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Bristol-based personal care company Natracare has launched what it claims is Europe’s first truly flushable moist tissue wipe, citing the new product as a response to a rise in fatbergs and growing concerns over plastic pollution in sewers and oceans.

In a world where 14,000 wipes are used every second, Natracare’s Safe to Flush Moist Tissue is seemingly the first and only product so far to be certified to Water UK’s Fine to Flush specification.

The new wipe has been backed by water and sewerage companies, who spend £100m a year to fix over 366,000 blockages. This cost is inevitably passed onto customers – which means that every single household in the UK pays the price.

The new moist tissue wipes from Natracare.

According to Natracare, the Safe to Flush Moist Tissues have passed stringent tests that check for the extent of break up in the drain and sewer system. These tests also look for residues that could contaminate rivers, estuaries and the sea. This product is plastic-free, compostable and made with natural and organic ingredients.

Defining what’s Fine to Flush
Water UK’s Fine to Flush certification has been designed to clarify what is truly flushable and what isn’t – many wipes on the market that claim to be ‘flushable’ are actually full of plastics or wood pulps that don’t break down sufficiently in the sewers.

Water UK developed the standard together with the Water Research Centre (WRc) and water companies across the UK. The Water Research Centre (WRc) undertakes the Fine to Flush testing.

Andy Drinkwater, the WRc’s lead engineer for Sewage and Flooding, commented: “Wet wipes along with fat, oils and grease have been a major issue for water and sewerage companies. Our new universal standard accurately analyses what is happening in the drains so that consumers can be better informed of what products are safe to flush.”

Susie Hewson, Natracare’s founder and director commented: “For the longest time, big toilet paper brands have been pedalling products with hidden plastics that claim to be ‘flushable’. We hope Water UK’s new standard will create more transparency – which will lead to less plastic pollution.”

“The global wipe market is valued at around £450bn a year and shows no signs of slowing down. We can’t bury our heads in the sand about the issue of single use plastics, and wipes are certainly no exception to this. I’m proud that from the very beginning, Natracare has been a solutions-focused brand. It’s taken us three years to develop it, but we’re very pleased to finally get this product out there.”

Natracare’s Safe to Flush Moist Tissues can be found in Waitrose, online at Ocado and through independent health stores around the UK. They retail at £1.99 for a pack of 30. See Natracare’s website for information about stockists.

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Noise pollution is making it difficult for birds to communicate with each other and it could lead to a severe decline in numbers, new research from Queen’s University Belfast appears to suggest.

In spring, birds use song to show aggressiveness and to attain territory for nesting and breeding, but this is becoming tougher due to noisy conditions created by humans.

Dr Gareth Arnott, Senior Lecturer and Researcher from the Institute for Global Food Security at Queen’s University Belfast, studied bird song in detail and found that background noise can mask crucial information.

The findings have been published in Biology Letters.

Dr Arnott explains: “Sound is a great form of bird communication because it can carry beyond where birds can see.

“Singing is one of the most common ways birds advertise that a territory belongs to them, and birds will perch near the edge of their territory to broadcast their claim to the maximum range. A strong, vibrant song will help defend a territory from intruders and attract a mate.”

However, Dr Arnott and his team say they have discovered man-made noise is disrupting them from being able to hear and understand each other clearly.

Dr Gareth Arnott continues: “We found that bird song structure can communicate aggressive intent, enabling birds to assess their opponent, but human-made noise can disrupt this crucial information passed between them by masking the complexity of their songs used for acquiring resources, such as territory and space for nesting.

“As a result, the birds receive incomplete information on their opponent’s intent and do not appropriately adjust their response.”

In the experiment, the team used playbacks of robin song to stimulate responses from birds who were territory holders. These were simple or complex songs in either the presence or absence of noise. Behavioural and vocal responses of territory holders to the playbacks were then recorded for analysis. The researchers found that song complexity was used as a signal of aggressive intent, with birds demonstrating higher aggressive intent towards complex versus simple song, reflecting the level of threat perceived by the signal. However, importantly, this assessment process was disrupted by the presence of noise.

The findings raise concerns about the ability of birds to compete for resources under the growing extent of noise from human activities. The study also shows that bird song is crucial to the survival and reproduction of birds and there are important implications to consider around noise pollution and the protection of wildlife.

Dr Arnott adds: “The study is evidence that human-made noise pollution impacts animal habitats and directly influences their ability to communicate properly, which may have implications for survival and population numbers for birds.

“This must be further investigated in order to protect our valued biodiversity.”

The research was funded by Queen’s University Belfast as part of its Masters in Science Zoology programme, pursued as a research thesis by James Wilson, and supported by Queen’s researcher’s Dr Kyriacos Kareklas, Dr Hansjoerg Kunc and Dr Gareth Arnott.

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Governmental policies that provide regulatory certainty are needed to spur private investment in the flexibility technologies required to ease the transition to a high-renewable energy future.

This is the core finding of a new industry white paper “Developing flexibility: the new cornerstone of the grid” commissioned by power management company Eaton and the Renewable Energy Association. The paper includes market data, expert insights and case studies from analysts and industry players including: Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF), Britain’s Renewable Energy Association (REA), Eaton, Drax, Nord Pool, Good Energy and Upside Energy.

In Europe, wind and solar power will dominate electricity generation from the early 2020s, due to powerful drivers including statutory requirements to meet the global Paris climate agreement, the falling cost of solar panels and wind turbines, rising carbon prices and the electrification of transport and heating.

Electricity demand has always varied with the seasons, weather and time of day. As a result of growth in wind and solar power, electricity supply will also be increasingly variable. To avoid resulting, higher system costs, flexibility must become the new cornerstone of the grid. Technologies and business models that promote flexibility can help smooth out this variability, for example by aligning peaks in demand with peaks in supply of wind and solar power.

Today’s electricity market and network regulations are failing to keep up. Market access requirements favour large, centralised fossil fuel and nuclear power plants. Governments and their energy regulators are thereby holding back a low-carbon energy transition, by increasing the cost and complexity of increasing the market share of variable renewables.

The following are the most important deficiencies highlighted in the paper where regulatory action could make the biggest immediate positive impact. Many of the related recommendations are based on the experience of the Nordic markets, which are the most advanced in Europe in terms of regulation and government policy that encourages private investment in smart, flexible energy systems.

· Weak or non-existent flexibility markets: Deep and liquid flexibility markets are an essential prerequisite to provide investors certainty on long-term cash flows. Where they exist today in Europe, they often provide only short-term visibility on possible cash-flows for flexibility assets. Reform is needed to provide predictable, long-term cash flows, for example via a combination of multi-annual contracts and annual auctions guaranteed to run for several years.
· Unequal access to ancillary services and capacity markets: Increasingly, electricity will be provided and managed by a range of technologies, including decentralised wind and solar power, batteries and smart EV chargers, working alongside centralised power plants. All these resources should compete on a level playing field, including in balancing markets. Current grid regulation in most European countries favours centralised generation assets, through connection, testing and metering provisions, availability requirements, capacity payment haircuts for storage assets and other administrative costs and minimum size thresholds. These hurdles penalise aggregators of small, distributed assets and make it difficult for all flexibility technologies to compete evenly.
· Need for smart and bi-directional EV chargers: Smart EV chargers will be essential to integrate variable renewables by shifting peak demand to times of peak supply. Smart charging would also lower the system cost of adding EVs, for example by avoiding the need for local grid upgrades, and new-build generation capacity to meet higher EV-related electricity demand. The latest EU charging rules focus on the numbers of chargers, rather than their flexibility – there is no requirement to make EV charging “smart”, or to install V2G. As a result, in both Britain and Germany, only a handful of either smart or V2G chargers exists. In the case of V2G chargers, there is also limited EV compatibility today.
· Need for smart meters and dynamic consumer pricing: Dynamic tariffs offer financial incentives for consumers to change behaviour, for example to shift to off-peak demand periods in response to market price signals. In Nordic countries, there is already near-universal, national rollout of digital meters. In Britain, dynamic pricing is now becoming available due to the target for universal roll-out by 2020. For example, the UK’s Octopus Energy has introduced an “agile tariff” which tracks wholesale power prices and advises customers 24 hours in advance of low-cost periods. In Germany, however, dynamic tariffs are unavailable, due to the absence of digital meters. In France, the introduction of dynamic tariffs is expected shortly to follow its smart meter programme.

“Britain is the first major nation to propose a government plan aimed at cutting greenhouse gas emissions to almost zero by 2050” said Richard Molloy, Business Development Manager Energy Storage at Eaton. “Moving from a target of reducing emissions by 80% to ambitions of reaching net zero reflects the UK’s increasing awareness of the need to act swiftly and boldly if we are to transition to a high-renewable energy future and make a big impact on climate change. Yet UK policy makers must commit if we are to see real progress.”

“High level policy, such as the Clean Growth Strategy, supports decarbonising the energy sector and economy yet the reality is some more detailed policy developments have hindered the UK’s energy transition. Policies must support the positive high level policy direction around renewables if the UK is to meet its targets for emission reduction and replace fossil fuels with cleaner power sources.”

“If we do not make the most of technology like demand response, energy storage and smart electric vehicle chargers, we risk remaining reliant on fossil fuels and further impeding Europe’s energy transition. Government and industry leaders must work together to accelerate the path to system-wide decarbonisation and create a new energy mix – one which ultimately prioritises reaching a high-renewable energy future.”

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Dosing very aggressive and corrosive liquids in laboratories is a challenge that can be effectively addressed with diaphragm pumps, according to KNF Neuberger, a supplier in this space.

The firm says its new SIMDOS® 02 FT (full Teflon®) has been especially developed for the transfer of aggressive chemicals. To facilitate this, it is fitted with a PTFE head, a PTFE-covered diaphragm, and chemically resistant valves (FFKM Kalrez®). An optional Chemraz® valve kit can support the pump’s use with highly concentrated acids such as nitric, sulphuric and hydrochloric acid, in addition to solvents such as TFH, DMF, DMSO and MEK. The pump head is situated outside the splash-protected IP-65 housing, cited as a very significant safety feature.

Also available with heads in PP or PVDF, the new dosing pump transfers liquids with a flow rate of 30 µl to 20 ml/min, and dose volumes of 30 µl up to 999 ml. Following calibration, repeatability is +/-1% (full range) and the pump is claimed to offer “excellent” long-term stability and consistent reliability throughout entire processes.

The part is also seemingly safe to run dry and is self-priming up to 2 m. KNF’s literature says it is effective against pressures of up to 6 bar, and transfers viscous media up to 150 centistokes. The integrated software permits the transfer parameters to be modified for a range of different viscosities at the touch of a button. KNF says a small footprint means the dosing pump takes up very little valuable laboratory space.

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A new, hard-hitting investigation exposes how the UK’s demand for so-called ‘biomass’ energy is destroying valuable forests and ecosystems in the U.S. Southeast, a designated global biodiversity hotspot. The photographic evidence gathered by the Natural Resources Defense Council, Dogwood Alliance, and the Southern Environmental Law Center documents the devastating ecological impact of biomass sourcing done for Enviva, the world’s largest wood pellet producer, to supply the UK utility Drax Power’s burning of wood to generate electricity. 

In a recent YouGov poll, only 3% of respondents thought the British government should be promoting biomass electricity using trees shipped in from overseas forests. Nevertheless, the UK government provides hundreds of millions of pounds per year in public subsidies to bankroll biomass energy at Drax Power Station. Burning wood pellets for electricity is anything but green – it accelerates climate change, destroys forests and increases emissions of dangerous air pollutants. But this hasn’t stopped Drax. A voracious demand for wood means Drax imports millions of tonnes of wood pellets, mostly from the U.S. Southeast.

The new documentary evidence revealed today shows how hardwood forests in the region are clear cut and vast quantities of whole trees and other large-diameter wood are sent to industrial mills to be manufactured into pellets to feed Drax’s boilers. The biomass sourcing practices documented in the investigation are all allowed to continue under UK regulations and Drax’s sustainability standards.

“There’s nothing green about devastating these stunning forests and then shipping the wood across the ocean to be burned in dirty power plants,” said Sasha Stashwick, senior advocate at the Natural Resources Defense Council. “This investigation is a direct challenge to the UK government’s policy of continuing to prop up Drax because it lets the British public see with their own eyes the reality of this dirty and destructive industry.”

The U.S. wood pellet mills that supply the fuel for Drax’s wood-burning facilities are located in areas that already endure some of the highest logging rates in the world, with surrounding communities suffering high poverty rates and facing the threat of flooding from climate change. What’s more, the mills tracked in this investigation release dangerous air pollution, often over legal levels.

“The UK’s dependence on biomass puts some of the world’s most ecologically valuable forests at risk,” said Rita Frost, campaigns director at Dogwood Alliance, which conducted the investigation. “If the UK is going to live up to its promises to address our climate crisis, it must cut harmful carbon emissions, not forests. It’s long past time for the UK government to end its subsidies for this false climate solution.”

In its Global Assessment Report last month, the UN revealed that a million species are at risk of extinction as natural ecosystems are destroyed and emphasised the role of human activity in the depletion of forests and other wild landscapes. Forests in the U.S. Southeast are being logged at four times the rate of those in the Amazon.

In the last year, the UK Committee on Climate Change made it clear that biomass must not be considered carbon neutral because it can result in carbon emissions comparable to those from fossil fuels. As part of that acknowledgement, the committee underscored the risks associated with biomass imports, including those from the very forests documented in this investigation.

“The photos do not lie,” Stashwick said. “It’s time to revoke Drax’s undeserved ‘green’ credentials and tell the truth about biomass.”

For further information, the full investigation booklet can be found here: https://www.nrdc.org/sites/default/files/global-markets-biomass-energy-06172019.pdf

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Environmental monitoring expert Bell Environmental offers its own guide to choosing a water logger that works efficiently, requires little maintenance and provides the best accuracy for your application.

1. What will my water depth be?
One of the first things to determine is the water level at your monitoring location(s), including an awareness of potential changes in level at each location. For example if you have 100m of water in a borehole, but the change will only be 5m, then you do not necessarily need a 100m range water level logger. Potentially a 10m range model would be sufficient in this example. If, however, the variation in level is likely be greater – for example, 80m – then a correspondingly larger range water level logger will be needed.

2. What accuracy do I need?
The next thing to consider is the required accuracy. The lower the range of the water level logger the greater the accuracy. For example, considering our own range, if you were to look at the 9m rugged Troll 100, this has an accuracy of +/-9mm. In comparison the 76m version has an accuracy of +/-76mm. If you were monitoring a surface water application, which typically has lower levels, we would highly recommend using a model with a lower level range to provide the best possible accuracy.

3. Will the water be saline or acidic?
The constituent materials of your logger are relevant here. For highly saline or acidic applications a titanium-bodied product is one way to avoid corrosion, with a ceramic pressure sensor, for example, to ensure the unit is not corroded or damaged. In the case of a clean water application stainless steel or titanium products can be used.

4. Is the area being monitored likely to flood?
Whether or not it will can mean the difference between an accurately-functioning system and one that becomes damaged. In applications which could be prone to flooding it would be recommended that you use an absolute (non-vented) water level logger. With a vented system you will have a breather tube, with a desiccant connected to the top of the sensor cable. If this desiccant and breather become submerged there is potential for water ingress into the water level logger and potential damage to the sensor. As absolute water level loggers are completely sealed there is no risk of water ingress via a vent tube.

Factors that have a bearing on the choice of water logger.

5. Vented or Absolute?
The aforementioned pointers may well be enough to provide confidence in choosing a water logger that fits your application.

It may be the case that the points above have highlighted key aspects of your applications, which in turn have confirmed the model you need. If not, then an overview of both the key advantages and disadvantages of both a vented and absolute water logger should help further.

Where applications require the highest level of accuracy the vented option is recommended. In most cases this will also be more accurate than an absolute system. For example in shallow-water applications, the vented tube directly transmits barometric data to the water level logger pressure transducer. With an absolute sensor you would need to consider both the inaccuracies of the water level logger and the barometric logger. However, in deep monitoring applications or those with a greater level variation it may be advantageous to use an absolute sensor. This is because the measurement of individual barometric data alongside level data allows you to determine the barometric efficiency.

6. What budget do I have?
Typically, absolute water level loggers are lower in cost, especially when monitoring with multiple sensors in one location – a single barometric logger can be used rather than multiple water level loggers. You may find the costs comparable to monitoring a single point, although the cable lengths will have to be factored in here. As well as purchase cost, the maintenance of absolute water level loggers is a lot less as there is no desiccant or breather tube to protect from water ingress.

If you require any further information or have any questions or queries please feel free to contact a member of our sales team – telephone: 01280 817304 or email: mail@bellenviro.co.uk

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Instrumentation firm Thermo Fisher Scientific has developed a new Total Residual Oxidant (TRO) analyzer to address the needs of the wastewater industry. The latter is in need of a robust, dependable instrument capable of reliably measuring low ppb chlorine concentrations in effluent and treated wastewater in line with stringent regulatory requirements.

Operating on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency-approved iodometric electrode technology, the Thermo Scientific Orion 7070iX TRO Analyzer has been designed to offer high sensitivity for low-level chlorine measurements down to 1 ppb with 1 ppb resolution. The firm says that with this “unique capability”, the system provides users with the confidence that chlorine concentrations in water discharged into natural water sources do not exceed the safety threshold or pose a threat to marine life. For optimal application flexibility, the new analyzer also enables full range measurements up to 15ppm.

Compared to the conventional DPD (N,N-Diethyl-1,4-Phenylenediamine Sulfate) colorimetric method, the iodometric electrode technology does not suffer from turbidity or color interferences, which can have a negative impact on result accuracy and precision. Further, the Orion 7070iX Analyzer is capable of operating autonomously for long periods of time with minimal instrument drift (180 days without calibration) eliminating the need for routine maintenance. At the same time, the system’s self-cleaning capability prevents chemical and biological fouling of the measurement cell and sensor, minimizing down-time and facilitating continuous testing.

“The launch of the Orion 7070iX Analyzer is reflective of our mission to help our customers make the world healthier, cleaner and safer,” said Amit Agarwal, vice president and general manager for water and laboratory products at Thermo Fisher Scientific. “The superior sensitivity of the instrument allows users to have full control over their chlorination and dechlorination processes, while its compatibility with different water matrices, including seawater, industrial water and brackish Ballast water, makes it the system-of-choice across a wide variety of applications.”

To maximize efficiency and productivity, the Orion 7070iX Analyzer can operate automatically on-demand in intermittent on-off mode, based on sample flow: once the flow starts, the unit’s pumps turn on and they shut down as soon as the flow stops. The Orion 7070iX Analyzer also provides real-time monitoring of TRO fluctuations, alerting users within just 120 seconds from the change, prompting timely corrective action.

The Orion 7070iX TRO Analyzer is the most recent addition to a robust portfolio of process analyzers that measure water contaminants including inorganic and disinfection byproducts. To learn more about our complete water analysis portfolio, visit thermofisher.com/wateranalysis.

For more information about the Thermo Scientific Orion 7070iX TRO Analyzer, please visit thermofisher.com/troanalyzer.

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Ofwat associate director Alison Fergusson says that it’s “an exciting time” for the roll-out of sensors in the water industry. Sensing technologies are set to become integral to the digitisation of the UK water industry and AMP7, the next regulatory asset management period (2020-25) for England and Wales.

Speaking ahead of the fifth Sensing in Water conference, where she will deliver a keynote speech, Fergusson said, “The cost of monitoring and having real-time data has really come down. Now the water industry has a chance to use the information that we’ve got on assets that have been out there for a while, but which up till now have just been invisible.”

Sensing in Water 2019 is organised by the Sensors for Water Interest Group (SWIG) and the biennial event takes place in Nottingham on 25-26 September 2019. Fergusson, whose role with the water industry regulator includes identifying cost efficiencies in water company business plans, will speak on the opening day.

“We’re starting to see opportunities coming through monitoring, seeing data come into a sensory system and then mining that data to get some useful information out of it. By putting that to use, companies can start to manage their systems more efficiently.”

Fergusson says that one of the challenges is knowing where to focus because there is so much that could be done, “I can’t think of a place where water companies wouldn’t want to have a bit more information, be able to communicate with customers and let them know that they really understand what’s going on, right down to their locality.”

She reflects on a sensor-based system that’s been installed in New Zealand, “It’s telling people where it’s safe to swim. Machine learning means they can predict combined sewer overflow spills even before they happen – where the beaches will be clean and where they will be less clean.

“That sort of information gives customers real choice about what they do, even in their leisure time. By understanding systems better I believe we will get to new and exciting places.”

Collaboration and innovation might help
Fergusson says more industry trials could help bring together some of the ideas, along with more collaboration to drive the innovation. Wastewater is one area where much less is known, she says, “There have got to be massive benefits in terms of quantity, quality, system behaviour – there’s definitely room for improvement. I think it’s an exciting time.”

Sensing in Water 2019 brings together water companies, regulators, the supply chain and academia to discuss the potential of sensor technology in the water industry. Sessions will include catchment monitoring, drainage infrastructure, distribution network monitoring and data analytics.

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The 115m-high Maguga Dam on the Komati River in Hhohho, Swaziland.

By Dr Peter Harrop of market intelligence firm IDTechEx

Hydropower takes years to install and it can drown vegetation creating years of methane, a potent greenhouse gas. Dams have burst in three countries recently. Fortunately many better options are available or emerging. The strong trend now is to making electricity where you need it, from your solar watch to your village microgrid. Both are evidence of another trend which is the ability to move your zero-emission electricity generation.

Hydropower can literally become a stranded asset. For example, African nations could face devastating blackouts as rising temperatures dry up their hydropower dams. Based on recent years in which extremely dry conditions saw electricity drop off in large areas, a new report by climate scientists has warned that the trend for dam construction is misguided, particularly in a country with ample sunshine and plummeting costs of photovoltaic panels. In Uganda they even make buses that get much of their range from solar roofing. Solar is becoming so affordable that excess panels can be installed to give adequate electricity even during the evening, reducing the amount of battery storage needed.

Unwisely, countries in southern and eastern Africa are due to more than double their hydropower capacity by 2030. Scientists warn that current efforts to mobilise the region’s vast hydroelectric potential will face challenges, while urging regional governments to launch their own investigations into these potential risks.

Raghu Das CEO of analysts IDTechEx contrasts that saying “Ghana has ordered 100MW of the new ocean wave power, minimally intermittent, taking no prime agricultural land with no risk to humans. Others now use wave power for desalination. Tidal power without concrete infrastructure is now looking good and it is even being proven in the flow of large rivers with almost instant installation: no dams. These are 1MW “propellers” folded out under boats and others simply dropped on the sea floor. GE has joined Atlantis on one such project.” See the IDTechEx report, “Wave, Tidal and Hydro Power 1W-10MW 2018-2038”.

Following behind is electricity from tethered drones rising to where the wind is almost continuous and even stronger at night when solar is dead. See IDTechEx report, “Airborne Wind Energy 2019-2039”.

Raghu Das adds, “First 30kW units have been sold to farmers in Norway and 1MW units are being developed. Shell recently joined a Google sister company in one such project in the USA. Delightfully, cheap solar with battery storage and all the above options are zero emission and can be incrementally expanded to meet need or shut down and rapidly removed to the other side of the world if necessary. Try that with a hydro dam.”

The new multiple zero-emission sources in one transportable microgrid are one topic covered in the IDTechEx reports, “Zero Emission Transportable Gensets 2019-2039” and “Desalination: Off Grid Zero Emission 2018-2028”

“Unpredictable changes in water availability clearly pose significant risks to the viability of hydropower plants, as well as the electricity security of the countries,” says Professor Declan Conway from the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment. He observes that a single widespread drought could disrupt many countries at the same time, including those countries, such as South Africa, that are connected to the regional power pool but do not have many hydropower dams of their own. Many of the dams currently being planned will be located in the very same river basins that have been worst affected by drought in recent years. Time to think again.

For more information contact research@IDTechEx.comor visit www.IDTechEx.com/research/offgrid

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UK recycling firm Advanced Sustainable Developments North West (ASD) is hoping to contribute to creating a circular economy in the North West of England by bringing innovative recycling methods to the region, including an advanced Deposit Return Scheme.

Recognising the North West’s commitment to a low carbon economy, ASD has strategically chosen Cheshire and Warrington as a location for their green vision, implementing proven technology in recycling PET plastic into food-grade materials.

The plant will apparently use innovative technology to recycle PET plastic with a vision to ultimately work along the entire journey of plastic bottle and food handling packaging – from the distribution centre, to the stores, to the consumer’s hand, and in the disposal and ultimately the return of this material to the firm’s processing facilities.

ASD aims to bring its own Deposit Return Scheme (DRS) to the region, called “Recycle Exchange” – and this will be encouraging the people of the North West to recycle and become engaged with the process providing the ability to track their own waste through the exchange. An App that allows consumers to obtain either monetary reward for depositing their plastic bottles or donating an amount to a local charity, will be developed.

Philip Cox, Chief Executive of Cheshire and Warrington Local Enterprise Partnership said “Cheshire and Warrington has a compelling offer with significant industry already located here, and the research and business expertise to support a shared ambition to become the number one location for clean growth. Our Enterprise Zone is geared up to support businesses that might locate there, with incentives available as well as a range of additional support services to make locating in Cheshire and Warrington easy. The LEP and our partners will always work with businesses to provide the right support that meets the needs of a business.”

Ahmed Detta, CEO of ASD believes the region will benefit significantly from PET recycling facilities and welcomes the initial discussions:

“Cheshire and Warrington Local Enterprise Partnership are working with us to help our investment at Protos, demonstrating a shared vision to develop a greener and more sustainable region. These shared goals will transform the way we recycle in the region – using a circular economy to make single-use plastic a thing of the past. These shared goals will transform the way we recycle in the region – using a circular economy to make single-use plastic a thing of the past.”

ASD North West says it hopes this world class sustainable plastic recycling facilities will be operational later this year with plans to expand across the UK next year.

The site where ASD hopes to be based is Protos within the Cheshire Science Corridor Enterprise Zone. The site, located on the south bank of the Manchester Ship Canal is run by specialist UK logistics and industrial property business, Peel Logistics Property.

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