens that has long been missing in the X-lens lineup. The 10-24mm wide-angle has been around for a few years and is certainly a good lens but the biggest downside has always been the aperture of F/4 which made it a good daylight lens but not so much of a good choice for low light or night shoots. Watch our video review below:

Ultra wide-angle lens review: Fujinon 8-16mm F/2.8 - YouTube

The 8-16mm is big and heavy compared to the 10-24mm which is not surprising considering the optics and constant aperture of F/2.8. But because of the size and weight it can be quite front heavy when using it on the X-H1 or X-T3 without a battery grip.

The auto focus is pretty fast and most of the time accurate but I often ended up focusing manually to be sure that I wanted to be in focus was actually sharp which is not always an easy task when shooting so wide.

A good fit: The 8-16mm on the X-H1 with battery grip

The lens is meant to be used for landscape and architectural photography and has no distortion, color fringing or vignetting even when shooting wide-open both at 8mm and 16mm. The detail and sharpness are amazing not just when shooting photos and but also videos.

Sample photo at 8mm captured with the X-H1 with an aperture of F/11

While this lens is a good choice for photography it’s not an ideal choice for video. The lack of image stabilization could be considered a downside but it’s not a big deal because the lens is ultra wide so little shakes won’t be visible especially when combining it with the IBIS of the X-H1. The bigger issue is a rather unexpected one: The filter thread or in this case the lack of it. Because of the lens design it’s not possible to screw on a circular variable ND filter. This is less of an issue for photo shoots because there are mounts available for rectangular filters but it’s unfortunate for video shoots that require the use of variable ND filters. The upside of this construction is that the sun hood is integrated and doesn’t need to be taken on and off for each shoot.

Good for photographers, bad for filmmakers: The front design of the lens

At around 2000 USD this is one of Fujifilm’s most expensive lenses but it’s also one of the sharpest ones and it is weather resistant. Is it worth it? Sure, if you are a professional how needs a technically perfect image this is the lens to go for but if you mainly shoot video, I wouldn’t recommend getting this lens.

There are a couple of cheaper and video friendlier options for filmmakers out there: If the aperture of F/4 doesn’t bother you then the Fujinon 10-24mm is still the best choice because it has a great focal range, no distortion, internal image stabilization plus it’s only half the price. The other, cheaper option would be the Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8 which also has no distortion but some vignetting when shooting wide-open. The lens is manual only which means it doesn’t have auto focus which depending on what you film isn’t too big of an issue.

Fujinon 8-16mm F/2.8 + Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8: Big, heavy and expensive vs. small, lightweight and affordable

You can purchase the Fujinon 8-16mm F/2.8 by clicking HERE from B&H Photo!

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, March 8, 2019

The post Ultra wide-angle lens review: Fujinon 8-16mm F/2.8 appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

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We finally put together a selection of time lapse, hyperlapse and flow motion footage we mostly captured in 2018 all around the globe. Shooting locations include Paris (France), Cologne (Germany), Las Vegas (USA) and different places in Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia). This is just a small part of what we shot. Lean back and enjoy!

4K Timelapse Reel - Fenchel & Janisch - YouTube

The fast motion footage was all shot with mirrorless cameras as raw photo sequences and put together in post using CameraRaw and Adobe After Effects.

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, March 8, 2019

The post 4K Timelapse Reel: Frankfurt & worldwide appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

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Wide-angle lenses are great for a lot of reasons but they can also be quite expensive especially if you want one that can shoot wide-open. Here are our three favorite wide-angles that we consider to be affordable and we have been using for a while.

3 affordable wide-angle lenses - YouTube

Samyang 12mm F/2

The cheapest on our list: Samyang 12mm F/2

Recommended for: Gimbal walking shots, landscape and low light

Price: $269.00

A classic and probably the cheapest good wide-angle lens out there is one of our favorites. The Samyang 12mm. It’s lightweight and small, has a plasticky feeling but can capture sharp photos and videos.  And the best thing: It has an aperture of F/2. Even though it’s not very sharp at F/2 it’s great to have that extra light and shallow depth of field especially when recording video. The sharpest performance is between F/5.6 and F/8 with the least amount of vignetting. Light sources and lens flares have a star shape so that is something to keep in mind when using this lens.

Because it’s a manual lens it lacks auto focus and has an aperture ring so it’s best to turn on focus peaking to make sure what you want to be in focus is actually sharp.

Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8

New and tiny: Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8

Recommended for: Gimbal walking shots, landscape and architecture

Price: $499.00

The newest lens on our list is the Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8 which is not only super tiny but built like a tank and actually quite heavy considering the size. The image quality, colors and contrast from this lens are great and the Zero Distortion claim also seems to be true. There’s still a high amount of vignetting until F/5.6 but everything above is sharp and clear. It has a very unique lens flare that filmmakers either going to hate or love.

Compared to the Samyang 12mm this has a much wider field of view even though the difference of 3mm doesn’t sound like much.

Even though the small size has a lot of advantages especially when it comes to travelling it can be tricky to change focus and aperture because it’s just so tiny.

Tokina 11-16mm F/2.8

Old but still powerful: Tokina 11-16mm F/2.8

Recommended for: Documentary and timelapse

Price: $399.00

The last lens on our list is a very old one. The Tokina 11-16mm. We have used this lens for 8 years now and it was one of the first affordable electronic lenses for crop sensor DSLRs with a constant aperture of F/2.8 which was also the reason we got it back then.

We originally got it for our Canon 7D which we used it on for almost five years on a daily basis. We didn’t only use it on documentary shoots but also commercial work and timelapse photography. These days we still use it for example on Cinema cameras or with adapters on other DSLRs and video cameras. Even though this lens is not a full-frame lens it can be used on a full-frame camera without vignetting when zooming in to 16mm.

The clear advantage the Tokina has over the other two lenses is the auto focus which works well for photos but is not quite up to date for shooting video. And of course, the zoom: Not being stuck with only one focal length is another big advantage especially in filmmaking.

All three: Tokina 11-16mm, Samyang/Rokinon 12mm, Laowa 9mm

Depending on which camera system and lens mount you are using one of these optics will certainly be a good choice especially if you don’t want to spend too much money on a wide-angle.

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, March 5, 2019

The post 3 affordable wide-angle lenses appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

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The A7R III is Sony’s flagship mirrorless camera that isn’t just made to take great photos but can also record crisp 4K video. Watch the video below to find out what we like and what we think should be changed!

Reasons (not) to get the Sony A7R III - YouTube

Here are some reasons why we think the A7R III is one of the best hybrid full-frame cameras right now:

Battery life

The first thing you will notice when using this camera is the amount of time you can shoot without needing to change batteries. Depending on if you’re capturing photos or videos you can easily shoot all day with just two batteries.

Lenses

Even though Sony is known for making great E-mount lenses they are not exactly cheap but you can still get some proper glass that won’t cost you a fortune. There are a lot of great third party lenses available that are not just affordable but also sharp and have reliable auto focus.

Sony FE lenses aren’t cheap. Third party lenses can be a good option!

Film picture profiles

To get the highest dynamic range when filming the A7R III can record with different log profiles that can be color corrected and graded in post. S-Log2 and S-Log3 are good if you have time to grade but the HLG profiles can also record in HDR without looking too flat or desatured. Even though the 8-bit XAVC codec only has a bitrate of 100Mbps in 4K 30p the footage holds up very well when grading.

A variety of film picture styles make it easy to get a specific film look.

IBIS

While in-body image stabilization has been around for a few years it’s a must have when taking pictures in low light or when filming hand-held with prime lenses or third-party lenses that don’t have image stabilization.

In-body image stabilization means your lenses don’t need to have IS to get shake-free footage.

The Sony A7R III seems like the perfect tool but there are some things that could be improved:

4K 60p

The lack of 60 frames per second when recording Ultra HD can certainly be a deal breaker especially because other camera manufacturers are already offering cameras that can record 4K 60p for just half the price.

10-bit codec

Even though Sony offers different flat picture profiles when capturing video the low bitrate 8-bit codec can be a problem in post, so it would be good to see a high bitrate 10-bit codec in the next camera.

Focus peaking

When manually focusing the focus peaking is too pixelated and it’s almost impossible to properly judge whether something is in or out of focus and blurry.

The A7R III connected to the Atomos Shinobi monitor

Video menu

When accessing the menu in video mode only video settings should be displayed to make the big menu less confusing and to simplify the view of the features.

The video recording display is simple, unlike Sony’s menu.

Timelapse mode

A feature that has long been missing is an internal timelapse mode that can save a video as well as a raw or JPEG sequence. But it seems like Sony will soon be adding this feature to several Alpha cameras.

Nontheless is the A7R III a great combination of photo and video camera that is certainly not cheap or meant for beginners but a great tool for professionals.

You can buy the camera by clicking HERE from B&H Photo!

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, March 1, 2019

The post Reasons (not) to get the Sony A7R III appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

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The Fujifilm X-T3 is a very capable stills camera but how good does it perform when it comes to capturing video? Watch our Vvdeo review below to find out!

Review: Fujifilm X-T3 for filmmaking - YouTube

The Fujifilm camera that got filmmaker’s attention first was the X-T2. It wasn’t really made for video recording but because of the detailed image and colors became popular among video creators. The X-T2 finally got on everyone’s radar when a big firmware update enabled the camera to shoot log internally as well as 120 frames per second in HD.

Two years after the X-T2 was launched its successor clearly shows that Fujifilm is focusing more and more on video features. The X-T3 can shoot 4K 60p at up to 400Mbps when recording in H.265. Even though this is not the fastest codec to work with when it comes to editing it’s definitely worth it when color correcting and grading the footage. Grading is also a lot easier because the H.265 footage is 10-bit with 4:2:0 subsampling. When using an external recorder like the Atomos Ninja 5 it can even output 4:2:2 to really get the best out of the image.

The compact body is an advantage if the lenses are not too big.

Fuji’s flat picture profile F-Log is certainly a good choice for grading but the new HLG profile is a much needed extension because it doesn’t require a heavy grade which means you will spend less time in post adjusting and tweaking colors and contrast. The advantage of this HDR picture profile is that the footage looks more saturated and less flat even though it has a high dynamic range. This is especially useful for productions that need to be edited and finished quickly without the need for a professional color correction.

A feature Fuji is constantly improving is auto focus. The continuous auto focus works very well most of the time just like the face tracking which can be useful for interview shoots or when vlogging.

Besides being able to record 120 frames per second in Full HD for a nice slow motion effect the camera can also do the opposite and record timelapses with the shortest interval of 1 second. A timelapse can be saved as JPEG or raw files with a resolution of up to 6K. But just like with other Fuji cameras there is no video preview or video file to display how the timelapse sequence looks like.

The X-T3 with the RODE Videomic Pro

The camera almost has it all. But one big feature is missing. IBIS. This certainly isn’t a big deal when shooting with XF zoom lenses that have built-in image stabilization or when using a tripod but filming hand-held with prime lenses is pretty much impossible because the footage will be too shaky.

The X-T3 has a headphone jack and a 3.5mm microphone input as well as all the necessary features to monitor the video on screen. The electronic viewfinder is bright and detailed and overall quite useful especially when shooting outdoors on a sunny day but also to add stabilization when filming hand-held. The ergonomics are almost identical to the X-T2’s which is good if you are familiar with the camera but rather unusual for everyone who hasn’t used Fuji cameras before. The grip is small which can be an issue for people with big hands even if the battery grip is attached.

Video menu

The battery life is okay but could definitely be better. During our testing I often used the battery grip which meant the camera had access to three batteries in total so I didn’t have to worry about running out of power so it always makes sense to go out with a few batteries.

So overall there isn’t too much to talk or complain about because the camera does a lot of things right. Just like most mirrorless cameras the X-T3 has a recording limit of 30 minutes in one take which isn’t a huge issue unless you’re shooting long interviews.

The main issue this camera really has, when it comes to video features, is the lack of in body image stabilization, which I know is not important to all users but can be if you’re currently using a camera that has it or if you want to use prime lenses that don’t have stabilization. If IBIS is really important for your style of filmmaking then I would recommend to take a look at the X-H1 which is also a good tool for filmmaking but lacks 4K 60p and can’t record video with 10-bit.

The Fujifilm X-T3 is a great camera that deserves all the attention and is pretty much unbeatable for the price. This is not just a good tool for photography but can definitely be used for professional video productions as well.

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, February 27, 2019

The post Review: Fujifilm X-T3 for filmmaking appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

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The Alpha 6400 is Sony’s latest update to their popular A6000 series. While it’s very similar to the older A6500 we still wanted to see for ourselves how good the camera is for video work. We took the small mirrorless camera out on a sunny afternoon and filmed in Downtown Frankfurt. We mainly recorded the Ultra HD footage (3840×2160) in S-Log3 but some shots with an HLG picture profile. For us it was a good way to test the dynamic range because the light was very hard which meant: Extreme contrast!

Sony A6400: Color Graded 4K Footage - Downtown Frankfurt - YouTube

We used the popular 70-200mm F/4 lens from Sony to get nice close shots as well as the Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8 ultra-wide-angle lens which we will be including in an upcoming wide-angle comparison video very soon. Both lenses performed very well in combination with the A6400.

Even though I am personally not a big fan of grading S-Log2 and S-Log3 footage especially at low bitrates the result is better than what I originally expected. The footage was edited in Adobe Premiere Pro CC and graded using the Lumetri panel.

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch on February 19, 2019

The post Sony A6400 video test: Color graded 4K footage appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

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Atomos latest product is not a recorder but simply a monitor. Find out more in our video below!

Atomos Shinobi - 4K HDR Monitor - First Impressions Review - YouTube

The Shinobi’s 1000nit HDR display comes in handy when filming in bright locations or outdoors on a sunny day.

The touch screen is very responsive and switching between settings is very easy and intuitive.

The Shinobi offers all necessary settings to check exposure, color and focus. Besides False Color, Waveform and Vectorscope useful features also include vertical and horizontal flip as well as different zoom modes which can help to check framing or focus in detail. Most of the settings can also be customized depending on the shooter’s preferences.

The brightness is really useful for sunny outdoor shoots.

The monitor supports the most common Log formats for example S-Log, V-Log or RedLog. Just like with Atomos recorders, the Shinobi can also display external LUTs which can simply be done by putting them onto an SD card. This allows a look preview in real time while shooting to see how the final video could look like.

Besides all the visual features the monitor also has 3.5mm headphone jack to listen to the audio.

Moritz filming with the Fujifilm X-T3 and the Atomos Shinobi on a sunny winter day.

Even though the monitor itself is very lightweight and compact the compatible NP-F batteries can add quite some weight so I recommend not to use the big ones unless you need the monitor to run for a few hours constantly.

This is definitely not a display for everyone simply because of the price of 400 US Dollars. There are cheaper small camera monitors on the market available right now but they often have quirky, menus, a bad color and contrast reproduction and are usually not very bright. The Shinobi is not aimed at beginners but rather at experienced camera men. The brightness, color accuracy, and long battery life make the Shinobi a reliable tool for professional filmmakers.

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, February 2019

The post Atomos Shinobi – 4K HDR Monitor – First Impressions Review appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

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The Feiyu Tech AK4000 is a 3-axis hand-held gimbal designed for DSLRs and mirrorless cameras with a payload of up to 4kg.

You can watch our video review below:

Magic camera gimbal? Feiyu AK4000 review - YouTube

The so called Magic Ring is the most unique feature of this stabilizer. Even though it just looks like a regular focus wheel of a follow focus it can control a variety of settings such as zoom, focus or rotation of the three axis.

The touch screen is quite big compared to other gimbals and is useful to control different settings like the modes, Wifi or Bluetooth to be able to use more features by controlling the gimbal via the Feiyu ON app.

The placement of the batteries in the bottom of the grip is a bit tricky because they are locked behind a little door which is tricky to close once it is opened.

Relatively compact and easy to operate, the FeiyuTech AK4000

The battery life varies heavily depending on the functions and modes that are used. The batteries sometimes only last for 6 hours even though Feiyu claims a battery use of up to 12 hours which is not very long compared to other camera stabilizers.

The gimbal itself is relatively compact compared to the Moza Air 2 or the DJI Ronin-S but can be extended with a rod so it’s definitely a tool that can be used when traveling compact and not wanting to bring big or heavy camera gear.

Besides being able to shoot motion controlled timelapses and hyperlapses the AK4000 offers a lot of features but the main task, to stabilize tracking and walking shots doesn’t always satisfy. Even though the camera is balanced correctly the gimbal sometimes seems to have troubles stabilizing the camera properly which results in vibration and micro jitter. While this issue can probably be fixed with firmware updates it’s something that I ran into a couple of times while testing the gimbal.

The AK4000 offers a lot of great features but the short battery life and vibration issue is something that should and hopefully will be improved with software updates.

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, December 2018

The post Magic camera gimbal? Feiyu AK4000 review appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

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The Moza Air 2 is a hand-held camera stabilizer designed for mirrorless cameras, DSLRs and cinema cameras with a payload of up to 4.2kg.

You can watch our video review below!

Moza Air 2 review: A gimbal that gets the job done! - YouTube

The gimbal is easy to balance and setup. It even has an automatic calibration feature which helps to get the best out of the stabilizer and pretty much makes it idiot proof.

Even though I was not a big fan of the original Moza Air gimbal because it didn’t have any unique features at the time, the Air 2 is definitely a great update.

The joystick is very responsive which means the different axis can be controlled very precise and smooth.

The stabilizer also can be used in combination with the iFocus system to control the focus of the lens used on the camera. The follow focus works well both with cinema glass as well as with photo lenses but takes a few minutes to setup. It can either be mounted on the left or right side of the lens by using a rod. When turning the wheel on the gimbal’s grip very fast the cut teeth of the lens and the cut teeth of the follow focus can disconnect because they are rotating too fast. Luckily this doesn’t happen at normal speeds.

Great for bigger camera Setups, the Air 2

By using the Moza app the gimbal can also capture a veriety of motion timelapses when using Nikon, Canon or Sony cameras.

The gimbal also offers a sports mode that means the axis follow very fast instead of slow which allows for quick pans and fast motion which can be useful for filming sports and action scenes.

Even though gimbals are often used in combination with wide-angle lenses to get a wide field of view and to usually follow a person I often film between 50mm and 100mm and rather use the stabilizer for shots that would typically be captured with a slider or a crane. But that’s the good thing about gimbals in general. They are versatile and should not only be used for walking shots but also for slower motion.

Doesn’t need complicated balancing thanks to auto calibration

A very useful feature of the Air 2 is this little switch which can lock the roll axis. This is especially useful when walking but not filming and just carrying the gimbal in one hand. This also prevents the axis from bouncing around and hitting each other which could damage the gimbal.

Even though the battery life is amazingly long, the placement of the batteries inside the grip is rather annoying because it’s tricky to actually get them out for charging.

The long battery life, the reliable follow focus, the overall robust and well designed gimbal make this stabilizer a great choice for professional cameraman and filmmakers who need to use big cameras on long shooting days and don’t mind the extra weight and size of a bigger gimbal.

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, December 2018

The post Moza Air 2 review: A gimbal that gets the job done! appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

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