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A new release of IBM Explorer for z/OS Aqua built on Eclipse Neon V4.6 is now available for download.

Check out this blog for the product updates that are delivered in this release.

The following products have been updated in this release:

There is no update for the following products in this release:

Along with product updates, the following documentation is updated in KC Installer:

  • IBM Explorer for z/OS V3.1.1
  • IBM z/OS Connect Enterprise Edition V3

If you have any question or comment, interact with us at our Mainframe Developer Center forum.

Previous What’s new blogs for V3.1:
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.19 (14 June 2019)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.18 (17 May 2019)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.17 (19 April 2019)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.17 (15 Mar 2019)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.16 (15 Feb 2019)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.16 (18 Jan 2019)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.15 (7 Dec 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.14 (16 Nov 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.13 (19 Oct 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.12 (21 Sep 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.11 (17 Aug 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.10 (20 July 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.9 (15 Jun 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.7 (20 Apr 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.6 (23 Mar 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.5 (16 Feb 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.4 (19 Jan 2018)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.3 (20 Dec 2017)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.2 (17 Nov 2017)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.1 (20 Oct 2017)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1 (8 Sep 2017)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.0.1 (14 July 2017)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.0 (16 Jun 2017)

The post What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.1.1.19 (19 July 2019) appeared first on Mainframe DEV.

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To obtain the SMP/E version of IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS, you can either order it via Shopz or contact your existing IBM representative to place the Shopz order for you.

Optionally paid IBM Subscription & Support (S&S) entitles you to world-class support for IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS. With S&S, you are able to open service requests for IBM, which are prioritized based on severity and addressed in documented turnaround times; learn more.

You can add paid S&S to an already-obtained SMP/E version of IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS by contacting your IBM representative, or you can get it when ordering the SMP/E version of the product initially. If you are ordering IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS as a prerequisite for Zowe, or OMEGAMON for Storage, the support you already receive for those products will cover your support needs for IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS too.

Shopz allows you to obtain the no charge SMP/E version with the option of adding Subscription & Support.
When you register for Shopz, you enter the customer numbers that you use to manage software. All existing IBM customers have at least one customer number. Multiple customer numbers are frequently used to manage software on different systems. If you don’t have a customer number, contact your existing IBM representative or get connected with a representative here.

Steps to order the SMP/E edition (with or without paid S&S) in Shopz:


After you login to Shopz, go to My Orders, click Create new order, and use the following selections to purchase IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS, V8:
Select the radio button for package category: z/OS – Products = CBPDO (products).
Note: ServerPac (which has a dialog program to help you install) will become available at a later date.
1. Optional: Name your order. Press Continue.
2. You should see a list of your company hardware. Select hardware model for installation. Press Continue.
3. Optional: You can upload a report of your current software environment, and Shopz will tell you required prerequisites. Press Continue.
4. Shop for products. Under the Catalog view, select the following:
Group: All groups
Language: All languages
Filter: Show all products
Search field: Product ID
Search for: 5655-DKN
Click “Show catalog”.
Select 5655-DKN in the search results. 
Press Continue.
5.  Verify your order.
6.  Select the new license.
7.  Specify delivery options. Select delivery media and provide shipping information.
Note: In the special instructions box, indicate either ‘I would like to purchase S&S’ or ‘I would like to opt out of S&S’.
8.   Review the order and submit.

You will get a pricing notification for the SMP/E edition without S&S, which is no license charge. If you specify that you’d like to purchase S&S, IBM will contact you about placing an S&S order. 

The post Obtain the SMP/E edition and optional support of IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS appeared first on Mainframe DEV.

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Node.js is an asynchronous event driven JavaScript runtime, designed to build scalable network applications. This tutorial will demonstrate how to use IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS® to create and serve HTTPS web services, and how to create HTTPS clients with help from the Request npm module.

Serving HTTPS web services

This section will demonstrate how to create and serve HTTPS web services.

Step 1: Download and Install IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS®

Download IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS here: Download IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS®

Follow the Knowledge Center Documentation installation instructions to install Node.js and required prerequisites.

Step 2: Start a New Project

Create your project directory and change your current working directory to it. For this tutorial, we will name our sample project my-server.

mkdir my-server
cd my-server

Create a Node.js Package using npm as follows:

npm init --yes

This command will create a package.json file which describes your package and its dependencies. The file will contain the following content:

{
  "name": "my-server",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  },
  "keywords": [],
  "author": "",
  "license": "ISC"
}

The main source file for our project will be named index.js by default.

Step 3: Generate SSL Key and Certificate

You will need to generate a private SSL key and a self-signed certificate to use HTTPS.

This step requires the OpenSSL client. If the OpenSSL client is not installed on your system, you may download it from the Rocket Software website. The download link is given in the Knowledge Center Documentation installation instructions.

Generate the private key privatekey.pem using the following command:

openssl genrsa -out privatekey.pem 1024

Generate a certificate signing request named certrequest.csr. You may be prompted for information that will be incorporated into your certificate request. Enter the information when prompted. Use the following command to begin the process of generating the request:

openssl req -new -key privatekey.pem -out certrequest.csr

Generate a self-signed certificate certificate.pem using the following command:

openssl x509 -req -in certrequest.csr -signkey privatekey.pem -out certificate.pem

Verify that the generated files privatekey.pem and certificate.pem are tagged correctly:

ls -T privatekey.pem

If the command prints out:

t ISO8859-1   T=on  privatekey.pem

Then the file is already tagged correctly. The prefix t ISO8859-1   T=on indicates that the file is tagged as ISO8859-1, and there is nothing you need to do.

If a different message appears, then the file still needs to be tagged. Determine the file’s current encoding:

file -W filecodeset=ISO8859-1 privatekey.pem

If the command prints out:

privatekey.pem: text

Then the file needs to be tagged as ISO8859-1. Run this command:

chtag -tc 819 privatekey.pem

Otherwise, if the command instead prints out:

privatekey.pem:  binary data

Then the file needs to be tagged as IBM-1047. Run this command instead:

chtag -tc 1047 privatekey.pem

Repeat the verification for certificate.pem (replace all instances of privatekey.pem with certificate.pem for each command.)

Step 4: Writing the HTTPS web service

Manually create a new file index.js, and then open it in a text editor of your choosing.

Write the following code to the file:

// Load modules that we'll use.
const https = require('https'); // HTTPS web server.
const fs = require('fs'); // Read files.


// Configuration for the HTTPS web server.
const options = {
  key: fs.readFileSync('privatekey.pem'), // Read privatekey.pem file.
  cert: fs.readFileSync('certificate.pem'), // Read certificate.pem file.
};


// Create the https server and begin listening for requests.
https.createServer(options, (req, res) => {
  // This callback function will be called when someone makes a request to the https server.
  // req will contain the request data, while res will allow a response to be sent back.
  res.writeHead(200); // Set the HTTP response status codes to 200 OK.
  res.end('hello world\n'); // Write the string 'hello world\n' to the body, and send the response back.
}).listen(3000); // Listen for requests on port 3000.
Step 5: Run the HTTPS web service

Run the index.js code we wrote using the following command:

node index.js

For this demonstration, our service listens on port 3000. If this port is already in use by another service, then replace it with a different port that’s not in use.

Next, test that the service is running correctly. Direct your web browser to your server on the appropriate port:

https://your.server.ip.address:3000

You may receive a warning message informing you that your connection is not private, or that the certificate authority is invalid. This is to be expected, because the certificate we generated in Step 3 is self-signed. Ignore the warning message and tell your browser to proceed to the website anyway.

You may see this message.

If everything is working correctly, your web browser should now display the “hello world” message.

“hello world” message in the web browser. Creating HTTPS clients with Request npm module

This section will demonstrate how to create HTTPS clients with help from the Request npm module.

For the purposes of this demonstration, it is recommended that you first complete the previous section, and keep the HTTPS web server running. The following instructions will assume you are working in a new session.

Step 1: Download and Install IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS®

If you already downloaded and installed IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS® in the previous section, skip this step.

Download IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS® here: Download IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS®

Follow the Knowledge Centre Documentation installation instructions to install Node.js and required prerequisites.

Step 2: Start a New Project

Create your project directory and change your current working directory to it. For this tutorial, we will name our sample project my-client.

mkdir my-client
cd my-client

Create a Node.js Package using npm as follows:

npm init --yes

This command will create a package.json file which describes your package and its dependencies. The file will contain the following content:

{
  "name": "my-client",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "description": "",
  "main": "index.js",
  "scripts": {
    "test": "echo \"Error: no test specified\" && exit 1"
  },
  "keywords": [],
  "author": "",
  "license": "ISC"
}

The main source file for our project will be named index.js by default.

Step 3: Install Project Dependencies

The Request npm module needs to be installed as a dependency using:

npm install --save request

This will generate a new file package-lock.json, and modify package.json to add Request as a project dependency. The Request npm module and all of its dependencies will be downloaded and installed under a newly created node_modules directory.

Step 4: Writing the HTTPS Client

Manually create a new file index.js, and then open it in a text editor of your choosing.

Write the following code to the file:

// Load modules that we'll use.
const request = require('request'); // HTTPS Client.


// Configuration for the HTTPS request that we're about to make.
const options = {
    // If you changed the port of the web service in the previous section to something other 
    // than 3000, modify the url accordingly as well.
    url : 'https://your.server.ip.address:3000', // The url of the server we're making the request to.
    rejectUnauthorized: false, // Ignore self-signed certificate warnings.
};


// Make a GET request.
request.get(options, function (err, res, body) {
  // This callback function will be called when someone makes a request to the https server.
  console.log('error:', err); // Print the error if any occurred.
  console.log('statusCode:', res && res.statusCode); // Print the response status code if a response was received.
  console.log('body:', body); // Print the body of the page.
});
Step 5: Run the HTTPS Client

Run the index.js code we wrote using the following command:

node index.js

Assuming that the HTTPS web server from the previous section is still running, you should now see the following printed to the console:

error: null
statusCode: 200
body: hello world

Since the HTTPS web server that we wrote returns status code 200 with “hello world” as the body, this indicates that both our HTTPS web service as well as the HTTPS client are working correctly.

If a different message appears, then either the HTTPS server from the previous section is no longer running, or you entered the IP address/hostname of a different web server.

The post HTTPS web services and clients using IBM SDK for Node.js – z/OS® appeared first on Mainframe DEV.

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We’ve just released the latest z/OS Connect EE open beta. We have added support for greater than 32K length string fields, and looking for your feedback on the JWT support for API requester, and IMS Database service provider features.

Greater than 32K length string fields now supported for API requester

For API requester, support for greater than 32K length string fields is now available in the z/OS Connect EE open beta. Two new build toolkit properties, characterVarying and characterVaryingLimit, control how variable-length character data is mapped to a language structure. Together with defaultCharacterMaxLength, these properties allow strings with a maximum length of 16777214 to be mapped as fixed-length strings, null-terminated strings, or as two related elements: data-length and data.

Find out more.

JWT support for API requester

This feature has been available in earlier versions of the open beta. We value your feedback.

z/OS Connect EE API requester JWT support can now be used when a CICS, IMS, or z/OS application calls a RESTful API that requires a JWT. On behalf of the CICS, IMS or z/OS application, z/OS Connect EE acts as a client to request a JWT from an authentication server and access the API with the JWT.

Find out more.

Furthermore, z/OS Connect EE API requester also provides the capability that allows a CICS, IMS or z/OS application to call a RESTful API that is secured by using both JWT and OAuth 2.0, where JWT is used to authenticate a client, and OAuth 2.0 is used to authorize the client to access the API.

Find out more.

IMS Database service provider

This feature has been available in earlier versions of the open beta. We value your feedback.

With the IMS Database service provider, you can create services which query IMS databases by using SQL statements. Using the open beta API toolkit, you can create an IMS database service by specifying database connection information and an SQL query. You can then deploy the service, and create APIs to test it, all from within the API toolkit.

In this release of the open beta you can create and test a database service.

The open beta API toolkit has been enhanced with the following features:

  • You can create an IMS database service with a SQL query and a database connection profile. The following must be prepared prior to using the API toolkit to create the IMS database service:
    • The SQL SELECT query must be prepared and tested.
    • The database connection profile must be prepared in the defined XML format. A database connection profile template is provided.
  • The service editor allows renaming, including, excluding, and setting default values for request and response fields.
  • IMS database services can be deployed to a z/OS Connect EE server for testing from within the API Toolkit.

In this beta, only access to IMS databases through SQL SELECT queries are supported. SQL INSERT, UPDATE, and DELETE commands are not supported.

IBM does not warrant that any version of the program that is formally released or made commercially available (if any) will be similar to, or compatible with, early release versions. Please let us know what you think about the IMS Database service provider, we value your feedback!

Find out more.

Open beta code available for up to 120 days

This version of the open beta is available for up to 120 days. We hope this will allow time for you to evaluate the new features offered through our beta and to provide us feedback on what you do and don’t like with these features. Please use the z/OS Connect EE open beta forum to provide your feedback.

Open beta version of the API toolkit

The open beta version of the API toolkit to accompany the open beta z/OS Connect EE runtime is V3.9.6.5. This open beta version of the toolkit will currently only run on Windows. You are strongly recommended to use this version of the API toolkit with the open beta z/OS Connect EE runtime to enjoy the full suite of new features available in both the toolkit and runtime, and also to ensure you maintain compatibility. For example, to try out the IMS Database service provider, you must use this open beta version of both the API toolkit and z/OS Connect EE runtime.

Open beta build and expiry dates

The build date for this version of the z/OS Connect EE open beta runtime is 20190701-1005 and appears on the BAQR0000I message.

This version of the z/OS Connect EE open beta is due to expire on 29 October 2019 and appears on the BAQR9999I message. However, do not panic! A newer version of the open beta with additional enhancements will be available to download before this version expires.

Using a server from a previous release of the z/OS Connect EE open beta

If you are using a server from a previous release of the z/OS Connect EE open beta, the first time you start your server with this release of the open beta, you may need to specify the --clean option on your started task PARMS statement, for example: /S BAQSTRT,PARMS=' serverName --clean'. This is to delete all persistent cached information.
Find out more about the --clean option.

If you fail to specify the --clean option your server may not function correctly and you may see the following errors in your messages.log, STDERR, and FFDC:

[ERROR ] CWWKF0002E: A bundle could not be found for com.fasterxml.jackson.core.jackson-annotations/2.9.5.
[ERROR ] CWWKF0002E: A bundle could not be found for com.fasterxml.jackson.core.jackson-databind/2.9.5.
[ERROR ] CWWKF0002E: A bundle could not be found for org.yaml.snakeyaml/1.11.0.
[ERROR ] CWWKF0002E: A bundle could not be found for com.fasterxml.jackson.dataformat.jackson-dataformat-yaml/2.9.5.
[ERROR ] CWWKF0002E: A bundle could not be found for com.fasterxml.jackson.core.jackson-core/2.9.5.

Subsequent starts of the server do not require the --clean option.

WebSphere Liberty Profile 19.0.0.3

The version of WebSphere Liberty Profile embedded in this open beta is version 19.0.0.3. The version level of the WebSphere Liberty Profile appears in both the top of the z/OS Connect EE messages.log file, and also in the STDOUT logfile.

Angel V11

The version of the angel shipped with WebSphere Liberty Profile V19.0.0.3 is version 11.

If you choose to remain at a lower version of the angel, you will see the following warning message in your z/OS Connect EE messages.log file when you start up your server:
CWWKB0127W: The current angel version is earlier than the version that the server expects. Update the angel version to the latest available version.
Find out more.

Feedback please!

While we hope you enjoy these new features, do understand that features delivered in the open beta are not always delivered in the GA product. Please provide feedback on these new features using the z/OS Connect EE open beta forum as your feedback will help influence our decisions.

Get started today

Use the links below to find out more, and to get started with the open beta now!

What’s in this release?

View the change history

Download the open beta now

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With much of the Application Delivery Foundation for z Systems (ADFz) team on long overdue vacations celebrating their respective nation’s holidays this week (Canada Day and US Independence Day), I thought I’d take this time to highlight the enhanced capabilities our team recently delivered this past quarter.

But it’s July, aren’t we in a new quarter? Indeed, we are. I was fortunate to have had the opportunity to speak at the Nordic GSE conference in Aarhus, Denmark. While there and the following week, I visited many valued clients and had lively discussion around the enhancements we have recently delivered and those we plan to deliver. After spending a few days celebrating Midsummer in Sweden (see the maypole in the picture above that is raised as part of the celebration) it was time to make the trek home and share some of the enhancements to ADFz. 

In 2Q19, our priority for ADFz was to deliver on client Request for Enhancements (RFEs). In addition to these RFEs, the ADFz team published Host Configuration Assistant for Z Development (HCA) V2.0, a free, cloud-based wizard that helps clients simplify planning and configuration of z/OS Development products. 

New in V14.17
  • IBM Developer for z Systems (IDz), the developer’s cockpit, provides an integrated development environment for developing, unit testing, and debugging IBM z/OS® applications. One focus area in IDz 14.1.7 was Menu Manager customer requirements. Menu Manager is an essential IDz capability that enables integration of existing utilities that your team uses (for example, REXX, CLISTs, TSO Commands, JCL, or ISPF Edit Macros) into IDz, making it easier for your team to continue using these same familiar functions. IDz 14.17 Menu Manager related enhancements include the possibility of Menu Manager actions in the Remote System Details view, a new variable named $text, to enable you to provide help text for IDz developers on the Menu Manager dialog, and other customer requested capabilities.
     

    Other new features in IDz 14.1.7 include easier stacking of commands in the LPEX editor, a “Create Section” Quick Fix, plus for the PL/I editor, addition of new Length and Offset columns to the Data Elements table. Finally,  Remote Systems View and the Remote Systems Detail View have been enhanced to show additional information for datasets.  Some of the enhanced information includes: Allocated directory blocks, Used directory blocks, Proportion Used, and Used Pages. 

    Please see the What’s New in IBM Developer for z Systems 14.1.7 blog to learn more. 

    To improve your debug experience, IDz 14.1.7 offers Source Entry Breakpoints, which provide the ability to set paragraph breakpoints prior to starting a debug session. Because these breakpoints are set using the original source files, they persist between debug sessions. 

    And if you use Visual Debugging, there is a new toolbar action in the Breakpoints view.   The “Link with Visual Debug View” action allows you to select a stack pattern breakpoint in the Breakpoints view, and later displays the stack pattern path in the Visual Debug view. In addition, stack pattern breakpoints that are set in one debug session are restored in subsequent debug sessions.  Note that the debug enhancements described for IDz 14.1.7 are also included in Z Open Development 1.0.2

  • IBM  Debug for z Systems, is powered by IBM’s next generation debug technology, the IBM z/OS Debugger. With V14.1.7 of all products that include the z/OS Debugger (IBM Debug for z Systems, IBM Developer for z Systems, and IBM Developer for z Systems Enterprise Edition) you can now use z/OS Debugger Utilities option 4.6 to set a different RESLIB for a specific IMS subsystem. For more information, see Scenario F: Enabling the Transaction Isolation Facility. In addition, the remote Playback function can now record and playback variable values. For more information, see Using the Playback toolbar.
  • IBM Developer for z Systems Enterprise Edition (IDzEE) is a superset of IDz and Debug for z Systems with value add capabilities like Dependency Based Build (DBB). DBB provides the facilities to build traditional z/OS applications, with a  modern scripting-language-based capability to automate delivery into a open DevOps pipeline. DBB 1.0.5 offers new samples:
    • Scripts to convert JCL to Groovy scripts using the DBB API to assist in your migration from any Library Manager to any modern SCM
    • New Application Build Scripts sample for z/OS (zAppBuild) with configuration files, based on client deployment experiences.
    • An ISPF Git Client is provided as a sample to allow those who wish to continue to use ISPF or for quick edits without bringing up Eclipse.

    Please see this blog to learn more about DBB 1.0.5. And if you want to learn how DBB can facilitate migration from a legacy library to a modern SCM, please register for this webinar: Migration Made Easy- host SCLM to Git on Z

  • File Manager (FM) provides a comprehensive set of tools for efficiently manipulating z/OS data. FM 14.1.7 adds support for ISPF extended statistics in PDS/PDSE directories, enhancing the FM DB2 component to allow generation of a copybook describing the exported data, File Manager PassTicket support for FM/CICS logon, and other capabilities. Please see the File Manager service information for more information. 
  • Fault Analyzer (FA) simplifies the process of diagnosing z/OS application abends. FA V14.1.7 offers a simplified way to work with imported fault entries that are exported using the IDIROBOT exec and a new Snapdata option that enables a copy of the ENV data area to be stored when calling the program SNAP interface (IDISNAP). Please see the Fault Analyzer change summary for more details. 
  • Application Performance Analyzer (APA) helps you identify z/OS application performance and response time problems, and assists in reducing resource consumption. APA V14.1.7 offers serviceability enhancements and fixes described here
New in HCA

With V2.0, Host Configuration Assistant for IBM Application Delivery Foundation for z Systems has been renamed to Host Configuration Assistant for Z Development. This is because it has been improved to aid in configuration of the z/OS components of IBM Z Open Development,  IBM Z Open Unit Test, and DBB, in addition the ADFz products that it already supports. 

The most significant enhancements in HCA include: the ability to choose whether to start by picking the products for configuration, or the host components (sometimes shared across products), and optimizing the component selection page so that it highlights the relations between products and components. Because of these additions, configuration z/OS development tools becomes more intuitive than ever.  Please read this blog to learn more about HCA 2.0. 

As always, please contact me via this blog or LinkedIn if you have questions or comments on ADFz. In addition, please take the opportunity to provide end user feedback in the z/OS Explorer Aqua clients when prompted. If you have a concern or area of dissatisfaction, you will be prompted for your email; please provide it so that we can follow up to get to a better understanding of your concerns. And finally, let us know what additional features you need in ADFz by submitting feature requests in the IBM RFE Community

As the third quarter of 2019 begins, I hope that you too have enjoyed or plan to enjoy some vacation time with family and friends to come back rested for fall- or spring if you live Australia, New Zealand, or South Africa! 

Additional resources

The post Application Delivery Foundation for z Systems V3.1.1- What’s new in 2Q appeared first on Mainframe DEV.

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IBM® ADI V5.1.0.3 is the latest release in our continuous delivery process where we introduce new features, usability enhancements and bug fixes on a regular basis.

In the December 2018 ADI release (V5.1.0) we introduced the first version of our Business Rule Discovery features. Business rule and term discovery is the key process of enterprise modernization and centers around exploring and identifying business logic in enterprise applications. The identified business logic and its terms could subsequently be formalized and stored independently or together with the implementation for easier management, control, and evolution.

As part of the IBM Application Discovery and Delivery Intelligence suite, ADI is integrating with Application Discovery (AD) capabilities and uses enterprise applications’ static analysis data and analytics from AD to guide the business rule discovery process.

In the subsequent release (V5.1.0.2) in March 2019, we introduced significant new features around Business Rule Discovery. In particular, we started using much more detailed data from Application Discovery, which allows precision exploration of the keywords discovered in the enterprise applications as potential candidates for business terms and business rules.

Also in 5.1.0.2, we provided the ability to create Business Rule Packages to organize business terms, code snippets, their relationships, and to facilitate business rule creation and lifecycle management:

If you would like to see a demo of ADDI Business Rule Discovery features in V5.1.0.2, watch the Webinar presented by Rami Katan, Chief Architect for ADDI, and Chris Backhouse, Architect for IBM Operational Decision Management.

In our current June 2019 release (V5.1.0.3), we enhanced the detailed view of the Business Rule Packages to allow managing the association of the business terms and code snippets. It is now possible to navigate directly to code snippet association from the detailed view. It is also possible to remove code snippet association from the business rule package by using the same view:

To further help organize business rule discovery process, in V5.1.0.3 we introduced the ability to group business terms into named hierarchies. Business term hierarchies are useful when you organize various related business terms to better manage them. For example, an enterprise may want to organize business terms first by line of business, then by specific groups of functions such as user management, account management, etc.
The business term hierarchy can be accessed at each stage of the discovery process and used for managing already discovered terms and rules.
Business term hierarchy on the main Application Discovery keyword exploration page:

Business term hierarchy on the detailed keyword exploration page:

Business term hierarchy on the Business Term Catalog page:

User-defined grouping of the business terms into hierarchies can also provide valuable information in further discovering business rules and terms in the enterprise artifacts.

In March we added support for Application Performance Analyzer (APA) and System Management Facility (SMF) data collection and trending. In V5.1.0.3, we enhanced this feature to allow view of the full APA and SMF reports in a content browser:

As with all our releases, we enhanced the usability and stability of the product by providing bug fixes and other improvements.

To try out ADDI and other IBM products live in the cloud, visit IBM® Z® software trials.

For more details about IBM® ADI V5.1.0.3, visit its documentation in the IBM® Knowledge Center.

The post What’s new in IBM Application Delivery Intelligence for IBM Z (IBM ADI) V5.1.0.3 appeared first on Mainframe DEV.

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We’ve just released V3.0.22 of z/OS Connect EE.

In this release we have upgraded the level of Liberty and included some APAR fixes.

WebSphere Liberty Profile 19.0.0.3

The version of WebSphere Liberty Profile that is embedded in z/OS Connect EE V3.0.22 is V19.0.0.3.

Angel V11

The version of the angel shipped with WebSphere Liberty Profile V19.0.0.3 is version 11.

You are advised to update your system so that your z/OS Connect EE server uses this version of the angel. If you choose not to update to this level of the angel, then the following warning message will appear in your messages.log file:

CWWKB0127W: The current angel version is earlier than the version that the server expects. Update the angel version to the latest available version.

Find out more.

API toolkit V3.0.6.6 / V3.2.6.6

The latest version of the z/OS Connect EE API toolkit plug-in to design and create your services and APIs is V3.0.6.6 for Aqua 3.0 users and V3.2.6.6 for Aqua 3.2 users. You are recommended to use this latest version as it includes all the latest fixes.

Find out more.

Get started today

Use the links below to find out more, and to get started with V3.0.22 now!

New to z/OS Connect EE?

Go to the Developer Center

What’s in this release?

View the change history

Download V3.0.22 Now

Get V3.0.22 [PH11931]

The post z/OS Connect EE V3.0.22 released appeared first on Mainframe DEV.

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IBM Dependency Based Build (DBB) has been announced and is now available since 6/21 as a stand-alone product. Previously DBB was a feature of IBM Developer for z Systems Enterprise Edition (IDz) and IBM Z Open Development (ZOD). With this new delivery vector, clients using Standard Edition of IDz or any other Integrated Development Environment for COBOL, PL/I, and Assembler can now access to build capabilities integrated to modern Source Configuration Managers (SCM) and Pipeline Coordinators.

DBB 1.0.5 also introduces new features delivered as samples on github.com DBB repository :
Scripts are provided to convert JCLs to Groovy scripts using the DBB API to assist in your migration from any Library Manager to any modern SCM
– A new Application Build Scripts sample for z/OS (zAppBuild) with configuration files to allow them to be used with limited modifications, based on client deployment experiences.
– an ISPF Git Client is provided as a sample to allow those who wish to continue to use ISPF Edit or for those quick edits on the system.

DBB 1.0.5 core APIs have also been enhanced :
Dependencies Management now supports finding and copying COBOL copybooks and PL/I include files that are stored in tar files and gzip files.
– During migration of data sets to Git, automatic detection of source members that contain characters that cannot be safely converted from IBM-1047 to UTF-8.
DBB Web Application Liberty server is now supported on Linux on IBM Z.

Start evaluating DBB today with a zero-install environment including Jenkins and Git running on IBM Z Development & Test with the IBM Z Trial Program. Z Trial Program is completely free and can be available in two hours for three days, where you can learn key capabilities through four scenarios including hands-on tutorials that explain how to:
Load a Git repository and modify the COBOL code
Run a build with IBM Dependency Based Build (DBB) and visually debug the program.
Commit and push modifications into the Git repository and request a Jenkins build.
Write a sample build script using DBB.

For more information check out the DBB marketplace page.

The post What’s new in IBM Dependency Based Build 1.0.5 appeared first on Mainframe DEV.

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Recently Application Performance Analyzer for z/OS has been receiving increased attention. We’ve noticed that many of our users bring to us both unique as well as common questions regarding the product. We only thought it appropriate to compile these questions into a monthly FAQ blog for APA. Contained herein are real questions from users, much like yourself. We hope you find the responses informative and instructive. You can expect to see an APA FAQ post once a month, so keep the questions coming.

We are using a CICSPlex configuration with TOR-AOR regions. Under our current configuration any given transaction could be routed to any available region. What are the best practices when using APA in a CICSPlex, while also optimizing to reduce APA overhead? Should sample observations be taken in each eligible region?
 
First off, it’s important to point out one of APA’s more prominent features – the user is always able to select specific CICS regions to be measured. We also should stress that measuring every region in the CICSplex may not be practical. Of course your own approach is quite unique; it will be completely dependent on your own production environment (i.e. the number of regions in the CICSplex).
 
In the case of a TOR-AOR arrangement like yours, you could configure your testing to limit observations to only those TOR-AOR candidates where the transactions occur. Consider asking the question: Have we identified a suspected region? If not, then APA observations could be performed across the entire CICSPlex. Once you are able to pinpoint the affected region, you’ll want to limit your performance tuning to that region only.

What happens when I sample observations within a single CICS region? Will the entire region be sampled?
 
The short answer is no. APA sampling only occurs for the transaction that is being monitored, not for the entire CICS region. When initially configuring an observation session, you can specify the transaction and one or more CICS regions (TOR or AORs). But only the transactions occurring in those regions will be monitored.

Once your measurement begins, APA will sample the CICS address space at the requested sampling rate and interval. During the measurement, each time APA samples the address space it checks for the specified transaction or a transaction from the specified terminal. If the transaction does not occur, then the sample will end immediately without collecting data. We should make an important distinction here; it’s not the measurement that ends immediately but rather the individual sample. In cases where samples are taken in the absence of a transaction, the resulting CPU overhead is minimal and significantly lower compared to instances where a transaction is found to be active. In any case, the measurement will continue to run until the requested number of samples have been collected.
 
Can I initiate an APA sample when my transaction executes? 

Yes, you can set this initially. Alternatively, you can configure APA so that it runs when certain thresholds are reached. This setting, which will limit CPU consumption, can be found on the Observation Session List Panel:

And recall that APA has been architected in such a way that results in negligible impact on CPU performance.  
 
In cases where a specific transaction is of interest, problem determination can also be achieved by combining the capabilities of APA and a performance management suite such as OMEGAMON. In a previous blog post, our lead architect for APA, Francisco Anaya, wrote that OMEGAMON for z/OS can be configured to initiate a new observation session request when an event like CPU threshold in a batch job is exceeded. This new feature (APA V14.1.4 and newer) helps you in taking a more proactive approach to diagnosing CPU usage. And as always, APA analysis reports include the program(s) in the job that contribute to the high CPU usage, WAIT times for database queries, and many other measurements too. 
 
Is APA safe to run in production?
 
Absolutely APA can run in production! APA is appropriate for multiple environments including development, testing, and production. APA is a very DevOps friendly tool and should be leveraged whenever your strategic imperatives include CI/CD. Indeed, it is true that APA’s main purpose is to help identify performance issues in your production applications. Taken a step further, the production insights derived from APA can provide your developer teams with an unparalleled level of instant feedback further fueling your business’ growth and agility. 
 
What is the impact on performance? Should I be concerned?

Remember that CPU utilization for APA is always included in the analysis reports. Typically, this usage is insignificant. Historically, our partners report APA overhead percentages in the single digits. It’s worth mentioning that the default max CPU usage is adjustable using the MaxMIPPercent parameter.
 
In the past there have been questions related to CPU consumption of extractors. This is quite specific and is highly dependent on the activities of the application and the frequency of subsystem usage. If we use a CICS example, when an extractor is activated but the suspected program does not contain CICS commands; the overhead is nearly imperceptible for that extractor. Put another way, while all subsystem extractors might be active the only one that will consume the CPU are those that are used in the application’s code.

Is there a list of potential recommendations or capabilities for APA? 

Short answer: APA can tell you whether your application is CPU intensive or Wait/IO intensive and provides a series of reports for both, which can then be used to aid in performance tuning. You can even pinpoint the specific source statements that are causing the CPU consumption issue so that your developer teams can develop a solution. 
 
Now, if you are asking about APA features and functionalities; that might take a while. There are quite a few. Consider this, each subsystem has its own set of recommendations that appear only when certain conditions occur. And these recommendations will all be dependent on your own operating environment. Just to provide a brief overview, APA currently provides performance analysis for: Assembler, C/C++, COBOL, PL/I, Java, CICS, DB2, IMS, WebSphere MQ, and WebSphere Application Server. 

One other area that we are excited about is the added APA functionality in our most recent release of ADDI. Now you can export your APA XML data files to ADDI and produce Application Program Performance Trending reports. By using “Workbooks” in ADDI you’ll even be able to keep separate production, development, and testing performance analyses. 

For answers to all your APA questions and more, ping Chris Hoina – Offering Manager for APA at:
Twitter: @chrishoina
Email: chrishoina@ibm.com

The post Application Performance Analyzer FAQs (June 2019) appeared first on Mainframe DEV.

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IBM Explorer for z/OS Aqua V3.2.0.3 for June 21 is now ‘live’ and available for download!

Check out this blog for the product updates that are delivered in this release.

The following products have been updated in this release:

There is no update for the following products in this release:

Along with product updates, the following documentation is added or updated in KC Installer:

  • IBM CICS Explorer V5.5.0.3
  • IBM z/OS Connect Enterprise Edition V3
  • IBM CICS Transaction Server v5.5
  • IBM Z Open Development V1.0.1

If you have any question or comment, drop us a note at our Mainframe Developer Center forum.

Previous What’s new blogs for V3.2:
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.2.0.2 (26 April 2019)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.2.0.1 (22 Mar 2019)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.2.0.1 (22 Feb 2019)
What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.2.0 (14 Dec 2018)

The post What’s new in z/OS Explorer Aqua V3.2.0.3 (21 June 2019) appeared first on Mainframe DEV.

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