Loading...

Follow Fenchel & Janisch – Film Production on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

This article contains affiliate links and is a sponsored post.

We often get asked: “So what are the essentials that I need to start filmmaking?” Since there are several components involved – some necessary, some unnecessary, we will help you with this filmmakers beginner guide to learn about the things that you absolutely need to able to start with. There are a lot of software tools and programs out there, same goes for camera and gear that you can purchase. But, you don’t need everything that’s out there, for sure not right at the beginning.

We will show and recommend different things in the order of a film production that we think are really necessary and useful. Everything recommended here is really the right choice for beginners.

Website

In order to present yourself and let people know that you are out there, it’s important to build a small website that shows a picture of yourself, a description about you and especially about the services that your offering in the field of filmmaking or if your not into commercial filmmaking what genres you are working in, for example documentary. There are different page builders out there, but we recommend themeforest.net because they have great wordpress templates that you can purchase at very affordable prices and with a wordpress website in combination with a great template you stay independant from any platform or page builder and you can easily and pretty fast setup your website.

Themeforest Camera & gear

We still think the Sony RX10 series is a great camera to start with. You don’t need to change lenses and at the same time you can cover most situations fairly well. This camera is especially great for shooting family home videos because of the auto focus or for travelling because of the small form factor and the fact that you don’t need to carry five lenses around all the time as well as the good image stabilizer. We do have a detailed review on the camera that you can find here: Sony RX10 review. We also made a short overview for you:

Beside the camera you need: Battery for the camera and of course a memory card. Make sure the memory card is fast enough, dont use the cheapest one. In Addition a tripod is essential as well as a microphone like the Rode Video Mic Pro. Thats really everything we started with in the beginning. There is no limit to the gear that you can own, so its always up to you to decide what you really need or which things you just want to have because of some cool features that you can’t really often make use of. Also a lot or expensive gear isn’t a guarantee to get hired more, in case your looking for work. Thats a misconception that a lot of filmmakers have these days.

Editing software

We recommend Movavi Video Editor Plus because it is easy-to-use if you have no experience. We often see people managing pretty well to shoot their videos but then struggling with editing. Movavi is different and a great tool for beginners because the functions are self-explaining and intuitive to use if you know how to use a computer. Also the price is very affordable and your first software doesn’t have to be expensive – it is a one time purchase and you are not stuck in any subscription model. The symbols within the software help you to get a good orientation about whats possible and where you need to click. Also the structure of how Movavi is setup, nice and clear organized. We really find it easy to keep an good overview even if your adding different compontents into your project.

Also it can be an issue that some video editing softwares only run if your computer and the graphic chip is fast enough, Movavi also runs on every computer, even if your computer is already old. Last but not least we want to point out two features that we like: First, the Intro Maker: There is no need to find a special program to make an intro for your channel. Use the special Intro mode to create a professional-looking intro for your videos. Second: Another helpful thing is the Built-in Media Collection that safes you time in searching and gives you hundreds of build-in media files, titles and transitions.

The Movavi Video Editor Plus is great to start with but also offers advanced features and is in that price range the best software that you can choose. Free trial is also offered which is great to try it and play with the features, you can download the software here.

Present your work

You now know, how to become visible online and present yourself, you know which camera and gear is essential for your start in filmmaking plus you have great editing software at hand to complete your production process. Once your video is finished, upload it to YouTube and Vimeo. Setting up channels there is to easy as that you would need an instruction for it. When placing the videos on YouTube ensure, that title, description and keywords match in order for people to be able to find your videos easily.

Written by Marcel Fenchel, July 4, 2019.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We had the chance to test the Lumix G95 (also known as G90/G91) for a day and took it out to the streets of Frankfurt (Germany) to test its video capabilities.

Panasonic G90 / G91 / G95: Color graded video samples - YouTube

This video was shot in Ultra HD resolution (3840×2160) using the Cinelike D picture profile. The 4K footage was color corrected and graded using the Lumetri panel in Premiere Pro CC.

before & after
before & after

The lenses we used were the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 50-200mm f/2.8-4 ASPH. POWER O.I.S. for the tele shots and the Venus Laowa 7.5mm F/2 ultra-wide-angle. The camera was mounted on a tripod for all shots. For the moment we won’t publish a video review because we only tested the mirrorless camera for a day but we will publish some hand-held video footage to demonstrate the performance of the in-body image stabilization (IBIS) soon.

You can order the camera with a kit lens at B&H Photo by clicking HERE!

Wide-angle lens: https://bhpho.to/2JPBBfa
Tele-photo lens: https://bhpho.to/2We2sbo

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch on May 20, 2019

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

With its unique design, the Crane 3 Lab from Zhiyun is definitely an eye catcher. Only the axis on top give away that this is even a camera gimbal. The handle and button setup look rather like a joystick in a fighter jet and don’t seem very comfortable to hold.

German review available HERE! (Deutscher Test)

Zhiyun Crane 3 Lab: DSLR gimbal review - YouTube

Besides having a reliable follow focusing system the Crane 3 Lab also offers a lot of camera controls that can be changed on the gimbal’s handle instead of the camera’s menu. For example ISO, aperture or even zoom. The Zhiyun mobile app also allows a remote control of the axis movements and settings.

Unusual but useful: New grip design and button setup

As you would expect from a gimbal in this price range, the performance is good and the footage captured when using the Crane 3 Lab looks very smooth without any jitter or vibrations.

The battery compartment which includes three batteries, can be opened and closed fast by pushing the lock forwards or backwards and removing the cover. The batteries last between 5 and 7 hours depending on the mode and features that are used. So it makes sense to get some spare batteries because they’re probably won’t last a full day of shooting.

All axis can easily be locked by switching the red latches to avoid the axis from spinning around or maybe even hitting each other which is a common issue with gimbals especially when walking around with the motors turned off.

The unusual ergonomics also mean that the small removable tripod should be attached at all times because it serves as the main grip and handle while the other hand operates the buttons. Above the tripod mount is a joystick which can be used to adjust the angle, which allows pan and tilt movements.

The handle design especially comes in handy when capturing shots at a low angle which is always a challenging task with electronic camera stabilizers.

Case with gimbal and basic accessories

The main downside of the Crane 3 Lab is the plasticky feel of the buttons and dials. The joystick’s reaction time is very fast and it’s also very sensitive so you might end up with some unwanted pans or tilts even though you just wanted to do one kind of motion.

It’s good to see that Zhiyun is trying a new kind of design to re-invent a tool that seems like it’s hit its peak already. Even though the setup may look a bit funny and impractical at first, the ergonomics are actually quite comfortable to use and for me personally it doesn’t seem to make a lot of sense to switch back to a one-hand gimbal after using this setup for a while.

You can purchase the Crane 3 Lab at B&H Photo by clicking HERE!

Deutscher Shop mit verschiedenen Bundles HIER klicken!

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch on May 18, 2019

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

There are different techniques on how to get really smooth timelapses. You can watch our video tutorial below to learn different ways that we use for our fast motion projects.

How to get smooth timelapses – edit & shoot tutorial - YouTube

Step-by-step to the best results

Usually timelapses look like this: Clouds, people or cars move fast through the frame. But especially when shooting a photo timelapse with a long pause in between pictures, a few seconds or maybe even minutes pass, things that were in one frame are not there anymore in the next frame which can lead to an unwanted effect: The footage simply looks like something is missing and doesn’t seem smooth.

To avoid this “choppy” effect there are two techniques that work well. First: Expose long and shoot at a short interval. Second: Expose short, capture the photos with a short interval and smoothen it in post.

To avoid this “choppy” effect there are two techniques that work well. First: Expose long and shoot at a short interval. Second: Expose short, capture the photos with a short interval and smoothen it in post.

1st technique: Shoot it smooth

While it’s common to expose night timelapses longer than day timelapses simply because there isn’t enough light it’s not so common to do the opposite which has two reasons.

City traffic long exposure at night

To expose long in daylight you need to close the aperture to let less light in the camera but even when shooting at F/22 you will still not be able to expose for very long which means you need to use a neutral density filter to darken the image. While for video it’s common to use variable ND filters to quickly adjust exposure without needing to change ISO, shutter or aperture, for long exposure photography it makes sense to use a fixed filter to avoid an unwanted X pattern. I recommend using a filter with ND 1000 also known as ND 3.0 to let as little light through as possible. That way you can easily expose for at least 2.5 seconds on a very sunny day but often even for more than 10 seconds.

ND filters make daylight long exposures possible

When now shooting a photo timelapse you will see a ghosting effect meaning everything that moves fast will have a high amount of motion blur just like with light trails and car lights in night timelapses.

This doesn’t only look cool, but it also gives the viewer or better understanding on where the fast motion in the pictures is leading, making it more relaxing and pleasant to watch. To get the best out of this technique it is important to keep the interval as short as possible otherwise there’s a gap in between frames which means frame one and two are visually not well connected.

The main downside of shooting long exposure photography is that you need to keep your tripod and camera perfectly steady, because little shakes and bumps can lead to an overall blurry image. This usually isn’t a big problem when using a wide-angle lens but can be an issue with everything above 50mm. The longer you expose the higher the chances are that there is some unwanted blur visible in the images.

Make sure the camera and tripod aren’t moving

If it is very windy or the ground on which the tripod is standing is vibrating or moving, which for example can happen when standing on a bridge, this is not the best technique to get smooth timelapse shots. When it comes to editing this kind of timelapse it’s especially important to use a deflickering plugin because the light and exposure is going to be a little different in each frame.

2nd technique: Fix it in post

If you prefer to smoothen your timelapses in post there is an easy way to do it. You can choose whatever shutter speed you like to shoot the timelapses at and no ND filter is needed because the blur effect will be added later on.

ND filter not needed: Motion blur will be added in post

The key to this technique is to take as many frames as possible to be able to emulate motion blur. If you’re shooting city timelapes with people visible in the shots it makes sense to shoot an interval between one and three seconds depending on how close you are to the scene.

There are different ways to add motion blur but I recommend using the Timewarp effect in Adobe After Effects. This effect allows you to easy control speed and motion blur. The advantage of applying this effect while editing instead of actually shooting long exposure photos is that you can control how blurry the motion within the frame should be and change it any time if it doesn’t give you the wanted result. Depending on how fast the motion should be you can double or triple the speed of your sequence and then enable motion blur and set it to manual. The blur is displayed as shutter angle just like on a cinema camera instead of shutter speed. But it’s not complicated to adjust the blur.

fast shutter speed vs. Timewarp (Pixel Motion Blur)

The higher the number the more motion blur will be visible. It’s pretty much the opposite of shutter speed when it comes to numbers. 1/50 of a second is 180 degrees. Feel free to play around with the amount of blur simply by dragging the slider to the right to increase the blur. You can further adjust other settings to get more pleasing results but usually this simple setting already does a good job. There can definitely be some issues when different motions are overlapping so it’s not an effect that always gives me the wanted results but definitely a good alternative to shooting long exposure timelapses. If you don’t want to change the speed you can also use Pixel Motion Blur which essentially does the same thing and is very easy to use. The shutter angle can be adjusted manually to get the wanted amount of motion blur.

I sometimes also add motion blur in post simply because it’s too windy outside to expose long in the field and the lenses on the camera are moving or shaking which is especially an issue with big tele-photo lenses and like mentioned earlier, lead to a blurry image. Stabilization effects like Warp Stabilizer can help to get rid of the lenses unwanted motion before applying the motion blur effect.In this comparison you can see both techniques work well but the long exposure timelapse clearly looks more realistic.

4K Timelapse Reel - Fenchel & Janisch - YouTube

The second technique is definitely easier and gives you more options while editing but needs a lot of computing power so I if you want to spend less time infront of your computer and more time outside give the first technique a try.

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch on May 7, 2019

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The SYRP Genie II pan tilt is a motion controlled head that can be used for timelapse and real time video shoots. The device can pan 360° which can be useful for panoramic shots and it tilts 180° which means there are no limitations when it comes to capturing every possible angle. You can watch the 7-minute video review below:

Cinematic motion control film gear – SYRP Genie II review - YouTube

The device has a 65mm quick release plate to mount a camera or ballhead with a ¼” or 3/8” screw that can easily be swapped. Due to the high built quality of the motion head there are no balance issues with both heavy and lightweight cameras as well as bigger camera setups of up to 6kg.

The Genie II can be screwed on most tripods or sliders simply by using a 3/8” screw which means an additional video or ball head is not necessary.

Shooting a pan-tilt timelapse in Downtown Frankfurt

Just like most other timelapse devices the Genie II needs to be connected with the camera by using a remote trigger cable that is either plugged in to one of the two USB-C ports or the dedicated 2.5mm camera port in the middle. The device will do a step by step motion and stop before taking a shot to allow blur-free images when shooting at long exposures. The USB-C ports can also be used to charge the removable BP02 battery that is placed above the connection ports which takes around three hours to fully charge. The battery lasts for a good day of shooting which of course depends heavily on the specific settings. Shooting timelapses needs less power than using the head in video mode because it doesn’t need to do a constant motion.

Settings keyframes in the SYRP mobile app to control the motion precisely

The SYRP mobile app allows keyframing, ease in and ease out both in video and timelapse mode to get the best results. The three axis can be adjusted by dragging your finger around just like a joystick. After setting a start and end point, interval, final video duration etc. can all be set in just a few a seconds. The motion setups can also be saved as presets so they can be repeated multiple times.

Setting the interval, shooting duration etc. only takes a few seconds

Having the option of using the integrated menu in the head itself is a great backup solution in case the app doesn’t connect with the device or if your phone simply runs out of juice.

No mobile app needed: The Genie II Pan Tilt has an integrated menu with all important settings!

A head like this is especially useful because it doesn’t only add higher value to your video but because it can shoot one shot that would have been two if you would only use a static tripod.

A pan-and-tilt-head is also great to reveal a scene by tilting up or down just like in this shot. This looks even better when ramping the speed. For example starting slow and becoming faster.

To get really smooth looking timelapses it’s also best to expose long rather than short especially with fast moving objects. For example, when setting a shutter speed of 1/4000s the motion can look a bit jittery compared to when exposing for one second.

Ideal for outdoor nature shoots or tough weather conditions, the Genie II

While there are technically no limitations on where to use it I think this motion head is ideal for outdoor city and nature shoots because of the robust built quality.

Even though the Genie II is easy and fun to use it’s less of a toy and more of a professional workhorse. That also becomes clear when looking at the price of USD 1600. It’s aimed at full-time timelapse shooters and filmmakers that want to invest in reliable gear that can deal with rough weather conditions and that can handle a few years of daily use.

You can order the motion control head at B&H Photo Video by clicking HERE!

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch on April 25, 2019

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The Edelkrone SliderONE version two is a small camera slider made to capture motion-controlled video, stop motion and timelapse shots. You can watch our video review below:

Edelkrone SliderONE V2 review & HeadONE – motorized timelapse gear - YouTube

The slider’s motion can be operated and adjusted by using Edelkrone’s phone application via Bluetooth. The app doesn’t require complicated pairing and is easy to understand and fast to setup. For real time motion you can simply drag your finger to the left or right and the slider will follow without a noticeable delay.

Edelkrone phone app slider settings

How fast the slider carriage is moving depends on how far the button in the app is being pushed to the side. Variable speed and range can be recorded and saved to repeat the same motion which can be handy for visual effects work.

The motion itself is super smooth both at minimum and maximum speed which makes this slider a reliable tool.

The SliderONE v2 mounted on to a tripod

Because of its short range of 27cm it’s important to either have something very close to the camera when using a wide-angle lens or to use a tele-photo lens for subjects further away to maximize the motion effect.

Especially impressive is the vertical setup which works without any issues. There are no changes in speed, sudden bumps or jerky motion. This kind of setup can be useful to reveal a subject or a product when doing a commercial shoot, moving slowly up or down.

Setting up timelapse shots is surprisingly easy and doesn’t require a lot of math. You can either specify every setting manually in the app, like interval, shutter count etc. or let the slider do its own thing automatically.

Edelkrone phone app timelapse menu

The easiest way to get good results is to set a starting and ending point, usually each at the opposite end of the slider and then choose the shooting time, let’s say 30 minutes as well as the shutter count, for example 240 frames which will be 10 seconds of video in a 24p timeline. The slider needs to be connected with the camera using a remote cable to trigger the camera’s shutter, otherwise the slider will move but the camera won’t take any photos. The slider’s carriage will then move a little in between shots and stop again to create motion which is especially important when shooting at longer exposures, to avoid a blurry image.

A useful add-on is the HeadONE which is a 360° panning device. Because of the speed variance it’s both useful for fast and slow real-time video as well as for timelapses. It can be connected with the slider to be used simultaneously to get a variety of motion effects such as parallax. The specific angle and keyframes can be set in the Edelkrone app both in video and timelapse mode.

Edelkrone HeadONE panning device

Both devices are powered by LP-E6 batteries which last two to four hours depending on the specific settings and use case.

The overall built quality is very high which is important when travelling a lot and shooting outdoors in different weather conditions. The slider can carry DSLRs or mirrorless setups of up to 2.3kg vertically which is pretty good considering the small size.

FLEXTilt Head 2 mounted on to the slider

Although it’s not always a good idea to only be able to use a product in combination with an app, the Edelkrone app works very well and I didn’t run into any issues during our test.

The Edelkrone SliderONE V2 is certainly not meant to be used for all kinds of shoots, because of its short range of less than 30cm and the compact size. Even though the noise of the motor is quieter compared to the original SliderONE it’s still audible which can be an issue for interview shoots. Another thing to keep in mind is that the slider comes without legs which means you need to mount it on to a small tripod to level it properly.

Edelkrone SliderONE v2 tripod timelapse setup

The main reason to get this slider is the compact size and the incredible smooth motion as well as the slow speed which is great for product and macro shots. It’s certainly meant for travelling and one-man bands because it doesn’t require a lot of accessories that need to be mounted first.

Another advantage of the small size is that you can mount it almost anywhere to get a unique angle which isn’t possible with bigger sliders.

You can purchase the products by using the links below!

SliderONE v2: http://edel.kr/dk
HeadONE: http://edel.kr/dl
FlexTILT Head 2: http://edel.kr/dm


Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch on April 8, 2019

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The Fujinon 8-16mm F/2.8 is a lens that has long been missing in the X-lens lineup. The 10-24mm wide-angle has been around for a few years and is certainly a good lens but the biggest downside has always been the aperture of F/4 which made it a good daylight lens but not so much of a good choice for low light or night shoots. Watch our video review below:

Ultra wide-angle lens review: Fujinon 8-16mm F/2.8 - YouTube

The 8-16mm is big and heavy compared to the 10-24mm which is not surprising considering the optics and constant aperture of F/2.8. But because of the size and weight it can be quite front heavy when using it on the X-H1 or X-T3 without a battery grip.

The auto focus is pretty fast and most of the time accurate but I often ended up focusing manually to be sure that I wanted to be in focus was actually sharp which is not always an easy task when shooting so wide.

A good fit: The 8-16mm on the X-H1 with battery grip

The lens is meant to be used for landscape and architectural photography and has no distortion, color fringing or vignetting even when shooting wide-open both at 8mm and 16mm. The detail and sharpness are amazing not just when shooting photos and but also videos.

Sample photo at 8mm captured with the X-H1 with an aperture of F/11

While this lens is a good choice for photography it’s not an ideal choice for video. The lack of image stabilization could be considered a downside but it’s not a big deal because the lens is ultra wide so little shakes won’t be visible especially when combining it with the IBIS of the X-H1. The bigger issue is a rather unexpected one: The filter thread or in this case the lack of it. Because of the lens design it’s not possible to screw on a circular variable ND filter. This is less of an issue for photo shoots because there are mounts available for rectangular filters but it’s unfortunate for video shoots that require the use of variable ND filters. The upside of this construction is that the sun hood is integrated and doesn’t need to be taken on and off for each shoot.

Good for photographers, bad for filmmakers: The front design of the lens

At around 2000 USD this is one of Fujifilm’s most expensive lenses but it’s also one of the sharpest ones and it is weather resistant. Is it worth it? Sure, if you are a professional how needs a technically perfect image this is the lens to go for but if you mainly shoot video, I wouldn’t recommend getting this lens.

There are a couple of cheaper and video friendlier options for filmmakers out there: If the aperture of F/4 doesn’t bother you then the Fujinon 10-24mm is still the best choice because it has a great focal range, no distortion, internal image stabilization plus it’s only half the price. The other, cheaper option would be the Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8 which also has no distortion but some vignetting when shooting wide-open. The lens is manual only which means it doesn’t have auto focus which depending on what you film isn’t too big of an issue.

Fujinon 8-16mm F/2.8 + Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8: Big, heavy and expensive vs. small, lightweight and affordable

You can purchase the Fujinon 8-16mm F/2.8 by clicking HERE from B&H Photo!

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, March 8, 2019

The post Ultra wide-angle lens review: Fujinon 8-16mm F/2.8 appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

We finally put together a selection of time lapse, hyperlapse and flow motion footage we mostly captured in 2018 all around the globe. Shooting locations include Paris (France), Cologne (Germany), Las Vegas (USA) and different places in Asia (Indonesia, Malaysia). This is just a small part of what we shot. Lean back and enjoy!

4K Timelapse Reel - Fenchel & Janisch - YouTube

The fast motion footage was all shot with mirrorless cameras as raw photo sequences and put together in post using CameraRaw and Adobe After Effects.

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, March 8, 2019

The post 4K Timelapse Reel: Frankfurt & worldwide appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Wide-angle lenses are great for a lot of reasons but they can also be quite expensive especially if you want one that can shoot wide-open. Here are our three favorite wide-angles that we consider to be affordable and we have been using for a while.

3 affordable wide-angle lenses - YouTube

Samyang 12mm F/2

The cheapest on our list: Samyang 12mm F/2

Recommended for: Gimbal walking shots, landscape and low light

Price: $269.00

A classic and probably the cheapest good wide-angle lens out there is one of our favorites. The Samyang 12mm. It’s lightweight and small, has a plasticky feeling but can capture sharp photos and videos.  And the best thing: It has an aperture of F/2. Even though it’s not very sharp at F/2 it’s great to have that extra light and shallow depth of field especially when recording video. The sharpest performance is between F/5.6 and F/8 with the least amount of vignetting. Light sources and lens flares have a star shape so that is something to keep in mind when using this lens.

Because it’s a manual lens it lacks auto focus and has an aperture ring so it’s best to turn on focus peaking to make sure what you want to be in focus is actually sharp.

Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8

New and tiny: Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8

Recommended for: Gimbal walking shots, landscape and architecture

Price: $499.00

The newest lens on our list is the Venus Laowa 9mm F/2.8 which is not only super tiny but built like a tank and actually quite heavy considering the size. The image quality, colors and contrast from this lens are great and the Zero Distortion claim also seems to be true. There’s still a high amount of vignetting until F/5.6 but everything above is sharp and clear. It has a very unique lens flare that filmmakers either going to hate or love.

Compared to the Samyang 12mm this has a much wider field of view even though the difference of 3mm doesn’t sound like much.

Even though the small size has a lot of advantages especially when it comes to travelling it can be tricky to change focus and aperture because it’s just so tiny.

Tokina 11-16mm F/2.8

Old but still powerful: Tokina 11-16mm F/2.8

Recommended for: Documentary and timelapse

Price: $399.00

The last lens on our list is a very old one. The Tokina 11-16mm. We have used this lens for 8 years now and it was one of the first affordable electronic lenses for crop sensor DSLRs with a constant aperture of F/2.8 which was also the reason we got it back then.

We originally got it for our Canon 7D which we used it on for almost five years on a daily basis. We didn’t only use it on documentary shoots but also commercial work and timelapse photography. These days we still use it for example on Cinema cameras or with adapters on other DSLRs and video cameras. Even though this lens is not a full-frame lens it can be used on a full-frame camera without vignetting when zooming in to 16mm.

The clear advantage the Tokina has over the other two lenses is the auto focus which works well for photos but is not quite up to date for shooting video. And of course, the zoom: Not being stuck with only one focal length is another big advantage especially in filmmaking.

All three: Tokina 11-16mm, Samyang/Rokinon 12mm, Laowa 9mm

Depending on which camera system and lens mount you are using one of these optics will certainly be a good choice especially if you don’t want to spend too much money on a wide-angle.

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, March 5, 2019

The post 3 affordable wide-angle lenses appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The A7R III is Sony’s flagship mirrorless camera that isn’t just made to take great photos but can also record crisp 4K video. Watch the video below to find out what we like and what we think should be changed!

Reasons (not) to get the Sony A7R III - YouTube

Here are some reasons why we think the A7R III is one of the best hybrid full-frame cameras right now:

Battery life

The first thing you will notice when using this camera is the amount of time you can shoot without needing to change batteries. Depending on if you’re capturing photos or videos you can easily shoot all day with just two batteries.

Lenses

Even though Sony is known for making great E-mount lenses they are not exactly cheap but you can still get some proper glass that won’t cost you a fortune. There are a lot of great third party lenses available that are not just affordable but also sharp and have reliable auto focus.

Sony FE lenses aren’t cheap. Third party lenses can be a good option!

Film picture profiles

To get the highest dynamic range when filming the A7R III can record with different log profiles that can be color corrected and graded in post. S-Log2 and S-Log3 are good if you have time to grade but the HLG profiles can also record in HDR without looking too flat or desatured. Even though the 8-bit XAVC codec only has a bitrate of 100Mbps in 4K 30p the footage holds up very well when grading.

A variety of film picture styles make it easy to get a specific film look.

IBIS

While in-body image stabilization has been around for a few years it’s a must have when taking pictures in low light or when filming hand-held with prime lenses or third-party lenses that don’t have image stabilization.

In-body image stabilization means your lenses don’t need to have IS to get shake-free footage.

The Sony A7R III seems like the perfect tool but there are some things that could be improved:

4K 60p

The lack of 60 frames per second when recording Ultra HD can certainly be a deal breaker especially because other camera manufacturers are already offering cameras that can record 4K 60p for just half the price.

10-bit codec

Even though Sony offers different flat picture profiles when capturing video the low bitrate 8-bit codec can be a problem in post, so it would be good to see a high bitrate 10-bit codec in the next camera.

Focus peaking

When manually focusing the focus peaking is too pixelated and it’s almost impossible to properly judge whether something is in or out of focus and blurry.

The A7R III connected to the Atomos Shinobi monitor

Video menu

When accessing the menu in video mode only video settings should be displayed to make the big menu less confusing and to simplify the view of the features.

The video recording display is simple, unlike Sony’s menu.

Timelapse mode

A feature that has long been missing is an internal timelapse mode that can save a video as well as a raw or JPEG sequence. But it seems like Sony will soon be adding this feature to several Alpha cameras.

Nontheless is the A7R III a great combination of photo and video camera that is certainly not cheap or meant for beginners but a great tool for professionals.

You can buy the camera by clicking HERE from B&H Photo!

Written by filmmaker Moritz Janisch, March 1, 2019

The post Reasons (not) to get the Sony A7R III appeared first on Fenchel & Janisch.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview