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Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce by Denver Metro Chamber - 3M ago

Education Bills: Getting Students through School with Credits and Real-World Work Experience

This week the Chamber supported three education bills that will provide additional opportunities for educational attainment for our students. Education is among our pillars to build a strong economy – talent is the most valuable asset for employers and is what attracts great employers to our region.

Senate Bill 216 is a pilot program that will allow participating schools to create innovative learning plans for their students. These plans could include opportunities to participate in apprenticeships with local businesses, competency-based learning projects and capstone projects, among others. The “seat-time” requirement in today’s school funding laws is frequently cited as a barrier for some schools to participate in such programs, and this bill hopes to address that and, subsequently, increase participation.

Senate Bill 176 modernizes current concurrent enrollment opportunities and requires that they lead to guaranteed transferable credit across all Colorado institutions. Students need to know that the concurrent courses they take in high school will be accepted for credit when they move on to college. By 2020, 74 percent of jobs will require some type of education beyond high school. Colorado’s existing labor force has a credential attainment rate of only 57 percent beyond high school, and only 43 percent of Colorado’s ninth graders are attempting to obtain a college degree. We must get every child to and through some level of post-secondary education to maintain Colorado’s competitive advantage.

The Chamber also supported House Bill 1252, which allows students and members of the current workforce to receive postsecondary credit for demonstrating competencies gained through work-related experience, work-based learning and apprenticeships. A statewide plan will be implemented to accomplish this to ensure that these opportunities are captured across Colorado. This legislation is modeled after a 2017 college credit program for members of the military, which passed unanimously and established a framework for prior learning while in service to count for postsecondary credit.

Oil and Gas Bill Heads to the Governor’s Office for Signature

Senate Bill 181, the comprehensive oil and natural gas legislation that has flown through the legislature, now heads to the governor’s office for signature after the Senate accepted the amendments added in the House. While the Chamber and the industry are still in opposition to the bill, credit should be given to legislative leaders who opened up to conversations with industry experts and accepted a few critical amendments that provide a level of certainty to oil and gas developers. Amendments include ensuring that fines, fees, setback distances and other regulations are reasonable, a request our president and CEO, Kelly Brough, included in her testimony last week. Amendments also removed the authority of the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission’s (COGCC) director to refuse issuing a permit and to make the COGCC a professional commission rather than the volunteer commission it is now. State officials have also committed to working with the industry during the regulatory rulemaking that will follow the bill.

Follow the Session

As always, Chamber staff will continue working on your behalf, analyzing and weighing in on legislation that can impact your business. We list all our bill positions online. Stay in touch with us by checking our website and sharing with us your concerns as the session progresses.

The post This Week in Policy appeared first on Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

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The Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce’s Business Awards celebrate organizations from across the region who are leading in their field and making an impact in the community – writing our next chapter as a great community to live and do business.

Meet the 2019 Minority or Woman-Owned Business of the Year finalists, presented by Xcel Energy: 360 Engineering, Cesco Linguistic Services and Pearl Street Lights. These businesses are leading in their fields and building a stronger, inclusive business community. The winner will be announced live on May 1.

Get your seat for the 2019 Business Awards Luncheon!

Denise Dihle, president of 360 Engineering, is building a different kind of business in this male-dominated field.

360 Engineering is a full-service woman-owned mechanical engineering firm serving clients in Denver and across the U.S.  Founded in 2003 by Dihle, the firm was built on providing exceptional customer service, which remains their core value and top priority. 360 Engineering’s services consist of mechanical and plumbing engineering, sustainability consulting and commissioning.

They have worked on major projects for organizations including Denver International Airport, National Western, Botanic Gardens and National Renewable Energy Laboratory – over this 11-year partnership they’ve completed more than 100 projects.

“To be so successful as a woman-owned business in a traditional male industry is absolutely rewarding,” Dihle said. “I have had the opportunity to speak to young women engineers who are coming up and just graduating … I hope that motivates them to keep moving forward with their career. Believe in yourself and when you get the opportunity to sit at the table, speak because you have what it takes to be there.”

Giovanna Carriero-Contreras, co-founder of Cesco Linguistic Services, is breaking down language barriers.

Cesco Linguistic Services delivers high-quality interpreting and translations services in more than 120 languages, working in health care, education, social services, nonprofit, legal, workers’ compensation and international development sectors. A connecting voice across languages and cultures, Cesco Linguistic Services works under the principles of quality, efficiency and confidentiality, delivering services in a prompt, professional manner.

Carriero-Contreras, along with her husband, are advocating for better industry regulation to ensure people get accurate interpretation and translation. She has developed curriculum for language services-based careers at South High School and at Metropolitan State University of Denver and hopes to expand this offering at the high school and collegiate level.

“As a woman-owned business I truly foster the diversity of perspectives that come to the table every time we need to work on a new project, come up with new ideas or also make changes,” Carriero-Contreras said.

Kerry Humphrey, founder of Pearl Street Lights, was able to rebuild her life through small business, and is working to empower others to do the same.

Pearl Street Lights creates and manufactures hand-poured soy wax candles with crackling wooden wicks, highly-fragranced wax melts and massage candles through a nonprofit job training organization that hires and trains individuals with barriers to employment.

Kerry founded her company in 2014 after her release from prison – launching Pearl Street Lights was a part of her healing process and it has allowed her to be that light for others who face barriers to employment. She partners with Mile High Workshop to produce her products, and each candle has the signature of the person who created it.

“As a woman-owned business, we have some amazing aspirations… one of which is to have Pearl Street Lights candles available in retail stores all across the country and provide a lot of opportunities for amazing individuals who need a little extra support in our community,” Humphrey said.

Laura James is the senior marketing and communications specialist for the Denver Metro Chamber.

The post Meet the 2019 Minority or Woman-Owned Business of the Year Finalists appeared first on Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

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Our companies have been giving back to their community for generations – and today, it’s not only considered cool but expected – 86 percent of U.S. consumers expect companies to do good (specifically to take action on social, environmental or other community issues). Our members continue to lead in this arena, recognizing that their corporate giving and community service strategies are key to attracting the very best workers. (In fact, 79 percent of Millennials consider a company’s social responsibility track record when deciding where they will work. And once they’re on a team, that connection keeps them engaged – reducing employee turnover by up to 50 percent.)

This commitment is why our Chamber was a founding member of B:CIVIC and a big part why we married the work of B:CIVIC with our Leadership Foundation last fall. B:CIVIC helps companies of all sizes develop their strategy for how they want to engage their team, give back to our community and have a meaningful impact. And, we are always looking for ways to shine a spotlight on the incredible work our companies are engaging in – it’s why we are helping launch The Civic 50 in Colorado.

What is the Civic 50? It’s like the Good Housekeeping Seal of Approval (OK, you have to be over 50 to even know what that is, so ask someone in the office to explain it to you) for corporate responsibility. It’s a consistent way to measure on a national level for corporate citizenship. And, when companies achieve this level of standard – it is really stellar. Colorado has been chosen as the second community in the country to offer a regional version of The Civic 50. Our local version will be launched in partnership with B:CIVIC and CSR Solutions, allowing us to recognize the best of the best in Colorado.

There’s lots of ways you can get involved. No matter the size of your company, we want to hear about what you’re doing in the community. Join B:CIVIC on April 24 for its networking happy hour, Sparks ‘n Sips, to learn more about The Civic 50 and how you can apply. Colorado honorees will be recognized at the B:CIVIC Summit in September.

Get ready to hear some amazing stories.  We are already seeing a number of our members achieve this level of recognition as national Civic 50 honorees – Aetna, American Express, AT&T, Bank of America, Charles Schwab, Comcast, Deloitte, FedEx Corporation, GE, Hogan Lovells, IBM Corporation, KeyBank, KPMG, PwC, S&P Global, Southwest Airlines, UnitedHealth Group, Verizon, Wells Fargo and Western Union. Get inspired by their work by learning more about their approach to giving back here.

We hope you’ll join us at the Civic 50 kickoff and join the work of B:CIVIC. Chamber members can use the promo code Chamber1 to attend at no charge.

Kelly Brough is the president and CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber. 

The post Giving Back is Good Business appeared first on Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

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Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce by Denver Metro Chamber - 3M ago

Read about our members in the news: City and County of Denver, National Western Center and Waste Connections of Colorado.

Our members work hard every day to make the Denver metro area a great place to do business. We want to keep you in the know about the important work of our members, whether they are opening new business locations, hiring more people or creating new partnerships.

City and County of Denver: Nominations for the Monte Pascoe Civic Leadership Award are open. Nominate by April 26.
National Western CenterShare Your Idea and Be Part of the National Western Center by April 20.
Waste Connections of Colorado: Team Up for the #TrashTag Challenge and Help Clean Up Our Community

Share your news!

The post Member News appeared first on Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

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A healthy community fosters strong businesses. We all have the ability to positively impact our community – and we have some tips and resources to help get you started. You may be surprised to learn that you don’t have to have a lot of time or money to be socially responsible and give back to the community. If you or your company doesn’t know where to start with corporate social responsibility, we’re here to help.

When a company is civically engaged, not only does it benefit the community, but it also benefits the business and its employees. “There has been a shift away from ‘it’s a nice thing to do’ to ‘it’s something that companies must do (to stay competitive),’” said Joyce Witte, founder of Corporate Community Investment Network, a predecessor of B:CIVIC, a new partner of our Denver Metro Chamber Leadership Foundation that is committed to increasing corporate social responsibility by providing tools for companies of all sizes to meet the growing expectations of their customers and employees.

In fact, 86 percent of U.S. consumers expect companies to act on social, environmental or other community issues. Cone Research found that 79 percent of people prefer to work for a socially responsible company and 79 percent of employees think it’s important that their companies match their charitable giving. According to the first-of-its-kind Good Business report – developed in partnership by the Chamber and B:CIVIC – 93 percent of companies in Colorado that gave in-kind services did so in the state.

The Chamber was a founding member of B:CIVIC in 2013, and the Leadership Foundation and B:CIVIC have a history of working toward a similar mission to strengthen Colorado through community leadership and social responsibility.

So, what is CSR?
Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is an opportunity for a for-profit organization to give back to its community and be socially accountable to itself, its employees, customers and the public. CSR practices can enforce a stronger bond between employee and corporation; they can boost morale and productivity; be more desirable for clients and potential employees; reinforce brand reputation; and build trust within your community.

Small businesses – those with fewer than 100 workers – accounted for 98.2 percent of employers in the U.S. in 2016. “With numbers like that, we must provide small businesses the resources to be successful in giving back to their community and benefiting from the employee and customer loyalty CSR offers,” said Kirsten Vermulen, executive director of B:CIVIC.

Similarly, Colorado’s economy is fueled by 1 million small business employees. “It’s imperative – businesses are a tool that we can use to do good,” said Adam Odoski, co-founder of Denver-based Good River Beer. “It’s a way to give back and promote a healthy and sustainable community – environmentally and socially. It’s our responsibility as members of the community to give back to where we live. We should be giving back more than we take to make it sustainable.”

Here are five of the major ways that small (or large) businesses can start giving back:

Make it a priority from day one.
“(Good River Beer) started with a different business model. We started with distribution first and without a taproom,” Odoski said. This allowed them to focus on getting their beer to consumers without the overhead, allowing them to commit 2 percent of their gross revenue primarily to American White Water and Colorado Water Trust. The result, a nonprofit dubbed 2% for Rivers, was created with the mission to protect clean, healthy river ecosystems and promote responsible recreation access. And, Good River Beer is doing just that – along with
brewing good beer.

Similarly, 34 Degrees – a cracker and snack company – has been giving back since its inception. “It was woven into the fabric of the company,” said Jenny Cavanaugh, culture and community manager for 34 Degrees. “At the beginning of every year, we put volunteer days on the calendar and account for it in our budget.”

Start small.
“Pick a cause you’re passionate about and just do it. Don’t overthink it; don’t over analyze it. If you need to start off small, great – do it small. Every dollar or bit of time helps – it goes a long way,” said Odoski.

After participating in the Denver Metro Chamber Leadership Foundation’s Leadership Denver, Tom Brinegar, VP and CFO of PEAK Resources, Inc., became more prescriptive around community engagement and how to have a bigger impact. PEAK Resources, Inc. employees wanted to engage in their own community (where their office is located, in Valverde), so they got involved with Denver Public Schools, volunteering as a group on a regular basis.

“It’s also a huge team building experience,” Brinegar said. “When you’re back in the office, you’re having more of a personal relationship with colleagues. It does resonate with people.”

Align with your mission.
“Food security is a huge focus for us. It’s part of our mission and connection to the food world outside our world of selling crackers,” Cavanaugh said. 34 Degrees is “committed to donating 1 percent of baked crackers to organizations to fight hunger.” They have close relationships with Food Bank of the Rockies and Project Angel Heart but are always looking to find organizations that can benefit from donations.

As a technology firm, PEAK Resources, Inc. presents a four-year scholarship to assist college-bound students from KIPP Collegiate who are interested in pursuing a degree in the technology field. “Having our employees being able to feel part of that is a huge benefit to us,” Brinegar said.

Think past the cash.
“You can do this without setting aside a cash amount,” Witte said. “Donate goods or services or give your employees volunteer time – either as a group or individually.”

34 Degrees provides two days per year for each employee to volunteer in addition to a companywide group volunteer day. “This gives people the opportunity to give back to other organizations they feel passion about,” Cavanaugh said. PEAK Resources, Inc. and Good River Beer also give their employees volunteer time off each year to follow their own charitable passions.

Engage your employees.
“Take the time to go to (your) employees first. I don’t think you can be successful if you don’t get employee buy-in from the very beginning,” Brinegar said. Ask your employees what they want to invest in (that aligns with the mission for the organization) and encourage employees to step up and get involved in the planning. “Find a way to enable people to be that champion within your company.”

It’s also a great way to “recruit, retain, increase engagement and increase productivity within your staff,” said Witte.

According to Project ROI, a well-designed corporate social responsibility program can:

  • Increase employee engagement up to 7.5%
  • Increase employee productivity by 13%
  • Reduce employee turnover by 50%
  • Increase revenue by as much as 20%

And, that engagement makes good business sense, too, these small business leaders said. “It gives legitimacy to the business side,” said Cavanaugh. “And, it seems to be more meaningful when there is a connection to how you’re making money and how you’re making change to the world.”

Maggie McEntee was the digital communications and brand manager for the Denver Metro Chamber. 

The post How Giving Back Can Benefit your Business appeared first on Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

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Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce by Denver Metro Chamber - 3M ago

Economic and Revenue Forecast Impacts State Budget

Kate Watkins, chief economist for the Colorado Legislative Council, presented the Council’s economic and revenue forecast to the Chamber’s Legislative Policy Committee this week following the release of their March Revenue Forecast. Both the Legislative Council and the Governor’s Office of State Planning and Budgeting, who also released a March forecast, lowered projections by about $200 million from their respective December forecasts because of indicators of slower economic growth than previously expected.

While both consumers and investors are cautiously optimistic and wages are rising, consumer activity and investing has slowed. Global economic activity is also experiencing a slowdown for many reasons, including tariffs and trade tensions.

What this means for Colorado, and the current legislative session, is that there is less money than previously expected for the myriad of proposals being considered. Gov. Polis’ full-day kindergarten plan has been allocated $185 million, down from the $250 million initially requested. Each chamber has been allocated about $20 million for special projects, which doesn’t go far when proposals such as the Family and Medical Leave Insurance Program (FAMLI), which needs $50 million just to begin ramping up, are being considered. Senate Bill 188, which would create FAMLI, was heard in Senate Finance on March 19, but was laid over in committee due to too many concerns about the bill by committee members. It likely won’t be heard until the long bill makes it through both the House and the Senate and legislators have a better understanding of how they plan to allocate their limited extra funds.  You can read our testimony here.

Oil and Gas: Don’t Stop Production

On Monday, Chamber President and CEO Kelly Brough testified against Senate Bill 181 in the House Finance Committee. This is the second time the Chamber has submitted testimony on this bill, which imposes new regulations on the oil and gas industry, including increased local governmental control, changing the composition and mission of the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) and directing the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission (AQCC) to adopt stricter emissions rules.

Although there are numerous amendments the Chamber would like to see to ensure the industry continues to thrive in Colorado, Brough focused on two main issues. First, that the industry be allowed to continue to operate while regulations are put in place. Adams County issued a six-month moratorium on new permits because they were concerned about “a potential flood of new permit applications,” going against the will of voters who unequivocally expressed their support of the industry when they rejected Proposition 112 in November. These temporary bans only create further uncertainty and should not be allowed to be put in place while regulations are being worked out.

Second, Brough asked that the standard for local regulations be “reasonable and necessary.” Currently, only some of the regulations proposed have this standard and it should be extended to all to encourage collaboration. The bill passed House Appropriations on Wednesday and was referred to the Committee of the Whole but has not been scheduled for a vote. Read our testimony.

Census on the Horizon

The Chamber supported House Bill 1239, which would allocated $12 million for grants aimed at ensuring an accurate count of the state population in the 2020 Census. An accurate count is critical for ensuring Colorado receives adequate federal funding and appropriate congressional representation in Washington.

Follow the Session

As always, Chamber staff will continue working on your behalf, analyzing and weighing in on legislation that can impact your business. We list all our bill positions online. Stay in touch with us by checking our website and sharing with us your concerns as the session progresses.

The post This Week in Policy appeared first on Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

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As March Madness kicks off, it’s a month of pure competition. When it comes to business, success is based off how you can rally your team, get a game plan and execute. Here are four lessons that you can take from the court to your boardroom.

Teamwork makes the dream work

No team can take home the championship title without working together. Even with a superstar, a team won’t win without accountability and passion for the job they need to do. Whether you’re on the court or in the office, teamwork is critical to creating culture, encouraging healthy risk-taking and building trust.

Chamber tip: A collaborative culture fosters effective teamwork. Check out why culture is your new HR for more tips on how to develop your company culture.

Don’t underestimate the underdog

It isn’t March Madness without an upset or two, shattering everyone’s brackets. This goes to show that you can’t underestimate the underdog, and that’s just as true for business.

In every industry, there are companies large and small, but that doesn’t mean small businesses should feel intimated. You can still build a deep bench with peers and experts, even if they’re not on your staff. The more people you have in your court the greater chance you have to succeed.

Chamber tip: In order to compete with the number one seeds, small businesses need a strong business strategy. Be a part of the Small Business Development Center’s Leading Edge for Entrepreneurs to get a leg up on the competition. 

Leave it all on the court

When the final buzzer goes off, that’s it. Each team has 40 minutes to take home the championship and not a minute more. There’s not much time to shake off previous losses or setbacks; what matters most is what happens in the moment. In business, you don’t get a second chance to make a first impression with your customer. Make that impression count, whether it’s through great customer service or a recognizable brand. Treat every customer interaction like the game winning shot.

Chamber tip: Your brand is the first impression that customers have with your company and helps your organization stand out in the crowd. Here are three ways to build your brand recognition.

Don’t be afraid to pivot

It doesn’t matter what the score is at halftime, the final score is what matters. If your team is down you can still make a comeback. You can change your game plan. Pivoting can ultimately make a business more successful. It can open your business to new customers, light a fire under your employees and encourage them to look towards the future. Be willing to make that pivot because you never know what the outcome will be.

Chamber tip: The best businesses have a game plan to be successful. Join the Small Business Development Center’s Start-up Track to discover how to position your business for success.

Laura James is the senior marketing and specialist for the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

The post 4 Lessons Businesses Can Learn from March Madness appeared first on Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

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A number of bills our members care deeply about are coming in fast. Last week, I mentioned Senate Bill 181, a bill that significantly changes how the energy industry works in Colorado, but with very little input from the industry. As we continue to work hard on that bill, we have a number of bills being considered that impact employers and employees greatly.

This week, we will update you on the one that is causing our members the greatest concern. It’s a bill that creates a government-run family medical leave and insurance program (Senate Bill 188).This is a nearly $1 billion payroll tax that impacts all sectors of employers and employees. Below is a summary of how this bill impacts all of us:

  1. As employers, we ensure our employees know how their wages will be covered and for how long. This bill won’t cover the full salary of employees, so many employees can’t count on this financially.
  2. In addition to confusion about how benefits will be paid, leave eligibility does not align with the Federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) and is incredibly broad – allowing for leave in increments as low as one hour and for any individual with which they have a “significant personal bond.” It’s unclear how the state will ensure that people do not take advantage of this system.
  3. Our employers currently cover much of the cost when employees need to take time off work for their families, yet this plan requires both employers and employees to pay into the state to cover the cost of this plan even though those employees won’t get their salaries covered in full.
  4. And, for many of us as employees, this would be a reduction in benefit compared to what we currently receive from our employers.
  5. If that’s not enough, we are extremely concerned that this program won’t be fiscally sound, meaning the money won’t be there to pay our salaries when we need it. Other states have introduced or passed family leave bills. In Washington, the cost just to create the technology infrastructure and staffing was $80 million, and will continue to cost more than $100 million each year, before any benefits are paid out. As we look at estimates here in Colorado, we’re deeply concerned that costs are being underestimated to start and maintain this program. Currently, legislators are setting aside $50 million to start this program. But once its in its first full year of operations, the cost to run and pay benefits will approach $1 billion. Meanwhile,  Washington is allowing employers who offer leave to opt out — something not provided to Colorado companies with the bill proposed here.

We know this is a critical issue for organizations like yours. We invite you to join our coalition and raise your voice on this issue. Join us.

Please also help ensure your elected representatives know you strongly support paid leave for your employees and ask that at a minimum they would allow employers who offer paid leave to their employees to opt out of this one.

Our workforce is everything to us — we can’t take chances that they won’t have their leave when they need it most.  Email your legislators.

Kelly Brough is the president and CEO of the Denver Metro Chamber

The post Take Action on Senate Bill 188 appeared first on Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

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Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce by Denver Metro Chamber - 3M ago

Read about our members in the news: RETTEW and Mental Health Center of Denver.

Our members work hard every day to make the Denver metro area a great place to do business. We want to keep you in the know about the important work of our members, whether they are opening new business locations, hiring more people or creating new partnerships.

RETTEWrecently hired Daniel Simpson as a Project Manager
Stephen A. Edmonds joins Mental Health Center of Denver
Mental Health Center of Denver
elects new Board Leadership
Tell Your Children:
The Truth About Marijuana, Mental Illness and Violence on March 20

Share your news!

The post Member News appeared first on Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

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Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce by Denver Metro Chamber - 3M ago

Mandatory Family and Medical Leave Insurance Bill Moving through Senate

Last Thursday, legislation authorizing the long-awaited Family Medical Leave Insurance Program (FAMLI) was introduced and was quickly heard in and passed out of the Senate Business, Labor and Technology Committee on Wednesday. The business community has been aware of this legislation and has participated in stakeholder meetings over the past several months, trying to temper the negative effects of this bill with little success. Senate Bill 188 will create a state-run insurance program funded through an assessment on employers and employees that will provide partial wage replacement to eligible individuals who take leave from work to care for a new child or a family member with a serious medical condition, because of a serious medical condition of their own or due to certain needs arising from a family member’s active duty service. However, participation is mandatory, and no employers will be exempt, regardless of their size or if they already offer a leave program to their employees. Employee payroll will be taxed at .64 percent to pay for the program, with a 50-50 split between employees and employers to fund it.

The business community has a long list of concerns, including:

  • the scope of the program, which is far greater in benefits than any state-run family leave program in the country;
  • the potential loss of richer benefits when companies are forced to forgo their programs due to the mandatory nature of this bill;
  • and the fact that it does not conform with the federal FMLA program.

However, one of the most alarming issues is the sheer cost of this program. An amendment was introduced to lower the local government employer contribution, including those of local government entities, school districts and the State of Colorado. These deep discounts for governmental entities narrow the assessment base to the private and nonprofit sectors and force employees and employers in those sectors to pick up the tab for government. While we are grateful that the impact on the smallest of businesses was considered in this amendment as well, we remain deeply concerned by the cost implications for many of our member companies. As it stands today, businesses with four or fewer employees will only have to pay one-eighth of the premium and those with five to 10 employees will pay one-fourth, while any companies larger than 10 will pay the full assessment. While the director of the Division of Family and Medical Leave Insurance can raise the assessment should the fund need more money to be solvent, another amendment was accepted to cap the premiums at a maximum of .99 percent of wages per employee.

Mizraim Cordero, vice president of government affairs at the Chamber, was set to testify on the bill at Wednesday’s hearing; however, he, like so many other stakeholders who wanted to share their voice in this process, was unable to attend due to the blizzard. We were disappointed that the Senate went forward with the hearing, forcing many in the business community to have to choose between their safety and having their voices heard. We instead submitted our written testimony for the committee to consider.

Read Our Testimony 

We will continue to work with bill sponsors to express our concerns and share ideas for amendments.

As always, Chamber staff will continue working on your behalf, analyzing and weighing in on legislation that can impact your business. We list all our bill positions online. Stay in touch with us by checking our website and sharing with us your concerns as the session progresses.

The post This Week in Policy appeared first on Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce.

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