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Self proclaimed "High-Fashion Nightmare" May May Graves brings her world of horror to life through her debut EP "Monsters". Combined with the industrial strength of Angelspit's Zoog Von Rock, "Monsters" is the first peek under the bed into a world of punk-rock slashers, murderous sirens, and seductive spirits.


“My vocal training was screaming my way through punk shows that I would host in hotel rooms before I was old enough to get into clubs! Add that to the brutal distorted production from Zoog Von Rock and you get a dream wrapped in a beautiful bout of sleep paralysis. The sound is BRUTAL with a touch of insanity. If Freddy Krueger's daughter sang about her daddy issues, you would hear the same smoothness with a hint of absolute rage.”

-May May Graves



"I've been a fan of May May for years. Not only is her voice powerful with a smooth lining, but she is also a solid song writer. I finally got the chance to work with her on her third release “Monsters” - a beautiful and deadly homage to her many murderous musical influences like Rob Zombie, The Birthday Massacre, Mindless Self Indulgence, Nine Inch Nails, and Peaches.”

-Zoog Von Rock


May May Graves new EP "Monsters" - 5 Tracks + Remixes - YouTube


​Billed as the "genderfuck of your nightmares", May May quit her job as a Church of Christ preacher in 2011 to be in a punk band….it all goes downhill from there.

The year is now 2018 and May May Graves has solidified her place in the DWF burlesque and drag scene and has toured stages across America, disappointing billions and captivating few with her dark, witty, and macabre stage presence. In doing that, she was the First Drag Queen to be crowned EVIL QUEEN OF BURLESQUE in 2015 and was even the First Drag Queen featured at the Dallas Burlesque Festival 2014. Her dark, macabre, and campy fetish themed performances have captivated and terrorized audiences across the country.
Pre-order on Kickstarter today and receive 5 tracks injected with harsh stomping beats, grinding bass and lyrical terror!

"Lights out baby, the night is ours!"



The Drag Enthusiast
Instagram: @dragenthusiast
Twitter: @dragenthusiast

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Photo by: Angelo S. Ortiz Vela

Houston, TX is very well known for an out of this world drag scene with well rounded performers of different genres of drag. Regina Blake-Dubois is a queen that gives a little bit of everything and shes taken the Houston drag scene by storm. She hosts her own show, "The Broad's Way", at Michael's Outpost every week. She recently brought the Houston community together and raised thousands of dollars during the tragedy of Hurricane Harvey for hurricane relief over Facebook live. She spends her time uplifting her community and she has a blast while doing it. Regina deserves more recognition than shes given and she was ecstatic to do this interview. Enjoy!

1. Who is Regina Blake-Dubois? 


Regina is that sarcastic aunt that helps you with your homework while also teaching you how to smoke out of an apple, all while endless showtunes play in the background. She's also this badass suit of armor that protects my sweet squishy interior when I'm out.



2. When and why did you begin doing drag? 

I started 3 and a half years ago, at the end of my freshman year of college. My roommate and I had been watching season six of RPDR, and we would turn to each other and say "hey we can do that!" He quit a few months later, and I'm still stuck swirling in this hell-hole and loving it!



3. How did you come up with your drag name? 

So the show "Once Upon a Time." This show fucked me UP. The evil queen in it was EVERYTHING. A sassy, powerful bitch that commanded attention when she walked in a room, took no shit from anyone, and had the most amazing wardrobe. She was all I wanted to be as a drag queen, and her name was Regina. Thorne comes from "Revenge," another ABC show that I eventually stopped watching. The main character was on a crazed path to avenge her father's death, but was also a sophistacted socialite in the Hamptons, and her name was Emily Thorne. DuBois (du-bwah, not du-boys) is a family name, given to me by our family mother Irene DuBois about a year and a half ago.



Photo by: Andres Garcia/Dulce Strutts

4. What would you say is your most unique quality? 

Im a Broadway queen, through and through. For almost 10 months, 95% of my performances have been from a Broadway show. I'm a very dramatic person, and that translates well in my drag. Not only do I DO Broadway, I can SELL Broadway. In Houston (in most of the South tbh) most popular drag requires a pageant title or a sickening dance number filled with death drops. I don't do that. I take a Broadway number, dissect it, figure out the emotion behind it, and spill all of into my performamces. Oh, and I'm always 100% on my lip sync. 



5. What is your favorite and least favorite thing about drag? 

My favorite thing is how drag is the best example of all the artforms coming together. Fashion, makeup, and hair are all given, but drag also includes sound design, painting, sculpting, dancing, singing sometimes, playing instruments sometimes, it can literally be ANYTHING!
My absolute least favorite thing is the drama. There's a reason they're called Drama QUEENS, y'all! I do a good job of avoiding drama at shows, or drama on Facebook, but you see it everywhere. I don't understand why this small section of an already targeted community spends so much time arguing about petty shit backstage or in facebook comments.



6. What should people expect when coming to your show "The Broad's Way"? 

Lots of puns, dad jokes, and horrible segways. Also, lots of awkward tales about things that have happened to me. 75% of my comedy is self-deprecating. But also, TBW is unique because we have both drag entertainers AND live singers at every show

Photo by: Angelo S. Ortiz Vela

7. How would you say drag changed your life? 

2 ways. I'm finally confident, and I'm finally happy. I think that says everything.



8. What is something you haven't told anyone but you think people need to know about you? 

I hate going out. Between my day job as a stage manager and working multiple bookings each week, I don't have the time or energy to do it. And when I do go out, I normally latch on to the friend who invited me, and if we get separated at some point I'm basically useless. So if you see me out when I'm not in face, take a picture. It's  a rare sight.



9. Do you have any hidden talents...if so, what are they? 

Deep-thr... um.
Actually I'm pretty solid at video games. Everyone's got a vice!

Photo by: Andres Garcia/Dulce Strutts

10. If you could pick 3 other artists to show appreciation for in the Houston drag scene, who are they and why should we show appreciation towards them? 

#1 is always Dessie Love Blake. I don't know a more polished, professional queen. She's helped launch the careers of so many queens in Houston through the 12 different drag races that she has hosted. I can also say that she works more and harder than any other queen I know, she's got a wonderful business head towards drag, and I look up to her more than anyone.

#2 would have to be Tatiana Mala-Niña. This is a queen that I have watched perform since I was just a little gay boy watching amateur drag shows in awe. She's worked her padded ass off to get to where she is now. I remember her being one of the first queens I saw go from amateur to supporting themselves completely on their drag. Plus she's fucking hilarious, the master of spoken word, and one of the strongest women I know.

#3 would be my younger drag sister, Roofie DuBois. I give her lots of shit, all the time, but I'm incredibly impressed by her. I was there for her first performance, she did Miranda Sings and looked HORRIBLE. Over the next year and a half though, she refined her brand and has become one of the youngest queens to build a large following in the city. She's more accomplished than I give her credit for.



11. Recently Houston dealt with Hurricane Harvey and you decided to spend days at a time in full drag on Facebook live to raise money for hurricane relief. How did you come up with the idea and how much money did you raise altogether? 

Thankfully my apartment didn't get flooded or damaged by Harvey, but we were still trapped inside for almost a week. And after 3 days of not doing anything except watching the news and seeing the damage elsewhere,  I decided to get off my ass and help. With assistance from my neighbor Jessica and our friend Allison, we put together a mini-studio in her apartment and 4 hours later we were live. I decided to ask people to tip performamces that happened during the stream, and all proceeds went to the Hurricane Harvey Relief Fund. Between those tips, and contributions from Dessie Love Blake and Rumors Beach Bar in Galveston, we raised $3000 in 9 hours. Our second broadcast, we were live for another 12 hours and raised an additional $1800.



12. Do you have a most embarrassing moment from when you were onstage? If so, what is it? 

I once performed Tove Lo's song "Like Em Young." However, my concept was a slutty teacher going after her students, and it wasn't picked up by the audience. Plus I kept tripping on my heels and the stage, my outfit kept malfunctioning, and Willam (my #1 fave) was in the audience. I walked off stage, started crying, grabbed my bag and ran out of the club.

Photo by: Angelo S. Ortiz Vela

13. What would you say is the most rewarding thing about being a drag performer? 

Being the host of a show made me realize that hosting a show is a skill that's very specific, and not everyone is good at it. I, however, am bomb as hell at it. Becauee of that, I get to first-hand watch audience members show up and experience the performances. As the show continues, you can literally see people's moods improve (and not just becauee they're drinking). Drag brings people joy, plain and simple.



14. If you could pick one place to travel to for a booking, where would you go and why? 

NEW YORK CITY! Manhattan, Brooklyn, Queens, I want to work anywhere in the place that will inevitably be my home. If you're from NYC, you should book Houston's PREMIER Broadway Queen to come perform!!



15. What is your best advice for performers who are just starting drag? 

I've got lots here so let me just advice-vomit.
1) Keep your drama off Facebook. I've put people on a ""Never Book Him/Her/Them" list because they start shit online.
2) You never know who's watching. Be polite, be professional, be personable.
3) Always be looking for the next step. Don't keep performing at amateur nights for 2 years if you're serious about drag. Go to other shows, meet show directors, express interest in working on their show. If you don't speak up, they probably won't hire you.
4) Asking to borrow bobby pins/hairspray/nail glue/etc once is ok. But asking a second time, at a different booking, is unprofessional and means you're unprepared.

Photo by: Angelo S. Ortiz Vela

Follow Regina:
Instagram: @reginablakedubois 
Twitter: @ReginaBDubois 


The Drag Enthusiast
Instagram: @dragenthusiast
Twitter: @dragenthusiast





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Originially from Denver, but currently reigning from the nightlife scene of Colorado Springs, CO, Anka Shayne admits that drag changed her life by ridding her of her internalized homophobia. She is known for changing up her looks and is most definitely not a one trick pony. Her dedication and love for the craft is untouchable and certainly hasn't gone unnoticed in the ever changing drag scene. She dreams of eventually performing in cities such as Chicago and sharing her work with a wider audience.



1. Who is Anka Shayne?

It’s hard to say! It really depends on the day. My style goes from fishy queen to literal fish. I love everything from to glamour to trash to old Hollywood to horror. Since I am able to transform myself into something or someone else, I try to change whatever I’m transforming into every time.



2. When and why did you begin doing drag?

The end of May is Anka’s third birthday. I’ve always been a creative person and have tried every artistic medium I could find but nothing ever held my attention for too long. I started drag because I loved the art form. If I start getting bored with one aspect, I can change my focus to keep me going. Hair, makeup, costumes, music, performing! Drag is endless.



3. How did you come up with your drag name?

I came up with Anka first. I have always been really drawn to very Eastern-European sounding names, they’re soft and feminine but also have a strength and (for lack of a better word) harshness to them. I love the contrast. So, I came up with Anka by just searching for Eastern-european baby names! I added a last name later, “Overkill”, but that stupid minion movie came out and the main character and I had the same last name! Not wanting to associate myself with minions, obviously, I started wracking my brain for a quick replacement. Rose McGowan’s character in Jawbreaker is one of my all time favorites, I tried on her character’s last name and it worked. I only realized after i decided that Anka Shayne was sort of punny. My tucking skills are pretty impeccable so being Danke Schoen without the d just works.



4. What is your favorite and least favorite thing about doing drag?

I LIVE for the moment when a look is finally completely put together and its just like “I did that!”. I… despise… padding. I like how my body looks with or without pads and I switch it up often. I don’t know if for some reason the tights just cause me more pain than normal or if I am just a complete baby but I find padding to be excruciating. I regularly (and unintentionally) cause myself to bleed while doing drag, I have bruised ribs and gone so hard that I have to limp back to the dressing room but none of it compares to padding. 



5. How has drag changed your life?

Before drag, I had A LOT of internalized homophobia and a general distaste for men. I had NO gay friends and NO male friends. The only gay or male people I would have in my life were people I was dating. Drag has forced me to deal with all of this. I finally have people in my life that I can actually relate to. Nearly 30 years is a long time to go without that. 



6. What would you say is he biggest misconception about the drag community? 

That we’re all bitches. I was terrified of drag queens even after starting drag until I got to know people in the community. I used to be afraid to even speak to a queen when it turns out that most of us do really love to hear from fans. I’m just playing dress up and while I will be proud of my art, I’m always a little taken aback when someone else likes it too. 



7. What is your most unique quality?

As a queen… my obsession with glue. I nearly always have something (beyond lashes, nails and wigs) glued to me when I’m in drag. Anything from actual stickers (and nothing else) as a costume to fake vomit to prosthetics and everything in between. Locally, I’m sort of known as the glue queen, people regularly reach out to me to ask what sort of glue they should use for different things. It’s such an absurd thing to be known for so I’m completely here for it.



8. What is something that no one knows about you?

Good question. I drink too much and talk too much to really have any secrets. People are generally surprised to learn that I’m kind of a rabid football fan and crazy dog lover, though.



9. Where do you get most of your inspiration from?

It truly depends on the individual look or performance. I will get inspired by a song, or a piece of fabric or a picture or a word and then piece everything together from there. The most common thing I get inspired by is themes. Themes for certain shows, or nights at the club or just following along with competitions have inspired some of my personal favorite looks (like my crystal castle and hairless cat looks)



10. What are 3 makeup products that you absolutely cannot live without? 

1. Kryolan Supracolor in clown white. 
2. Ben Nye Lumiere in Ice.
3. ABH Dipbrow.



11. If you could describe your drag persona in one word, what would it be?

If I could, I would but I don’t think I can. Trash seems so predictable but if I HAD to choose… trash.



12. If you could change something about the drag community, what would it be and why?

I would love to see drag open up to a world beyond bars and nightclubs. The late nights and partying can be fun but it can also be exhausting. I’d love to have more options which would give the art more exposure. 



13. If you could travel anywhere to perform, where would you go and why?

I am absolutely dying to perform in Chicago. I can just feel that scene calling me name. I love all the queens from there that I’ve met. An overwhelming majority of the queens I look up to are from there. I think I could be embraced but also pushed there.



14. What is a big goal you have set for yourself for your drag career in the future?

Performing in Chicago is definitely up there. Of course, RPDR would be amazing. However, filming an episode of Transformations with James St. James is a HUGE goal for me right now.



15. What is your biggest guilty pleasure?

Hibernating in my room during the few weekdays that I’m not doing drag. 



Follow Anka Shayne:
Instagram: @anka_shayne 

The Drag Enthusiast:
Instagram: @dragenthusiast
Twitter: @dragenthusiast
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Many performers take their inspiration from something beautiful. Abhorra is a different story. She finds her best material when taking inspiration from the ugliest items you could possibly find. A lot of her inspiration comes from icons like John Waters and Divine, and she never fails to stand out in a crowded room. She says one of her goals is to be the most interesting looking trash queen in the room, and from the looks of it, she doesn't seem to ever disappoint.

 
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Most major cities have a drag scene that is booming, including different YouTube channels, drag blogs, and podcasts to go with it. NYC has "Grizzly Kiki", LA has "UnBEARable", and Colombus, OH has "Drag Cast" with Nina West. Most recently, though, the Chicago drag scene has garnered tons of attention and is known for being one of the most diverse and accepting drag communities to ever exist. It for sure has different outlets, but there was yet a need for a podcast. That's up until now...with "Thots & Shares".


"Thots & Shares" is the podcast that has been started by Chicago mastermind, Dakota Conduct. Every Tuesday, a new episode will appear online and it will cover the Chicago LGBT scene and how it is evolving in today's turbulent world and will feature some of the many incredible musicians, drag performers and sexy thots the Chicago LGBT community has to offer.. It was created to start positive dialogue not only among the Chicago community, but those who support Chicago's ever fast growing scene.

Who is Dakota Conduct?
Dakota Conduct is new to the Chicago drag scene but has already left her mark on the city. As a corporate strategy professional by day, and drag queen by night, Dakota Conduct not only slays on stage but has a knack for marketing, networking, and media production. She has been featured in music videos, a full-length documentary, been the subject of artists at the Lillstreet Art Center, and has performed all over North America, from LA to New Orleans to Montreal. She is originally from Washington DC, lived in New York City, but now calls Chicago home and the best city in the world.



“We live in politically turbulent times,” Dakota Conduct says. “I started drag as a response to the Trump presidency. This is my way of resisting. And under this administration we have seen such a lack of dialogue through social media platforms and the spread of fake news. This show, while bringing the underground scene of drag to light for those unfamiliar with it, is also dedicated to having conversations on topics that matter to the Chicago community. We want to get debates out of the comments section and into actionable, positive dialogue.”


So, why exactly did Dakota start "Thots & Shares", you ask?
"I'll come out and say it: Chicago has THE best drag scene in the world. We are home to some of the biggest and best names in drag, to some of the most talented kings and queens, and we showcase variety like no other city. We welcome bearded queens, big girl queens, club kid queens...you name it, it's in Chicago. But we don’t have a place to have raw dialogue on what is going on in the city and how drag is evolving. I am setting out to create that space." -- Dakota Conduct


Scarlet Bar, located at 3320 N Halsted St in Chicago, will be hosting an official launch party on Sunday, November 12th, from 1-3pm. It will feature a drag show with performances by Kat Sass, Veronica Pop, Melee McQueen (from Milwaukee), Electra Cute, Blonde Benet, and Auntie Heroine.


Follow Dakota Conduct:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DakotaConduct
Instagram: @dakotaconduct


Listen to the first Episode of "Thots & Shares" featuring Chicago's very own Lexi Pro Cute:

Website: http://thotsandshares.com/2017/…/05/episode-1-lexi-pro-cute/
iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/thots-shares/id1301425186?mt=2#episodeGuid=tag%3Asoundcloud%2C2010%3Atracks%2F352288463


Follow Thots & Shares on social media:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/thotsandshares/
Instagram: @taspodcast


The Drag Enthusiast
Twitter: @DragEnthusiast
Instagram: @DragEnthusiast
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dragenthusiast
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Mother of the Strange Doll Haus, Electra Cute is determined to set up her drag family for success and navigate the drag world while staying true to who she is as an artist and also encouraging her family to grow with confidence. She's very well known for her style and audience interaction during her performances and she also takes her role of a mentor quite seriously. A mixture between goth girl and cougar mom, she definitely doesn't disappoint. 

Photo by Flaming City Photography

1. Who is Electra Cute?

Electra Cute is first and foremost the mother and founding member of Strange Doll Haus, Chicago’s premiere drag family. When she's not nurturing talent she can be found performing monthly all over the city such as Logan Square, Uptown, Andersonville and Lakeview. Electra’s aesthetic falls somewhere between the goth girl in high school all the boys secretly wanted and your friend’s hot cougar mom. Her electric performance style is high energy, powerful, sexy and known for her audience interaction. I feel like a lot of Electra comes from different parts and layers of my personality. 


2. How did you come up with your drag name?

Well when I first started drag my name was Samantha Darko (after Donnie Darko's sister and I happen to have dated a lot of girls named Samantha) but as I started going out I realized I was just getting called Samantha and I didn't think it had enough energy for me and when I mentioned that to my boyfriend Zach he suggested Electra Cute and I feel in love right away and never looked back.


3. When and why did you begin doing drag?

The very start of my drag had to be cosmetology school and falling in love with the beauty industry, then I found Drag Race. If anyone remembers they showed the first season or two on VH1 and that was my girlfriend Sam and my favorite channel at the time and I’m not ashamed to say that I was absolutely inspired by Drag Race and the artistry it presented. Fast forward like a year and a half and insert learning good makeup skills. Shortly after I started going out I was introduced to my eldest drag daughter, Fox E. Kim, and started to teach her what I knew about drag makeup and our friendship quickly blossomed and so did both of our drag. A little later we ended up at FABITAT...Lucy Stoole's show where Fox E was asked to perform on a whim and absolutely slayed me and inspired me to start performing myself. Lucky for me, Lucy Stoole reached out and gave me my first performance opportunities...thus my entrance into the drag community. She kind of showed us the ropes a bit and gave us encouragement.



4. What is something that sets you apart from other performers?

My energy and stage presence and ability to work every damn corner of the stage or floor or what have you without being much of a dancer. My first performances were mostly just crazy energy practically moshing myself onstage to a song I liked ending up shoeless and wigless on the ground. I have since refined that while keeping a similar in your face attitude with how I approach a crowd. As a drag haus something that sets us apart is the spaces we take over, like our regular show in Logan Square at Slippery Slope is a total takeover of a not typically seen as queer space and I think spreading drag to all types of people and places is really important and extremely fun!


5. If you could travel anywhere in the world to perform, where would you go and why?

This is an easy one! Literally everywhere, I haven’t done a lot of international travel in my life and would cherish the opportunity to experience that...worldwide drag culture is exploding and the more of that I can experience the better person and queen I will be. I have however started to take my drag to a few other states with my drag family Strange Doll Haus...such as Iowa, Wisconsin and South Dakota and am always trying to get us booked in new places around the country.


6. What is one thing you would change about the drag community?

I'd say something that really stands out is how little drag is spread around the city and shows/events can suffer sometimes when its not at your typical venue or in a designated queer space. I do think this is something that is in the process of changing with the growth of the community and the ambition of all sorts of talented individuals trying to create a space for themselves. So, really, what I would change is more shows all over the city and to see people support even the most obscure events.



7. What is your favorite and least favorite thing about doing drag?

My favorite thing about doing drag is that feeling you get right when you finish your beat and then that feeling you get right when you step on stage and then letting all your feelings out on stage and seeing people live for it. That brings me so much joy and it showers all the other good and less than good things in drag with a really pleasing warmth. I also love the endless creativity that comes out of me doing drag. My LEAST favorite thing about doing drag would definitely be the mess. I’m already a less than organized person and adding an entire elaborate wardrobe on top of that is like an avalanche of mess.


8. What is something that sets apart Chicago drag from everywhere else?

I think being the 3rd largest city in america makes us feel like we have something to prove to the bigger cities that we can keep up and put out fierce drag and to the smaller cities that we can be just as much of a hub for talent as say New York. It makes us shine, and it's the drive to be something collectively great and have our space be known that has pushed the talent to the level its at now.


9. How did the Strange Doll Haus start? 

I have always been a close friends kind of person, relying on a base group for my general social needs. Getting into drag, I realized that not only was it a huge community, but also there are close families and that was an instant draw. The whole time I was teaching myself drag, all I wanted was friends to learn with...but my social anxiety really blocked me from making many friends and beginning to learn before I was 21 added a level of difficulty. So once I was of age and I had met my eldest daughter, Fox E. Kim, my social life grew and my confidence grew. I started to reach out to some of my particularly pretty clients that I thought would be good queens, it should also be noted that the first 3 members of Strange Doll Haus I met through my day job doing hair. Once there were 4 of us all together and we were starting to do stuff together, I added the house name Strange Doll Haus, which I think is really fitting for all of the queens that have been involved. Since then we have all grown close and challenge and inspire each other with just a little shade ;)



10. What would you say is your favorite quality about each of the other members of the Strange Doll Haus? (Fox E, Lexi, Mikki) 

I’m just going break this down one by one and in family age order starting with the youngest, Mikki Miraj- my favorite thing about Mikki is how much of a go getter she is. I was instantly blown away by her energy and charisma and her "take charge of her own destiny" no nonsense attitude. It has taken her far already and her growth is something really magical.

Lexi Pro Cute-my one and only full drag baby. She was my client and I pushed her to do drag until she finally decided to let me put her in full drag for a hair show event and she never looked back. We get ready together probably 98% of the time and it's also one of my favorite parts of doing drag. So my favorite thing about Lexi is not a single quality...it's seeing her grow and change and adapt and learn about who she is as a queen and finding herself and her aesthetic. It's been an amazing process with her and she makes me so SO proud every day.

Fox E. Kim-I could say so much about her because she's done so much for me but I'll keep it simple….after I gush a little bit. Fox E is the fastest learner I have ever met. When I started showing her what I knew about makeup, I'd show her on one eye and then she would do it almost exactly the same on the other eye. She learned everything she could from me and has grown so much and created such a beautiful character its really amazing. I'd say my favorite quality though is her professionalism. She has a really fantastic work ethic and it's taken her so far in the community. I can honestly say I learned a lot about being a professional from her. and I'll always appreciate that.


11. Do you have a most embarrassing moment while performing? If so, what is it?

Well, to be honest, not really. My approach to drag has always had a level of trial and error so I expect myself to fuck up sometimes. I have fallen out of shoes, broken corsets, ripped off failing garment reveals, slipped on tips, spun too hard and lost my footing, lost wigs...and the list goes on. Of course I care and want to do a good job, but I really try and not be to hard on myself about my fuck ups because drag is hard. I think it's important to always try and improve though, never stop growing.


12. If you were stranded on an island, what are 3 things you would need to have with you? 

I hate this question because I’m a total realist with it. I'd want things to help me survive like 1. an extensive book on tropical plants and fish 2.lots and lots and lots of rope and 3. a really solid hunting knife. I think those things would be pretty essential to surviving on this imaginary island. Can I just say I want a huge box of survivalist equipment? I wanna live, not be pretty!



13. What is your biggest guilty pleasure?

Doing absolutely nothing occasionally in my free time. I love to binge watch TV and smoke a TON of weed and lay in bed. Not all the time but, hey that's a guilty pleasure right? 


14. What would you say is your favorite performance you've ever done? 

Hmmmm...this is a hard one because there have been so many with various feelings attached...but I think any group number I have done with my family with one or all have always been really special. Our very first family show we put together we named “sexy summer sacrifice”, and we did a couple large group numbers that told a story of us killing each other off and sacrificing our baby sister (Lexi Pro) by tearing out her heart...oh and I also cut a brain out of one of my daughters wigs so it was pretty epic. I'd also say a recent duet I did with my daughter, Lexi Pro, for the Harem of Oddities at Berlin where I shaved off her beard and threw her around on stage for a mommy dearest effect really shined in my mind, it was a really raw expression that will stick with me for a long time.


15. If you could give advice to younger queens that are just starting to perform, what would it be? 

DRAG IS A SLOW BURN!!! Don’t rush yourself or get ahead of yourself. Focus on now and growing at a comfortable speed. It can be really discouraging when you realize how hard it can be so don’t give up. Also don't be afraid to ask for things and create your own space in the community. there's not one “drag scene”in Chicago...everyone doing drag makes up a wonderful map of talent so push your pin in that map wherever you want. As a drag mother, I could go on an on because its in my heart to mentor, so I'll add one more thing...be humble and be nice, bitchy entitlement is never a cute look, so don’t wear it.


Follow Electra Cute:
Instagram: @electracutesillusion 

Strange Doll Haus:
Instagram: @strangedollhaus 

Photo Credit:
Erik Michael Kommer: @lad_of_leisure on instagram 

Interview done by: Natalie
Instagram: @urjustadrag_
Twitter: @urjustadrag 

The Drag Enthusiast
Twitter: @DragEnthusiast
Instagram: @DragEnthusiast
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dragenthusiast
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The Chicago based cosplay queen named Fox E Kim started off doing drag during a marathon and hasn’t put her brushes down yet. If you haven’t been able to catch her at her many booked gigs including Geekhaus at Berlin and LiquidBrunch at Scarlet Bar, you’re missing an unique performer who can lip sync in a wide variety of languages and with six alter egos to boot.




 1. Who is Fox E. Kim?

The ruiner of days, the harbinger of sorrow, it's Fox E. Kim! But seriously, I'm a party girl who enjoys anime, manga, and a lot of final fantasy.



2. When and why did you begin doing drag?

I started doing drag about four years ago. One day, a good friend of mine asked me to get up on stage during the Chicago marathon and dress like a bridesmaid to support marriage equality (it wasn't legal in Illinois at the time) so I did and loved it and it's sort of been a giant party ever since.


3. How did you come up with your drag name?

My drag name is actually a sort of anagram/rearrangement of my actual name. So, Michael Foxworth is my first and middle name and for the most part people were calling me Foxy/FoxyMike for the longest time. I'm also a linguist by day so I wanted my name to be somewhat clever. The E. Kim in Fox E. Kim spells Mike backwards so Fox E. Kim turns into Fox MikE. or FoxyMike. Get it? Clever, right!



4. Where does your inspiration come from?

I describe my look as a party girl ready to fucking GO. Like, I'm really into showing off my naturally big Sicilian thighs. A lot of my non-cosplay drag comes from It's interesting however, because I do a lot of cosplay, which doesn't allow me to go too far off the beaten path. With cosplay, if you aren't recognizable, you're sort of missing the mark. The balance between the two is probably the most challenging aspect of my drag but also what drives me to constantly improve.


5. What would you say is the most unique thing you have to offer?

I crochet. No, actually, I would say my ability to lip sync in a variety of languages (Japanese, Romanian, French, Spanish, some Afrikaans) opens a lot of unique doors for me and removes a lot of limitations for my performances. It also allows me to pull in original material (for example, anime looks/performances) that may not always be available to some performers.


6. What is a big future goal you've set for yourself?

I want to bring my cosplay to Japan. I love visiting there and to be able to showcase some of the anime inspired looks I've created based on Japanese culture would be amazing.



7. What is your favorite and least favorite thing about drag?

My favorite thing about drag is the transformation. It's really an escape from reality and going from frump to fab makes my day. Sometimes, I'm not feeling my fantasy but it is a fantasy that I created and at the end of the day, I'm proud of it. My least favorite thing about drag is how much 'regular' performers, hosts, etc. get compared to Ru girls. Drag race has become an end all be all for some girls and that saddens me. It's a perfectly good goal to have, but there is more to drag than just ONE TV show.


8. What does drag mean to you?

Drag is transformation. It is going from one persona to another. I'm really obsessed with the idea of having multiple alter egos (I have 6) and what it means to fully realize each one. Drag is a beautiful way of completing an alter ego that can readily be showcased to the world.


9. What is your advice for younger performers who are just starting drag?

You don't get what you don't ask for. Seriously. You're never going to get through life with just having things handed to you. Also, if you aren't being told 'no' you probably aren't asking for things big enough! Take risks and be unapologetically you. If you aren't you, people will catch on. It's just drag--have fun with it!



10. Where do you see yourself in a few years regarding your drag?

I'd like to be touring a bit more with my 'haus'es. Right now I'm doing *a lot* but I think I can reduce the total number of gigs but improve the quality and performances over all.


11. In your drag journey, what are some obstacles you’ve faced? How have you overcome them?

I've been somewhat of a lone wolf in the Chicago drag scene. I love my sisters but at the end of the day, I've always done me. This has probably caused me to miss some opportunities. I also feel like I started the game late, which has forced me to be in a constant state of playing catch up in the drag scene. To think where I would be if I started drag when I was 20 or 21! I would be so much further along my journey.


12. How long does it take you to get in drag and what all goes into your preparation?

If I oversleep, I can wear a wig with a heavy bang and paint my face in about 45-60 minutes. Usually I give up to 2 hours for makeup and 30 minutes for changing. I think it's a super valuable skill to get your 'go to' face down to about 1.5 hours. If I'm doing something more complicated (Marie Antoinette face, Goldar, prosthetics, etc.) I budget up to 3 hours. My glitter shapes also take about 90 minutes to apply so I don't always do them.



13. If you got on RPDR, who would you play for snatch game?

Easily Mary Kate Olsen. Have you watched Very Mary Kate? It's genius. I've never identified with a character so much.


14. Marry, Kill, Kai Kai, Kiss: Strange Dollhaus edition. Lexi Pro, Electra Cute, Mikki Miraj

ohhhh nooooooooooo. Okay. Kill Mikki. Marry Lexi. Kiss Electra. I'm not Kai-kai'ing with any of them ha!


15. What is your favorite part of doing charity/benefit shows?

I host Proud to Run yearly and they raise thousands of dollars for local LGBT charities. Like, this is THE reason I think people should do drag--for the community. It brings me such joy to see organizations receive the help they need and deserve to do better in the world.


16. Favorite Cosplay to date and why?

My favorite cosplay is my Yuna series from Final Fantasy. I do a reveal from FFX to FFX-2 mid performance and it wows the audience every time. To see people's faces and smiles during it reminds me why I do drag.


17. What are some future goals that you’ve set for yourself?

Stone at least a fourth of my wardrobe. Also apparently I should get a gas mask for the E6000 fumes. I know it seems like a silly goal, but it's important to freshen up your wardrobe every now and then. Also, I'd like to do ONE international performance in the next year even if it means Canada! That counts, right?


18. Dream cosplay/performance venue?

I would love to do a huge Final Fantasy show in the Akihabara district (anime area) of Tokyo. The energy, the community, everything would just be so perfect. It would truly be a dream come true.



19. What is your favorite part of being in a drag haus?

We truly do support each other even if we don't act like it. I'm an only child in real life so I haven't really had siblings before. It's been interesting being the 'oldest' daughter because I've had to set a lot of examples while still making sure to support my sisters. Despite what it may look like I do have everyone's best interests in mind, even Mikki's :-P


20. How has having a drag haus changed things for you?

It's created some amazing opportunities for me that would not be available on my own. We've started several shows in some venues around Chicago and have gotten out of town gigs together and now tour regularly. It's been an amazing journey that I wouldn't have been able to do on my own.


Follow Fox E Kim
Instagram: @foxekim
Facebook: facebook.com/foxe.kim

All photos used were captured by Joe Lewis Creative:
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/joelewiscreative/

Strange Doll Haus Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StrangeDollHaus/


Interview Done By Eich Ivy

Twitter: @ambretrishawna
Instagram: @ambretrishawna
 
 
The Drag Enthusiast
Twitter: @DragEnthusiast
Instagram: @DragEnthusiast
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dragenthusiast

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This tiny Harajuku Fairy will captivate your heart and put a spell on you. Mikki Miraj is taking Chicago by storm. This beautiful theater loving queen takes her love of video games and burlesque and incorporates it in her shows. With her own new show Dream House she's casting a spell all over Chicago and soon the world.

                                                  
                                                               Photo by Jason Kaplan

1. Who is Mikki Miraj?

Mikki Miraj is the local Harajuku Fairy Princess Doll of Chicago!

2. When and why did you begin doing drag?

I started drag May 1st of last year-- I fell into it through a musical theater job I had the previous winter. In the show I was playing a drag queen and I took my character research pretty seriously. I brushed up on my drag herstory and started watching Drag Race. The first time I put on a face and hair and looked in the mirror my breath was snatched away! I saw myself and I literally thought "DAMN. I am pretty! There's a future for me here." I then made the decision that drag was the element that had been missing from my act as a performer all along.

3. How did you come up with your drag name?

So my name is sorrrrrt of misleading. The obvious pun is on Nicki Minaj. BUT. My middle name is "McKenzie" and my online persona/handle has always been Mikki-- so I knew that that HAD to be my first name. I needed a last name and Miraj popped into my head right away! It's campy and cute, a little funny, and my fantasy illusion is my whole brand so it stuck.

                                                 
                                                               Photo by Dutchesz Gemini

4. Where does your inspiration come from?

I'm inspired by so many sources! Video Games and the Metaphysical are what drive the core of my character--with fashion/aesthetic inspired by anime, Harajuku, and my own wild imagination. Topping all of that off is my love for musical theater and storytelling through music/performance and you have my recipe card in full.

5. What would you say is the most unique thing you have to offer?

I think my versatility is probably the most unique thing I have to offer. My commitment to the many different masks I wear is the strongest part of my drag. One night I may be a sex bomb woman stomping the house down to a club banger, and the next I may be a Fairy Priestess weaving a spell of unity. Either way, you can always expect the unexpected with my act!

6. What is your most embarrassing moment?

Oh my goodness. Well, the drag I do can sometimes be high risk high reward given how skimpy my outfits usually are. Early on in my career I was still learning through trial and error and I remember I planned this great burlesque act with chair work. The wig came off, the tuck was out, and all I was wearing was a string thong at the end and I felt like such an idiot. The trade didn't seem to mind though.
         
                                    
                                                        Photo by Eric Michael Kommer


7. Who is Strange Doll Haus and what makes them unique?

Strange Doll Haus is a collection of dolls both campy and glamorous-- and always with an off the beaten path edge. I think we all have a similar commitment to appearing as both a beautiful toy and an edgy question begging to be answered at once. We're all known for our high energy no apologies performances and loud personalities!


8. If your drag persona was a superhero, what super power would you have?

Mikki Miraj is a Fairy, so her power is the manipulation of perceived reality. In layman's terms she can weave illusions. What you see, hear, smell, taste, and feel are never what you might expect in her presence. Now as for superHERO in the first place I'm not so sure-- I prefer to remain much more morally gray. (Perhaps she can fill the antihero role better?)



9. If you got on RPDR, who would you play for snatch game?

I'd to be someone totally unexpected like Kristen Chenoweth! She has such a bubbly, over the top personality and shes a theater icon! My backups would be someone equally outrageous like Glozelle Green.

                                     
Photo by Erik Michael Kommer 


10. What is your favorite and least favorite thing about drag?

My favorite thing about Drag is crafting a new story to tell every night. Every song I choose is there for a reason, and the look, down to the makeup is usually telling a new story. The thing about drag that I liked the least is navigating Social Media Land. I think social media narrows the extent we can have conversations quite a lot-and ends up being more harmful than good in a lot of discussions. Plus theres a good amount of Queens (though this isn't necessarily linked soley to drag) that LOVE to stir the pot to keep themselves relevant. I just disagree with that approach to lite--it bugs me espeically when you see talented people succumb to this urge. It's more rewarding in my opinion to rise up based on your own work and merit than by internet gimmicks.


11. What is the biggest misconception about drag in your opinion?

I think the biggest misconception about drag is that in order to be a "good drag queen" you must be EVERYTHING all at once. You must sew, and be a comedian, and be naturally beautiful, and dance, and death drop, and be out every night, and be a twitter master, and etc. etc. etc. The thing that makes us unique as individuals is the sum of our parts-- both our strengths and our weaknesses. That doesn't disappear when you are done with drag.



12. What makes the Chicago drag scene different then other places like Los Angeles or Atlanta?

I think what makes Chicago drag so amazing is all of the avenues for queens to come up and express themselves, and the abundant opportunities to create your own space out here. Competition is natural for the drag scene, but there are SO MANY well-respected ways to get your act on stage as a new queen-- and there are plenty of ways to carve out space for your art if you're a go-getter. In my first year I've started a monthly show I host so I can practice and learn, you don't get that experience everywhere! Also, no shade but bitches really are the whole package out here-- and still know how to get down and not take themselves so seriously when its time to party ;)

                                                   
                                                                     Photo by Jose A. Rios


13. Marry, Kill, Kai Kai: Lexi, Fox E Kim, Electra

Omigod I have no idea... Erm, Kai Kai with Lexi because she's as big a slut as I am... Maybe Marry Electra because she'd take care of me best as my husband-wife... And Kill Fox E?  No but I don't want any of them gone because they're my favorite people in the city to pester!


14. What is a big future goal you've set for yourself?

I want to develop merch and take myself to that next level of promotion! My next big goal in drag is to make an appearance at DragConNYC and promote myself on that platform. I really want to show up and turn it out and spread a little #Fairydrag in the city that never sleeps.
 

15. Where do you see Strange Doll Haus in the next few years?

Lowkey on a trahsy reality TV spot living our best queenly lives.


                                              
                                                                Photo by Mars Cumpian


Follow Mikki Miraj
Instagram: @mikkimiraj
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/jacob.m.gilchrist

Follow The Strange Doll Haus:
Instagram: @strange_doll_haus
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/StrangeDollHaus/ 

The Drag Enthusiast
Twitter: @DragEnthusiast
Instagram: @DragEnthusiast
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dragenthusiast 

Interview done by Kory Lyn
Twitter: @oxkoryxo
Instagram: @oxkoryxo
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/oxkoryxo


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 Bearded beauty by night, marketing genius by day, Lexi Pro will surely blow your mind. She is part of Chicago's Strange Doll Haus alongside three other talented ladies, each representing their own aesthetic and pushing each other to be better performers. Lexi's biggest inspiration is her drag mother, Electra Cute, who put her in drag for the first time 2 years ago for a fashion show, and she hasn't been able to stay away ever since.




1. Who is Lexi Pro Cute? 
Lexi is a bearded bombshell. She’s kind of like a punky pin-up who’s let her hair down. Or, more like a stripper who forgets her whole routine and makes it up as she goes. She’s sultry and she never smiles for photos (I tried it once and hated it!), but she’s really a total ditz. 

2. When and why did you begin doing drag?
I’ve always loved playing with makeup—wearing a smoky eye and slightly more-than-nude lip out to the club. I was getting my hair done by my drag mother, Matthew/Electra, for a couple of years; and the more we connected about drag, the more he encouraged me to try it for myself. Each year, Slade’s Barbershop puts on a fashion show and in Spring 2015, Matthew put me in drag for the first time wearing the most gorgeous hairpiece. I walked the runway and even got featured on the cover of Windy City Times—nip slip and all!

3. How did you come up with your drag name? 
I’ve been on antidepressants since I was 13. Ideally, I’d like to make people smile some when they see me perform.

4. Where does your inspiration come from?
Conchita. Duh. No but seriously, my drag is heavily influenced by my sexuality. I like to show off as much skin as possible, and bearded ladies like Grace Towers really inspire me to push a nonconventional aesthetic even further. Of course, smooth-faced, hyper-sexual queens like James Majesty definitely do it for me, too. I love how James is always playing with a new face. I really admire that versatility.

5. What would you say is the most unique thing you have to offer?
My beard and my fur, for sure, but also a certain shamelessness. Once I get going, I make it a point to really move my body. I’m always working to refine my performances, but I think there is something captivating about the sheer amount of energy I exude onstage.
                                                        Photo taken by Joe Lewis 

6. What is the Strange Doll Haus? 
Strange Doll Haus is one of the larger drag families in Chicago. Currently there are 4 core queens who perform together a couple of times a month—plus our Milwaukee sisters Aubrey Del Mar and Omëga. We are close friends, and that comes with a lot of love and plenty of sisterly shade. I wouldn’t trade it for anything. 

7. How long have you been a member of the Strange Doll Haus? 
I’ve been a member of Strange Doll Haus as long as I’ve been doing drag—so just over 2 years now.

8. Is there an "image" that is meant to be projected or upheld, being in the Haus?
I think we are diverse queens as far as aesthetic, but we have a similar performance style. We are “in your face” and strive to interact with the crowd as much as possible. We take over a space and try and work every inch—on and off the stage.

9. What does the Strange Doll Haus mean to you?
Strange Doll Haus is a sisterhood. We are a drag family sure, but we are also a collective of artists. We bounce ideas off one another. We understand each other’s strengths and struggles. And personally, I lose my shit when I see one of my sisters push herself in a performance—or maybe borrow something from the group that is out of her own comfort zone. 

10. You are a bearded queen. I've seen pictures of you with and without it. Is it a matter or preference or does that have anything to do with your aesthetic? 
When I first started drag, the beard was a preference. I freaked out at how fast my five o’clock shadow came in the first time I was in face, and so really you could say it was a matter of convenience. Still, I was aware that I was covering something up. 
But lo and behold, with the power of a good coral-colored concealer and about a year’s worth of practice, I tried out full fishy face for a few weeks—and then again for a month more recently. I loved contouring my tits and really got a knack for witling down my man-jaw, but I didn’t feel entirely like myself. The beard now is more of a chinstrap: I joke that it acts as great jaw contour. But really, it informs my aesthetic from the neck down. It’s freeing.

11. How has having a beard affected you as an entertainer? Have you ever faced discrimination because of it? 
Definitely. I have some gorgeous, fishy friends and going out alongside them was tough at first. I don’t “pass” in the same way, and I wasn’t having drinks bought for me from multiple (albeit sometimes sketchy) guys at the club. In fact, I lacked some of the confidence that I had out of drag as a bearded man. I think that’s kind of the opposite of queens who really come into their own and discover their inner diva when they first get in the geish.
It’s taken awhile, but now I see my drag as a “fuck you” to anyone who doesn’t get it. I recently found myself in bed with a guy who couldn’t believe I did drag: “But you’re so masculine,” he said. Well, we hadn’t done much talking. I’m furry, sure, and I’m also unabashedly femme. Owning that femininity as a bearded queen and re-evaluating my privilege within the gay and queer community has been a deeply personal experience.


                                                        Photo taken by Donna Jean

12. Describe the Chicago drag scene and how you've found your place in it. How has it shaped you, if at all? 
With all that being said, I don’t often feel discriminated against by the drag community for my beard or body hair—at least not that I’m aware of. There will be the odd comment, and I do have to explain myself at times; but I feel like I’m judged on a more meaningful set of criteria. In fact, when I shaved for awhile there were queens who didn’t even realize it at first. The scene is smart and extremely diverse, which means you really must push every unique aspect of your drag to stand out.   

13. What are some of your favorite things about the Chicago drag scene? 
For all the competition, the drag scene is supportive and collaborative in Chicago. There are many opportunities to perform in high-profile shows if you put yourself out there. And off-duty performers come out to support, too. 

14. What has been the most discouraging experience you've faced as a drag queen? 
Getting Lexi’s Facebook profile shut down. It’s super frustrating because it’s a great way to communicate and to promote shows, but I don’t know how to prove I am a bona fide bearded lady!



15. What is something you would like for people to know or simply understand about you? 
There is something slightly wrong about Lexi, and I’m learning to revel in that. I think I’m my own worst enemy: I tend to get in my head a lot, and beat myself up when things go wrong during a performance. Now, I’m not saying it’s ok to settle for being a “messy queen.” Polishing your technique is important, but I do think we could stand to take ourselves a little less seriously. The fact is that no one wants to hang with a nervous, self-conscious drag queen. 

16. What advice would you give to anyone wanting to start doing drag? 
Doing drag is incredibly specific to you. From your tuck to your makeup technique and every trick in between, you can’t always compare yourself to other queens. I am, for instance, a sweaty beast and I’ve learned to accept my boy brows popping when I draw them high and dance too hard. So I’ve experimented with new ways to draw in my brows. You have to find your own way to feel beautiful, and I’m still finding myself. Be patient.

17. Of the many crowds you entertain, are there any people or situations that stand out? Good or bad? 
Strange Doll Haus often performs at bars that aren’t traditionally “Gay” or “Drag” bars. We have a monthly show at Slippery Slope in Logan Square, and I really enjoy that crowd. There’s usually a teaching moment or two, but overall there’s a sense of wonder—maybe not as many “yas kweens” as we’re used to, but a lot of smiles nonetheless. A lot of those folks haven’t been to a drag show before, but they are open-minded and appreciative of a new experience.


18. Where do you see yourself in 5 years? 
I work in PR and Marketing when I’m not performing, and I have a mind for how my drag might influence my career. My dream would be to work for a beauty or cosmetics company. Just think of all the free make-up!

19. How does drag affect your personal life? Do you find it difficult to find and keep genuine relationships of any kind? 
I am very upfront about being a drag queen, and to date it hasn’t affected my relationships. But if I take on that second question independently of drag, we could be here all day… 
Seriously, though, I had an ex—years before I started doing drag—who lit up at the smallest things. I got into a serious dance-off at a New Year’s party and when I made it off the floor he was waiting with a rose, and told me how he was bragging to everyone that I was his boyfriend. I’d like to find someone like that, in or out of drag. But like, if they can hold my purse and collect my tips, that’s clutch. In the meantime, I have a kick-ass group of friends to support me. 

20. Who or what has influenced you the most in your drag career? 
My drag mother, Electra Cute. The amount of love and the lessons she’s taught me are astounding. I don’t think it’s a common relationship among drag queens. Sure, we talk about drag pretty constantly, but we are also best friends. We look out for each other when we are out in the scene, and we make each other better people all the time. At this point, we won’t settle for less.


Follow Lexi Pro Cute: 
Instagram: @lexiprocute

Follow The Strange Doll Haus:
Instagram: @strange_doll_haus

The Drag Enthusiast 
Twitter: @DragEnthusiast
Instagram: @DragEnthusiast 

Interview done by Brandi Lynne
Twitter: @Brandi_Lynne7
Instagram: @brandilynne7
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/castawaybrandi
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 Photo by Joe Lewis

Reigning the Chicago drag scene, C'est Kevvie has always wanted to inspire others to love themselves. She is very well known and respected as someone who is always pushing self awareness and body positivity and does even more than just that--she also is known for always recognizing other talent as well. She has an instagram account with the handle @ChicagoDragLegacy where she recognizes drag influencers in Chicago's past, present, and future. Taking inspiration from artists such as Divine, she works incredibly hard to be a conceptual drag performer and she always leaves everyone wondering what she's going to pull out of her bag of tricks next.

1. Who is C'est Kevvie? 

C’est Kevvie is the body positive art hoe.  I show off my body even if it makes people uncomfortable because it will help normalize the idea of plus size bodies being beautiful.  I also call myself the Drag Docent because of my interest in art and museums.  Several people have described me as the “internet troll” of Chicago drag because of my dumb sense of humor.


2. When and why did you begin doing drag? 

My first time performing in drag was April 1st, 2015.  While I was a student at Valparaiso University I was part of Alliance, their queer organization.  One day another organization reached out to us and asked if we would co-sponsor a drag show, and since I was the only person in either org who knew anything about drag I was basically in charge of putting the whole thing together.  I had wanted to start performing for a while at this point, so I figured that would be my chance.  It was so much fun, and we had two hundred people in attendance!


3. How did you come up with your drag name? 

“C’est Kevvie” is French for “It’s Kevvie.”  I actually decided back in high school, way before I started doing drag, that my stage name would be “C’est Kevvie.”

Photo by Greg Scott

4. What is your favorite and least favorite thing about doing drag? 

I love drag because it is a creative outlet for me.  I have a very creative mind and drag gives me the ability to express myself rather than keeping all these weird ideas in my head.  I also love when people get my references.  Sometimes if I’m performing as a work of art or an obscure character, only a handful of people in the audience will appreciate it, but those people love it so much and it brings me joy to see their responses.
My least favorite part about doing drag is taking it off.  I don’t consider myself to be unattractive, but when I wipe off my drag face I think I look frightening.  I’d wear drag makeup all day everyday if I could, but I don’t have that much time or energy.


5. Who would you say is your biggest drag inspiration?

My biggest drag inspiration is art and museums.  I love to walk around art museums and imagine turning the works of art into conceptual, wearable objects.  My other biggest inspirations are Divine and Edith Massey.  These queens were vulgar and sexy as hell, embracing their size and showing off their beautiful bodies.  They helped me to see that my body is beautiful and should be celebrated.


6. What would you say sets you apart from other performers? 

I am a very conceptual performer.  I’ll usually start with a work of art or a horror movie that I like, and develop a look and a mix with that in mind.  My drag often tells a story.



 Photo by Jessie Gonzalez

7. What is your favorite thing about Chicago drag? 

My favorite thing about Chicago drag is that when you go to a show you never know what you’re going to see.  Chicago has such a large variety of entertainers with different backgrounds and ideas, so each performer beings something unique to the stage.  Nobody has to fit a certain mold in order to be accepted; you fit in by standing out.


8. What is something you would like to change about the drag community? 

One thing that irks me about the drag scene is that the way to get your foot in the door is through competition, yet the competitions are based on popularity rather than talent.  I don’t know how many times I’ve spent weeks preparing a routine, but then my friends bailed on me or the audience didn’t get the reference.  I’m familiar with the adage “don’t get bitter just get better,” but when I put in the work and still fail just because my friends didn’t show up to vote for me, I’m going to be salty.
Another disappointment I have with the drag community is that so many younger queens don’t know their history.  Knowing the queens who came before you used to be an important part of drag culture, but now few queens know their history beyond Drag Race.  Hopefully opening a drag museum will help revive people’s interest in the legacy they are a part of.


9. You recently stated that you wanted to eventually open up a drag museum. What exactly should people expect?

I am currently studying at UIC to get my Masters in Museum and Exhibition Studies.  After I graduate I will put all the gears in motion in order to bring the drag museum to life.   It will focus on the history of drag as well as the transformation process so that the institution will be accessible to performers, fans, and people outside of the drag community.  Since drag is a performance art, there must be a performance space in the museum as well.  The museum will host frequent shows where all varieties of drag artists could present their work in a non-competitive environment.

Photo by @certee (IG)

10. What would you like to tell people about your Instagram project (@chicagodraglegacy)? Why did you start it and what is it about?

@ChicagoDragLegacy began as a grad school project.  For one of my classes I had to curate a fictional exhibit and write wall labels, a press release, and a social media strategy.  I chose to make my exhibit about Chicago drag.  Since the assignment was limited to ten objects, my social media plan was to make an Instagram account where I could post about all of the great Chicago figures that didn’t make it into the exhibit.  After finishing the project it dawned on me that the Instagram idea could exist on its own, so I made a new account called @ChicagoDragLegacy.  I use this account to share stories about historical figures in Chicago’s drag history as well as people who I believe are currently having an important impact on the Chicago drag scene.


11. You identify as transgender. Have you faced any sort of discrimination or have you mostly been loved and accepted as you are? 

I haven’t had many issues within the drag community about being trans.  Chicago’s drag community is quite progressive.  I guess one issue I do have in the clubs is that out of drag I don’t “pass,” so frequently people don’t realize I’m transfemme. I get misgendered, even in queer spaces, painfully often.
While I love and accept myself for who I am, I feel like it’s harder to find love and acceptance from other people.  Being a fat woman on top of being a queer and trans woman, I often feel like I’m perceived as bottom of the barrel.  I’m 23 years old and I’ve never been on a date.  The only people who seem to be interested in me are either chasers who fetishize my size and gender, or people who are too drunk to care or remember.  Maybe I’m oblivious, or naïve for expecting people to express their feelings directly and openly, but as far as I’m aware I’ve yet to find someone who wanted a legitimate romantic connection with me.  It can get pretty lonely sometimes.


12. What are your favorite makeup products that you can't live without? 

I am obsessed with Sugarpill!  I guarantee that anytime you see me in drag I’m wearing at least two different Sugarpill eyeshadows, most often Bulletproof and Frostine, often paired with a Sugarpill liquid lip color.  I hope that if I wear them enough that someday they will send me free stuff, because if they sent me stuff I would promote the shit out of it!
Lately I have been really into turqoise lips. Breakfast at Tiffany’s is definitely the best shade I’ve found, so I wear it a lot, but I often feel pangs of guilt for wearing it because I do not like the person who makes it and do not want to endorse them.  I’m praying that Sugarpill will come out with a turquoise liquid lip soon, because obviously it will be a better product and I could wear it guilt free.
There is a pretty new makeup brand called Vaughn Michael Cosmetics that I also really love.  I always apply the Vaughn Michael primer before any drag look.  They have gorgeous glitters and loose eyeshadows; my favorites are Candy Blades, which is a glittery red eyeshadow that other queens always comment on when I wear it, and You & Me, an extremely fine blue glitter with a green iridescence that has excellent coverage.
One last thing! My favorite eyeliner is L’oreal Silkissime.  It’s a soft pencil that goes on very smooth and is incredibly pigmented.  I use the black one for drag, and for daytime beats I’ll wear the silver or gold ones.

 Photo by Colectivo Multipolar


13. What is one of your biggest goals for the future pertaining to your drag?

I really want to get some bookings outside of Chicago so that I can introduce myself to a wider audience.


14. If you ever auditioned for Rupaul's Drag Race and got on the show, who would you do for snatch game? 

Edith Massey!  She is my favorite ever.  She has some of the most memorable quotes of anyone in the John Waters films.  Her outfit in Female Trouble is fashion goals.


15. Marry, Kai Kai, Kill: Windy Breeze, Dixie Lynn Cartwright, Lucy Stoole 

I would marry Windy Breeze because she’s my sister and I love her.  I would kai kai with Lucy Stoole because she seems like a mama bear; she’d pound your ass to Mars and back and also be really nurturing.  I’d kill Dixie Lynn Cartwright.  I’d kai kai with her first because I’ve seen what she’s packing, and then I’d kill the bitch.



16. You recently released an original song titled “Food Horny.” What can you tell us about your debut single? How did the idea come about?

The idea for “Food Horny” came about one night when Estelle Shambles was driving my drunk ass home from a gig.  Sometimes on our way home we’ll stop at White Castle, but this night we didn’t.  Every food place we passed made me want to eat more and more, not because I was hungry, but because I wanted the pleasure of eating something delicious.  I described this feeling as “food horny” and Estelle said I had to turn it into a song. So here we are!
I recorded it a couple weeks later when Estelle was driving my drunk ass home from a gig.  We went through the White Castle drive through and I got my fave chicken breast sandwiches with cheese and the new mac n cheese bites.  We pulled over and I recorded myself eating, and used that as my vocals.  The song is produced by Ariel Zetina, who also produced Imp Queen’s new EP The Magenta Agenda.  The song and accompanying music video are sexy, funny, and mildly disturbing.  It’s a great representation of what I’m about!

Watch "FOOD HORNY" here:

C'est Kevvie "Food Horny" - YouTube


Follow C'est Kevvie:
Twitter: @cestkevvie  
Instagram: @cestkevvie 
Official Website: https://www.cestkevvie.com/

The Drag Enthusiast:
Instagram: @dragenthusiast
Twitter: @DragEnthusiast

Interview done by Natalie
Instagram: @urjustadrag_
Twitter: @urjustadrag


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