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New archived records from around the world are published on FamilySearch every week to help you find your ancestors. This week, the new additions include almost 3.5 million records from Oklahoma, 1.5 million from Germany and more from Quebec, Italy, Lesotho, Ireland, Peru, Georgia, Texas, Costa Rica, and Poland.

See the official announcement to learn more or search these new free records:

New Historical Records on FamilySearch: Week of April 16, 2018

Over 6 billion searchable historic records are available from around the world on FamilySearch.org. Records are published with the help of thousands of volunteer indexers who transcribe digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. To help make more historical records from the world’s archives available online, volunteer with FamilySearch Indexing.


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FamilySearch Blog by Alison Ensign - 1w ago

How to use these questions: Ask your family members one question each week for a year. Or pick your 12 favorite questions and ask just one per month.

You can pose each question while gathered all together, or you can send it out by email or text. If everyone has the same answer to the question, you have one important, unified story to tell. If you get several different answers, you’ll have a lively discussion on your hands—and the chance to weave several story threads together.

While these questions as written pertain mostly to your family of origin, you can adapt them to capture family stories from your current perspective as a parent or grandparent.

No matter how you approach it, #52stories for families is a great way to gather multiple perspectives as you collect and record family memories. Bonus: you may also find yourself strengthening generational bonds and forging a strong family identity.

  1. What are some of your family’s greatest accomplishments—things you worked together to achieve?
  2. What family goals are or were you forever setting, whether or not you actually achieved them?
  3. What are the biggest obstacles you’ve overcome together as a family?
  4. What are some crises, natural disasters, or other tragedies that you had to pull together to get through?
  5. What are the parameters that define “success” in your family, whether financial, occupational, educational, religious, familial, etc.?
  6. What are some of the inside jokes that no one outside your family understands?
  7. What fictional family—anywhere in books, movies, or television—most closely resembles your family and why?
  8. What movies or books are frequently talked about or quoted in your family?
  9. How does your family tend to show their love for one another—perhaps through acts of service, gifts, saying it out loud, humor, hugs and physical affection, etc.?
  10. What are some of the physical traits that make it obvious your family members are all related to one another?
  11. What are some of the personality traits that run in your family—quiet, loud, adventurous, reserved, hilarious, serious, courageous, cautious, faithful, skeptical, fun-loving, hard-working, etc.
  12. Are there any occupations that have run in your family for generations?
  13. Are there any hobbies or common interests that run in your family?
  14. What are the most common pastimes that your family enjoys together—sports, outdoor activities, board games, music, plays, movies, cooking, swapping stories?
  15. What songs would be on your family’s soundtrack—the songs that everyone knows the words to?
  16. What meals would be in your family’s cookbook—the foods that make you feel nostalgic for your childhood or for home?
  17. What are some of the meals and cooking traditions that have been passed down from generation to generation?
  18. Which of your maternal grandmother’s physical and personality traits can you identify in her children and grandchildren?
  19. Which of your maternal grandfather’s physical and personality traits can you identify in his children and grandchildren?
  20. Which of your paternal grandmother’s physical and personality traits can you identify in her children and grandchildren?
  21. Which of your paternal grandfather’s physical and personality traits can you identify in his children and grandchildren?
  22. What old family stories are most often told at family gatherings?
  23. What are some of the quotes, proverbs, sayings, or aphorisms your family members repeat often?
  24. What are some unique colloquialisms, phrases, made-up words, and mispronunciations your family is known for?
  25. What are some of your family’s core values?
  26. As you’ve looked at your family compared to other families, what makes yours unique, different, or special?
  27. Does your family have deep roots in a particular place? How has that place impacted your family story?
  28. How many different cities or towns has your family called home?
  29. What other families have been particularly influential to your family—cousins, friends, neighbors, in-laws?
  30. What was your family’s most frequent vacation destination?
  31. What are the most memorable vacations your family has ever taken together?
  32. Who are some of the nonrelatives who have played a significant role in your family memories—neighbors, teachers, religious leaders, coaches, community leaders?
  33. Who are some of the most interesting characters you know about from your family history?
  34. How has military service or involvement in foreign wars affected your family dynamics, past and present?
  35. What are some of the major life events that pushed your family in a new direction and brought you where you are today?
  36. What are some of the historical events (wars, emigration, natural disasters, etc.) that have had a significant impact on your family history?
  37. How has faith played a role in your family history? What religious traditions influenced your parents, grandparents, great-grandparents, and beyond?
  38. What traditions did your family observe around Christmastime?
  39. What traditions and rituals do you remember surrounding the start of a new school year?

  40. What were some of your family’s birthday and anniversary traditions?
  41. Did your family celebrate any obscure holidays or cultural traditions?
  42. What are the heirlooms, objects, and keepsakes that hold special meaning for your family?
  43. Does your family have any specific traditions for funerals, Memorial Day, or otherwise commemorating loved ones who have passed on?
  44. What are some of the names that have been passed down through multiple generations of your family?
  45. Does your family follow any unique naming conventions, such as being called by a middle name, naming children after ancestors, inventing completely unique names, having all names start with the same letter, etc.?
  46. What are some of the most unique names that can be found in your family tree? (Try Baby Ancestry to find out.)
  47. Who are the most famous ancestors that can be found in your family tree? (Try Relative Finder to find out.)
  48. What are some of the charitable, political, or environmental causes your family fought for, donated to, volunteered for, or continue to support?
  49. What makes your family laugh? Share some of the funniest stories or events that bring a smile to everyone’s faces.
  50. Thinking of your family of origin, what were the differences between your dad’s side of the family and your mom’s side that had to be reconciled within your nuclear family? (Affluent vs. middle class, reserved vs. outgoing, religious vs. secular, Republican vs. Democrat, etc.)
  51. Fill in the blank with as many different words as you can: “We come from a long line of ______________________.”
  52. What are the values that you hope to see passed down to future generations of your family?
Why Your Story Matters Free Printables and Downloads 18 Writing
Tips
Weekly Questions

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During the Family History Leadership Session at RootsTech 2018, Elder Bradley D. Foster, General Authority Seventy and Executive Director of the Family History Department, invited each temple and family history consultant to “go to the many resources on FamilySearch.org” to get help as each strives to minister one by one to those they are called to serve.

One of those many resources is a new “Learn about My Calling” page now available on FamilySearch.

This page highlights the three most important things to learn and do in your calling as a temple and family history consultant:

  1. Learn from the prophets and apostles.
  2. Have a personalized family history experience.
  3. Learn how to help others using key principles.

In conjunction with this page, newly called temple and family history consultants will receive emails inviting them to visit this page and contact the right helper, who can guide them in learning their calling.

Area and stake temple and family history consultants will also receive an email informing them when a new consultant has been called and how to contact him or her to provide the training the new consultant will need to help others.

Throughout this page and these emails, you will find inspirational videos and specific instructions that will help you to minister to others, one by one, as the Savior did. These resources, when used with prayer and guidance from the Holy Ghost, will assist you in helping others discover, gather, and connect with their families. Visit the Learn about My Calling page today to learn more.


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A host of family information is stored in valuable photos, books, newspapers, records, and more that are at risk of being lost. Efforts to preserve and digitally store these resources can save family histories for future generations.

Access and Preservation Day at RootsTech 2018 was a great opportunity to hear from some industry leaders who are taking important steps in preserving valuable information. Read from the highlights below to learn how certain organizations and libraries, such as the Internet Archive and the Allen County Public Library, are working to do just that. Find out how you can participate as well as access the irreplaceable digital archives they’ve preserved in the name of genealogy.

As Curt Witcher said, “As librarians and archivists, we are curating the stories of our lives.”

Preserving Digital Memories

The Future of Digital Libraries

Digital Asset Management


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New archived records from around the world are published on FamilySearch every week to help you find your ancestors. This week, over 2.5 million new church and civil records are available from Brittany, France and more from Peru, Ecuador, Sweden, Germany, Chile, the Netherlands, and Ukraine.

See the official announcement to learn more or search these new free records:

Over 6 billion searchable historic records are available from around the world on FamilySearch.org. Records are published with the help of thousands of volunteer indexers who transcribe digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. To help make more historical records from the world’s archives available online, volunteer with FamilySearch Indexing.


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New archived records from around the world are published on FamilySearch every week to help you find your ancestors. This week, nearly 8 million new records are available from France and more from Sweden, Austria, Montana, Pennsylvania, Luxembourg, and the Czech Republic.

See the official announcement to learn more or search these new free records:

This week’s newly published records include the following locations or collections:

  • Austria
  • BillionGraves
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Find a Grave
  • France
  • Georgia
  • Luxembourg
  • Montana
  • Ohio
  • Pennsylvania
  • Sweden

Over 6 billion searchable historic records are available from around the world on FamilySearch.org. Records are published with the help of thousands of volunteer indexers who transcribe digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. To help make more historical records from the world’s archives available online, volunteer with FamilySearch Indexing.


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New archived records are published on FamilySearch every week to help you find your ancestors. This month, millions of new records from France and the United States were published along with millions more from around the world.

Search these new free records by clicking on the record release announcements from March:

29 different countries were represented in March’s newly published records, including the following locations or collections:

  • Austria
  • BillionGraves
  • Belgium
  • Bolivia
  • Brazil
  • California
  • Cape Verde
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Croatia
  • Dominican Republic
  • El Salvador
  • El Salvador
  • England
  • Find a Grave
  • France
  • Germany
  • Guatemala
  • Honduras
  • Hungary
  • Idaho
  • Iowa
  • Italy
  • Illinois
  • Louisiana
  • Maine
  • Massachusetts
  • Mexico
  • Michigan
  • Netherlands
  • New York
  • New Zealand
  • Nicaragua
  • North Carolina
  • Pennsylvania
  • Peru
  • Paraguay
  • Portugal
  • Poland
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Texas
  • Ukraine
  • United States
  • Uruguay
  • Vermont
  • Washington

Over 6 billion searchable historic records are available from around the world on FamilySearch.org. Records are published with the help of thousands of volunteer indexers who transcribe digital copies of handwritten records to make them easily searchable online. To help make more archived historical records available online, volunteer with FamilySearch Indexing.


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FamilySearch Family Tree is seriously huge. With over a billion unique names, it is the largest family tree in the world.

Navigating such a large tree to connect with your ancestors can be tricky. We recently added a new feature called “Labels” that will, as it continues to develop, provide a new way to place your ancestors in better context.

You’ve used labels on other sites and in apps to easily organize and view similar types of things. You can now add labels to your ancestor’s listing in Family Tree to honor their accomplishments, signify their involvement in a group, or memorialize their profession.

The number of available labels is pretty limited at this point, but it will grow. In the meantime, use the new label feature to explore Family Tree in new and interesting ways.

How It Works

Here’s how you can add labels to your ancestor’s person page and use them to browse the Family Tree.

Adding and Editing Labels

It’s simple to add or remove a label.

  1. Sign in to FamilySearch.org. Hover your mouse pointer over Family Tree, and click Tree. Go to the person page of one of your ancestors. Near the bottom of the page is a new section called “Labels.”

    (Tip: The sections of the person page can be reordered by clicking the gear button at the top of the details section).

  2. Click Attach Label to select a label category.

  3. Select the label you want to appear on your ancestor’s person page.

  4. Click Attach.

  5. (Optional) Add a web page link to a page that has more information about your ancestor.
  6. Include a reason for attaching the label.
  7. Click Attach.

Viewing All Persons with a Label

To view all of the people in Family Tree that have the same label, simply click the label at the top right of the person page.


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Now that RootsTech 2018 had ended, refresh what you learned about inviting the spirit into family history work. Revisit this page throughout the year to access downloadable presentations, helpful links, and more from 10 Latter-day Saint family history classes presented at RootsTech 2018.

Family Discovery Day

Temple & Family History Consultants

The Importance of Family History

Gathering the Family

Living Memory

The Spirit of Family History

Ministering to Others

Discovery Experiences

  Family History & Missionary Work

Helping Consultants Succeed

 

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FamilySearch Blog by Familysearch - 1M ago

The influence of strong, faithful women has been felt throughout history and continues to bless countless lives around the world.

Who are the women that shaped your family? Do you know their stories? Do you know what their lives were like? If not, celebrate Women’s History Month this March by learning about the inspiring women in your family tree. Read the articles below to find tips that can help.


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