Loading...

Follow Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

The congregation of St. Alban’s Theatre Arlington is inviting everyone to join them for a silent vigil in support of the many people, especially children, who are legally trying to enter this country but who are being kept in confinement in detention centers.

People will meet near the DREAM sculpture at the southwest corner of the intersection of Abram and Pecan streets at 8:00 pm on Friday, July 12, 2019. The vigil will last less than 30 minutes. Handheld candles will be supplied. This vigil is part of thousands taking place on five continents and in nearly 600 locations worldwide as part of the Lights for Liberty action between 7 and 9 pm Friday night.

“We are children of the one God who is the Creator of us all,” said Presiding Bishop Michael Curry. “It is our sisters, our brothers, our siblings who are seeking protection and asylum, fleeing violence and danger to children, searching for a better life for themselves and their children. The crisis at the border is not simply a challenge of partisan politics but a test of our personal and public morality and human decency.”

In a statement released on Monday, July 8, all of the bishops in the six Episcopal dioceses in Texas said, “We call on our state and national leaders to reject fear-based policy-making that targets people who are simply seeking safety, and a chance to live and work in peace. The situation at the border is, by all accounts, a crisis. Refugees come in desperation; border personnel are under stress.

“We call on our leaders to trust in the goodness, generosity and strength of our nation. God has blessed us with great abundance. With it comes the ability and responsibility to bless others.

“We do this because Christians are commanded to love our neighbors as we love ourselves.” Read the entire statement.

Here are Episcopal Church resources in response to the crisis on the border.

The post Join the Lights for Liberty vigil Friday night July 12 in Arlington appeared first on Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Mitch Carr of KRLD AM radio interviewed Bishop Scott Mayer about the joint statement by all bishops in all six Episcopal dioceses in Texas. Listen to the interview.

The post Bishop Mayer interviewed on KRLD 1080 AM about joint statement on detention centers appeared first on Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

July 8, 2019

To our state and national leaders,

We are bishops of the six Episcopal dioceses in Texas. All but 700 miles of the almost 2,000 miles of the US-Mexico border are in Texas. All of Texas feels the impact of anything that happens on our southern border.

We feel it through our families, many of whom have ancient deep roots in lands south of the United States. We feel it in our economy, as Mexico is Texas’ biggest trading partner. We feel it in our culture, since Texas was part of Mexico before we were part of the United States. Most of all, we feel it in our souls, for these are our neighbors, and we love them.

We write to decry the conditions in detention centers at our border because we are Christians, and Jesus is unequivocal. We are to pray without ceasing for everyone involved-refugees, elected officials, and law enforcement-while also advocating for the humane treatment of the human beings crowding our border as they flee the terror and violence of their home countries.

We call on our state and national leaders to reject fear-based policy-making that targets people who are simply seeking safety, and a chance to live and work in peace. The situation at the border is, by all accounts, a crisis. Refugees come in desperation; border personnel are under stress.

We call on our leaders to trust in the goodness, generosity and strength of our nation. God has blessed us with great abundance. With it comes the ability and responsibility to bless others.

We do this because Christians are commanded to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. And how we are to treat our neighbors, especially the children, could not be any clearer than it is in Matthew 18:2-6:

“He called a little child to him, and placed the child among them. And he said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Therefore, whoever takes the lowly position of this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. And whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me. If anyone causes one of these little ones—those who believe in me—to stumble, it would be better for them to have a large millstone hung around their neck and to be drowned in the depths of the sea.”

We are to care for the children, cherish them, protect them and keep them safe.

But what if they are strangers, foreigners? The message of God in the Hebrew Scriptures, Leviticus 19:33-34, also is very clear: “‘When a foreigner resides among you in your land, do not mistreat them.  The foreigner residing among you must be treated as your native-born. Love them as yourself, for you were foreigners in Egypt. I am the Lord your God.”

And again, in Matthew 25: 31-40. “I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me.”  And, in Matthew 25:40: “Truly I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these, you did it to me.”

This is not a call for open borders. This is not saying that immigration isn’t complicated. This is a call for a humane and fair system for moving asylum seekers and refugees through the system as required by law. Seeking asylum is not illegal. Indeed, the people at our border are following the law when they present themselves to border authorities.

Asylum is “a protection granted to foreign nationals already in the United States or at the border who meet the international law definition of a ‘refugee,’ which is ‘a person who is unable or unwilling to return to his or her home country, and cannot obtain protection in that country, due to past persecution or a well-founded fear of being persecuted in the future ‘on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.’”

Congress incorporated this definition into U.S. immigration law in the Refugee Act of 1980. The Refugee Act established two paths to obtain refugee status—either in the United States as an asylum seeker or from abroad as a resettled refugee.

As Christians, we seek to follow the biblical and moral imperatives of our Lord. In addition, the United States has legal obligations through international law as well as our own immigration law to provide protection to those who qualify as refugees.

And while the border authorities can detain asylum seekers, courts have ordered them to do so in “safe and sanitary conditions.” Credible news reports documenting unsafe conditions, especially for children, have made it clear this is not happening in consistent and sustained ways, as resources and personnel are overwhelmed by the situation.

This nation has the resources to handle these refugees humanely. We call on our leaders to find the will to do so swiftly.

signed by

The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas
The Rt. Rev. George Sumner

Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth
The Rt. Rev. J. Scott Mayer
The Rt. Rev. Sam B. Hulsey
The Rt. Rev. Rayford B. High Jr.

Episcopal Diocese of Northwest Texas
The Rt. Rev. J. Scott Mayer

The Episcopal Diocese of the Rio Grande
The Rt. Rev. Michael Buerkel Hunn

Episcopal Diocese of Texas
The Rt. Rev. Andrew Doyle,
The Rt. Rev. Jeff W. Fisher
The Rt. Rev. Kathryn M. Ryan

Episcopal Diocese of West Texas
The Rt. Rev. David Reed
The Rt. Rev. Jennifer Brooke-Davidson

The post Texas bishops’ statement decrying conditions at border detention camps appeared first on Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Bishops in all six Episcopal dioceses in the state of Texas have joined in issuing a statement calling on state and national leaders to swiftly address the inhumane conditions in the detention centers at the border.

Read the statement in Spanish.

The bishops’ statement

To our state and national leaders,

We are bishops of the six Episcopal dioceses in Texas. All but 700 miles of the almost 2,000 miles of the US-Mexico border are in Texas. All of Texas feels the impact of anything that happens on our southern border.

We feel it through our families, many of whom have ancient deep roots in lands south of the United States. We feel it in our economy, as Mexico is Texas’ biggest trading partner. We feel it in our culture, since Texas was part of Mexico before we were part of the United States. Most of all, we feel it in our souls, for these are our neighbors, and we love them.

We write to decry the conditions in detention centers at our border because we are Christians, and Jesus is unequivocal. We are to pray without ceasing for everyone involved- refugees, elected officials, and law enforcement- while also advocating for the humane treatment of the human beings crowding our border as they flee the terror and violence of their home countries.

We call on our state and national leaders to reject fear-based policy-making that targets people who are simply seeking safety, and a chance to live and work in peace. The situation at the border is, by all accounts, a crisis. Refugees come in desperation; border personnel are under stress.

We call on our leaders to trust in the goodness, generosity and strength of our nation. God has blessed us with great abundance. With it comes the ability and responsibility to bless others.

We do this because Christians are commanded to love our neighbors as we love ourselves. And how we are to treat our neighbors, especially the children, could not be any clearer than it is in Matthew 18:2-6:

“He called a little child to him, and placed the child among them. And he said: “Truly I tell you, unless you change and become like little children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Therefore, whoever takes the lowly position of this child is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven. And whoever welcomes one such child in my name welcomes me. If anyone causes one of these little ones—those who believe in me—to stumble, it would be better for them to have a large millstone hung around their neck and to be drowned in the depths of the sea.”

We are to care for the children, cherish them, protect them and keep them safe.

But what if they are strangers, foreigners? The message of God in the Hebrew Scriptures, Leviticus 19:33-34, also is very clear: “‘When a foreigner resides among you in your land, do not mistreat them.  The foreigner residing among you must be treated as your native-born. Love them as yourself, for you were foreigners in Egypt. I am the Lord your God.”

And again, in Matthew 25: 31-40. “I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me.”  And, in Matthew 25:40: “Truly I say to you, as you did it to one of the least of these, you did it to me.”

This is not a call for open borders. This is not saying that immigration isn’t complicated. This is a call for a humane and fair system for moving asylum seekers and refugees through the system as required by law. Seeking asylum is not illegal. Indeed, the people at our border are following the law when they present themselves to border authorities.

Asylum is “a protection granted to foreign nationals already in the United States or at the border who meet the international law definition of a ‘refugee,’ which is ‘a person who is unable or unwilling to return to his or her home country, and cannot obtain protection in that country, due to past persecution or a well-founded fear of being persecuted in the future ‘on account of race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion.’”

Congress incorporated this definition into U.S. immigration law in the Refugee Act of 1980. The Refugee Act established two paths to obtain refugee status—either in the United States as an asylum seeker or from abroad as a resettled refugee.

As Christians, we seek to follow the biblical and moral imperatives of our Lord. In addition, the United States has legal obligations through international law as well as our own immigration law to provide protection to those who qualify as refugees.

And while the border authorities can detain asylum seekers, courts have ordered them to do so in “safe and sanitary conditions.” Credible news reports documenting unsafe conditions, especially for children, have made it clear this is not happening in consistent and sustained ways, as resources and personnel are overwhelmed by the situation.

This nation has the resources to handle these refugees humanely. We call on our leaders to find the will to do so swiftly.

Signed by

The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas
The Rt. Rev. George Sumner

Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth
The Rt. Rev. J. Scott Mayer
The Rt. Rev. Sam B. Hulsey
The Rt. Rev. Rayford B. High Jr.

Episcopal Diocese of Northwest Texas
The Rt. Rev. J. Scott Mayer

The Episcopal Diocese of the Rio Grande
The Rt. Rev. Michael Buerkel Hunn

Episcopal Diocese of Texas
The Rt. Rev. Andrew Doyle,
The Rt. Rev. Jeff W. Fisher
The Rt. Rev. Kathryn M. Ryan

Episcopal Diocese of West Texas
The Rt. Rev. David Reed
The Rt. Rev. Jennifer Brooke-Davidson

We commend to you the following article regarding The Episcopal Church’s response to the crisis that continues to unfold at our southern border.

EPISCOPAL CHURCH RESPONSE TO CRISIS ON THE BORDER

July 2, 2019
Read it on episcopalchurch.org

Over the past several weeks, The Episcopal Church has responded to the reports of inhumane conditions for children and other asylum seekers in government custody in a number of ways. This response includes calls for donations and goods from Episcopal dioceses on the border, prayers for those seeking safety, efforts to engage in advocacy, and pastoral messages from bishops around the Church.

“We are children of the one God who is the Creator of us all,” said Presiding Bishop Michael Curry. “It is our sisters, our brothers, our siblings who are seeking protection and asylum, fleeing violence and danger to children, searching for a better life for themselves and their children. The crisis at the border is not simply a challenge of partisan politics but a test of our personal and public morality and human decency.”

The Episcopal Church, through the Office of Government Relations (OGR) and Episcopal Migration Ministries (EMM), has compiled a list of resources, bishop statements, and information in response to the ongoing humanitarian situation at the southern border.

“Reports of poor care for children in Customs and Border Protection (CBP) custody and continued policies to limit access to asylum are extremely concerning to people of faith. We must remember these children are here because they cannot find safety anywhere else,” stated Rebecca Linder Blachly, Director of The Episcopal Church Office of Government Relations. “The U.S. has an established system to process asylum seekers, who are coming to the U.S. legally. The response to asylum seekers who are desperate and afraid should not be deterrence or detention. We have the capability to respond in a humane and compassionate manner, and I am grateful for everyone in The Episcopal Church who is responding to this crisis.”

The list of resources for education and support is available on the EMM website at episcopalmigrationministries.org/response-to-the-border-education-and-advocacy/ and will continue to be updated with ways to learn more and take action. The OGR and EMM webinar with Bishop Michael Hunn of the Diocese of Rio Grande will be made available on-demand through this website as well.

“The enormity of the challenge is daunting. It is easy to feel helpless to make a difference. While we cannot do everything, we can do something,” said Curry. “The links to resources of bishops and dioceses on the border, the Office of Government Relations and Episcopal Migration Ministries offer practical suggestions for how we can each and together do something.”

The Office of Government Relations represents the policy priorities of The Episcopal Church to the U.S. government in Washington, D.C. This office aims to shape and influence policy and legislation on critical issues, highlighting the voices and experiences of Episcopalians and Anglicans globally. All of its work is grounded in the resolutions of General Convention and Executive Council, the legislative and governing bodies of the church. Connecting Episcopalians to their faith by educating, equipping and engaging them to do the work of advocacy through the Episcopal Public Policy Network (EPPN) is a key aspect of this work.

Episcopal Migration Ministries is a ministry of The Episcopal Church and is one of nine national agencies responsible for resettling refugees in the United States in partnership with the government. Episcopal Migration Ministries currently has 13 affiliate offices in 12 states. To directly support EMM and its life-changing work, visit www.episcopalmigrationministries.org/give or text ‘EMM’ to 41444 (standard messaging and data may rates apply).

The post All Texas bishops decry conditions in border detention centers appeared first on Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Somos los obispos de las seis diócesis episcopales en Texas. Al menos 700 de las casi 2,000 millas de la frontera entre U.S. y México se encuentran en Texas.

Todo Texas siente el impacto de todo lo que sucede en nuestra frontera sur. Lo sentimos a través de nuestras familias, muchas de las cuales tienen raíces antiguas profundas en las tierras del sur de los Estados Unidos. Lo sentimos en nuestra economía, ya que México es el mayor socio comercial de Texas. Lo sentimos en nuestra cultura, ya que Texas era parte de México antes de ser parte de los Estados Unidos. Pero, sobre todo, lo sentimos en nuestras almas, porque estos son nuestros vecinos y los amamos.

Escribimos para denunciar las condiciones en los centros de detención ubicados en nuestra frontera porque somos cristianos y Jesús es inequívoco.

Debemos orar sin cesar por todos los involucrados; por los refugiados, los funcionarios electos y las fuerzas del orden, al mismo tiempo abogamos por el trato digno de los seres humanos que se abarrotan en nuestra frontera mientras huyen del terror y la violencia de sus países de origen.

Hacemos un llamado a nuestros líderes estatales y nacionales para que rechacen la formulación de políticas basadas en el miedo que se dirige a las personas que simplemente buscan seguridad y la oportunidad de vivir y trabajar en paz. La situación en la frontera es, a ciencia cierta, una crisis. Los refugiados vienen desesperados y el personal de la frontera está bajo mucho estrés.

Hacemos un llamado a nuestros líderes para que confíen en la bondad, generosidad y la fortaleza de nuestra nación. Dios nos ha bendecido abundantemente. Con ello viene la capacidad y la responsabilidad de bendecir a los demás.

Hacemos esto porque a los cristianos se nos ha llamado a amar a nuestro prójimo como a nosotros mismos. Y la forma en la cual debemos tratar a nuestros vecinos, especialmente a los niños, está escrito claramente en el evangelio según San Mateo 18: 2-6:

“Llamó a un niño pequeño y lo colocó entre ellos. Y él dijo: “En verdad les digo que, a menos que cambien y se conviertan como un niño pequeño, nunca entrarán en el reino de los cielos. Por lo tanto, quien toma la posición humilde como la de un niño es el más grande en el reino de los cielos. Y el que reciba a uno de esos niños en mi nombre, a mí me recibe. ‘Si alguien hace que uno de estos pequeños, que creen en mí, tropiece, sería mejor para ellos tener una gran piedra de molino colgada alrededor de su cuello y ser ahogado en las profundidades del mar.’”

Debemos cuidar a los niños, protegerlos y mantenerlos seguros.

Pero ¿y si son extranjeros? El mensaje de Dios en las Escrituras hebreas, Levítico 19: 33-34, también

es muy claro: “Cuando un extranjero reside entre ustedes en su tierra, no lo maltraten. El extranjero que reside entre ustedes debe ser tratado como uno de ustedes. Ámalo como a ti mismo, porque eras extranjero en Egipto. Yo soy el Señor, tu Dios.

Y otra vez, en Mateo 25: 31-40. “Tenía hambre y me diste de comer, tuve sed y me diste de beber, fui forastero y me recibiste.” Y en Mateo 25:40: “De cierto os digo, como lo hiciste con uno de los más pequeños, me lo hiciste a mí.”

Esto no es una solicitud de fronteras abiertas. Esto no significa que la inmigración no sea un proceso complicado. Este es un llamado a establecer un sistema justo y humano para movilizar a los solicitantes de asilo y refugiados a través del sistema tal como lo exige la ley. La búsqueda de asilo no es ilegal. De hecho, las personas en nuestra frontera están siguiendo la ley cuando se presentan ante las autoridades fronterizas.

El asilo es una protección otorgada a ciudadanos extranjeros que ya se encuentran en los Estados Unidos o en la frontera y cumplen con la definición de derecho internacional de “refugiado”, esto es, “una persona que no puede o no quiere regresar a su país de origen por qué no puede obtener protección en ese país, debido a la persecución o al temor de ser perseguido en el futuro 'por motivos de raza, religión, nacionalidad, pertenencia a un grupo social particular u opinión política.’ ”.

El Congreso incorporó esta definición a la ley de inmigración de los U.S. En la Ley de Refugiados de 1980. La Ley de Refugiados estableció dos vías para obtener el estatus de refugiado; ya sea en el extranjero como refugiado reasentado o en los Estados Unidos como solicitante de asilo.

Como cristianos, buscamos seguir los imperativos bíblicos y morales de nuestro Señor. Además, Los Estados Unidos tiene obligaciones legales a través del derecho internacional, así como nuestra propia ley de inmigración de brindar protección a aquellos que califican como refugiados.

Y mientras que las autoridades fronterizas pueden detener a los solicitantes de asilo, los tribunales les han ordenado que lo hagan en “condiciones seguras e higiénicas.” Informes de noticias creíbles que documentan condiciones inseguras, especialmente para los niños, han dejado claro que esto no está ocurriendo de manera consistente y sostenida, debido a que los recursos y el personal se ven abrumados por la situación.

Esta nación tiene los recursos para tratar a estos refugiados humanamente. Hacemos un llamado a nuestros líderes para que tengan la voluntad de hacerlo rápidamente.

 The Episcopal Diocese of Dallas
The Rt. Rev. George Sumner

The Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth
The Rt. Rev. J. Scott Mayer
The Rt. Rev. Sam B. Hulsey
The Rt. Rev. Rayford B. High Jr.

Episcopal Diocese of Northwest Texas
The Rt. Rev. J. Scott Mayer

The Episcopal Diocese of the Rio Grande
The Rt. Rev. Michael Buerkel Hunn

The Episcopal Diocese of Texas
The Rt. Rev. Andrew Doyle,
The Rt. Rev. Jeff W. Fisher
The Rt. Rev. Kathryn M. Ryan

The Episcopal Diocese of West Texas
The Rt. Rev. David Reed
The Rt. Rev. Jennifer Brooke-Davidson

The post Emiten los obispos de las seis diócesis de Texas una declaración colaborativa lamentando las condiciones inhumanas en las fronteras de nuestro país. appeared first on Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Join Presiding Bishop Michael Curry of The Episcopal Church as he guides us along the Way of Love. Hosts Kyle Oliver and Sandy Milien talk with Bishop Curry and others committed to growing in love by turning, learning, praying, worshipping, blessing, going, and resting. Subscribe now and listen wherever you get your podcasts. Listen online at wayoflove.episcopalchurch.org/.

Each week in Season 1, Bishop Curry introduces one of the seven Way of Love, Practices for a Jesus-Centered Life: Turn, Learn, Pray, Worship, Bless, Go, and Rest. New episodes air Tuesdays through July 30, 2019. You’ll be invited into deeper engagement with each practice as Kyle and Sandy share their insights and offer questions for reflection or small group discussion.

The way of Jesus is the Way of Love. And the Way of Love can change the world.

The Way of Love is an intentional commitment to a set of practices. More than a curriculum, it is an intentional commitment to a set of practices. It’s a commitment to follow Jesus: Turn, Learn, Pray, Worship, Bless, Go, Rest. There are resources, materials, and small group curriculum available from The Episcopal Church here.

Our diocese has a podcast – subscribe



Explore the intersection of faith & life with the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth when you subscribe to our podcast. Listen to sermons and reflections and get a glimpse into how we engage with the Bible, the people in our congregations, and the world we live in. Listen to or download our audio on the go at diofw.podbean.com.

Podcasts? Who, me?

Podcasts are audio programs that connect you to new ideas in areas that interest or inspire you. Learn, escape, broaden your horizons, or be entertained. Optimize your time and listen to podcasts while walking, driving, commuting, doing routine tasks, or working out. Podcasts roll education and entertainment into one tailor-made package for a multi-tasking life.

2019 Podcast Statistics from podcastinginsights.com

The post Subscribe to the Way of Love podcast with Presiding Bishop Michael Curry appeared first on Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If you have an idea for making a positive impact in your community with the church’s help, or there is a project your church would like to develop that could use a little extra funding, you need to apply now for mission and outreach grants.

The Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth, through its Mission and Outreach Committee, will be awarding grants to programs that assist those who are underserved in our communities, strongly involve personal participation by our congregations, and that will be strengthened by the endorsement of the diocese.

Whether you are an individual member of the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth, a group of members of a congregation within the diocese, or a combined group such as a group of congregations in your deanery, you are encouraged to submit an application. Funds are offered in two categories:

  • Beyond the Diocese Outreach Impact Program – This category includes special outreach needs beyond the geographical boundaries of the diocese, both inside and outside the United States. The available funding budgeted for this category is $4,847.
  • Matching Grant Outreach Program – This category includes outreach within the diocese. These funds are to be used to match or to provide seed money for congregations or groups to fund or undertake an outreach need that they could not do on their own. The Matching Grant Outreach Program currently has budgeted $32,313.

The Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth’s Mission and Outreach Committee was established in 2011, and one of its tasks is to help administer these outreach grants. For examples of past projects, ten grants were awarded for 2014 and ten in 2015. See more recent examples in the video below:

Sharing the tithe - YouTube

Applications are being accepted from now until Thursday, August 1. Please complete the form below, which you can submit online. Please note that the diocese can only write checks to 501(c)(3) non-profit organizations.

If you have received funding for your project in the past, please tell us specifically how the money was spent.

As soon as you click “Submit,” your application will go by email to the members of the mission & outreach committee, to the rector/priest-in-charge or senior warden of your congregation for endorsement, and to the diocesan office, who will compile the applications for review by the committee. You should receive a confirmation email letting you know that the application was received.

Project organizers will be notified in late August if their grant request was approved, and checks will be cut directly to the approved programs. We expect the checks to start going out soon after the committee approves the grants.

If you have any questions about mission and outreach grants, email the committee at outreach@edfw.org.

2019 grant APPLICATION
Outreach Grant Application
If you are human, leave this field blank.
Your Name *
Members of the Mission and Outreach Committee are asked not to submit grant requests.
Your Email Address *
Your Phone Number *
Your Congregation *
Requests must come from a member of a congregation of the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.
Your rector/priest or senior warden's email address *
A copy of this request will be forwarded to the rector/priest-in-charge or senior warden to seek endorsement of the church's involvement in this project. Please make sure that your congregation's leadership is aware of the request before submitting it.
Name of Project *
Amount Requested *
Please note that the diocese can only write checks to 501(c)(3) non-profit organizations.
Project location: within or outside the diocese *
Within the geographic area of the Diocese
Outside the geographic area of the Diocese
Choose the option that best describes where your project will primarily be of benefit.
Matching funds and/or service hours being provided *
Indicate what matching funds and/or involvement through service hours your congregation or organization will be providing toward the project in addition to what is being requested from the diocese.
Description of Project *
Have you received a Mission and Outreach grant from the Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth in the past? *
Yes
No
After you click submit, you should receive a confirmation email. If you do not hear from the committee to confirm that we've received your application, please contact the committee directly at outreach@edfw.org
Describe how your previously awarded grant was spent.

The post Apply for mission and outreach grants in 2019 appeared first on Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“…If you cannot preach like Peter, if you cannot pray like Paul, then tell the love of Jesus who died to save us all….” The Balm of Gilead

St. Christopher Episcopal Church, Fort Worth, invites all to Summer Salad Suppers and Vacation Bible School on four Wednesdays in July, beginning  July 10.

The evening starts with Eucharist in St. Simon’s Chapel at 6:15 p.m. followed by a dinner of salads and desserts in the Parish Hall. The program will be a series of sermons given by Presiding Bishop Michael Curry on the Power of Love and should end by 8:15 p.m.

Kids Club Vacation Bible School for elementary-aged children and the Little Saints (preschool and younger) will take place at the same time. After dinner adults and older youth will stay in the Parish Hall, elementary children will go to their Sunday School Room, and our Little Saints (Preschool and younger) will go to their classroom for their programs.  A Nursery is provided for our youngest saints.

The meals are coordinated by the Parish Life Committee.  All programs will be led by the Christian Education Team.

Schedule

July 10 – God Is A Community of Love

July 17 – There Is Another Way

July 24 – Responding With Love

July 31 – Go As People of Jesus

Reservations

Please contact St. Christopher to make reservations, as they need to know the names and ages of the children who will be participating in our VBS program in order to plan accordingly. Email reservations to office@stchrisfw.org or call 817-926-6277.

The post Summer Salad Suppers and VBS at St. Christopher, Fort Worth appeared first on Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Many brilliant organists have performed at All Saints’ Episcopal Church, Fort Worth, but the next recitalist is a musical multi-tasker on a truly global scale. Paul Griffiths is the British organ sensation with an interesting day job. He is chief executive officer of Dubai Airports.

On Friday, June 14th at 7:30 pm, Griffiths will present a program with a decidedly French air featuring composers Debussy, Duruflé and Saint-Saëns.

Admission is free, and a reception for everyone will follow the concert.

Five days after playing at All Saints’, Griffiths  will perform at the National Cathedral in Washington, D.C. In February, he played the organ for 130,000 people at the Papal Mass given by Pope Francis during his historic visit to the Arabian Peninsula. He has performed at Windsor Castle, Westminster Abbey, St. Paul’s Cathedral, and many other cathedrals in the UK.

Griffiths began playing at the age of 10, winning first prize in the London Musical Competition Festival at 13. He performs regularly as an organ recitalist and continuo player and today is vice president of the Royal College of Organists.

He combines his international recital career with his role as Chief Executive Officer of Dubai Airports, responsible for the operation and development of Dubai International (DXB) as well as Dubai World Central (DWC), which will eventually be the world’s largest airport with capacity to handle up to 240 million passengers and 16 million tons of freight annually.

Prior to moving to Dubai, he was Managing Director of London’s Gatwick Airport, the second largest airport in the UK. Previously, he spent 14 years as an Executive Director of Virgin Atlantic and the Virgin Rail Group.

In 2015, Griffiths was appointed as a Companion in the Order of St. Michael and St. George in the Queen’s Birthday Honour List, for services to British prosperity overseas and to music. He has three children and lives in Dubai, London, and Sussex. His wife, Joanna Marsh, is an organist and composer of choral and orchestral works. Their Sussex home contains the largest classical pipe organ in a private home in the UK.

The post Enjoy a journey through French airspace at All Saints’, Fort Worth appeared first on Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The Rev. Scot McComas, rector of St. Martin-in-the-Fields, Keller, has accepted a call to be rector of The Episcopal Church of the Nativity in Scottsdale, Arizona. He will begin there in mid-August.

The Rev. Scot McComas

McComas was installed as the third rector of St. Martin on May 30, 2015, by Bishop Rayford B. High Jr. His last Sunday there will be July 14, 2019. There will be a farewell reception after the 10:30 am service in the large parish hall.

McComas has spent 15 years in ordained ministry, with experience in parishes and schools in Florida, North Carolina, New Jersey, and most recently, two parishes and the Parish Episcopal School in the Episcopal Diocese of Dallas. He is a graduate of Southern Methodist University, Harvard Divinity School, and General Theological Seminary. He attended the College of Preachers.

Read the letter from McComas to St. Martin.

Read the announcement from the senior warden at Nativity in Scottsdale.

The post Scot McComas called as rector in Scottsdale, Arizona appeared first on Episcopal Diocese of Fort Worth.

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview