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Eatclean by Admin - 1M ago

Everybody knows how healthy it is to eat more vegetables, fruits and whole foods, but there is one feeling which is not uncommon when starting to eat more plant-based wholesome foods… It is the uncomfortable belly bloating.

The excessive bloating occurs when large amounts of air or gas build up in the gastrointestinal tract which might cause pain and discomfort. The air comes from swallowing it while you talk, eat and drink, and the gas comes from bacteria that live in your digestive tract. These bacteria produce gas by feeding on the undigested carbohydrate and fibre from the foods you eat.

How to swallow less air while eating or drinking?

  • Eat slowly and try to relax while you eat
  • Chew thoroughly with mouth closed and save talking until after eating
  • Drink from a glass instead of a bottle, can or travel mug. Avoid using a straw to drink
  • Avoid chewing gum
  • Drink fluids lukewarm instead of hot
  • Avoid carbonated drinks like sodas and sparkling waters
  • Avoid overeating. Eat smaller meals and add another additional small meal if needed

The trio: fibre, water, activity

HIGH FIBRE FOODS The fibre is a carbohydrate found in plant-based foods (legumes, wholegrains, vegetables etc.) that our digestive system cannot digest. Although we are not able to digest it, the fibre has some important functions within the body, such as helping to regulate food movements trough the intestines and keeps our gut microbiome healthy. Most people do not get enough fibre (recommended daily fibre intake: 25-30 grams) but increasing fibre intake too quickly can cause bloating. It is a good idea to start slowly with increasing the high fibre food intake over several weeks to allow the body to adjust to this change in the diet.

WATER All the extra fibre you are consuming requires a significant amount of water to work its best. In fact, without enough water, fibre will have the opposite effect. In other words, you are literally plugging yourself up. Suggestion is to always keep a water bottle at your side and to drink small amounts of water throughout the day.

KEEPING YOURSELF ACTIVE When you are eating enough fibre and drinking adequate amount of water, you still need another complimentary thing to make sure everything is rally working its best… It’s being active! Include at least 2½ hours of moderate to vigorous physical activity each week like walking, swimming, dancing etc.

This trio (fibre, water, physical activity) will keep things moving through the intestines and decrease the risk of constipation, which could be another reason for bloating.

Which foods cause the most discomfort?

Some foods are known to cause bloating more than others. Remember what causes bloating for one person, may not cause it for you. If you are suffering from this digestive discomfort, then try to find out your foods which are causing the belly bloat and then adjust your food choices to reduce the symptoms.

LEGUMES Legumes take very important place in plant-based diet because they contain important amounts of plant-based protein, vitamins and minerals. Legumes may cause bloating because they have a high fibre content and contain oligosaccharides, which are carbohydrates that the body can find difficult to break down. Here are some cooking techniques to try to reduce the bloating factor:

  • Soak the legumes before cooking
  • Drain and rinse the soaked legumes. Do not use the soaking water for cooking
  • Cook legumes thoroughly, until they are soft
  • Try to cook them with a little kombu or wakame (seaweed), or a bay leaf
  • In case of canned legumes: drain and rinse legumes before eating
  • Start with small portions every day and gradually increase the portion size

VEGETABLES AND FRUITS

Raw vegetables Cooking foods lightly helps gently break them down and makes them easier on the digestive process. Enjoy more cooked foods over raw as you transition to a higher fibre diet.

Onions and garlic Onions and garlic contain fructans, which are soluble fibre that may cause bloating. People can substitute these vegetables with celery, collard greens, fennel or spices and herbs, such as chives and basil.

Cruciferous vegetables Cruciferous vegetables include cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, Brussels sprouts and others. Cooking cruciferous vegetables makes them easier to digest. Or, alternatively, you can replace them with other vegetables that are rich in vitamins and minerals but will not cause bloating. These include baby spinach, zucchini, sweet potatoes, carrots, green beans etc.

Fruits The same as vegetables, there are some fruits which are known to cause more bloating than others. These are pears, apples, peaches, mangoes, blackberries, figs, dried fruit (prunes, figs, dates) etc. You can replace them with more safer options like bananas (unripe), blueberries, strawberries, clementines, kiwis, honeydew, passion fruits etc.

ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS Sugar alcohols or polyols are commonly found in sugar-free foods, chewing gums, protein bars, toothpaste and plenty of processed foods under names including sorbitol, lactitol, xylitol, mannitol and typically anything else with an "ol" ending. These sweeteners are generally considered to be safe alternatives to sugar. However, they may cause digestive problems in high amounts. The bacteria in your large intestine digest them and produce gas.

What else you could do?

ENZYMES You can try supplements that contain the enzyme alpha-galactosidase to help digest the carbohydrates in grains, legumes and some vegetables.

CHOOSE ALTERNATIVES (LACTOSE INTOLERANCE) If you are lactose intolerant you are unable to digest the sugar in milk and milk products and this can cause bloating. Use lactose-free milk and milk products, fortified soy, rice and almond beverage, soy yogurts and soy cheeses are also lactose-free and healthy choices. You may also be able to tolerate yogurt and some cheeses since these foods are lower in lactose.

SEE A DOCTOR If you have tried these tips and still suffer from severe chronic bloating, you may need more help from a doctor and a dietitian. This means that other digestive conditions could be causing your symptoms.

Author: Lenda Lindermane from Lenda's Healthy Diaries.

The post Beat The Bloat! appeared first on Eatclean Blog.
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Everybody knows how healthy it is to eat more vegetables, fruits and whole foods, but there is one feeling that is not uncommon when starting to eat more plant-based… It is the uncomfortable belly bloat. The excessive bloating occurs when large amounts of air or gas build up in the gastrointestinal tract leading to pain and discomfort. The air comes from swallowing it while you talk, eat and drink, and the gas comes from bacteria that live in your digestive tract. These bacteria produce gas by feeding on the undigested carbohydrate and fibre from the foods you eat.

How to swallow less air while eating or drinking?

  • Eat slowly and try to relax while you eat
  • Chew thoroughly with mouth closed and save talking until after eating
  • Drink from a glass instead of a bottle, can or travel mug. Avoid using a straw to drink
  • Avoid chewing gum and sucking on hard candy
  • Drink fluids lukewarm instead of hot
  • Avoid carbonated drinks like sodas, beer and sparkling waters
  • Avoid overeating. Eat smaller meals and add another additional small meal if needed

The trio: fibre, water, activity.

  • High fibre foods:
  • Fibre is a carbohydrate found in plant-based foods (legumes, whole grains, vegetables etc.) that our digestive system cannot digest easily. Although we are not able to digest it easily, the fibre has some important functions within the body, such as helping to regulate food movements trough the intestines and keeping our gut microbiome healthy. Most people do not get enough fibre (recommended daily fibre intake: 25-30 grams), but increasing fibre intake too quickly can cause bloating. It is a good idea to start slowly with increasing the high fibre food intake over several weeks to allow the body to adjust to this change in the diet.

  • Water
  • All the extra fibre you are consuming requires a significant amount of water to work its best. In fact, without enough water, fibre will have the opposite effect. In other words, you are literally plugging yourself up. Suggestion is to always keep a water bottle at your side and to drink small amounts of water throughout the day.

  • Keeping yourself active
  • When you are eating enough fibre and drinking adequate amount of water, you still need another complimentary aspect to make sure everything is really working its best… It’s being active! Include at least 2½ hours of moderate to vigorous physical activity each week like walking, swimming, dancing etc.

This trio (fibre, water, physical activity) will keep things moving through the intestines and decrease the risk of constipation, which could be another reason for bloating.

Which foods cause the most discomfort?

Some foods are known to cause bloating more than others. Remember what causes bloating for one person, may not cause it for you. If you are suffering from this digestive discomfort, then try to find out the foods which are causing the belly bloat and then adjust your food choices to reduce the symptoms.

  • LEGUMES
  • Legumes take a very important place in a plant-based diet because they contain important amounts of plant-based protein, vitamins and minerals. Legumes may cause bloating because they have a high fibre content and contain oligosaccharides, which are carbohydrates that the body can find difficult to break down. Here are some cooking techniques to try to reduce the bloating factor: Soak the legumes before cooking Drain and rinse the soaked legumes. Do not use the soaking water for cooking Cook legumes thoroughly, until they are soft Try to cook them with a little kombu or wakame (seaweed), or a bay leaf In case of canned legumes: drain and rinse legumes before eating Start with small portions every day and gradually increase the portion size

  • VEGETABLES AND FRUITS

Raw vegetables

Cooking foods lightly helps gently break them down and makes them easier on the digestive system. Enjoy more cooked foods over raw, as you transition to a higher fibre diet.

Onions and garlic

Onions and garlic contain fructans, which are soluble fibre that may cause bloating. People can substitute these vegetables with celery, collard greens, fennel or spices and herbs, such as chives and basil.

Cruciferous vegetables

Cruciferous vegetables include cauliflower, broccoli, cabbage, brussel sprouts and others. Cooking cruciferous vegetables makes them easier to digest. Or, alternatively, you can replace them with other vegetables that are rich in vitamins and minerals but will not cause bloating. These include baby spinach, zucchini, sweet potatoes, carrots, green beans etc.

Fruits

The same as vegetables, there are some fruits which are known to cause more bloating than others. These are pears, apples, peaches, mangoes, blackberries, figs, dried fruit (prunes, figs, dates) etc. You can replace them with safer options like bananas (unripe), blueberries, strawberries, clementines, kiwis, honeydew, passion fruits etc.

  • ARTIFICIAL SWEETENERS

Sugar alcohols or polyols are commonly found in sugar-free foods, chewing gums, protein bars, toothpaste and plenty of processed foods under names including sorbitol, lactitol, xylitol, mannitol and typically anything else with an "ol" ending. These sweeteners are generally considered to be safe alternatives to sugar. However, they may cause digestive problems in high amounts. The bacteria in your large intestine digest them and produce gas.

What else you could do?

  • Enzymes
  • You can try supplements that contain the enzyme alpha-galactosidase to help digest the carbohydrates in grains, legumes and some vegetables.

  • See a doctor and/or dietitian
  • If you have tried these tips and still suffer from severe chronic bloating, you may need more help from a doctor and a dietitian. This means that other digestive conditions could be causing your symptoms.

Looking to eat more plant-based foods? Check out the Eat Clean vegan meal plan!

Author: Lenda Lindermane from Lenda's Healthy Diaries.

The post Beat The Bloat On A Plant-Based Whole Foods Diet appeared first on Eatclean Blog.
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I highly believe that there is no “one size fits all” diet; not everything works for everyone. Also, I truly believe that we can eat the healthiest foods, but if we don’t end up digesting and absorbing them, they won’t end up in our cells in order to provide us with their nutritional benefits.

Both the digestion of the food we eat and the absorption of its nutrients are the functions that allow the entire body to be nourished.

To start, food is first broken down in macronutrients and micronutrients, processed into amino acids and then the absorption happens. Gut microbes play an important role in absorption of fats and vitamins, because they thrive on the indigestible parts of our foods: fiber!

In short, we have to be able to digest, breakdown and then absorb the nutrients from the foods we eat. If we don’t do that, if we don’t absorb enough iron, then anemia can be an outcome; if we don’t absorb enough vitamin B6, this can lead to neuropathy, not enough Omega 3 fatty acids can lead to depression, not enough magnesium can lead chronic headaches and so on.

What affects optimal digestion and absorption?

  • Poor eating hygiene: its not how clean your food is, but HOW you eat your food: Do you eat on the go? Do you chew well?
  • Drinking too much water with your meals: this dilutes the stomach acid and can impair digestion. Drink water 20 minutes before your meals or 30 minutes after your meals. You can drink warm ginger tea to enhance digestion.
  • Drinking coffee/tea with meals: caffeine negatively affects iron absorption! It is not recommended to drink coffee before your breakfast. If you take vitamin supplements, have your coffee 30 minutes after your meals and your vitamins 2 hours before or after your coffee as caffeine prevents iron from being absorbed in the body.
  • Over the counter medications: some medications lower stomach acid and weaken digestion. Get to the root cause of your issues and try to avoid medication as much as possible. Don’t turn to pills to numb down your pain, instead, understand what is causing the pain and try to fix it. For example, if you are suffering from a migraine, you could be dehydrated or sleep deprived.
  • Painkillers: if you take them consistently you can damage the GI tract and decrease the ability to absorb nutrients. Damage to your intestines can affect the quality of nutrient absorption; if you must take painkillers, make sure you don’t take them on an empty stomach.
  • Stress: your digestive system turns off every time you are in stress mode! Eating slowly and mindfully helps you become aware of what you are eating and how you are eating. Eating slowly also helps control portions and makes you feel full faster.
  • Food combinations: some nutrients compete with each other and others enhance others' performance. For example, calcium competes with iron, but vitamin C helps the body absorb it! Little tip: drizzle your olive oil and lemon juice on that kale and devour it :)

Be mindful of what you eat, and everything will fall into place!

Author: Functional Medicine Health Coach, Dina.

The post You are not what you eat, you are what you absorb! appeared first on Eatclean Blog.
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The food and processing industry has now become a multi-billion dollar sector coming up with all manner of processed foods by the day. Cases of cancer and other diseases such as obesity have now skyrocketed raising deep concerns worldwide. Nonetheless, people are slowly becoming more aware of their eating habits and opting for healthier choices of diet.

However, the Chinese have been at the forefront for thousands of years now with traditional diets that complement the body constituents. Those who have preserved these habits have benefitted greatly and rarely experience medical issues. The secrets of traditional Chinese food and its application to traditional Chinese medicine are now out and the rest of the world can’t help but borrow a thing or two. Today is your lucky day since these secrets are about to be made known to you. Brace yourselves and prepare to start living a long, healthy life using traditional Chinese medicine tricks and diet tips.

Moderation is Key It’s been a common misconception among a good number of people that the more you consume, the bigger and healthier you grow. In as much as the former is true, most people deteriorate in health due to unchecked food consumption. The vice versa would actually hold in this instance – less equals health. Those who’ve been lucky to visit a Sushi restaurant can bear witness of how foods are served in small quantities. Overstuffing your stomach tends to slacken the digestive process thus preventing it from detoxifying and releasing all this food.

Understand Your Body Type We are all uniquely made, therefore, our bodies are not all the same. Just the same way, different foods will have different properties that can be matched up to suit the different body types (tizhi). Foods, according to Chinese principles, are divided into 4 natures referred to as “siqi”:

  • Warm/Hot
  • Cold
  • Cool
  • Neutral
  • Whatever the case, the purpose of eating is to find a neutral body state to enable the perfect flow of Qi through our bodies.

Find a Common Balance A person whose body constituent exudes hot properties tends to be sweaty, constipated and grumpy most of the time. Such a person would require cool and cold foods such as green tea, salad and cheese. Those with cold bodies display characteristics such as bad blood circulation, cold hands and feet, and even paleness and general body weakness. Such would be favored by traditional Chinese medicine in the form of hot and warm foods such as hot chilies, coffee, ginger and beef.

Observing Seasons & Climate We have a special connection to nature – this argument forms the basis of Chinese philosophy and medicine. Just like times and seasons change, so should our eating habits and food choices. The first point to note is that consuming the same type of food for a prolonged period, no matter how healthy, will eventually cause a body deterioration since you deprive the body of essential nutrients in other foods.

Seasonal Foods Matter The food eaten in summer should differ from that consumed in autumn and winter. This is because hot summers call for cold foods to cool down the body whereas freezing winters requires hot foods to get the much-needed heat. Dry autumns need the body to be lubricated and foods such as honey and snow peas would be the perfect fit. Similarly, the climatic conditions of a place will also influence the food choices if the balance is to be maintained. Those living in Big Bog, Hawaii for instance experience a constant cold and wet condition that spans through most of the year. As such, spicy foods would offer the perfect substitute to regulate and counteract this.

Keep It Balanced – Even the Timing! You all have a slight or substantial knowledge on balancing a diet from your Biology. It’s simple, vitamins, proteins and carbohydrates all play an essential role in the body. It’s crucial to ensure the body has a good mixture of all these three in the right amounts. Individuals have the choice to vary the intake for each mineral depending on personal attributes. For example, if you are into manual labor, you might opt to consume more proteins, fats and carbohydrates than vitamins to get the much-needed energies. This is not to say your body doesn't need the vitamins and mineral supplements. One last reminder, it’s important to vary the food intake depending on the time of the day. You are most active in the morning after a good night’s sleep and this is when digestion is at its best. The process will be slower at night when preparing for bed and you would be doing yourself a disservice if this is when you take the largest amounts of food.

It’s pretty simple when you come to think of it. You don’t have to source out all the traditional Chinese medicine, Chinese diets and herbs to medicate your body since these may be hard to come by. The foods within your reach will work just perfectly if only you know how to vary them to your advantage and to match up your body’s properties.

Finding challenging to balance your meals and stay on track? Check out the several meal plan options that can be delivered to your door every morning :)

Author: Elaine from www.tcmshanghai.ae

The post Healthy Eating in Traditional Chinese Medicine appeared first on Eatclean Blog.
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Eatclean by Admin - 7M ago

Detox water has been getting more and more popular these days. Making it at home is so simple: chop up your favorite fruits, vegetables and herbs and add them to cold water for extra flavor!

Although you might get some nutrients from the infused ingredients, it is not close to the amount you would be getting from eating them whole. Hence the "detoxing" element of detox water is more in the result of drinking more water than the ingredients in the mix themselves. It is recommended to drink on average 8 glasses of water per day, and if you are one to struggle with staying hydrated, then this is a quick fix :)

Our top detox water picks are below:

  • Lemon, Cucumber, Mint
  • Cucumber, Basil
  • Watermelon, Mint
  • Strawberry, Lime
  • Blackberry, Orange
  • Ginger, Lemon

When you drink more water, it is said to boost the immune system, improve digestive health, get rid of toxins, improve the mood and energy levels among many more health benefits. Let's get hydrated!

In need of a more intense, actual cleanse? Check out our juice cleanses and bone broth packages to order online!

The post Let's Detox With Water! appeared first on Eatclean Blog.
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A childhood favourite recreated in a healthy way with a fashionable twist! This recipe combination of beetroot, coconut and chocolate is raw, vegan, gluten-free and lightly sweetened.

INGREDIENTS

Filling

  • 1 tbsp beetroot powder
  • 1 ½ cups unsweetened coconut, shreds or flakes
  • ¼ cup coconut oil
  • 1 tbsp pure maple syrup
  • ¼ tsp vanilla

Chocolate coating

  • 1/2 cup cacao powder
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil
  • 3 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1/4 tsp vanilla

METHOD

To make the filling:

  • Process the coconut products and syrup or honey until a homogenous and sticky mixture is obtained. Add the beet powder and process again.
  • Turn into balls and freeze for 15 minutes.

To make the chocolate coating

  • Place everything in a small bowl and mix everything until well incorporated.
  • If it is not perfectly smooth then continue to adjust your proportions until just right.

Last step

  • Bathe each coconut ball in the chocolate.
  • Place in the fridge or freezer for 30 minutes to an hour to set before serving.

Author: Tatiana from Health & Yum.

The post Fashionista Bounty Balls appeared first on Eatclean Blog.
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It’s that time of year when many parents start thinking about sending their kids back to school and how to keep them healthy. Finding time to shop and prepare nutritious meals that your child will actually eat for lunch can be challenging for even the most organized parents. But the foods you send to school contribute up to a third of your child’s daily food intake. So it’s important to pack a balanced meal to ensure that your kid’s lunch box provides much needed nutrients, vitamins and minerals for energy and growth.

Follow the core four rules to pack a nutritious lunchbox

  • Main lunch meal
  • Nutritious snack
  • Piece of fresh fruit (seasonal)
  • Drink
  • 1 Extra snack for active kids

We recommend planning each lunch box based on the five food groups and making sure they are all included as part of a varied and balanced meal:

  • Cereals and grains:
  • The first thing that you should be considering is a good source of carbohydrate for energy. Choose whole grain and high fiber varieties of breads, cereals, rice, pasta, noodles, and crackers that are likely to keep your child fuller for longer and help maintain their concentration and attention throughout school time. Refined grain products (such as ready to eat bars, cakes, biscuits, and pastries) can be high in added sugar, fat and sodium, so better to avoid them.

  • Protein foods:

Add to your child’s lunch box a source of protein which is responsible for the muscle and tissue build up, maintenance and repair. As a good source of iron, they also affect learning, memory, and attention. Lean ham, turkey, chicken, canned tuna, salmon, eggs, tofu, beans or lentils, are good options to fill a sandwich or a salad as a main meal.

  • Dairy:

The foods in this group are the best sources of calcium, which is important for strong and healthy bones. Make sure to include at least one in the lunchbox like yoghurt, flavored milk, or milk pudding. For non-dairy alternatives, there are plenty of products fortified with calcium and other important vitamins such as almond milk, soy milk, oat milk among many others.

  • Vegetables:

Offer at every meal and snacks, a variety of colorful veggies as a combination of raw and cooked. They provide vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber and phytonutrients (nutrients naturally present in plants) to keep your child fuller for longer and to maintain his/her overall health. You can add to a sandwich some lettuce, cucumber circles, capsicum, celery, or grated carrots as good veggie options that will not make it too soggy.

    • Fruits:

    Offer a variety of colorful fruits which provides vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber and antioxidants that boost the immune system and help the body stay healthy. Fruits can be offered as an assortment of fresh slices with a yoghurt dip or dried fruits.

      • Drink:

      Water should always be the preferred drink. Always include in the lunch box a water bottle that can be frozen the night before for hot summer days. Fruit juices and flavored milk contain sugar and should not be consumed on a daily basis. You can add an additional low-fat milk of no more than 300ml or a fresh fruit juice drink of 150ml once or twice a week.

      • Extra Snack:

      Every child is different and depending on their activity level or rate of growth, they may need an additional nutrient-rich snack. Choose the extra snack from the five food groups such as crackers with cheese, veggie sticks with labneh or hummus dip or yoghurt topped with fresh fruit for example.

      Not including a “fun” snack in your child’s lunch box runs the risk of them exchanging their “nutritious” snack for more appealing packaged options. A more realistic approach is to occasionally replace the extra snack by a “fun” food such as snack bars, sweet cookies and cakes, flavored or coated popcorn, savory biscuits or chips (preferably homemade with wholesome ingredients).

      To make sure that your hard work will not go to waste and your child will eat the food, make sure to involve your kids in the planning and packing by making it fun!

      If you don't have time to cook, check out our top recommendations below to order online!

      Yawmi's kid's meals.

      ENCAS kids' snacks

      .

      Author: Carina Khoury, Dietitian at GMC Clinics.

      The post Back To School The Healthy Way! appeared first on Eatclean Blog.
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      It’s that time of year when many parents start thinking about sending their kids back to school and how to keep them healthy. Finding time to shop and prepare nutritious meals that your child will actually eat for lunch can be challenging for even the most organized parents. But the foods you send to school contribute up to a third of your child’s daily food intake. So it’s important to pack a balanced meal to ensure that your kid’s lunch box provides much needed nutrients, vitamins and minerals for energy and growth.

      Follow the core four rules to pack a nutritious lunchbox

      • Main lunch meal
      • Nutritious snack
      • Piece of fresh fruit (seasonal)
      • Drink
      • 1 Extra snack for active kids

      We recommend planning each lunch box based on the five food groups and making sure they are all included as part of a varied and balanced meal:

      • Cereals and grains: The first thing that you should be considering is a good source of carbohydrate for energy. Choose whole grain and high fiber varieties of breads, cereals, rice, pasta, noodles, and crackers that are likely to keep your child fuller for longer and help maintain their concentration and attention throughout school time. Refined grain products (such as ready to eat bars, cakes, biscuits, and pastries) can be high in added sugar, fat and sodium, so better to avoid them.
      • Protein foods:
      • Add to your child’s lunch box a source of protein which is responsible for the muscle and tissue build up, maintenance and repair. As a good source of iron, they also affect learning, memory, and attention. Lean ham, turkey, chicken, canned tuna, salmon, eggs, tofu, beans or lentils, are good options to fill a sandwich or a salad as a main meal.

      • Dairy:
      • The foods in this group are the best sources of calcium, which is important for strong and healthy bones. Make sure to include at least one in the lunchbox like yoghurt, flavored milk, or milk pudding. For non-dairy alternatives, there are plenty of products fortified with calcium and other important vitamins such as almond milk, soy milk, oat milk among many others.

      • Vegetables:
      • Offer at every meal and snacks, a variety of colorful veggies as a combination of raw and cooked. They provide vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber and phytonutrients (nutrients naturally present in plants) to keep your child fuller for longer and to maintain his/her overall health. You can add to a sandwich some lettuce, cucumber circles, capsicum, celery, or grated carrots as good veggie options that will not make it too soggy.

      • Fruits:
      • Offer a variety of colorful fruits which provides vitamins, minerals, dietary fiber and antioxidants that boost the immune system and help the body stay healthy. Fruits can be offered as an assortment of fresh slices with a yoghurt dip or dried fruits.

      • Drink:
      • Water should always be the preferred drink. Always include in the lunch box a water bottle that can be frozen the night before for hot summer days. Fruit juices and flavored milk contain sugar and should not be consumed on a daily basis. You can add an additional low-fat milk of no more than 300ml or a fresh fruit juice drink of 150ml once or twice a week.

      • Extra Snack:
      • Every child is different and depending on their activity level or rate of growth, they may need an additional nutrient-rich snack. Choose the extra snack from the five food groups such as crackers with cheese, veggie sticks with labneh or hummus dip or yoghurt topped with fresh fruit for example.

      Not including a “fun” snack in your child’s lunch box runs the risk of them exchanging their “nutritious” snack for more appealing packaged options. A more realistic approach is to occasionally replace the extra snack by a “fun” food such as snack bars, sweet cookies and cakes, flavored or coated popcorn, savory biscuits or chips (preferably homemade with wholesome ingredients).

      To make sure that your hard work will not go to waste and your child will eat the food, make sure to involve your kids in the planning and packing by making it fun!

      If you don't have time to cook, check out our top recommendations below to order online! Yawmi's kid's meals. ENCAS kids' snacks.

      Author: Carina Khoury, Dietitian at GMC Clinics.

      The post Back To School The Healthy Way! appeared first on Eatclean Blog.
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      Staying active during your summer holidays is about making your health and fitness a priority and a lifestyle no matter when or where! Long gone are the days when your health and fitness routine gets compromised when traveling :)

      If anything, the best time to exercise is while on vacation. You can maintain and even improve your fitness levels while you are on holiday, because you actually have more time on your hands and you don't even have to enter a gym to do so! Fitness during summer holidays can include walking, hiking, swimming, stretching, sunrise or sunset yoga among many more activities! You can even rent a bike and tour the city or better yet, walk during your tour and go site seeing by foot. You can take the stairs and avoid taking the lift as often as possible. Stair climbing alone will help boost your metabolism and heart rate.

      You can always fit in a short 10 minute mini workout every morning right from the comfort of your room, including:

      • 30 to 60 seconds of jumping jacks
      • 10 push-ups off or on your knees
      • 10 to 20 squats
      • 15 to 30 bicycle reps
      • 20 seconds to 1 minute plank holds

      This workout requires no equipment, just your body weight and can be done anywhere and at anytime. If you prefer a gym, make sure the hotel you are staying in has one and have your workout clothes laid out the night before by your bed side. That’s what I do for motivation!

      If your vacation consists of hiking and touring, that alone will burn off a ton of calories and keep your endurance and strength levels high and active.

      Incorporating fitness during your summer holidays no longer has to be a chore. Keep it simple and make sure you are not sedentary too often while away. Stay active and don’t allow your heart rate to stay dormant for too long. Meaning you have to feel short of breath sometimes and break a sweat when you can or park your car a few feet away from your destination and get walking. Aim to get 10,000 steps in a day if not more, and track your fitness and heart rate to make sure you are staying active.

      Remember, an active heart rate zone for most is above 100 beats per minute and a heart rate between 120 and up to 150 beats will be your fat burning, endurance / fitness zone for most.

      Once your summer holidays are over or you’ve returned from your travels, you’ll be relieved and most importantly happy that you kept your fitness and health on track, so you don’t have to work extra hard to get your fitness back on track once you’ve returned!

      Author: Jennifer Chalouhi www.jennifercfit.com/. The post Stay Active During The Summer Holidays! appeared first on Eatclean Blog.

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      It’s the season for traveling and summer vacations! Finally, time to take a break! Whether you’re relaxing on the beach or exploring a new city, a time out from the normal routine can be a wonderful thing. But it can also make it tough to stay healthy and fit; all those meals out and indulging in a few drinks doesn't exactly help either. The good news is that feeling healthy during and post-vacation is totally possible. Making just a few smart choices will keep you active and energized and help you get the most out of your trip!

      Fill up on fruits and veggies

      One of the easiest ways to keep your eating plan in check and to avoid going overboard is to be conscious of including fruits and vegetables in your daily diet. I suggest incorporating a fruit or vegetable at each meal. Try to include a fresh fruit serving in the morning with breakfast or as a mid morning snack, and include some kind of vegetable dish with lunch or dinner. It can be a fresh salad, a cooked vegetable, or a healthy soup option.

      Exercise

      You may not lose weight on a leisure trip, but you can come close to breaking even. Set aside 20 minutes every other morning, either in the gym or outside, to run, speed walk, yoga, etc. Being active gets your limbs flexed and your heart rate pumping, making you feel better throughout the day, and will encourage you to eat healthier. I won't suggest every day since that's an unrealistic goal given early morning tours and activities. Another great way to explore a new location and stay active, is to check out the city by bike or a walking tour! Being on foot lets you shoot photos, discover authentic cafes and shops and ramble down charming alleyways.

      Consciously Indulge

      Vacations are not a time to begin a diet, and it is also not a time to go completely overboard. If you overdo it with fries at lunch, don’t start dinner with three buttered rolls, because you think, “Well, the day is ruined.” Its not. Planning in advance helps a lot; so identify the local cuisine that you want to try and plan your eating around that. It’s important to enjoy the local cuisine, and you can and should enjoy the indulgences that matter most to you on vacation. Don’t deny yourself entirely. Just make sure you plan when and what you will be indulging on during your trip.

      Smart Snacking

      When you plan to be out all day, bring along your own non-perishable healthy snacks to stave off hunger. Nuts & seeds are a great healthy snack to have on the go. Rich in healthy fats and fiber, they’ll keep you satisfied till your next meal. Try to stay away from simple carbs (the kind found in sugary, white flour foods like pastries, crackers, and cookies) as such foods will spike your blood sugar levels quickly, then leave them plunging soon after. That blood sugar plunge causes intense hunger for more sugary carbs, and the cycle continues. Our top recommended snacks to take with you when traveling are the plant-based Freakin' Healthy natural energy bars and Munchbox healthy snack packs.

      Stay Hydrated

      The summer heat makes you more susceptible to dehydration, and drinking enough water is often a challenge while traveling. Carry a water bottle with you as a reminder to drink water and infuse it with fresh fruits and veggies for extra flavor! Our favourite combinations are: cucumber, lemon & mint, strawberry & lemon, watermelon & basil. Also, dehydration is often masked as feelings of hunger, when really your body just needs fluids. If you feel hungry, and you haven't drank much that day, try drinking a glass of water and waiting 15 to 20 minutes to see if your hunger subsides. Check out our range of vitamin water, coconut water and a natural antioxidant drink.

      Rest and Relax

      Most importantly… rest and relax! Keep work away and free your mind. Get the most out of your time off by doing activities that you enjoy, and sharing time with friends and family. Fuel yourself with experiences, exploration, and the adventure of your getaway :)

      Author: Linda Said, US Registered Dietitian.

      The post How to travel healthy this summer! appeared first on Eatclean Blog.

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