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We can never have enough content. We always want another sick graphic, a GIF, a video, and we need it in specs for this platform and that platform. And we need it all ASAP.

But producing content takes time and it takes talent. Whether an organization is all in-house, all outsourced, or a combination, content needs must be thoughtfully determined. Because if you try to grind a creative team into the ground, the work will suffer and the dreaded ‘B’ word in social media and sports will rear its ugly head – you know it: burnout.

Strategy and planning are the keys to maintaining the sanity of the creative team while still having an effective, engaging, and impressive digital presence. This is the mindset that Josh Wetzel, Digital Media Specialist for Auburn Athletics, has learned and practiced in his role with the Tigers. It’s not about content for content’s sake – it’s thoughtfully figuring out the best solution for every content need in Athletics. Don’t ask for a graphic if a photo will be better, don’t write a brief for a bunch of new GIFs when you have templates that can be put to use. Starting out in Sports Information, where more stats, nuggets, articles, and game notes were always better, Wetzel had to learn the economy that comes with content in college athletics, and digital/social, in general.

“Figuring out a way to balance the content to where it doesn’t burn them out – that was a big learning curve for me because, coming as a SID, I just wanted content, content, content,” said Wetzel, who served in the military before attending Auburn first as a student before later coming back to work there full-time. “And I wasn’t taking into account what it was doing to my creators. That can create a lot of burnout really fast…I really had to learn that lesson…”

It’s further complicated by the sheer tonnage of sports in which Auburn competes – all with varying scale, schedules, and needs. They all compete for the singular Auburn Tigers brand (War Eagle!) and they all want to be churning out content constantly. Every school manages their content in their own way – some will centralized content creators, some with armies of students to help, some in which SIDs or student athletes have talents to help out, and many more variations.

But wait, there’s more. Throw in the marketing elements – selling tickets to revenue sports and driving attendance at all sports, driving donations, media relations, putting on the events/games themselves, running digital marketing, managing operations, and, yes, creating and managing content. Before your head explodes, hear how Wetzel and Auburn keeps track of it all and assures every sport is firing on all cylinders. They use what Wetzel called a ‘pod’ system. Let him explain:

“Every team has a pod and in that pod there’s a graphic designer, a videographer, a digital media representative…a marketing representative, a team representative – we all have meetings weekly and we discuss what’s going to happen,” Wetzel described.

“Specifically with basketball (for which Josh serves as the digital media rep), we’ll get together (and discuss) things coming up, things we want to highlight throughout the week…how do we best visually represent that? I have a really good relationship with my graphic designer and videographer – I’ll bounce ideas off them…’What’s going to best tell the story in this situation’? Every team kind of has that.”

It’s an understatement to say digital and social media now have a place at the table. Everyone from the recruits of tomorrow to the Athletic Director to the President of the University have a stake in what goes out on the Auburn Tigers social media channels. Particularly sport-by-sport, the head coach often leads the way, however, at many schools. It remains not too uncommon for some coaches to completely (and naively) eschew social media, deeming it more trouble than it’s worth.

That’s not the case for Auburn and the teams with which Wetzel works. Talking specifically about Men’s Basketball, one of the most competitively successful of Auburn’s revenue sports in 2018-19, Wetzel described a dream situation – one in which the head coach gives them leeway to tell a positive story of the team, and appreciates the value of what they produce. When the coaches buy in, when they recognize the power of the platforms – well, that’s music to the ears of the digital and social media teams.

“With social media being a big part of recruiting – we’re involved with the staff…they kind of give us some leeway for what we need do, and they may give us some things they’d like us to push to drive the narrative,” explained Wetzel, who was right in the trenches on the digital side as Pearl and the men’s basketball team made a run to the Final Four. “It’s just been awesome to work for [head coach] Bruce Pearl…He really appreciates everything everybody does… A little thankfulness goes a long way and Bruce Pearl does a great job of showing his appreciation for his support staff.”

Sure, it’s easy to welcome the video and content team with open arms when you’re having perhaps the best season in the history of the program. But it’s the access and trust permitted by Pearl that helps Auburn’s digital team make magic, and drives deep connections with fans. If they avoided the melancholy moments and only captured and shared the wins, if they didn’t share the emotion and desire of the players, it diminishes how much the fans feel and how much they ultimately care. By the end of their magical March Madness run, Wetzel could look back knowing fans went on that emotional roller coaster ride with them, and that’s what kept those ties stronger than ever and will create an everlasting bond to the Tigers. Wetzel gives an example to underscore this mindset:

“Like, when we lost by 30-something points at Kentucky, Coach Pearl let us in the locker room postgame, and we put out a video from that moment,” Wetzel recounted to me. “We want to show those hard moments – that’s something a lot of teams don’t do, they don’t show the hard moments, so their fans kind of rise and fall with the momentum.

“If you can bring in those hard moments, it humanizes everybody and everybody feels like they’re actually on a ride. We established that relationship through the season, so when we were in the locker room postgame after (the SEC Championship), that was normal and that’s great.”

In the end, it’s all about making your fans feel like they’re part of the story, getting them to buy in and invest emotionally. That’s the North Star that can guide the economy necessary in content strategies and lead to the ultimate goal, as Wetzel stated, to ‘visually represent’ the brand, the team, the story, the moment.

Every piece of content that fills your feeds takes preparation, thought, strategy, and planning. All of that content is created for a reason and the way it looks and feels, and the message it conveys – that’s all done intentionally, too. Wetzel is living these decisions every day, guiding strategy by that guiding beacon – to expand and strengthen the Auburn brand, to widen and deepen the connection with fans and keep them screaming ‘War Eagle’ with all their heart.

LISTEN TO MY FULL CONVERSATION WITH JOSH WETZEL

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On episode 145 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Josh Wetzel, Digital Media Specialist for Auburn Athletics.

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher.

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Listen to episode 145 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast with Josh Wetzel, Digital Media Specialist, Auburn Athletics.

https://watercooler1.files.wordpress.com/2019/06/dsmsports_joshwetzel.mp3

70 minute duration. Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Stitcher

Posted by Neil Horowitz Follow me on Twitter @njh287   Connect on LinkedIn

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On episode 144 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Rob Schack, Vice President for Reuters Sports

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher.

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Ever since there have been sports, there have been sports partnerships. The admission to sporting events held at the Roman Coliseum was typically free – often sponsored by Roman politicians looking to curry favor with the public.

The forms of entertainment and things that capture public attention has multiplied exponentially since the days of Ancient Rome, as have the ways for people – or, more commonly these days, businesses and brands – to activate a partnership. Yet, sports remains at the center of sponsorship. And sports teams and leagues now operate extensive ecosystems of partners that deliver tangible and intangible value for the businesses that pay millions for the right to co-mingle with a league, its teams, and its fans.

At the recent Leaders Week conference, Rahul Kadavakolu, Executive Director of international brand and prominent sports sponsor Rakuten, beautifully articulated three key factors behind why a brand like Rakuten chooses to invest as a partner in sports, all strengthened by the unique, powerful emotional ties that bind fans (consumers) to their favorite teams and athletes, and to the brands with whom they partner.

Brand Awareness

It has been well-documented that sports remains one of the best ways to reach masses of engaged, attentive eyeballs on a consistent basis. And that’s why you see brands – big and small – investing in sports to help get their name out there. YouTube TV plastered themselves all over the World Series and now finds themselves on the jerseys of Major League Soccer club LAFC, while everyone that follows hockey now knows PPG Paints thanks to them putting their name on the Pittsburgh Penguins’s home arena. And it’s why Elk Grove Village continues to sponsor the ‘Makers Wanted’ Bowl, and even why an international powerhouse brand like Rakuten, seeking more US awareness, finds themselves on the Golden State Warriors jerseys and spending money on a clever Super Bowl ad. Impressions and eyeballs may be softer metrics, when awareness is the KPI, the scale and engagement that sports offers is a helluva value prop for partners.

Brand Preference

In less crowded industries, the frequency of impressions and awareness detailed in the last point can drive business simply because, well, they may not know a ton of paint brands off their top of their head, but PPG Paints sticks with them. Then, in verticals where more options are more well-known, sports represents an avenue to drive consumer preference. This happens a number of ways we see every day in sports sponsorship – demonstrations, free sampling, first time trials or discounts, team-branded products, and players/teams using the product or service themselves. The emotions play a role, too, as many fans will opt for one brand over another simply because they do sponsor their favorite player or team. It’s why sponsors love NASCAR, in which 65% of fans surveyed were more likely to consider a product or service if they see it’s the “Official ‘x’ of NASCAR.” And perhaps all those fans of ‘Dub Nation’ will bookmark Rakuten on their browser or in their minds instead of opting for Amazon.

Brand Extension

This is a quickly emerging element of sports partnerships – as sponsors of the same team or league congregate together, learn from each other with how they’re activating their partnerships, and often find and activate upon synergies or co-branded activations. It’s why you’re starting to see more teams host sponsorship summits the last few years and multi-brand promotions like a sweepstakes that involve purchasing a Coca-Cola product at a Pilot Flying J or perhaps even a company like Rakuten offering a discount on a fan’s next purchase of a Nike product on their site (both of these are hypothetical examples). Brand extension means partners can be so much more than the sum of their parts when they work together to win over the fans’ hearts, minds….and wallets. And sports offers entry into a community of sponsors unlike any other avenue.

Many of us who have worked in sports business don’t know it without sponsorship comprising a key piece of the pie. RFP’s come in, deals are renewed or reworked over decades, and certain categories continue to spend a huge portion of their marketing budgets on sports partnerships. And it was illuminating to hear from one of the world’s biggest companies on what makes sports special for them. So, why sports? I encourage you to watch the full video snippet below and you’ll understand the answer to that question.

In order to build a brand…there’s a certain emotional quotient that’s required. We believe that sports can do that better than other platforms.”

Great overview of why sports – brand awareness, brand preference, brand extension. #sportsbiz #LeadersWeekpic.twitter.com/9FVmbyiKmQ

— Neil Horowitz (@njh287) May 21, 2019

Want to learn more about the Leaders group? Check out their site

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Listen to episode 144 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast with Rob Schack, Vice President, Reuters Sports.

https://watercooler1.files.wordpress.com/2019/05/ep143-dsmsports-robschack.mp3

57 minute duration. Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Stitcher

Posted by Neil Horowitz Follow me on Twitter @njh287   Connect on LinkedIn

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It’s always easier when the team is winning. The engagement rate goes up, the growth surges, and it seems like every post and piece of content performs.

But, as anyone that works in sports business knows, counting on a winning is not a strategy. Brandon Naidus knows this all too well. Naidus led social media for the Arizona Cardinals and Jacksonville Jaguars of the NFL, but ignominiously never experienced a season with a team better than .500. So, yeah, he knows a thing or two about social media strategy without the benefit of a winning team. It’s the challenging times, however, that reveal the roots of why fans care for the team, and how social strategy ultimately comes to down stories.

Naidus learned quickly as he got going in Jacksonville. The Jags weren’t winning a lot, but Naidus knew there were things happening on the field every game giving fans reason to cheer, and the team was in a good position to use social media to augment and frame the story they wanted to tell about a young, talented team on the rise.

“When you have those disappointing seasons, the focus then becomes what are your storylines?,” said Naidus, who noted the Jags had exciting players like wide receivers Allen Hurns and Allen Robinson to go with just-drafted 1st round quarterback Blake Bortles. “It was the story of telling the story of this young team…It was an exciting time in the sense that those guys were putting up big numbers.”

It was a much different story when Naidus got to Arizona – the Cardinals were perennial contenders and weren’t far removed from coming oh-so-close to winning a Super Bowl. They were poised, and picked by many, to make another deep playoff run the season Naidus arrived. But seasons don’t always go as predicted. Losses and injuries piled up, and Naidus and the social media team had to scramble a bit out of the pocket.

“So people were kind of (saying) their window is closed, so the optimism was definitely down,” he said as the team began to fall short of the preseason positive expectations. “It’s – ‘What are people talking about that we can talk about?’ 2016 it was [running back] David Johnson, 2017 it was [linebacker] Chandler Jones.

Most sports biz pros will agree that even the angriest, loudest fan base is better than a silent one. And Naidus noted that the fans were indeed vocal, but not all positive. So, he had to be savvy when activating storylines on social. You still work for the team and want to portray your players and team in the best light possible, because those are the players you work with every day on content, too.

“Obviously, there are other things they’re talking about that we’re not going to talk about” he explained. “…I always try to lean toward being as positive as possible, because you always have to have those relationships within the organization…”

Every season will have its winning teams and its losing teams, its pleasant surprise teams and those that disappoint. The playing field is further affected by varying sizes, budget, and overall resources for social media teams. But most coaches will tell you that you have to worry about your own team first, to get the most out of your players, resources, and stories. And that’s how Naidus approached social media strategy with his clubs, executing a successful game plan that fit their teams, their goals, and their fans. It’s your team’s story to own, to tell, and to craft the best way you can.

“I think the best thing you can use analytics for is how to implement in your own strategy rather than comparing yourself to everybody else…” said Naidus. “I think every team has different objectives and different resources [which can skew comparing with other teams, even more so when team performance is accounted for].”

Every team enters the season with plans to go 16-0 and then make a run to the Super Bowl, right? But, for the love of David Tyree, no team has yet completed that goal. So the only thing we can count on is our ability to find and craft stories worth telling. That transcends wins and losses.

LISTEN TO MY FULL INTERVIEW WITH BRANDON NAIDUS

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On episode 143 of the Digital and Social Media Sports Podcast, Neil chatted with Brandon Naidus, Digital Communications for the City of Orlando.

What follows are some snippets from the episode. Click Here to listen to the full episode or check it out and subscribe in iTunes or Stitcher.

Read Full Article
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Listen to episode 143 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast with Brandon Naidus, Digital Communications for The City of Orlando, previously social media for the Jacksonville Jaguars and Arizona Cardinals NFL clubs.

https://watercooler1.files.wordpress.com/2019/05/brandonnaidus.mp3

93 minute duration. Show format contains separate parts. Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Stitcher

Posted by Neil Horowitz Follow me on Twitter @njh287   Connect on LinkedIn

Read Full Article
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Listen to episode 143 of the Digital and Social Media Sports podcast with Brandon Naidus, Digital Communications for The City of Orlando, previously social media for the Jacksonville Jaguars and Arizona Cardinals NFL clubs.

https://watercooler1.files.wordpress.com/2019/05/dsmsports_143-brandonnaidus.mp3

93 minute duration. Show format contains separate parts. Subscribe to the podcast via iTunes or listen on Stitcher

Posted by Neil Horowitz Follow me on Twitter @njh287   Connect on LinkedIn

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