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Disability Visibility Project - Podcast by Alice Wong: Disability Activist, Me.. - 2w ago

Today’s episode is about disabled lawyers with Hamza Jaka and Britney Wilson. Hamza is a recent graduate from UC Berkeley’s School of Law. Hamza shares with his experiences requesting accommodations for his LSATs, the gatekeeping nature of the legal profession that excludes students with disabilities, and the overall toll of law school, ableism, and capitalism on disabled law students. Britney Wilson is a proud graduate of Howard University and the University of Pennsylvania Law School. Britney talks about why she wanted to become a lawyer, her experiences during law school, and her commitment to civil and disability rights.

Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

Disability Rights Bar Association

National Association of Attorneys With Disabilities

National Center for Law and Economic Justice

2019 tenBroek Disability Law Symposium: Interview with Victoria Rodríguez-Roldán. (April 8, 2019). Disability Visibility Project

deVise, Daniel. (May 12, 2012). Howard graduate caps a four-year fight for access. Washington Post.

Escobar, Natalie. (March 25, 2019). The Time Crunch on Standardized Tests Is Unnecessary. The Atlantic.

Gaffney, Nicholas. (July 16, 2018). In Conversation with Attorneys with Disabilities. Law Practice Today.

Moss, Haley. (April 9, 2019). I’m Florida’s First Openly Autistic Attorney. Here’s What That Means. Huffington Post.

Sloame, Joanna. (January 31, 2018). Meet the Deaf-Blind Lawyer Fighting For People With Disabilities. PopSugar.com 

Ward, Stephanie Francis. (February 6, 2019). With $1M donation, this law school plans to build pipeline of lawyers who have disabilities. ABA Journal.

Ward, Stephanie Francis. (November 9, 2018). Following contempt finding in accommodation lawsuit, LSAC ordered to pay attorney fees. ABA Journal.

Wilson, Britney. (September 2017). On NYC’s Paratransit, Fighting for Safety, Respect, and Human Dignity. Longreads.

Wilson, Britney. (February 23, 2017). Disability and Policing. The Regulatory Review.

Wilson, Britney. (July 10, 2014). Pathways to the Profession: Britney Wilson L’15. University of Pennsylvania Law School.

About Hamza Jaka, a brown American Pakistani man, smiles up at the camera. He is wearing glasses, a blue UNESCO Chair Institute shirt, and a fanny pack along with lanyard.

Hamza Jaka is a double bear Berkeley grad, having gone to Berkeley for undergrad, and for law school (Class of 2018). He recently passed the Illinois Bar and plans to begin work in Illinois shortly. Hamza is passionate about inclusion and disability justice, and the arts. He hopes to combine all three as part of his legal career. Outside of the law, Hamza is an active disability rights advocate, gamer, pop culture consumer, writer, and board game player.

Twitter: @HamzaAJaka

A Black woman in a blue suit standing on crutches in front of a golden replica of the globe outside of the United Nations headquarters in New York.

Britney Wilson is an attorney at the National Center for Law and Economic Justice (NCLEJ). Her work focuses on the intersection of poverty, civil rights, and racial justice. Before NCLEJ, Britney worked on a range of racial justice issues, from discriminatory policing, including Floyd v. City of New York, the landmark case that successfully challenged the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk practices, to issues of immigration, voting rights, fair housing, and the school-to-prison pipeline at the Center for Constitutional Rights and the ACLU.

Especially committed to advocacy on behalf of people of color and people with disabilities, Britney has written and spoken extensively about the intersection of these issues, including for The Nation Magazine, Longreads, and This American Life. She is a proud graduate of Howard University and the University of Pennsylvania Law School.

Twitter: @labelleverite

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Credits

Sarika D. Mehta, Audio Producer

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Cheryl Green, Text Transcript

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Song: “Dance Off”

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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Disability Visibility Project - Podcast by Alice Wong: Disability Activist, Me.. - 1M ago

Diverse representation in literature is incredibly important for young people in their formative years and today’s episode is all about Young Adult literature. Today’s episode features an interview with Marieke Nijkamp editor, author, founder of DiversifyYA and former senior Vice President of We Need Diverse Books.

Marieke and I talked in 2018 about her novel Before I Let Go and an anthology she an anthology she edited, Unbroken: 13 Stories Starring Disabled Teens.

Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

Disability in KidLit

We Need Diverse Books

Leary, Alaina. (January 20, 2018). Why The Publishing Industry Needs To Be More Inclusive Of Autistic And Disabled People. Bustle.

(April 5, 2019). Why this author disagrees with Autism ‘Awareness’ Day. BBC.

(July 17, 2018). Review of Unbroken: 13 Stories Starring Disabled Teens. Kirkus Reviews.

(October 1, 2017). Review of Before I Let Go. Kirkus Reviews.

Rodriguez, Cindy L. (January 18, 2016). Q&A with Debut Author Marieke Nijkamp about This Is Where It Ends. Latinos in KidLit.

About Photo of Marieke Nijkamp, a young white agender person with short hair with the left side shaved and dyed purple and bright cobalt blue. She is wearing glasses, a black necklace, a silver necklace with a cross, and a long-sleeved blue scoop neck top. She is smiling at the camera and some grass and green bushes are behind her.

Marieke Nijkamp was born and raised in the Netherlands. A lifelong student of stories, language, and ideas, she spends as much time in fictional worlds as she does the real world. She loves to travel, roll dice, and daydream. Her #1 New York Times bestselling debut novel, This Is Where It Ends, follows four teens during the fifty-four minutes of a school shooting. Her sophomore novel, Before I Let Go, is a haunting young adult murder mystery set during a cruel Alaskan winter. Marieke is the editor of the 2018 anthology Unbroken: 13 Stories Starring Disabled Teens (FSG).

Twitter: @mariekeyn

Instagram: @mariekeyn

Website: http://www.mariekenijkamp.com/musings/

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Credits

Geraldine Ah-Sue, Audio Producer

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Cheryl Green, Text Transcript

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Song: “Dance Off”

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

Leap Forth” by Throcke (Leap Forth by Throcke is licensed under a Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0 United States License)

Wednesday Night Flavor” by Podington Bear (Wednesday Night Flavor by Podington Bear is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License)

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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Disability Visibility Project - Podcast by Alice Wong: Disability Activist, Me.. - 1M ago


Today’s episode is on care work with Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha, a writer, cultural worker, teacher, and trainer based in the Pacific Northwest. Leah will discuss her recent book that came out in October 2018 titled, Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice. We talked last fall about the meaning of care work and disability justice and how people practice both in their everyday lives. Please note, throughout the interview, the term DJ refers to disability justice. 

A brown naked body- mostly the hand and leg- are wrapped around and crawling out of a rich root system. The title “Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice: Essays by Leah Piepzna-Samarasinha” is above this on a white background. Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

Amor, Bani. (November 1, 2018). “Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice” Draws Real-as-F*ck Maps of Justice and Care. Autostraddle.

Contractor, Rachna. (March 21, 2017). An Interview with Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha. Plenitude Magazine.

Hamilton, Anna. (November 14, 2018). Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha’s Care Work is an Outstanding Collection of Essays on Disability Justice. Global Comment.

Gershon, Livia. (November 2018). A Stimulus Plan for the Mutual Aid Economy. Longreads.

About Leah looks at the camera in a garden in South Seattle in August. She has long curly brown, silver and green hair, dark magenta lipstick and light brown skin, and is grinning in front of a garden wall covered in blooming jasmine. Photo credit: Jesse Manuel Graves

Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha is a queer disabled femme writer, organizer, performance artist and educator of Burgher/Tamil Sri Lankan and Irish/Roma ascent. The author of Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice, Dirty River: A Queer Femme of Color Dreaming Her Way Home (ALA Above the Rainbow List, short-listed for the Lambda and Publishing Triangle Awards), Bodymap (short-listed for the Publishing Triangle Award), Love Cake (Lambda Literary Award winner), and Consensual Genocide, with Ching-In Chen and Jai Dulani, she co-edited of TheRevolution Starts At Home: Confronting Intimate Violence in Activist Communities. Leah’s next two books, Tonguebreaker and Exploring Transformative Justice: A Reader (co-edited with Ejeris Dixon) are forthcoming in 2019.

A lead artist with the disability justice performance collective Sins Invalid since 2009, Leah’s writing has been widely anthologized and published, with recent work featured in PBS Newshour, Poets.org’s Poetry and the Body folio, The Deaf Poets Society, Bitch, Self, TruthOut and The Body is Not an Apology. Her essays have appeared in Glitter and Grit, Octavia’s Brood, Dear Sister, Undoing Border Imperialism, Stay Solid, Persistence: Still Butch and Femme, Yes Means Yes, Visible: A Femmethology, Homelands, Colonize This, We Don’t Need Another Wave, Bitchfest, Without a Net, Dangerous Families, Brazen Femme, Femme and A Girl’s Guide to Taking Over The World.

From 2006-2015 Leah co-founded and co-directed Mangos With Chili, a groundbreaking  queer and trans people of color performance tour and collective, and she co-founded Toronto’s Asian Arts Freedom School in 2006. She is a VONA Fellow and holds an MFA from Mills College. She is also a rust belt poet, a Sri Lankan with a white mom, a femme over 40, a grassroots intellectual, a survivor who is hard to kill.

Website: http://brownstargirl.org/

Support Disability Media and Culture

DONATE to the Disability Visibility Project®

Credits

Geraldine Ah-Sue, Audio Producer

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Cheryl Green, Text Transcript

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Song: “Dance Off”

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

Slow Casino” by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License)

Rose Ornamental” by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License)

“Alphabet Soup” by Podington Bear is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License)

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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Disability Visibility Project - Podcast by Alice Wong: Disability Activist, Me.. - 2M ago

Today’s episode is on design with my guest Liz Jackson, co-founder of Project Thisten and founder of The Disabled List, a design organization that engages in disability as a creative practice. Liz will talk about her work with the design community, how material objects are an important part of our self-identity, the limits of building empathy in design, and a series of design fellowships called WITH that places disabled people with top design studios and creative spaces for three-month fellowships.

Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

“How Liz Jackson Is Changing The World Of Disability Design,” Brianna Flaherty, September 21, 2018, The Iconic.

Liz Jackson: Designing for Inclusivity (video), 99U Conference 2017.

Project Thisten

The Disabled List

“We Are the Original Lifehackers”, Liz Jackson, May 30, 2018, The New York Times

WITH Fellowship

About Photo of Liz Jackson, a queer white disabled person with short hair. She is wearing eyeglasses, a navy vest with a black t-shirt underneath. She is smiling broadly. Photo credit: Ryan Lash

Liz Jackson is the founder The Disabled List, a design organization that engages in disability as a creative practice. The Disabled List is committed to partnering disabled creatives with top design studios and creative spaces for three-month fellowships through a program called The WITH Fellowship. You can learn more about Liz in her personal website, The Girl with the Purple Cane.

Twitter: @elizejackson

Support Disability Media and Culture

DONATE to the Disability Visibility Project®

Credits

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Cheryl Green, Text Transcript

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Song: “Hard Out Here for A Gimp”

Album: NO BIG DEAL

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

Made It by Yung Kartz is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License.

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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Disability Visibility Project - Podcast by Alice Wong: Disability Activist, Me.. - 2M ago

Today’s topic is disability studies featuring a discussion with two scholars, Dr. Sami Schalk and Dr. Subini Annamma. Disability studies is an interdisciplinary field that looks at disability from multiple perspectives and approaches. Sami is the author of Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women’s Speculative Fiction and Subini is the author of The Pedagogy of Pathologization: Dis/abled Girls of Color in the School-prison Nexus. Both Subini and Sami will talk about their experiences writing their books, the future of disability studies, and what excites them about teaching and generating knowledge as academics.

Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

2018-19 Ford Foundation Fellowship awarded to special education faculty member, April 12, 2018, KU News Service

Book explores how minority girls with disabilities are criminalized, form ‘ecology of resistance’ in juvenile jails, February 20, 2018, KU News Service

Book explores how disability, race intersect in pushing kids to prison, May 10, 2016, KU News Service

Disability Studies Initiative, Emory University

Imagine Otherwise: Sami Schalk on Black Women’s Speculative Fiction, July 4, 2018, Ideas on Fire podcast

Professor’s book explores intersectionality of ableism, race through fantasy, October 5, 2018, Jain, Anushka, Daily Bruin

Society for Disability Studies

Space the Nation: The future is female — and black, and disabled, January 22, 2019, Ana Marie Cox, SYFY Wire.

Subini Annamma on “Excavating Possibilities: Disability Critical Race Theory (DisCrit) in Education,” February 22, 2019, Haas Institute For a Fair and Inclusive Society, University of California, Berkeley.

About Photo of Dr. Subini Annamma, a Black-South Asian woman with long black curly hair and brown skin tone. She is wearing a short-sleeved black v-neck top with a purple tank underneath. A tree with green leaves and a grassy lawn is behind her.

Subini Ancy Annamma, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Special Education at the University of Kansas. Her research and pedagogy focus on increasing access to equitable education for historically marginalized students and communities, particularly students with disabilities. Specifically, she critically examines the social construction of race and ability; how the two are interdependent, how they intersect with other identity markers, and how their mutually constitutive nature impacts education experiences. She centers this research in urban education and juvenile incarceration settings and focuses on how student voice can contribute to dismantling systemic inequities and identifying exemplary educational practices.

Dr. Annamma is the first author on Dis/ability Critical Race Studies (DisCrit): Theorizing at the intersections of race and dis/ability, which was published in Race, Ethnicity and Education in 2013 and is included in the 2nd edition of Foundations of Critical Race Theory in Education. Since then she has published multiple articles, book chapters, and is currently a co-editor of two books. She served as an Associate Editor of International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education and is currently on the editorial board of Multiple Voices for Ethnically Diverse Exceptional Learners. Dr. Annamma is a past winner of the American Education Research Association (AERA) Dissertation Minority Fellowship in Education Research Award and is currently Co-Program Chair for the 2016 annual conference of the Critical Race Studies Association in Education. She has served as an invited speaker on topics ranging from the School-to-Prison Pipeline and Mass Criminalization, Restorative and Transformative Justice, Disability Critical Race Theory, and Critical Perspectives in Special Education Policy and Practice.

Twitter: @DrSubini

Medium shot of Dr. Sami Schalk. She is a light-skinned black woman with short curly hair and brown glasses. She is smiling to the camera in front of an off-white painted brick wall. She is wearing a black velvet jacket over a purple dress, red lipstick, and silver hoop earrings. Photo by Smoketree Photography of Madison, WI.

Dr. Sami Schalk is an Assistant Professor of Gender & Women’s Studies at University of Wisconsin-Madison. She earned her BA in English (Creative Writing) and Women’s Studies from Miami University in 2008, her MFA in Creative Writing (Poetry) from University of Notre Dame in 2010, and her PhD in Gender Studies from Indiana University in 2014.

Dr. Schalk’s interdisciplinary research focuses broadly on disability, race, and gender in contemporary American literature and culture, especially African American literature, speculative fiction, and feminist literature. She has published on literature, film, and material culture in a variety of peer-reviewed humanities journals.

Dr. Schalk’s first book Bodyminds Reimagined: (Dis)ability, Race, and Gender in Black Women’s Speculative Fiction  (Duke University Press 2018) argues that black women writers of speculative fiction reimagine the possibilities and limits of bodyminds, changing the way we read and interpret categories like (dis)ability, race, gender and sexuality within the context of these non-realist texts. Dr. Schalk has begun a second book project on disability politics in contemporary African American art and activism, including the Black Panthers and the Black Lives Matter movement. She also writes for mainstream outlets, namely Our Lives Magazine, Madison’s local LBGTQ magazine.

On a personal level, Dr. Schalk identifies as a fat, femme, black, queer, cisgender, nondisabled, middle-class, polyamorous, body-positive, sex-positive, intersectional feminist woman. Dr. Schalk uses she/her pronouns. You can follow her activities on Twitter and Facebook.

Support Disability Media and Culture

DONATE to the Disability Visibility Project®

Credits

Sarika D. Mehta, Audio Producer

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Cheryl Green, Text Transcript

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Song: “Dance Off”

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

La verdadera impaciencia (B-side)” by L.D.I. is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License)

The Stream” by The Pangolins is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License)

Frisco Nights” by Loco Lobo is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 License)

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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Disability Visibility Project - Podcast by Alice Wong: Disability Activist, Me.. - 2M ago

Today’s episode is about mental health and people of color. My guest today is Dior Vargas, a Latina Feminist Mental Health Activist and the creator of the People of Color and Mental Illness Photo Project. Dior will talk about her photo project which started in 2014 and a new book of photo essays she edited titled, The Color Of My Mind: Mental Health Narratives from People of Color. This book features full page portraits of a wide range of people of color with different mental health disabilities including short quotes about their lives. We also talk about the invisibility of people of color in the media representation of mental illness and the need for greater cultural competence in mental health.

Book cover of The Color of My Mind: Mental Health Narratives from People of Color, Edited by Dior Vargas & Photography by Zackary McDowell. Photo with a red background featuring a woman of color with curly brown hair looking to the right of the camera. She is wearing a white shirt with a floral print. Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

Depressed While Black

Disability Visibility Podcast. (March 11, 2018). Ep 20: Asian American Women and Mental Health with Emily Wu Truong and Jessica Gimeno.

National Queer and Trans Therapists of Color Network

No More Martyrs

Project LETS

Shelton, Tiffany. What’s the Big Deal? Therapy for Women of Color. My Brown Box.

Tessera Collective

About Black and white photo of a Latina facing the camera with a serious face, her hair down, and wearing a black v-neck top. Photo credit: Norman Jean Roy.

Dior Vargas is a Latina Feminist Mental Health Activist, and the creator of the People of Color and Mental Illness Photo Project, a response to the invisibility of people of color in the media representation of mental illness. She tours the country giving keynotes, hosting workshops, and speaking on panels. Her work and insight have been covered in media outlets such as Forbes, Newsweek, NBC News Latino, and The Guardian. Dior is the recipient of numerous awards including, The White House Champion of Change for Disability Advocacy Across Generations. She is working towards a Master of Public Health at NYU’s College of Global Public Health.

Dior is the Editor of The Color Of My Mind, a photo essay based on her viral online photo series, “People Of Color and Mental Illness Photo Project,” launched in September, 2014.

The Color Of My Mind is now available for purchase: http://diorvargas.com/shop/book

Website: http://diorvargas.com

Twitter: @DiorVargas

Instagram: @Dior_Vargas

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Credits

Geraldine Ah-Sue, Audio Producer

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Cheryl Green, Text Transcript

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Song: “Dance Off”

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

Dirty Wallpaper” by Blue Dot Sessions (Dirty Wallpaper by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial License)

The Yards” by Blue Dot Sessions (The Yards by Blue Dot Sessions is licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial License)

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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Today I talk with Carly Findlay, author of a new book titled Say Hello published by Harper Collins. Based in Melbourne, Australia, Carly is a blogger, writer, speaker, and appearance activist. Carly will talk about her writing career, the politics and pitfalls of visibility, and her writing process for Say Hello. Please note: I interviewed Carly in 2018, as she was in the middle of writing her book. Also: Say Hello is Australian and NZ release only right now. International order details on Carly’s blog.

Book cover featuring woman with red face and short dark curly hair, smiling. She’s wearing a pink floral top and bright orange skirt. Her hand is on her hip. Curly orange text reads “Say Hello”, and black text reads “Carly Findlay How I became the fangirl of my own story – a memoir and manifesto on difference, acceptance, self love and belief.” Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

Say Hello (information on Carly Findlay’s book)

Call for submissions: Growing Up Disabled in Australia. Black Inc.

Findlay, Carly. (January 29, 2019). I finally see my skin as my identity. SBS.

Findlay, Carly. (April 24, 2018). Say Hello: Doing Disability Activism My Own Way. Feminist Writers Festival.

Findlay, Carly. (February 25, 2014). Standing up to my trolls triggered an incredible response. The Guardian.

Findlay, Carly. (September 13, 2013). Just because I have ichthyosis doesn’t mean I want your prayers. The Guardian.

Northover, Kylie. (February 4, 2019). I didn’t think disability could be great: Lunch with Carly Findlay. The Sydney Morning Herald.

About Image shows Carly standing, hands on hips, laughing in front of a blue background wearing an awesome bright yellow dress adorned by beautiful white flowers.

Carly Findlay is a blogger, writer, speaker and appearance activist. She challenges people’s thinking about what it’s like to have a visibly different appearance.

She’s written for many publications including The Guardian, The Age and Sydney Morning Herald, Daily Life, The ABC, Mamamia, Frankie magazine and BlogHer. She’s used her blog to write about her skin condition, Ichthyosis, as well as promoted causes such as Love Your Sister and Donate Life.

Carly was named as one of Australia’s most influential women in the Australian Financial Review and Westpac 100 Women of Influence Awards for 2014. Carly received the 2010 and 2013 Yooralla Media Awards for Best Online Commentary for her body of disability focused writing. She also won the best personal blog category for Kidspot Voices of 2013, and the 2013 BUPA Health Activist award for Positive Life Change. She’s also been a finalist in the Best Australian Blogs competition in 2011, 2012 and 2014.

Carly is an accomplished speaker – she’s spoken at the University of Western England’s Appearance Matters conference, the Melbourne Writer’s Festival, Emerging Writers Festival, Problogger, University of Melbourne, Royal Melbourne hospital, Progress2017, the Australian Education Union of Victoria and Cancer Council of Victoria (to name a few). She’s a regular on ABC radio, and has spoken on podcasts including the Oaher Günsberg Podcast, Fully Sick, The Accessible Stall, Neighbuzz, and Just a Spoonful.

Carly has performed in Quippings  at Hares and Hyenas, the Spiegeltent and Malthouse Theatre in the Melbourne Fringe Festival and Emerging Writers Featival.

She organised Australia’s first Ichthyosis meet in 2015 – bringing together 75 people affected by the rare, severe skin condition Ichthyosis. 25 attendees had Ichthyosis. Friendships and support networks were formed.

Carly appeared on You Cant Ask That and Cyber Hate with Tara Moss on ABC TV in 2017.

She develops and runs disability training for organisations and schools – get in touch if you want to book her.

Carly is writing her first book – a memoir called Say Hello. Find out more about Say Hello here. She’s represented by Jacinta Di Mase’s agency.

In 2013 Carly was discriminated against by a taxi driver because of her skin. She wrote about this on her blog, took the case to the Human Rights Commission and made a complaint to the taxi company and the Victorian Taxi commission. One of the outcomes she wanted following her complaints was for improved disability training for taxi drivers. A video was made for the taxi company with Carly’s input, and disability-related complaints have since reduced. She is proud to have influenced the taxi industry and assisted passengers in this way. The video has since been disseminated to all Victorian taxi companies via the Victorian Taxi Commission too.

Website: http://carlyfindlay.com.au/

Twitter: @CarlyFindlay

Support Disability Media and Culture

DONATE to the Disability Visibility Project®

Credits

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Cheryl Green, Text Transcript

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Song: “Dance Off” and “Hard Out Here for A Gimp”

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

Aspire” by Scott Holmes. (Source: freemusicarchive.org  licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial License)

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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Disability Visibility Project - Podcast by Alice Wong: Disability Activist, Me.. - 2M ago

Today’s episode is about disabled “fakers,” that is, the misconceptions and stereotypes of disabled people exaggerating or faking their disabilities. I talk with Doron Dorfman, incoming Associate Professor of Law at Syracuse University College of Law, who conducted two case studies on this subject during his time at Stanford Law School. We talk about his research and disability studies at Stanford including the campus initiative that made it happen.

Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

Doron Dorfman bio, Stanford Law School.

Kolluru, Srinvindhya. (November 25, 2018). U of T student calls for Disability Studies program. The Varsity.

Leary, Alaina. (November 9, 2017). We need to stop shaming “fakers” for using accessible parking spots — and start understanding what disability really looks like. Hello Giggles.

Picciuto, Elizabeth. (April 6, 2016). Disneyland Cracks Down on Fake Disabilities, Forgets Real Ones. The Daily Beast.

Samrai, Yasmin. (May 11, 2018). Disability studies class renewed for next academic year. The Stanford Daily.

Tuttle, Brad. (October 12, 2013). National Epidemic of Horrible People Pretending to Be Disabled. Time.

I’ve been called a faker for using my phone & white cane. Disability shaming & policing means disabled people are afraid to ask for support or use their mobility aids.

Stop judging disabled people by your misinformed prejudiced views. https://t.co/pUyNAzYVrJ

— Dr Amy Kavanagh (@BlondeHistorian) January 27, 2019

About A headshot of a white man with dark hair and eyes smiling straight to the camera. He is wearing a blue colored shirt and square dark blue eyeglasses.

Doron Dorfman is an incoming Associate Professor of Law at Syracuse University College of Law and recent Liberman fellow and a JSD (Ph.D. in Law) candidate at Stanford Law School. His research focuses on Disability Law and Health Law using a social science perceptive and a wide variety of both quantitative and qualitative methods. Doron also teaches Stanford’s first ever disability studies class. You can download his scholarship for free here.

Twitter: @DorfmanDoron

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Credits

Cheryl Green, Audio Producer and Text Transcriber

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Songs: “Dance Off” and “Hard Out Here for A Gimp”

Album: NO BIG DEAL

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

Even Dreams of Beaches,” “Jog to the Water,” “Our Digital Compass,” and “Titter Snowbird” by Blue Dot Sessions. (Source: freemusicarchive.org.  licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial License.)

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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Disability Visibility Project - Podcast by Alice Wong: Disability Activist, Me.. - 2M ago

Today’s episode is about is employment with two professors from the University of Illinois at Chicago about their research. First, Rooshey Hasnain will talk about a recent pilot project in partnership with the Illinois Division of Rehabilitation Services called ADOPT (Asians with Disabilities Outreach Project Think-Tank). Next, Kate Caldwell tells me about her research on disabled entrepreneurs with a project called CEED, Chicagoland Entrepreneurship Education for People with Disabilities project. We’re gonna discuss barriers, underrepresentation, structural issues, the need for research, and much more.

Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

Institute for Disability and Human Development, University of Illinois, Chicago

National Council on Disability: Employment publications

ADOPT (Asians with Disabilities Outreach Project Think-Tank)

Illinois Office of Rehabilitation Services (ORS)

Center for Capacity Building on Minorities with Disabilities Research, University of Illinois, Chicago

CEED (Chicagoland Entrepreneurship Education for People with Disabilities) 

Entrepreneur Profiles

Understanding Disability & Entrepreneurship (​Infographic): http://www.ceedproject.org/infographic.html

Disability Holiday Gift Guides: http://www.ceedproject.org/disability-holiday-gift-guide.html

Morris, Amanda. (January 13, 2019). Deaf And Unemployed: Taking Matters Into Their Own Hands. NPR.

Disability Visibility Podcast. (October 21, 2018). Ep 36: Disabled Entrepreneurs with Mary, Hannah, and Emma Layden and Tinu Abayomi-Paul.

About Photo of Dr. Rooshey Hasnain, a South Asian woman with should-length black hair. She is wearing eyeglasses and a black shirt. She is smiling at the camera.

Rooshey Hasnain. Ed.D., M.A. is a Clinical Assistant Professor with the Department of Disability and Human Development and the Undergraduate Rehabilitation Sciences Program at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC). Her primary professional interest is in understanding the lives, challenges, and strengths of people with disabilities and mental health conditions, especially those from refugee and immigrant backgrounds. She works on finding ways to reduce cultural stigma associated with disability and mental health issues, and ways to promote a human rights perspective on behalf of underserved individuals, their families, and their communities. Most of the projects she has founded attempt to bridge the service and opportunity gaps between U.S. disability service systems and hard-to-reach disabled people and their families. Currently she is the Principal Investigator for a NIDILRR field-initiated project called Partners of Refugees in Illinois Disability Employment (PRIDE), which aims to support Illinois-based job-seeking refugees with disabilities in accessing employment and career opportunities.

Bio: https://ahs.uic.edu/disability-human-development/directory/hasnain-rooshey/

Photo shows a close up image of a Kate, a not-as-young-as-she-used-to-be white person wearing thick rimmed glasses. She is smiling while sitting on Chicago public transit in her grey pea coat. She has short cropped brown hair that is trimmed close on the sides, but longer on top and swept over and back to one side.

Kate Caldwell is a Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Disability and Human Development at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), where she received her doctorate in disability studies and worked on the Chicagoland Entrepreneurship Education for People with Disabilities project (www.CEEDproject.org). Having also received a master’s degree from the University of Chicago in interdisciplinary social sciences, she brings this expertise to approaching complex issues where various fields intersect and facilitating dialogue across disciplines. Her research in the area of employment and social policy has focused on the experiences of people with disabilities, and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities (I/DD) in particular, in entrepreneurship. This is a topic that allows her to bridge the fields of disability studies and entrepreneurship studies by integrating theoretical advancements that have been made in feminist theory, citizenship theory, and social justice. Kate has served on the National Task Force on Workforce Development and Employability for People with Disabilities as an advisor for the Subcommittee on Entrepreneurship, Tax Incentives & Procurement. For two and a half years she served as the Editorial Coordinator for the AAIDD journal, Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.

Kate is a theorist, having written on the intersection of bisexuality and disability. Her work has contributed to the inclusion of disability in The Bisexuality Report and the inclusion of bisexuality in the Global Disability Rights Library. She is also a methodologist and developed the technique for conducting Dyadic Interviews with individuals with intellectual disabilities, which is informed by critical disability studies. She also developed the best practice recommendation for the Association of University Centers on Disabilities (AUCD), and currently in use by the Institute on Disability and Human Development at UIC, for creating plain language summaries for academic articles.

Website: http://www.kecaldwell.com

Twitter: @cycleberry

Support Disability Media and Culture

DONATE to the Disability Visibility Project®

Credits

Cheryl Green, Audio Producer and Text Transcription

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Songs: “Dance Off” and “Hard Out Here for A Gimp”

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

Elmore Heights,” “Greylock,” “Shifts of Currents,” and “Vittoro” by Blue.Sessions. (Source: freemusicarchive.org. licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial License.)

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

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Disability Visibility Project - Podcast by Alice Wong: Disability Activist, Me.. - 2M ago

Today’s episode is about is about D/deaf people in prison. My guests are Claudia Center and TL Lewis. Both Claudia and TL will talk about a case filed by the ACLU on June 20, 2018, on behalf of 14 D/deaf and hard-of-hearing inmates in Coen v. Georgia Department of Corrections. The suit says Georgia is violating the Americans with Disabilities Act and the U.S. Constitution’s protections against cruel and unusual punishment because they are denied communication access. TL and Claudia will discuss their role in this case and the major issues facing incarcerated D/deaf and hard-of-hearing people in Georgia and nationally.

Transcript

[Google doc]     [PDF]

Related Links

ACLU. (June 20, 2018). ACLU & NAD Seek Class Action on Behalf of Deaf Prisoners in Georgia Denied Communication Access.

Andrews, Avital. (April 15, 2018). The 30 Top Thinkers Under 30: The Activist Attorney Working to Promote Justice for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing. Pacific Standard.

Coen v. Georgia Department of Corrections. (June 20, 2018). 

HEARD – Helping Educate to Advance the Rights of Deaf Communities

Ludwig, Mike. (August 22, 2016). No Way to Call Home: Incarcerated Deaf People Are Locked in a Prison Inside a Prison. TruthOut.org

Novic, Sara. (June 21, 2018). Deaf prisoners are trapped in frightening isolation. CNN.

Woody, Jeremy and Christie Thompson. (October 18, 2018). The Isolation of Being Deaf in Prison. The Marshall Project.

About Photo of Claudia Center, a white woman with wavy shoulder-length brown hair. She is wearing glasses and a heather gray cardigan with a purple t-shirt underneath. She is smiling at the camera.

Claudia Center

I grew up in New Hampshire, went to Wesleyan University for college, then moved to California. I was a paralegal for a big law firm and then I went to Berkeley Law (aka Boalt Hall). After law school I worked for NARAL in D.C., starting as a Women’s Law and Public Policy Fellow. Then I worked for the Employment Law Center (now Legal Aid at Work) for many years before joining the ACLU’s Disability Rights Program. Ask me your questions about the ADA, the Rehabilitation Act, disability rights, disabled people, and the disability community. I was a foster parent to two teenagers who are now my adult children. I have three older sisters; we all look alike. I’ve been taking Spanish classes diligently for four years (so far reaching the proficiency of your average Anglo at the end of their first year of high school Spanish). I sing in an a cappella choir, Scales of the City, and I make my friends attend our concert once a year. (Check out our YouTube channel!) I’m an advanced FBer and watcher of television. I live with two cats and one adult child. I’m in a long-term love-hate relationship with San Francisco. My best friend is my iPhone. Twitter: @Claudia_SF

Image of a young genderfluid black person of African descent (TL) wearing a bright blue collared shirt while seated at a desk in a hallway with their hands folded under their chin and elbows leaning against the tabletop. There are windows & doors in the background.

Recognized as a White House Champion of Change and one of Pacific Standard Magazine’s Top 30 Thinkers Under 30, Talila A. Lewis is a Community Lawyer who has been engaged in innovative and intersectional anti-violence, decarceration & prison abolition work for over a decade. Talila’s work highlights and addresses the nexus between race, class, disability and structural inequity—focusing in particular, on people with multiply marginalized identities. Talila co-founded & serves as the volunteer director of Helping Educate to Advance the Rights of Deaf Communities (HEARD), a volunteer-dependent nonprofit organization which created and maintains the only national database of Deaf, DeafBlind, DeafDisabled and Hard of Hearing imprisoned people. Talila also serves as a consultant on radical education and workplace inclusion; an expert on cases involving disabled people; and previously served as the Givelber Public Interest Lecturer at Northeastern University School of Law and a visiting professor at Rochester Institute of Technology/National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Talila is a founding member of the Harriet Tubman Collective and co-creator of the Disability Solidarity praxis. A recent graduate of American University Washington College of Law, Talila has received awards from numerous universities, the American Bar Association, Congresswoman Eleanor Holmes Norton, the American Association for People with Disabilities, National Black Deaf Advocates, and the Nation Institute, among others. Talila is the recipient of the 2018 Roddenberry Fellowship and the 2018 Atlantic Fellowship for Racial Equity. Twitter: @talilalewis

Support Disability Media and Culture

DONATE to the Disability Visibility Project®

Credits

Cheryl Green, Audio Producer and Text Transcriber

Alice Wong, Writer, Producer, Interviewer

Lateef McLeod, Introduction

Mike Mort, Artwork

Theme Music (used with permission of artist)

Song: “Dance Off”

Artist: Wheelchair Sports Camp

Music

CGI Snake” by Chris Zabriskie. (Source: freemusicarchive.org. Licensed under a Attribution License.)

Ice Climb” by Podington Bear. (Source: freemusicarchive.org. Licensed under a  Attribution-NonCommercial 3.0 International License.)

Transitioning” and “Somber Heart” by Lee Rosevere. (Source: freemusicarchive.org. Licensed under a Attribution-NonCommercial License.)

Sounds

“VOCODER countdown” by Jack_Master. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

8 Bit Beeping Computer Sounds” by sheepfilms. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons 0 License.

Read Full Article

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