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How Successful Nonprofits Use Infographics

Nonprofits have a big job. They don’t operate like traditional businesses (i.e. for profit), so they need donors and volunteers to help them do their highly important work. To attract potential donors, companies and even volunteers to help their cause, nonprofits have to market themselves constantly.

Enter infographics.

Infographics for nonprofits

Infographics are images that visualize information, and are made to illustrate facts, figures and even “emotional” information about a nonprofit. As people retain images far longer than words, infographics are an ideal way to share and inspire lots of people with less effort (and fewer resources). To get you inspired and to show you the many different ways your nonprofit can use infographics, here are a few nonprofits that use infographics successfully. 

Amnesty International

Amnesty International is a global nonprofit that focuses on human rights. Its goals are researching human rights abuses and coming up with plans of action. In order to emphasize the work behind their multi-year research into birthing practices in the United States, Amnesty International released an infographic in warm colors with the silhouette of an expectant mother. “Deadly Delivery: The Maternal Healthcare Crisis in the USA” included points from the research, as well as callouts for action to help improve the situation.

This infographic serves a few uses: to inform of the maternity healthcare crisis, to be used as marketing materials, and to increase the authority and presence of Amnesty International online.

ALS Association

By now, who hasn’t heard of the ALS Bucket Challenge? A few years ago, millions of people engaged in an interactive effort to educate people about amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a motor neuron disease. In order to educate people on the impact that challenge had, the ALS Association published an infographic titled “Progress By the Bucketful.”

This infographic reflects the ways the ice bucket challenge impacted people with ALS, as well as how much money has been raised for research and other facts about living with and treating ALS. Infographics like this are a great way to show your donors and followers just what a difference they’re making, which is a great way to keep them engaged.

Habitat For Humanity

Habitat for Humanity focuses on creating affordable housing for low-income families and is very reliant on volunteers in different parts of the world. That’s why Habitat for Humanity has so many “chapters” and branches of their organization. Habitat for Humanity of Florida designed an infographic illustrating their individual impact as a branch of the main organization, which is a great way to show just how widespread the impact can be worldwide.

The infographic is also a great way to thank local volunteers, raise awareness in their area and show just how many people they’ve helped.

Resource-friendly marketing + impact

Nonprofits operate best when they can constantly increase their audience, donors and reach. There is no time to waste on marketing tactics that don’t work, and infographics allow nonprofits to disseminate information quickly, clearly and with the ability to adjust later. You can also use infographics in multiple mediums, from print mailers to email newsletters, social media and beyond.

Infographic creation is a necessary tool for any nonprofit’s toolbox, and if you want to learn how to make them for your organization, check out our Udemy “Crash Course in Infographics” course. We also can design an infographic for you for only $39!

The post How Successful Nonprofits Use Infographics appeared first on Create Amazing Infographics Easel.ly!.

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How Do I Communicate What My Nonprofit Does With Infographics?

Infographics are images that relay information, and you’ve probably used them in some shape or form for your nonprofit’s internal messaging or statistics reports. But infographics can come in a variety of sizes and templates, which allows them to be utilized across multiple platforms for multiple purposes. And since the human brain retains the most information through visuals – and visuals connect to the emotional centers of the brain — infographics are the optimal choice to convey what your nonprofit does to the public.

Support a wider campaign

Let’s say your nonprofit is a food bank, but you need to spread the word on social media and via traditional marketing methods. To combine memorable information with your donors’ interest in the work you’re doing, you could create an image of statistics about how many children use the food bank in your area. This immediately establishes the focus of your nonprofit, creating a memorable visual so people can remember your name and what you do, while also impacting them emotionally. You could post that infographic on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest and Instagram to gather attention or you could use it for flyers, internet ads, etc. If you couple that infographic with, for instance, an email about a food drive campaign to get more kid-friendly foods donated, it could affect real change. 

Hunger in America

Gather support with infographics

Let’s say your nonprofit rescues animals and you want to get the word out that your nonprofit saves four-legged (or fewer!) lives. Creating an infographic with before-and-after shots of an animal you’ve rescued will get the sort of attention your nonprofit needs to keep going. Communicating with visuals like that elicits an emotional reaction while also telling people who you are and what you are about, which is very powerful. Do you need donations for pet supplies or food? Do you want to get the animals adopted even faster? Creating an infographic is a great way to get the job done because it combines emotional visuals with facts – people get motivated to make a difference and donate (or adopt!).

San Antonio Pets Alive

Infographic reporting

Most nonprofits have hundreds, if not thousands, of people supporting what they do. There are volunteers, board members, activists and donors to keep abreast of the latest happenings. This is where infographics come in very handy. Let’s say you want to communicate your nonprofit’s new goals for the year. Creating a series of visuals that tell the story of where your nonprofit was last year and where it plans to go this year can get everyone on the same page and motivated to continue to make a difference.

Every nonprofit has lots of internal information detailing procedures or what they offer, and infographics are a great way to convey those directions in a concise, visual message.

From Nonprofit Marketing Guide

Think visually to attract donors

With every year that passes, we become a more visual society. Phones, tablets and laptops offer more mediums than ever before for communicating with your donors. If you want to attract as many donors as possible, why not give them information the format that works best for them – and can be used multiple times in different mediums? Communicating what your nonprofit does can be easy with infographics – you just have to get creative.

The post How Do I Communicate What My Nonprofit Does With Infographics? appeared first on Create Amazing Infographics Easel.ly!.

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How to Use Infographics to Educate or Train Employees

Infographics are visual representations of information. When it comes to training new employees or educating current ones, infographics are a great way to effectively and quickly communicate procedures, rules and expectations. Here is how to use them to create a smarter, more efficient workplace.

Safety first

Most every workplace has a break room or lounging area. This is where people congregate to eat and talk so it makes sense to have an infographic at the ready – whether it’s for emergency reference or consistent access.

AHA CPR training

Create a graphic that illustrates exactly how to perform things like the Heimlich maneuver or CPR. You may even consider a graphic that highlights what is in the first aid kit and what each item is used for. Even if your workplace isn’t traditionally a “high risk” area, it is helpful to have these infographics in common areas just in case.

Cohesive training procedures

Whether it is training someone on how to ring up items at the register or to fill out certain forms, every workplace has procedures. Often, they are mandated by the company but some may be little quirks and tips relative to that particular position or office. No matter what you need to train an employee to do, an infographic can show employees how to do it effectively. This doesn’t just benefit the company, but it makes an employee’s job easier.

Consider placing an infographic related to an employee’s job duties next to their work station (i.e. how to use a forklift properly). You can also create infographic handouts to tuck into employee training manuals so that new and existing employees can reference proper procedures at a quick glance.

Dress code

Appearances are a sensitive subject in most workplaces. Sometimes, it is best to illustrate company decisions on things like dress code, footwear, makeup, facial hair and body modifications with an infographic. A simple silhouette illustrating exactly what sort of clothing and hairstyles allow people to see for themselves what is expected on the job. This can also be a great way to show employees how to properly dress for safety if they work in a warehouse, on a construction site, etc.

See full dress code infographic here

About the company

From smaller “mom and pop shops” to larger corporations, there are a lot of moving parts required to make a workplace a functional environment. Using handouts to illustrate exactly what your work is about allows employees to understand it on a “big picture” level. A visual accompanied by statistics or data about the company may give workers the chance to understand not just what they do, but why they do it in the first place.

Your company’s mission or values are also important reminders for employees, and research shows that a strong “culture” in the workplace can actually lead to higher employee retention. Why not create infographics that show exactly what your company stands for – or the difference your employees are making.

Keeping up with the times

Humans are visual creatures and over 65% of us learn best through visuals. Infographics in the workplace are a great way to relay information that gets remembered. They can be tweaked to be funnier, brighter, or more fun to make them even more memorable.

But the most important thing to remember when creating infographics for employees is that everyone should be on the same page. With training and education infographics, you create the same standard of information so that new and current employees all have the same information. Better yet, they have it easily viewable or accessible when they have questions.

The post How to Use Infographics to Educate or Train Employees appeared first on Create Amazing Infographics Easel.ly!.

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Why Visual Communication is an Important Skill to Learn

Effective communication is one of the most vital life skills we need to succeed. Conveying your ideas, thoughts, feelings, facts and information clearly and concisely has always been important — but it’s never been as important as it is now. Media is consumed at all hours of the day and through many different mediums, and the average American spends half their day looking at a screen. Communication is becoming less and less in-person and much more online. And if you’ve noticed the popularity of platforms like YouTube and Instagram, you’ll also notice that communication is becoming much more visual.

This makes mastering visual communication, rather than basic communication, absolutely essential. Here’s why:

Information retention

You want people to remember what you’ve said long after you’ve said it. Visual communication does this better than other types of communication because of how our human brains work. Images are remembered by the part of the brain responsible for long-term memory, as opposed to the written word alone, which is stored in the brain’s short-term memory. Coupling any communication with a visual that bolsters what you are trying to say creates a stronger connection (something that is important in today’s information-riddled world).

Time savers

How long did it take you to read the first part of this article? Probably a minute or two. Communicating with visuals decreases the time spent communicating. Rather than spending the time to read information, a clear visual with thoughtful care in mind for the information it needs to relay is a huge time saver.

Relatability

Everyone loves gifs and memes. Why? Because images can cross cultural and even language barriers. You don’t have to use words to try to explain something when you can share an infographic, picture of short video that gets straight to the point. Think about how you learn in a foreign language class — images almost always accompany the written definitions of the words. Visuals catch people’s attention at work or at school because it creates common ground.

via GIPHY

Consistency

If you want to deliver a message effectively, you must be consistent. In order for everyone to take away the same message, visual communication must have a reliable theme – and you must share valuable information. Especially if you’re an entrepreneur, small business or nonprofit creating visual communication, your fonts, images, graphics, icons and colors must be similar enough to seem like they were created by the same person or company. (For more on this, we wrote an article just for you: Authentic Branding for Your Infographics).

Most of all, visual communication is a marketable skill

In today’s online and visual world, any job or trade you train in will rely on visual communication. From safety handbooks in the warehouse to infographic reports in the boardroom, being able to communicate effectively with visuals is something every professional relies heavily upon. That’s why, whether you’re an experienced professional or a student, learning how to create visuals – and communicate with them – is absolutely necessary.

The post Why Visual Communication is an Important Skill to Learn appeared first on Create Amazing Infographics Easel.ly!.

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How to Choose the Best Chart/Graph for Your Infographic

As an increasingly visual society, it makes sense to relay information in a visually concise manner. Infographics are great for this. It’s much easier for people to digest information when text is coupled with an illustration — but if you’re trying to create an infographic, it’s hard to know which kind to use. And if you’re relaying hard data or statistics, it may be difficult to decide how best to organize that information visually.

Luckily, there are all manners of charts and graphs in Easelly to choose for your infographic. Here are a few tips for choosing the best charts and graphs for your needs.

A piece of the pie chart

A pie chart is arguably the most commonly known chart for infographics. If you have a simple piece of data to convey that can be broken down into percentages, this is a good way to go. However, if that data is all roughly the same percentage, a pie chart may not be the best option, as there isn’t enough of a striking difference in the “slices” of the pie.

Customize this Halloween infographic here

Meet you at the bar

When comparing two or more sets of data, a bar chart is a great choice. These can be presented horizontally or vertically and work very well when you want to visually contrast information, as the eye can easily interpret the different heights of the bars. Bar graphs are also a striking way to get people to remember information.

PRO TIP from our designers: Bar charts don’t have to be boring graphs! They can be icons representing the number of people/items in a data set, colored in icons, etc. Look at the image below. Not only are there “traditional” bars representing drug classifications, but also a horizontal “bar” with people icons. You can have fun with traditional bar charts for your infographics!

To customize this medical infographic, click here.

Lean on the column

Using column charts in an infographic is great for representing amounts like units of time and distance because they are presented horizontally. You could say that the only difference between bar charts and column charts is that vertical vs. horizontal difference and you’d be right on principle if not in practice. Column charts look good when comparing around five items at most. Beyond that, to avoid visual clutter a bar chart is better.

This image does a great job of using the many types of charts/graphs. The “Sales by Agent” section shows how a column chart can easily show sequential differences between

Customize this infographic here.

The Great Pyramid

Choose a pyramid chart when the goal is to represent how data is related to one another. Think of the food pyramid most kids were taught in school. It laid a foundation of healthy eating but all lined up because the overall joining topic was food. Using the triangular shape and fun colors, a pyramid infographic imbues a sense of continuity about a topic.

Get in line

 Line charts are a great way to show changing trends over time, as well as compare multiple data sets in the same view. For example, you can use line charts to show how much income has changed in the years since 1985, with different lines representing genders, races, or even geographical locations.

Customize this money infographic with Easelly

Which chart or graph is best for you?

Infographics are easily shared across multiple platforms and mediums, and they’re great at making news and ideas easier to digest and remember. Choosing the correct chart or graph for your infographic means considering the sort of message you would like your data to evoke in the viewer. Sometimes, you may need to play around with different templates to see what feels right. Ultimately, the right chart will be one that is visually striking, memorable and concise – it’s up to you and your data to know which one works best.

The post How to Choose the Best Chart or Graph for Your Infographic appeared first on Create Amazing Infographics Easel.ly!.

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How to Effectively Promote Your Business Infographic

You’ve spent a lot of time creating an infographic that reflects your business products, services and/or message… and now you’re ready to share it with the world. But how do you promote your business infographic?

Donna Moritz of Socially Sorted believes promotion is the most important step in content creation – and we totally agree with her! She says, “…The success of content doesn’t stop simply at the creation of the content in the first place. You need to promote it and give it ‘legs’!”

The beauty of infographics for business is that they can go beyond blogs, videos or podcasts; you can use them in social media, emails, print materials, banner images and more. But the first step to promoting your business infographic is giving it a home.

First Step to Promoting Your Business Infographic

Once you’ve hit “Download” on your Easelly creation, it’s time to pick the most impactful home for that image. We at Easelly usually recommend embedding your infographic in your blog or on a high traffic page on your website first. This is because you want people to follow the “funnel” your infographic creates, no matter where you share it next. Whether you post the image to social media or link to it in an email, when people click that image or link, it will take them back to your business’s website or blog. That’s where you want them!

To embed an infographic, all you have to do is copy the embed code under “Share” in the Creation Tool.

Then, on the “Text” window of your Content Management System (WordPress, SquareSpace, etc.), paste the code where you want the image to appear. Return to the “Visual” window or preview the page to ensure the image is appearing like it should.

Why embedding? An embedded image becomes a part of the blog or webpage. This means that, should someone find your image on another platform, it will be connected to your blog or webpage. It’s a good way to ensure you get the web traffic connected to your image.

If you provide an embed code for other people to use, it also can affect your SEO ranking and impact the number of times your image appears in searches (like Google Images)!

Why embed infographics on your blog? Statistics show that infographics are performing better than blogs – so we recommend adding your infographic to a new post on your website before sharing it anywhere else!

Promoting your business infographic doesn’t stop at posting it on your website, though. To get the real bang for your buck, you’ll need to promote your content in ways that translate to more traffic, sales or conversions (however you measure that). Social media, because it is so visual, is a great way to promote your infographic. And while not every social media platform or promotion method works for everyone, we have a few tips for you to try.

Infographic Marketing on Social Media

Infographics are great because they can be easily promoted on multiple platforms. When it comes to infographic marketing, though, social media is a huge driver. To get the most out of each infographic you create, try:

  1. Regularly tweeting your infographic. Make sure to include #infographic or a hashtag relevant to the content or your niche to help it gain traction. You can schedule multiple tweets with infographics using different social media scheduling tools to save time!

Follow @easel_ly on Twitter!

2. Share it on Facebook. We recommend sharing the link to your blog or website where the infographic is located in one post, then sharing the infographic as a JPEG or PNG as an image post. Direct image uploads work best if the infographic is not super long, so chop up a larger infographic into social media-friendly sizes (yay, multi-use content!).

3. Post on LinkedIn. LinkedIn has their own “article publishing” tool which essentially operates like a blog. Include your infographic image, some of the original post, and a link to your website!

4. Use social media video to announce your new post and infographic. Facebook Live and Instagram Stories are becoming really popular for expanding on content ideas and getting people engaged!

5. Create smaller social images using pieces of your infographic. Use headlines, tips or quotes that will entice people to check out the original infographic from Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest or Twitter (like the one we created below).

Find the full infographic here.

6. Optional: You can also upload it to SlideShare or submit it for approval to Infographic directories.

These infographic promotion ideas may seem overwhelming – but they get results. Once you gain a little bit of traction and people start clicking on or sharing your infographic, it will snowball. Donna Moritz even says, “[Infographics] can potentially drive traffic to your website for months and even years down the track…. so it’s worth it!”

Email, Materials and Other Ways to Promote Infographics

Social media isn’t the only place that infographics shine; email marketing is another great way to promote your business infographics. Why email marketing? Some studies indicate that email is 40 times more effective than social media in converting new customers, for starters.

Miranda Paquet of Constant Contact recently shared a few ideas for incorporating infographics into emails to gain and retain subscribers, like:

  • Selecting a preview portion of an infographic for your email. Trim the image to fit in the email template and then link to the entire infographic on your website.
  • Making your email template an infographic. People love visual emails so why not make a newsletter in Easelly?

Need more ideas for your infographic email campaign?

On top of email marketing for your business infographic, you can also:

  • Give it away! Offer your infographic to relevant blogs, websites or companies who could benefit from your information. When you do this, always make sure you have your business information on the footer!
  • Share it on forums and answer sites. Blog comment sections, Quora pages and even Reddit are all great places to provide value with your infographic. Don’t spam anyone – just offer to provide information that you’ve taken the time to curate and design!
  • Use your infographic as design for Facebook ads, banner ads and even print materials! Your infographic counts as design materials – why not use them to their fullest? Submit sections of your infographic (or the whole infographic if small enough) to Facebook and other ad campaigns to start promoting yourself visually. We at Easelly even use an infographic for our edcamp promotion materials!

  • Include infographics in worksheets, ebooks and other resources you create. People love visual information, so any time you want to relay information quickly and effectively, include your business infographic(s). If you create a number of infographics, you can also package them as a free resource or report!

However you decide to promote your business infographics, we hope you see that you have plenty of options. Remember:

Creating isn’t enough; you need to promote

While creating an infographic that looks great will attract attention, promoting that image is what gets conversions and growth for your business.

Additional Infographic Promotion Resources

The post How to Effectively Promote Your Business Infographic appeared first on Create Amazing Infographics Easel.ly!.

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Best Practices for B2B Infographics

From the increases in ROI that your software generates to the trends of your industry, there’s a lot of data that B2B marketers need to share with their customers, and infographics continue to be a great way to tell a story and visualize data. While it’s easy to understand why infographics work—they make it easy to digest data in a way that’s visually pleasing—the best practices for B2B infographics are somewhat nebulous. Should you go with a bright color scheme to make the infographic more exciting? How much data should you include? Which graphics go best with the content or audience?

Lucky for you, we’ve narrowed down some of the best practices for B2B infographics, and soon you’ll be designing infographics that will help you land new clients and retain your current ones.

Use a vertical design to optimize the display of your story

A long, vertical infographic makes it easier for you to create a flow for your audience. An infographic that’s closer to a square than a rectangle may require readers to scroll sideways, then down, then sideways again. A square infographic could also break the flow of the story you’re trying to tell. So, make sure you use a horizontal design like most infographics. Vertical infographics display much better on both desktop and mobile devices and are easier to make responsive. Vertical graphics also display much better on popular social media platforms like LinkedIn and Pinterest.

Vertical Infographic:

The full infographic can be found here.

Horizontal Infographic:

The full infographic can be found here.

Which would you prefer? With a vertical infographic, it’s easy to scroll (and keep scrolling). With a horizontal infographic, the user has to enlarge the infographic and then zoom in to actually read the content. Depending on the device they’re on, they may even have to scroll left and right, which is not an ideal user experience.

Stick to your brand colors

It’s exciting to play with different color schemes and create colorful and eye-catching infographics that people will want to share on social media, but it is best to stick to your brand colors. Using your brand-approved colors will ensure that audiences can tie your infographic back to your brand. Especially if you’re creating multiple graphics, it’s best to keep things consistent with maybe just a couple alternating accent colors to mix things up from image to image.

Include data that’s easy to digest

Including all of the findings from your case study might not be the best idea. Choose some of the biggest takeaways to include in your infographic, and make sure that you don’t need to explain too much. Make sure that your data sets go together well, too. Your infographic should aim to tell one story, not ten. Choose multiple data sets that back up the title of your infographic, and ask yourself if each piece of information is telling the same story.

The full infographic can be found here.

This infographic clearly depicts what times are best to post content on Twitter and Facebook. The user can quickly retrieve the information they are looking for without having to hunt for the answer.

Encourage your audiences to share your infographics

The first step to take to encourage people to share your infographics is to share it yourself. LinkedIn is a popular place for B2B infographics, but Facebook and Pinterest are two other great options. Depending on your company and your audiences, determine the best places to share your data and utilize social media management tools to gain exposure at the most optimal times of the week.

Another great way to encourage sharing is to create bite-sized graphics by cropping out sections of your infographic. Cropping will make it easier for your readers to share one piece of information and link back to the entire infographic. No matter how you share your data (in pieces or as a whole), make sure that your brand name is always on the graphics you create to boost brand awareness and create positive associations with your brand.

Make infographics easy to consume

We live in the age of technology and information. That means your audiences will continue to have access to all of the data they need with just the click of a button or the touch of a screen — and why it’s increasingly important to provide data in an easily digestible format. Capture attention with business infographics, and drive traffic, leads and conversions by following these simple best practices.

Kelsey Reaves is a content-focused Marketing Manager at TrustRadius, a trusted site for B2B software reviews. When she’s not sharing her knowledge on the latest trends in software and B2B news, she nurtures her passion for travel by exploring new cities and binge watching Anthony Bourdain.

The post Best Practices for B2B Infographics appeared first on Create Amazing Infographics Easel.ly!.

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How to Get Maximum ROI From Infographics

Infographics first started gaining traction as a marketing asset nearly ten years back. Since then, we have seen them evolve from an interesting novelty into a very vital component of any marketing plan.

Traditionally, infographics have been used for viral marketing. They are eye-catching and tend to get shared widely. This not only helps spread the word about your brand, but can also help with SEO (since users sharing infographics tend to cite your company website as the source). But there is more to infographics than just SEO and branding. They’re actually powerful marketing tools that can help you attract new audiences that will grow your business.

Curious about how to use infographics to boost your marketing? Here are a few tips on maximizing your marketing ROI from infographics:

Infographics don’t have to be lengthy

An infographic, by definition, is the use of images + graphics to tell a story. It is not uncommon for marketers to create infographics that are several thousand pixels long. But successful infographics do not always have to be lengthy. If you have insightful blog posts or research articles on your website, you may look at creating infographics to summarize the points made.

Millennial readers have very short attention spans and the use of infographics in your blog posts help with better engagement and retention. When you provide bite-sized content, it tends to get shared more than text-only content. It also takes fewer resources to create small infographics. However, the ROI from using such assets on a blog post can be extremely high.

Seeding your infographics

When it comes to marketing, the adage, “Build it and they will come” is never true. For maximum ROI from infographics, it is important to seed your content across multiple channels and platforms. You may, for instance, publish a blog post focusing solely on your infographic as well as share it on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. To do get the full “growth” from your infographics, you should do this with each one you create (not just one!).

It is important to tweak your infographics for each platform if you want maximum returns.

  • Blogging: On blogs, it is a good idea to test different titles to test reader engagement.
  • Social media: Hashtags are absolutely vital for platforms like Twitter, Instagram and Facebook. Some marketers recommend the use of as many as 25 to 30 hashtags to maximize reach. Hashtags are used for discovery and can help your posts reach as many targeted users as possible.
  • Email marketing: If you have a mailing list, you may also use your infographics within your messages to trigger interest and increase click-throughs.

Create topical infographics

While it is true that infographics can convey information more effectively than text, marketers also need to acknowledge the sheer saturation in the amount of content produced each day. There are dozens of infographics on every conceivable idea today and this can make marketing tricky.

One way to stand out from the clutter is by moving away from “evergreen” content to topical alternatives. You may pick news topics that are currently trending and create infographic that can tie these topics to your industry. For instance, cryptocurrencies were all the rage a couple of months ago when the price of Bitcoin shot up to nearly $20,000 and then took a nosedive a couple of weeks later.

If you were a financial services company, you could create an infographic comparing the volatility of Bitcoins with your own investment devices. A software company, on the other hand, could create an infographic summarizing the security issues with cryptocurrencies. The idea is to maximize your infographics ROI by investing in trending content that readers love to share.

Source: Pinterest

Target influencers

Infographics have very high user engagement potential. To maximize your infographics ROI, it is important to get it seen by people who have large audiences. This includes bloggers and social media users who are extremely active and have a larger following.

Finding the right influencer can be tricky – and the strategy can vary from one platform to another. To find influential bloggers, perform a Google search for blogs that have published infographics in your industry. For instance, a business that sells cell phone accessories could look up blogs that have infographics about smartphones. Once you have a list of blogs, sort them by their traffic metrics (using sites like Alexa).

The strategy can be a little easier on social media platforms. You may search for hashtags like #infographic or those that represent your industry. Build a list of users who enjoy a high number of likes, comments or shares. These are the influencers you should be targeting.

Once you have a list of influencers on each platform, create an outreach plan to get them to share your infographics. This may either be an organic outreach or this could also be a paid campaign. Either way, getting shared by dozens of influencers could help your content spread virally and help your marketing campaign gain traction.

Create a strategy before you create

Creating infographics can be absolutely easy with tools like Easelly. However, researching content and putting together an infographic plan can consume a lot of resources. It is absolutely important to establish a marketing strategy that will not only maximize your infographics ROI, but also makes sure that such visual content you create complement your other marketing strategies.

Author Bio: Benjamin S Powell is the founder of AdSoup, a social CRM tool that brings together customer conversations over Line, Facebook Messenger, email, live chat and Twitter direct messages under one application

The post How to Get Maximum ROI From Infographics appeared first on Create Amazing Infographics Easel.ly!.

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How to Collect Reliable Information for Your Infographic

Trying to create a compelling infographic but struggling to find reliable information? In today’s world, information found on the internet is not necessarily vetted for accuracy or even its level of objectivity.

In fact, information found in mainstream search or on social media may be biased, even though its facts and statistics are typically checked for relevance and reliability.

Whether you are a student trying to find reliable sources or a marketer looking for good information, you will need to be able to collect reliable information for your infographic (and any content you create). This way, you’ll create a highly successful infographic

Here are our tips on how to collect reliable information for your infographic:

1. Check for relevance

Check the date. This will let you know whether or not the information you are putting together is up to date and worthy of your readers’ valuable attention. Check the dates on the source articles and see how far back any statistics go.

As a general rule of thumb, many organizations don’t use sources older than five years. That’s because so much can change in today’s online world, so it’s important to have the most up-to-date information.

2. Check the intent

Understanding the intentions of the source information you are reviewing is vital. Ask yourself who the information was intended for and what their purpose was with writing it. If the purpose was to persuade the audience to take action or to think in a specific way, be wary about using that information to craft your infographic.

To test the intent behind an article or piece of information:

While you can still use statistics from an article that is highly biased, it’s important to fact check that information against other sites to make sure it’s accurate.

3. Check for opinion versus fact

If you want to post reliable information, it is vital that the information you research is factual and not someone’s opinion. That’s why we highly recommend using databases rather than random internet sources for your article. If you’re not sure which databases to use, check out our suggested list of data sources here.

4. Check the source links

A simple way to check the validity of information on the internet is to check the extensions of links. For example, .edu, .org and .gov are typically educational institutions, nonprofit organizations and government agencies that are (generally) credible. For-profit, commercial .com links can indicate other potential red flags in the reliability of the information.

5. Check for accuracy

If you want to verify whether or not your information is trustworthy, it is vital that you check your source against others. If the information you are collecting can be checked against other sources, has been reviewed by a third party and has correct grammar and spelling, there is a good chance that it is accurate and factual information. If you’ve found the information in more than one place and you’ve checked the source for reliability, it’s probably safe to use!  

To check sources for accuracy:

  •    Take key points from their article and search for it on Google. You can take pieces of the article, like “65% of people are visual learners,” and see what pops up. If more sources (hopefully .edu, .org or .gov) use that same data, it’s accurate.
  •    Follow links to the original source if available to make sure you get the data/facts from the original source.
  •    Make sure the website or article uses the actual source of the information. If they’re pulling out statistics without citing them, don’t use that information.

Most of all, if something seems too good to believe, it probably is. Do more research to refine the results and make sure that the numbers or facts you’ve found actually work.  

6. Go old school

The library is a great place to find data and information that is vetted and reliable. Just make sure that you use sources that are “timeless” or that are up-to-date. Resources and databases are also available online from most libraries, so you can research from home (or anywhere).

Most of these can’t be found for free online, but you can access them for free with your library card. Ask a librarian about your research and the type of sources you’re looking for; they’ll be happy to help!

Start finding reliable infographic data

Everyone using information from the internet must be aware of its reliability before using it to create an infographic. The information should be objective and accurate as well as easy to cross-reference to other sources. Make sure to check a variety of sources before selecting any information for your infographic, and use the steps above to ensure that you create an infographic that is both compelling and trustworthy!

The post How to Collect Reliable Information for Your Infographic appeared first on Create Amazing Infographics Easel.ly!.

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6 Science Infographics That Will Make Studying Easier

Admit it, studying Science may not be a piece of cake compared to other subjects. But once you find great resources that help you retain more information, you’ll be a pro! Science helps us understand the world a little bit better, so why not make it interesting? Here are 6 science infographics that will share interesting facts – and pique your interest in a variety of science fields.

Anatomy infographic

Are you fascinated with the study of the structures and parts of living organisms? If so, this anatomy infographic cleverly presents facts that you may not know about the human body. Did you know that the brain operates at the same power level as a 10-watt light bulb, or that the nose is able to remember 50,000 different scents? This infographic shares tons of fascinating information about our bodies.

Dinosaur infographic

If there’s one science topic that can easily attract young kids, it’s dinosaurs! (Does anyone else hear the Jurassic Park theme song playing?) From films to popular culture to books and recent discoveries, these mysterious and captivating creatures are a pleasure to study. This dinosaur infographic will take you back 250 million years, when reptiles dominated the earth, then to the Jurassic era – 199 million years ago – where Ichthyosaurus and Plesiosaurs were all over the place. This timeline infographic covers it all – even the end of the age of the dinosaurs.

Dinosaur species infographic

Another infographic about dinosaurs shows which dinosaur species roamed the different continents. The dinosaur species infographic shows actual illustrations of the dinosaurs, plus facts about their size and diet. Overall, it’s perfect for a quick scan, or great for sharing with students for a project in the classroom.

Dinosaur species infographic

Nuclear disasters in history infographic

This nuclear disasters in history infographic exposes the worst nuclear events recorded. It highlights the eve- famous Chernobyl event in 1986, where thousands of people died due to radiation exposure. Learn about other significant nuclear events in this highly intriguing historical infographic.

Artificial intelligence infographic

Robots and Artificial Intelligence (AI) have come a long way in recent years. This artificial intelligence infographic shows the progression of AI since the1950s to today. There are so many changes in technology that self-driving cars are no longer a thing of the future. Healthcare, IT and even financial services are benefitting from AI, so learn more before the robots take over!

AI infographic

Drone infographic

This aerospace and drone infographic showcases the rise of UAVs, or Unmanned Aerial Vehicles. In addition to presenting the largest drone ever built, it also included details on wingspan, maximum altitude, range – and yes, weapons. Plus, you can learn how they use drones in wartime.

Drone infographic

Whether you prefer learning about earth science or the age of dinosaurs, or the rise of the robots, we hope these science infographics intrigue you! They are great resources for students and teachers – so make sure you use these science infographics in your classroom!

The post 6 Science Infographics That Will Make Studying Easier appeared first on Create Amazing Infographics Easel.ly!.

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