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Here is my variation on the theme of Bret Pimental’s EWI stand.

I had been using a bassoon stand for a while, but I wanted a stand specifically for the EWI. There are some very nice EWI stands for sale, but they tend to be expensive!

I started with a Gator guitar stand. I removed the fork at the bottom in order to insert a 3-inch x 5/16 inch carriage bolt instead. I had to wrap the carriage bolt with duct tape (could use electrical tape or teflon tape) to make it snug in the socket.

I bought a 3-inch PVC end cap and drilled a 5/16 inch hole in the middle of the side for the carriage bolt. The PVC material is soft enough that I was able to wrench the nut to “countersink” the carriage bolt. I used a second locking nut to space the cup about an inch from the guitar stand socket.

Then, I used some 1/8 inch dense foam for cushioning inside the cup–a 3-inch diameter circle for the bottom and a 1-inch rectangular strip around the sides.

The EWI will rest nicely in the upper holder without the elastic strap secured, but to leave the instrument on the stand, I go ahead and fasten the elastic strap.

I debated on cutting the cup to allow USB or audio cable to remain connected to the EWI when the instrument is on the stand. But, I decided to leave the cup intact for now. My habit is to power down the EWI, disconnect cabling, and place the instrument on the stand. Since I had an episode with a failed internal power supply (the factory repair took over a month!), I’m extra cautious about powering down before making any cable connection changes.

I haven’t painted the cup yet, but a little black spray paint should do the job.

My stand cost me ca. $20 in parts and a few minutes to assemble.

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For removing cane from the reed blades and fine finishing I use these:

Fox Bassoon Arrow Plaque

Landwell double hollow ground reed knife

Jende 15K reed knife

Spyderco, Inc. Ceramic Whet Stone (Fine grit)

Grobet Chrome steel warding file #2 (8A, fine)

Grobet Chrome steel warding file #0 (8, coarse)

Grobet Diamond three square file (170/220 grit, fine)

3M P400 wet-or-dry sandpaper

I always use an arrowhead plaque between the reed blades when working on the reed. I’ve used the Landwell knife for years. My Jende 15K knife is a recent acquisition, but what a knife! Removing cane with precision (very gently!) is effortless with the Jende knife. In my opinion, nothing beats a fine ceramic whet stone (mine is made by Spyderco, Inc.) for keeping knives sharp. I’ve used the Grobet warding files for a long time and really like them. The Diamond three square file is a recent acquisition and it is excellent. For mild overall smoothing and reducing thickness, especially in the back 2/3 of the blades, and thinning the tip I’ve used #400 grit wet-or-dry sandpaper for decades. The 3M P400 product has a “No-Slip Grip” backing that doesn’t break down as easily as the standard wet-or-dry sandpaper. I’ve linked to vendors at random. For files and sandpaper, I’m sure if people “shop around” on the internet or even at the local hardware store, competitive prices can be had. Of course, the reed knives are specialty tools only available from double reed suppliers.

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