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DIY: Lush Inspired Jelly Bath Bomb – Attempt # 4 - YouTube

Experiment four utilized a mixture that was approximately 7.5% sodium alginate by weight. While it generated a jelly layer that would be suitable for most, I believe that we can do better.

Calcium content in water will impact the effectiveness of the jelly bombs (and many other bath products). I have what I would classify as slightly hard water. Given this, I realize that my results are better than many will see (and worse than others). With this in mind, I want a jelly bomb that will tolerate a wide range of water conditions.

Experiment 4 Ingredients:
  • Baking Soda – 150 grams
  • Citric Acid – 100 grams
  • Sodium Alginate – 20 grams
  • Binder: 91% Isopropyl Alcohol

The jelly bombs themselves are cheap and easy to make with ingredients that you can quickly get through amazon or even local grocery or health food stores. In truth, as a whole these jelly bath bombs unmolded better than any other bath bombs I have ever made – I typically didn’t have any that failed to hold their shape or tried to crumble on me.

For most, I am making the mini-bombs as a proof of concept test model. I did this primarily so that I did not have to waste as much water to get a sound test.

The post DIY Lush Inspired Jelly Bomb Experiment 4 appeared first on Digital Fairy Creations.

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This Shea Body Butter is a tried and true recipe for me. Quick and simple to make and always works wonderfully. Shea butter is a wonderful skin nourishing and inexpensive base for making body butters. To give an idea, this body butter is what I would call a heavy butter. It is great during winter months as it forms a barrier against the harsh drying wind. This shea body butter is also great for individuals with dry or difficult skin. If you are looking for a lighter butter, something for summer; I recommend using mango or other lighter weight butters.

I have opted to use ratios instead of exact weights. The rationale, this recipe scales well and you can make as little as one jar or as many as a hundred all depending upon your needs. The basic ratio for this shea body butter is 3 parts shea butter to 1 part lightweight oil. To reduce oiliness and give a powdery type feel add 1 teaspoon tapioca starch for each 4 ounces of oil/butter blend.

Recipe
  • 3 oz (85 grams) unrefined shea butter
  • 1 oz (28.3 grams) liquid or low-melt point oil [I use Argan oil.]
    • See below for suggestions and considerations regarding other oils
  • Approximately 1 teaspoon (2.53 grams) tapioca starch/powder
    • Also can use arrowroot powder or corn starch – this helps to reduce the oily feel and enhances the powdery feel of the butter
  • optional Vitamin E (a few drops personal preference)
  • optional Essential oils for fragrance/additional benefits (a few drops personal preference)
  • optional Preservative (I use Optiphen at 0.75% of total oil weight – Optiphen is usually used at 0.5% to 1.5% total weight)
    • see below for considerations and why I include a preservative
Instructions: Method 1:

Combine Shea butter and Argan oil in missing bowl. Blend slowly until fully incorporated. Once fully incorporated increase mixer speed and whip oils until light and fluffy. (They will fluff much like making a meringue.) Once butter is whipped; slow mixer, slowly add tapioca starch and blend until fully incorporated. Add fragrance oils/essential oils; preservative if desired.

Potential negatives of method 1 – oils tend not to whip as fluffy and can take a while to fully incorporate

Method 2 (the version I use):
  1. Measure Shea butter and Argan oil in separate measuring containers.
  2. Melt Shea Butter using microwave or double boiler. Filter melted Shea Butter through cheese cloth to filter any impurities that may be present (pure unrefined Shea butter often has organic bits present that may be undesired in final product).
  3. Add Argan oil to the melted Shea Butter, lightly stir/blend until fully incorporated.
  4. Refrigerate oil blend until oil blend is partially solidified.
  5. Once solid, remove and add to mixing bowl. Add fragrance/essential oils and preservative. Blend slowly at first to break and blend mixture. Increase speed and whip oil blend until light and fluffy.
  6. Once oil blend is whipped, slow mixer and add tapioca starch. Allow starch to incorporate. Once incorporated, increase mixer speed and continue whipping until starch is well distributed and mixture forms peaks.
  7. Spoon, pipe, or dispense body butter into appropriate sterile containers. Seal and label appropriately.
What do we mean by lightweight oil?

You can utilize any number of liquid or low-melt point oils depending upon your preferences. I utilize this simple body butter during the winter months and may not use a whole container, so I select an oil with a long shelf life. A few examples: Coconut oil (2+ years), Argan oil (2+ years), or Meadowfoam oil (~5 years). If on the other hand, you believe you will utilize the body butter quickly, you may want to go with something like Sweet Almond oil, Apricot Kernel oil, or Avocado oil – all of which have a shelf life of about one year.

The sample picture was made with Argan oil. I tend to favor Argan oil because it is high in Vitamin E and antioxidants, thus saving me from adding additional Vitamin E. It also tends to be good in helping dry skin recover. Some people do not like using Argan oil because they think it has an odd smell. This isn’t the case, quality Argan oil has a slight nutty smell and is unnoticeable in this body butter. If you have an Argan oil that smells foul (I have heard it described as ‘manure’ smelling) it is spoiled/rancid.

Do I really need a preservative?

Ultimately, the choice is up to you. Personally I do use a preservative in my body butter. I can already hear some of you saying, ‘but you only need a preservative when there is water in a product’. Generally speaking, this is true. As you saw by my recipe, there is no water in this mix. So, why on earth would I feel the need to use a preservative?

For me the answer is quite simple. Think about when you or others may use your body butter, where are you? Think about where you will store your body butter when not in use, where is that? In many cases, the answer is going to be the same – the bathroom. What can be found in abundance in most bathrooms, water and moisture (think about the steamed up bathroom mirror after you shower).

While our recipe may not have any water in it, that doesn’t mean that water will not find it’s way into the product. I often apply mine immediately after a shower, and yes I double dip (egad the horror. Lol). My skin was moist when I got some of the body butter out the first and probably the second time. All while using it in a very moist humid environment (right after showering). Water is being introduced even if we didn’t intend it to.

Sample Ingredient Listing (Eucalyptus Spearmint Shea Body Butter)

Butyrospermum Parkii (Shea) Butter, Argania Spinosa Kernel (Argan) Oil, Tapioca Starch, Eucalyptus Globulus Leaf Oil, Mentha Spicata (Spearmint) Leaf Oil, Phenoxyethanol (and) Caprylyl Glycol

The post Super Simple Shea Body Butter Recipe appeared first on Digital Fairy Creations.

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DIY: Lush Inspired Jelly Bath Bomb – Experiment # 3 - Getting Closer - YouTube

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, there is no question that Lush’s Jelly Bombs have left an impression. I being ever up for a good experiment decided to take on a project to imitate and make my own variation. The goal to create a jelly bath bomb as good if not better than those that inspired it. This is the chronicle of the pursuit for my version of the perfect jelly bath bomb. Share your thoughts and suggestions with me by commenting and be sure to subscribe to see other experiments and the final product.

Experiment three utilized a mixture that was approximately 5.5% sodium alginate by weight. While it generated a much better jelly layer than experiment one or two, the volume was still not where I want it.

Calcium content in water will impact the effectiveness of the jelly bombs (and many other bath products). I have what I would classify as slightly hard water. Given this, I realize that my results are better than many will see (and worse than others). With this in mind, I want a jelly bomb that will tolerate a wide range of water conditions.

Experiment 3 Ingredients:
  • Baking Soda – 150 grams
  • Citric Acid – 100 grams
  • Sodium Alginate – 15 grams
  • Binder: 91% Isopropyl Alcohol

The jelly bombs themselves are cheap and easy to make with ingredients that you can quickly get through amazon or even local grocery or health food stores. In truth, as a whole these jelly bath bombs unmolded better than any other bath bombs I have ever made – I typically didn’t have any that failed to hold their shape or tried to crumble on me.

For most, I am making the mini-bombs as a proof of concept test model. I did this primarily so that I did not have to waste as much water to get a sound test.

The post Lush Inspired Jelly Bath Bomb – Experiment 3 appeared first on Digital Fairy Creations.

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As a child, I can remember being woken at 4 am every year on the Friday after Thanksgiving. Shuffled hurriedly through a morning routine of getting dressed and getting a quick breakfast (leftover turkey somehow always played a role), then everyone loading into the car and heading to the stores.

My mother was like a general preparing to go to war. Schedules were drawn, battle plans were readied, and we the weary but loyal troops were marshalled off to war. You see, I grew up on a farm, while we never went without, there often wasn’t a lot left for splurging. Black Friday deals were how we were able to afford gifts for family and friends; so everything had to be planned to the letter.

Fast forward to today, and you won’t find me standing in line at the store. It simply isn’t worth it to me today, and had we had the internet when I was a child I doubt it would have been for us then. But despite the change to my shopping venue, I still get excited about Black Friday. But, as a soaper and crafter, my shopping targets have changed.

I keep hopefully checking my email and facebook feeds for news of a vendor having a special discount or even an early bird special. All in the pursuit of more items to feed my soaping addiction.

So far, only Aztec has satiated my desire for a sale. Their Black Friday sale begins in a few hours (Wednesday at noon). While I keep telling myself that I don’t need anymore fragrance oils, I know I will order. $11 dollars a pound for some of my most used fragrance oils is something even I can’t pass up. Nearly every fragrance is one that I am totally or nearly out of.

Of course, I will talk myself out of ordering until I remind myself that not only are the fragrance oils on sale, but I need other things from Aztec. Other things are 5% off and I do need more candle wax to finish up items, specifically I need more paraffin tart wax. But we will see if my will power can be maintained or if I fall prey to the enticing allure of even more fragrance oils.

If you are in need of fragrance oils, be sure to swing by Aztec’s Black Friday sale. It runs Wednesday 11/22 at Noon until Friday 11/24 at midnight. http://www.candlemaking.com/black-friday-sale.html

Being ever vigilante for sales, if I happen to stumble across any good deals, I will let you know. Check us out on Facebook and Twitter for any we stumble across. (Side note, wholesale supplies plus confirmed they are NOT having a sale. I am a tad disappointed as I need to order some more bottle lids – somehow I have about 300 bottles that have no matching lids and I want to use them up this season.

The post Black Friday Anticipation appeared first on Digital Fairy Creations.

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DIY: Lush Inspired Jelly Bath Bomb - Experiment # 2 - YouTube

DIY: Lush Inspired Jelly Bath Bomb – Attempt # 2 – A FAIL by my definition.
Love ‘em or hate ‘em, there is no question that Lush’s Jelly Bombs have left an impression. I being ever up for a good experiment decided to take on a project to imitate and make my own variation. The goal to create a jelly bath bomb as good if not better than those that inspired it. This is the chronicle of the pursuit for my version of the perfect jelly bath bomb. Share your thoughts and suggestions with me by commenting and be sure to subscribe to see other experiments and the final product.

Experiment two utilized a mixture that was approximately 4% sodium alginate by weight. While it generated a much better jelly layer than experiment one, the volume was still too small to be practical when scaled to a bathtub level. Someone looking for only a minor amount of jelly would appreciate this version.

Ingredients: Lush Inspired Jelly Bomb Experiment 2 – FAIL

Baking Soda – 150 grams
Citric Acid – 100 grams
Sodium Alginate – 10 grams
Color – Yellow #6 Lake dye
Binder: 91% Isopropyl Alcohol

As I get time over the coming days to pull together the videos and upload, I will be sharing those experiments – the good, the bad, and the oh so ugly. All so you can learn from my failures and successes.

The jelly bombs themselves are cheap and easy to make with ingredients that you can quickly get through amazon or even local grocery or health food stores. In truth, as a whole these jelly bath bombs unmolded better than any other bath bombs I have ever made – I typically didn’t have any that failed to hold their shape or tried to crumble on me.

For most, I am making the mini-bombs as a proof of concept test model. I did this primarily so that I did not have to waste as much water to get a sound test.

Music: ‘Summer’ from Bensound (bensound.com)

The post DIY: Lush Inspired Jelly Bath Bomb – Experiment # 2 appeared first on Digital Fairy Creations.

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DIY: Lush Inspired Jelly Bath Bomb - Experiment One - YouTube

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, there is no question that Lush’s Jelly Bombs have left an impression. I being ever up for a good experiment decided to take on a project to imitate and make my own variation. The goal to create a jelly bath bomb as good if not better than those that inspired it. This is the chronicle of the pursuit for my version of the perfect jelly bath bomb. Share your thoughts and suggestions with me by commenting and be sure to subscribe to see other experiments and the final product.

Experiment 1 trying to duplicate the Lush Jelly Bombs – FAIL

Experiment one utilized a mixture that was approximately 2% sodium alginate by weight. While it generated jelly, the volume was too small to be practical when scaled to a bathtub level.

Ingredients:

Baking Soda – 150 grams
Citric Acid – 100 grams
Sodium Alginate – 5 grams
Color – Blue Lake dye
Binder: 91% Isopropyl Alcohol

As I get time over the coming days to pull together the videos and upload, I will be sharing those experiments – the good, the bad, and the oh so ugly. All so you can learn from my failures and successes.

The jelly bombs themselves are cheap and easy to make with ingredients that you can quickly get through amazon or even local grocery or health food stores. In truth, as a whole these jelly bath bombs unmolded better than any other bath bombs I have ever made – I typically didn’t have any that failed to hold their shape or tried to crumble on me.

For most, I am making the mini-bombs as a proof of concept test model. I did this primarily so that I did not have to waste as much water to get a sound test.

Music: ‘Energy’ from Bensound (bensound.com)

The post DIY: Lush Inspired Jelly Bath Bomb – Experiment One appeared first on Digital Fairy Creations.

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Amber Dreams Cold Process Soap - YouTube

The fragrances can be summed up in three words ‘ Warm and Inviting’. The intoxicating scent of amber combined with vanilla with undertones of sandalwood and musk. When I envisioned this soap, the scents caused me to think of a combination of earthiness and romance. I opted to use earthy tones of brown and bronze, a passionate red, and a fiery gold.

Then in one of my worst ideas of the days, I decided it would be cute to stick melt-n-pour leaves into the top of it;

Amber Dreams Cold Process Soap Making and Cutting Video

just having them sticking partially out. I really don’t know what inspired it, but it was definitely a design fail, they just look awkward and out of place. In a slab mold with them laying fully on the bar, it would have had the cute effect I was seeking, but in a loaf mold it is just tragic.

Fragrances:

Lone Star: Amber Vanilla (1oz); Candle Science: Amber Noir (1oz)

Additives:

Tussah Silk, Sodium Lactate, Goat’s Milk (from powder), UV Color Stabilizer.

Colorants:

Nature’s Garden 24 Karat Gold; Wholesale Supplies Plus Adobe Orange; Nurture Soaps Ruby Red; Nurture Soaps Copper Penny; Nurture Soaps Mocha (Brown); Titanium Dioxide

Oil Blend:

Coconut Oil, Palm Oil, Palm Kernal Oil/flakes , Olive Oil Pomace, Castor Oil, Shea Butter, Cocoa Butter, Canola Oil, Rice Bran Oil, Jojoba Oil, Grapeseed Oil, Argan Oil, and Stearic Acid

Music:

Autumn Day
Courtesy of: Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com)
Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0 License

The post Amber Dreams Cold Process Soap appeared first on Digital Fairy Creations.

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DIY: Lush Inspired Jelly Bath Bomb PREVIEW - YouTube

Love ‘em or hate ‘em, there is no question that Lush’s Jelly Bombs have left an impression. I being ever up for a good experiment decided to take on a project to imitate and make my own variation. The goal to create a jelly bath bomb as good if not better than those that inspired it. In creating my preferred variation, I experimented with a number of different ideas (and even came up with a few more for future projects). As I get time over the coming days to pull together the videos and upload, I will be sharing those experiments – the good, the bad, and the oh so ugly. All so you can learn from failures and successes. The end result, a jelly bomb that I personally think is the perfect mixture of fizz, jelly, and even a little bubbly.

The journey for the perfect Jelly Bath Bomb; check our blog for links to all experiments.

The jelly bombs themselves are cheap and easy to make with ingredients that you can quickly get through amazon or even local grocery or health food stores. In truth, as a whole these jelly bombs unmolded better than any other bath bombs I have ever made – I typically didn’t have any that failed to hold their shape or tried to crumble on me.
For most, I am making the mini-bombs as a proof of concept test model. I did this primarily so that I did not have to waste as much water to get a sound test. In the later videos you will see me scale them up and add a few embeds to the full size versions.

Music: ‘Pop Dance’ from Bensound (bensound.com)

The post DIY: Lush Inspired Jelly Bath Bomb PREVIEW appeared first on Digital Fairy Creations.

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Digital Fairy Creations Blog by Digital Fairy - 3M ago

Bah Humbug I say!   — Oh, who am I kidding, I love Christmas time. All the decorations, the lights, and the colors, the world just seems to brighten up. Plus Santa Claus will be coming any day now. lol

It is just difficult for me to get into the Christmas spirit in October or even still in early November. This is the unfortunate life of a soaper, you have to be in the holiday spirit months in advance of the holiday. I started making my Christmas items before we had even gotten into October, and it shows. Those soaps lack the spirit and energy that I associate with the season. The September and early October soaps themselves are attractive, but other than scent they feel no different than those I might have made in June or March or any other month.

As we get closer to the holiday season, the soaps have gotten more festive and spirited (thankfully), but I doubt I will ever get used to the idea of starting to prepare for holidays months in advance. I managed to squeeze in a mini-soapapalooza the other day (four batches in one short evening). To get in the spirit I started up the holiday music and had it filling the house. It also happened to be nice weather out, so I had the windows open. A friend stopped by the house and when she entered, she couldn’t stop laughing about the fact I was already listening to holiday music and had some Christmas decorations randomly spaced throughout the house. The things we do to get into the holiday spirit. lol

I’m hoping to have some time to post some of the videos and photos of items in the next couple of weeks (maybe over Thanksgiving). The reality for me has been that I was stuck deciding between the time needed to make the soap or the time needed to edit the videos. Videos don’t need a month to cure, but soaps do. So the winner is the soap. I just need to be able to clone myself or find time to take a day off to spend getting both caught up and ahead (there never seems to be enough time in the day for any of us). lol

The post Bah Humbug appeared first on Digital Fairy Creations.

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Pumpkin Spice Latte Cold Process Soap, Making and Cutting - YouTube

Nothing says fall like the smells of pumpkin and spice. This pumpkin spice latte cold process soap uses natural pumpkin puree along with ginger, nutmeg, and other spices to capture this classic scent of fall and nourish your skin.

Using natural ingredients in soaps can be a wonderful way to obtain extra benefits. For instance, pumpkin is full of antioxidants and alpha hydroxy acids helping to gently exfoliate the skin, promote cell growth, and protect against free radicals. Nutmeg has long been used for its astringent properties and ability to help reduce acne and clogged pours. Ginger is full of antioxidants, can help reduce signs of scars, can promote hair growth, and stimulates circulation. While cinnamon can be an irritant, in smaller quantities it can help treat eczema and reduces signs of wrinkles by promoting blood flow and plumping the skin.

Fragrance:

Coffee (Lonestar), Spiced Pumpkin Latte (Rustic Escentuals)

Additives (not all referenced in the video):

Tussah Silk, Sodium Lactate, Pumpkin puree, Ginger, Nutmeg, Cinnamon, Allspice [note – some people are highly allergic to allspice and can have severe adverse skin reactions, bear this in mind before choosing to use it in your soap/ I am making this for me and a few friends none of whom have a sensitivity.]

Colorants:

Adobe Orange Mica (Wholesale Supplies Plus); Copper Penny (Nurture Soap); Titanium Dioxide

View of the cut Pumpkin Spice Latte Soap Mold:

Essential Depot – Natural Soap Mold

Embeds:

Pumpkins using melt and pour; the mold was purchased as Michael’s. Coloring Adobe Orange (Wholesale Supplies Plus) and Glow in the Dark Powder (Nurture Soap)

Oil Blend:

This blend uses: Coconut Oil, Palm Oil, Palm Kernal Oil/flakes, Olive Oil Pomace, Castor Oil, Shea Butter, Cocoa Butter, Canola Oil, Rice Bran Oil, and Jojoba Oil

The post Pumpkin Spice Latte Cold Process Soap appeared first on Digital Fairy Creations.

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