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Angela Craven will be in the Paint Studio demonstrating painting related to empathy, noon–3 pm July 13-14 and July 20-21, 2019. The Paint Studio is included with general admission, which is free for members and youth 18 and under.

Angela Craven is a Denver-based abstract expressionist painter with a studio in the RiNo Art District. She studied in Siena, Italy with abstract painter and video artist Franca Marina and holds a BFA in painting from Colorado State University. Angela has shown her work at TAXI, GRACe Studios’ Gallery, and with Manhattan Arts International and has been a featured artist at RiNo Made. View more of her work on Instagram.

Colorado artists studio Meet the Artist

My experience has shown there are many branches on the path to coping with loss and that art has a powerful place in that process.

– Angela Craven
Angela Craven, Ghost Currency, 2017. Acrylic and Mixed Media on Wood Panel, 30 x 80 in. Courtesy of the artist.

Laura Thompson: What will your demo at the DAM look like? What can visitors expect?

Angela Craven: For my demo, I’ll be working on an ongoing series which explores the universality of grief and related topics of empathy and transformation. The paintings in this series reflect the personal stories of people who’ve been touched by loss. The resulting work is nonrepresentational, large, and colorful.

I’ll be sharing the research and process behind each piece, which is an essential part of the series and pulls from my background in design research. Part of what I’ll be sharing will also include the personal stories behind the work. These stories are gathered and understood through multiple one-on-one conversations and take place in the painting subject’s home and in the context of their current life and ongoing experiences. The content of the interview is then woven into each painting with text and color.

LT: As an abstract expressionist painter, how do you see your artwork as continuing and breaking with the mainstays of this art movement?

AC: I very much relate to the gestural mark-making and nonrepresentational imagery that were characterized as abstract expressionism in the 1940s and ‘50s. I love the quick, uninhibited physical expression related to this movement. I thrive on translating human experience into a visual and non-literal language.

In the same breath, I also wouldn’t consider my work to mimic purely improvisational action painting like Joan Mitchell’s or Jackson Pollack’s works. Nor would I relate it to the color field paintings grounded in myth and religion that are tied to many abstract expressionists. I’d say my work also pulls from process and conceptual art.

One major way that I break from the mainstays of abstract expressionism is by incorporating layers of text. I do this for both conceptual and visual effects. I use many tools and materials, including pastry bags or condiment bottles full of paint and collaged pieces from my own writing. I look at the text as part of the composition. I also view it as a conversation between the painting and myself. I love the process of playing with whatever emerges as I add each word and layer.

I’m interested in a painting’s ability to function as a tool for communication and reflection for those who interact with my art. The idea that a completed painting communicates itself with the viewer in layers just as the meaning of a conversation evolves as it occurs is endlessly interesting to me. This interaction constantly evolves with its audience allowing the viewer to explore and discover new perspective over time.

Through my process and my paintings, I seek to encourage empathy, facilitate connection, and inspire dialog both with collectors and among viewers. This is my personal mark of art that I view as peripheral to the abstract expressionist movement.

LT: You have mentioned that your paintings are records of significant events in your own life as well as the lives of others as a means to foster reflection, strength, and connection. Could you give some insight into this process?

AC: This work grew from my own path of trying to have children, which began several years ago and had a profound impact on my life. During this time, I lost multiple pregnancies and was diagnosed with infertility. We weathered the ongoing disappointment, uncertainty, and frustration that come with the rollercoaster of infertility and also the grief that comes from loss.

Loss, grief, and infertility can all be strange and difficult things to talk about. There is stigma that comes with speaking about these experiences, even though many people have been affected by them.

Expressing my experience with loss and infertility through art led me to begin speaking to family and close friends about these issues. It was only through that process that I realized I was experiencing grief. I needed a non-solutioning space to feel heard in order to navigate the pain. I have learned that this is important for others as well—to know that they aren't alone and that they can find healing and transformation through that kind of communication and connection.

These realizations also stemmed from a previous body of work. I created small work daily for 365 consecutive days and shared my work online each day. Some pieces reflected events or my thoughts from the day, and some were more generally inspired by color, texture, and the light in my studio.

During this reflection, the 365-day pieces became more than a record of days. I could see at the time, my work strengthened connections and created conversations with friends and family and even led to new relationships and experiences.

Looking back, I realized events that seemed mundane were actually part of a larger transformation. Even the hardest challenges, which seemed overwhelming in the moment, never lasted as long as they felt. Positive events were never too far in the future but it took this body of work for me to realize that.

It’s easy to move through the years and fail to acknowledge celebratory moments, successes, challenges, and growth. This project taught me the value of taking time to reflect and celebrate the ability to grow and achieve my goals.

This became even more important through my own experiences with infertility, loss, and grief. As an artist, painting was more than a powerful source of expression for me during my own journey. Painting became a conduit to strength and healing.

My experience has shown there are many branches on the path to coping with loss and that art has a powerful place in that process. I love the idea of offering another opportunity to explore healing through a collaborative and creative process. This isn’t art therapy but may have a therapeutic effect through the act of being heard and honoring a part of an intangible experience through something as tangible as art.

LT: Your paintings are highly emotive. What is the role of color and line in communicating feeling? What are you thinking about when you begin a new painting? Do you decide on a specific experience or feeling to communicate or do your compositions take form more organically?

AC: My work begins with words from conversations, something I’ve read or a passing thought. Words inspire my work and inform the shapes, textures and colors on my canvas.

The text that I start with also comes from books, a poem, a song, or maybe something I’ve scribbled on a small scrap of paper… all of these things create the foundation that I build upon. I use an old trunk as a type of sketchbook to collect these text souvenirs and use them when the time or painting presents itself. I write, collage, and create underpaintings with them, using oil sticks, pastels, charcoal, paint markers, and various types of bottles and pastry bags that help me write with paint.

Once I have that foundation, I start responding to a painting more intuitively with gestural strokes of color, lines, and repeating forms, layering more text and color as I go. Sometimes the text gets lost. It can grow illegible and become a conceptual part of the painting. It can be private to me or the person I’m painting a commission for.

Photo at top: Angela Craven in her studio. Courtesy Rebecca Tillett.

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¡Juega… en serio este verano en el DAM! / Play…seriously this summer at the DAM!

Este verano, los visitantes del museo podrán tener la experiencia de mecerse suavemente acompañados de los sonidos musicales de La Musidora, una obra de arte de 27 metros de longitud. La obra, diseñada por Héctor Esrawe e Ignacio Cadena de la firma de diseño con base en la Ciudad de México, Esrawe + Cadena se encuentra ya instalada en la Plaza Martin cercana a la entrada del museo. El nombre de La Musidora proviene de la combinación de las palabras la música y la mecedora. Para La Musidora, Esrawe + Cadena no solo tomaron inspiración del idioma que se habla en México –el español, para su título, sino que también encontraron inspiración en las tradiciones artesanales de sus textiles y en los colores vibrantes de su cultura.

Para activar La Musidora, se requiere la participación de por lo menos dos personas, y hasta un máximo de veinte, meciéndose en tándem, para producir su dulce música. Uno de los beneficios principales de La Musidora es el de promover la participación conjunta de la gente –familiares o amigos, o de perfectos extraños, creando así un sentido de comunidad que nos permite darnos cuenta del impacto que podemos tener en la creación de algo positivo, cuando elegimos colaborar unos con otros. La Musidora, instalación de arte al aire libre, comunica la importancia del arte público, el cual puede ser accesible y disfrutado por todos.

También en la Plaza Martin, entre semana, de 11am – 2pm, te invitamos a descubrir nuevas maneras de disfrutar de las esculturas al aire libre del museo y de la bella arquitectura de sus Edificios Norte y Hamilton. Visita el carrito verde en la plaza y recoge un librito con tarjetas que contienen información e ideas para explorar el arte al aire libre del museo. En caso de que tengas preguntas, personal del museo estará disponible para ayudar a darle respuesta, así como para compartir comentarios o detalles contigo.

Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America La Musidora en español

Pinta al deleite de tu corazón en el Estudio de Pintura

El Estudio de Pintura permanecerá abierto todos los días dentro del horario regular del museo todo el verano. Invitamos a toda la familia a aprender acerca de las diferentes técnicas de la pintura y a crear ¡sus propias obras maestras!

En fines de semana, de 12 pm a 3 pm, artistas locales harán demostraciones y compartirán con los visitantes sus técnicas de pintura.

Los días 13, 14, 20 y 21 de julio, la artista Angela Craven compartirá sus técnicas de pintura de expresionismo abstracto.

Los días 27 y 28 de julio, la artista Lucía Rodríguez demostrará su técnica en el uso del color.

La diversion continúa con Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America

Sumérgete en el mundo del diseño inspirado por un sentido de juego que dio origen a las frescas ideas traducidas en la fabricación de muebles, juguetes, y diseño de interiores del hogar y oficina estadounidense. La exposición incluye un área para que el visitante pueda expresar su propia imaginación y creatividad. En este espacio, aún los adultos podrán recrear experiencias de su propia infancia al reconocer, tal vez, sus propios juguetes u objetos de su hogar. Serious Play incluye más de 200 obras que van desde trabajos en papel, modelos, textiles, mobiliario, y cerámica, hasta otros objetos como películas, juguetes, equipo de juegos y diseño de productos.

Play…seriously this summer at the DAM!

This summer, visitors can experience the gentle rocking motion accompanied by the musical sounds of La Musidora. This is a large-scale artwork that spans 90 feet. The work is designed by Héctor Esrawe and Ignacio Cadena of the Mexico City’s design firm Esrawe + Cadena and installed on Martin Plaza near the museum’s entrance. The name La Musidora comes from the combination of the Spanish words for music (la música) and rocking chair (la mecedora). For La Musidora, Esrawe and Cadena not only took inspiration from the language that is spoken in México to name the artwork, but they were also inspired by the country’s traditional woven crafts and the vibrant colors associated with Mexican culture.

To activate La Musidora, the participation of at least two people, rocking in tandem, is necessary to produce its sweet music. This experience can be enjoyed by up to 20 people at the time. One of the main benefits of La Musidora is that it encourages the joint participation of people – friends and family, or complete strangers, thus creating a sense of community and makes all of us more aware of our impact on the creation of something positive when we choose to collaborate with one another. La Musidora, an outdoor art installation, communicates the importance of public art that can be accessible and enjoyed by everyone.

Also at the Martin Plaza, on weekends, 11 am–2 pm, you are invited to discover new ways to enjoy the DAM’s outdoor sculptures and the architecture of North and Hamilton Buildings. Visit the green cart at the plaza and pick up a booklet with cards that contain information and ideas on how to explore the museum’s outdoor art. If you should have any questions, a staff member will be available to help with the answers and to share insights with you.

Paint to your heart’s delight at the Paint Studio

This summer, the Paint Studio is open every day of the week, and available during the museum’s regular open hours. The whole family is welcome to learn about different painting techniques while creating their own masterworks!

On weekends, from 12–3 pm, local artists will demonstrate and share with visitors about their own particular approach to painting.

On July 13–14 & 20–21, artist Angela Craven, will share about her abstract expressionist technique.

On July 27–28, Lucía Rodríguez will demonstrate and share her technique in the usage of color.

The fun continues with Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America

Immerse yourself in the world of design inspired by a sense of playfulness that gave birth to fresh ideas that translated in the creation of furniture, toys, and interior design in the American home and office. The exhibition includes an area for visitors to express their own imaginations. This is a place where even grown-ups can relive their own childhood, as they recognize perhaps their own toys or home furnishings. Serious Play includes over 200 works ranging from works on paper, models, textiles, furniture, and ceramics to other items like films, toys, playground equipment, and product design.

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On View in Serious Play through August 25, 2019

Following the trauma of World War II, American architects and designers began to explore new ways of living and reimagined ordinary objects throughout the home in innovative ways. The Eames Storage Unit (ESU), a lightweight system of freestanding cabinets, was promoted as an inexpensive solution to the changing storage and display needs of postwar families. With the end of wartime rationing and a booming economy, Americans were acquiring more goods, and the storage and creative display of their posessions became a signifcant interest. Constructed of plastic-coated plywood, enameled Masonite, and enameled steel framing, the ESU was an example of Charles and Ray Eames' continuous effort to design and produce economical household furniture using industrial production techniques.

In designing this system, the Eameses took their cue from the type of metal shelving found in warehouses and factories; no attempt was made to disguise or soften the the "nuts and bolts" vocabulary of its industrial parts. These various components were entirely interchangeable and could be easily combined into almost limitless configurations to suit the desires of the consumer; whether in living rooms, dining rooms, bedrooms, or anywhere else. The units were available in single and double widths—in the 100 (one unit high), 200 (two units high) and 400 (four units high)—as well as desks.

design and graphics Inside the Collection Charles Eames and Ray Eames, Eames Storage Unit (ESU), about 1949. Birch plywood, laminated plywood, enameled Masonite, fiberglass, and enameled steel; 59 × 27 × 17 in. Manufactured by Herman Miller, Zeeland, Michigan. Funds, by exchange, from Mr. and Mrs. John C. Mitchell II, Calvina Morse Vaupel in memory of Calvin Henry Morse, Mrs. George Cranmer, Charles E. Stanton, Charles Bayly Jr. Collection, Mrs. Claude Boettcher, Dr. Charles F. Shollenberger, Mr. Ronald S. Kane, Frances Charsky, Dorothy Retallack, Mrs. Alfred B. Bell, Charles William Brand, Doris W. Pritchard, Mrs. F. H. Douglas, Mrs. Calista Struby Rees, and Jane Garnsey O'Donnell, 2017.208 ©Eames Office LLC (eamesoffice.com)

PLAYFUL APPROACH

As husband and wife, Charles and Ray placed play at the core of their lives and work; it was a dominant personality trait, a work ethic, and an undercurrent of their design process. Expressing the couple's playful approach, the ESU turned furniture into a creative plaything—a kind of Tinkertoy for adults. Although the perforated steel framework was standardized, buyers could choose from many options to customize the interior arrangement. Shelf tops were made of plywood with an upper veneer of birch, walnut, or solid black plastic laminate. Sliding door options included a thin birch plywood with a vacuum-pressed circular or "dimple" design. Enameled Masonite, produced in eight colors (including brilliant red, yellow and blue), was used for filler panels. Perforated metal backs were also available. Owners could also take them apart and rearrange or add on, treating the furniture as a series of modular boxes, amendable as needs changed.

© Eames Office LLC (eamesoffice.com)

The Herman Miller Furniture Company began marketing the Eames Storage Units in 1950. The first-edition cabinets were originally sold as a knockdown product, requiring customers to screw and bolt the parts together. Assembly tended to be laborious, and Herman Miller later offered the storage units fully assembled around 1952. A new and stronger leg with a triangular support replaced the earlier light-gauge legs of the initial knockdown version, which occasionally buckled when mishandled in shipping. Production of the ESU ended in 1955.

The first-edition 400-series ESU, a recent addition to the design and graphics collection is featured-alongside other works by Charles and Ray Eames and other designers—in Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America. Organized by the Denver Art Museum and Milwaukee Art Museum, the exhibition opened in Denver on May 5, 2019.

Image at top: Gallery view of Serious Play. Photo © Denver Art Museum.

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On View in Serious Play through August 25, 2019

Following the trauma of World War II, American architects and designers began to explore new ways of living and reimagined ordinary objects throughout the home in innovative ways. The Eames Storage Unit (ESU), a lightweight system of freestanding cabinets, was promoted as an inexpensive solution to the changing storage and display needs of postwar families. With the end of wartime rationing and a booming economy, Americans were acquiring more goods, and the storage and creative display of their posessions became a signifcant interest. Constructed of plastic-coated plywood, enameled Masonite, and enameled steel framing, the ESU was an example of Charles and Ray Eames' continuous effort to design and produce economical household furniture using industrial production techniques.

In designing this system, the Eameses took their cue from the type of metal shelving found in warehouses and factories; no attempt was made to disguise or soften the the "nuts and bolts" vocabulary of its industrial parts. These various components were entirely interchangeable and could be easily combined into almost limitless configurations to suit the desires of the consumer; whether in living rooms, dining rooms, bedrooms, or anywhere else. The units were available in single and double widths—in the 100 (one unit high), 200 (two units high) and 400 (four units high)—as well as desks.

design and graphics Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America Inside the Collection Charles Eames and Ray Eames, Eames Storage Unit (ESU), about 1949. Birch plywood, laminated plywood, enameled Masonite, fiberglass, and enameled steel; 59 × 27 × 17 in. Manufactured by Herman Miller, Zeeland, Michigan. Funds, by exchange, from Mr. and Mrs. John C. Mitchell II, Calvina Morse Vaupel in memory of Calvin Henry Morse, Mrs. George Cranmer, Charles E. Stanton, Charles Bayly Jr. Collection, Mrs. Claude Boettcher, Dr. Charles F. Shollenberger, Mr. Ronald S. Kane, Frances Charsky, Dorothy Retallack, Mrs. Alfred B. Bell, Charles William Brand, Doris W. Pritchard, Mrs. F. H. Douglas, Mrs. Calista Struby Rees, and Jane Garnsey O'Donnell, 2017.208 ©Eames Office LLC (eamesoffice.com)

PLAYFUL APPROACH

As husband and wife, Charles and Ray placed play at the core of their lives and work; it was a dominant personality trait, a work ethic, and an undercurrent of their design process. Expressing the couple's playful approach, the ESU turned furniture into a creative plaything—a kind of Tinkertoy for adults. Although the perforated steel framework was standardized, buyers could choose from many options to customize the interior arrangement. Shelf tops were made of plywood with an upper veneer of birch, walnut, or solid black plastic laminate. Sliding door options included a thin birch plywood with a vacuum-pressed circular or "dimple" design. Enameled Masonite, produced in eight colors (including brilliant red, yellow and blue), was used for filler panels. Perforated metal backs were also available. Owners could also take them apart and rearrange or add on, treating the furniture as a series of modular boxes, amendable as needs changed.

© Eames Office LLC (eamesoffice.com)

The Herman Miller Furniture Company began marketing the Eames Storage Units in 1950. The first-edition cabinets were originally sold as a knockdown product, requiring customers to screw and bolt the parts together. Assembly tended to be laborious, and Herman Miller later offered the storage units fully assembled around 1952. A new and stronger leg with a triangular support replaced the earlier light-gauge legs of the initial knockdown version, which occasionally buckled when mishandled in shipping. Production of the ESU ended in 1955.

The first-edition 400-series ESU, a recent addition to the design and graphics collection is featured-alongside other works by Charles and Ray Eames and other designers—in Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America. Organized by the Denver Art Museum and Milwaukee Art Museum, the exhibition opened in Denver on May 5, 2019.

Image at top: Gallery view of Serious Play. Photo © Denver Art Museum.

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Escape the Heat & Enjoy Family Fun at the DAM Things to See & Do in July

All of the following exhibitions and activities are included with general admission, which is free for members and youth 18 and younger. Visitors with a SNAP card receive discounted general admission.

Pop on over to Cuentos del Arte

Join our cuentista, or master storyteller, on July 6, 2019, for Free First Saturday where she will share the story of the Moon Rope. Stories are bilingual and will begin at 11:30 am and 1 pm.

Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America Light Show Kids & Families

Spark Your Creativity at a Create-n-Take

Take a moment to slow down and notice the colorful details in Jordan Casteel: Returning the Gaze. At the Hand in Hand Create-n-Take, use colors and patterns inspired by Casteel’s work to create your own hand portrait that represents you, a loved one, or maybe even someone you do not know.

Artist Marie Watt’s colorful artwork, Butterfly, symbolizes two women’s happiness while dancing. Challenge yourself to make a piece of art that describes how you feel with only colors and shapes at the Shape of Feelings Create-n-Take.

It’s Plaza Playtime

On weekdays 11 am–2 pm, head to the green cart on Martin Plaza to pick up a booklet of cards with fun ways to experience our outdoor sculpture and discover the amazing architecture of the Hamilton Building and the North Building. A staff member will be on hand to share insights, answer questions, and help you see things differently.

Shine at Create Playdate

This month at Create Playdate, we are playing with light and shadow. We will be joined by the Central City Opera for a special performance—you won’t want to miss this! Meet us on level three 10 am–2 pm to get started. Create Playdate Is best for 3–5 year olds, but older and younger siblings are always welcome.

Illuminate Yourself in the First Light Family Space

Step into the shining world of the new First Light Family Space and try hand-on activities inspired by The Light Show. Capture nature’s shadows, experiment with transparency and color on overhead projectors, mix patterns to cast bold shadows, and design a wearable mirror.

Summer Brings Serious Play

Come tinker, climb, imagine and play in Serious Play: Design in Midcentury America. Experiment with spinning tops, arrange vinyl Colorforms, and build with a House of Cards. Stop in the Free Play Zone at the end of the exhibition with animal masks and a theater, an artist-created climbing structure, and an area for constructing with the Tyng toy, a life-size building system.

Paint Studio

Discover the world of painting by experimenting with watercolor techniques, exploring the idea of painting en plein air, or using paper marbling to create an abstract work of art. Located on level one of the Hamilton Building, the Paint Studio is open seven days a week during regular museum hours, with demonstrations from local artists every weekend from noon to 3 pm.

Join artist Leticia Tanguma on July 6–7 as she demonstrates oil and acrylic portraiture techniques. Next, artist Angela Craven, an abstract expressionist painter who creates colorful nonrepresentational artworks that examine overcoming grief through empathy painting, will be demoing on July 13–14 & 20–21. And finally, at the end of the month join Lucía Rodríguez as she investigates how colors interact with and relate to one another through her paintings, and discusses her use of color in her demonstrations on July 27–28.

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Watch this video to get a taste of some of the fun you can expect at monthly Untitled Final Friday events at the Denver Art Museum. Untitled Final Fridays are developed with dynamic featured artists who invite other local creatives to collaborate on musical and spoken-word performances, tours with a twist, artmaking, and other surprises—all inspired by artwork on view.

Each event includes a cash bar for adult beverages and yummy eats available from a different food truck each month. Untitled Final Fridays happen 6-10 pm on the last Friday of every month through October 2019. General admission to the museum is included.

Upcoming Untitled Final Fridays

July 26-Cyber Future featuring Michael Sperandeo

August 30-A(me)ricana featuring Kate Speer

September 27-Harvest of the Dreamer featuring MO SPKX

October 25-in/visible featuring Lauri Lynnxe Murphy

Our Golden Triangle Neighborhood also hosts events on Final Fridays through September 27. Get the scoop.

Colorado artists Light Show Untitled Final Fridays
Untitled Final Friday is One of the Fun Things to Do at the Denver Art Museum - YouTube
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Leticia Tanguma will be in the Paint Studio demonstrating portraits in oil and acrylic noon–3 pm June 29-30 & July 6-7, 2019. The Paint Studio is included with general admission, which is free for members and youth 18 and under.

Colorado artists Meet the Artist

To me, art is in a person’s glance, laughter, grito, or cry. Art is the interaction between this candor and the universe. When I create art, my challenge is to reflect truth, whether within beauty or darkness or whether in present tensions or in the echoes of generations. I am guided by love.

– Leticia Tanguma

Denver artist Leticia Tanguma paints social justice murals, abstract, and representational art, often reflecting her own struggles, pain, and light, and often reflecting the voices of others’ stories of hardship and triumph. For the past 20 years, Leticia has created community art, including murals about peace at locations in Denver and Boulder.

Her most recent murals are for Cross Purpose, an organization dedicated to lifting people out of poverty through education and community development, Earthlinks, an organization helping people who are homeless become self-sufficient by creating and selling nature crafts, and the Troy Chavez Memorial Peace Garden, a community garden founded for youth who have been killed by violence. She has also created artworks for the Gathering Place, which helps women, children, and transgendered individuals as they survive homelessness and poverty. Recently, Leticia joined Las Adelitas Living the Arts, a nonprofit organization supporting Latina artists overcoming trauma.

Anwyn Steele: What will your demo at the DAM look like? What can visitors expect?

Leticia Tanguma: I will have acrylic and oil painting portraits of people who I know and people who I imagine. Some of the paintings will include images that represent attributes or the spirituality of the people I am painting. Other paintings are portraits of humanity. I plan to invite people to actually paint portraits with me. I'd like to discuss with them how art reflects humanity—both its frailties and beauty. I paint things that are both pretty and ugly, yet speak of truth and hope.

AS: You have mentioned that you are influenced by the great Mexican muralist David Alfaro Siqueiros as well as your father, Leo Tanguma, who also is a muralist. How do you see your murals as continuing these practices? Do you see your work as breaking from these traditions in any way?

LT: I am inspired to paint murals of social conscience by the work of my father, Leo Tanguma. I wish to continue his legacy and that of the Mexican mural masters such as David Alfaro Siqueiros, who painted people’s struggles to overcome poverty and oppression. I also wish to continue the legacy of my indigenous heritage of storytelling.

AS: What are you thinking about when you begin a new painting? Do you decide to represent something specific or do your compositions take form more organically?

LT: My process of mural painting includes interviewing people from all walks of life who have experienced abuse and poverty. We discuss universal themes of healing, justice, and peace. I then create both poetry and mural art to reflect the stories and journeys we share.

Photo: Leticia Tanguma. Denver, CO, 2019. Courtesy of the artist.

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DAM Curators Discuss Monet's Life & Work 

In this video, Christoph Heinrich, Frederick and Jan Mayer Director, and Angelica Daneo, Chief Curator, discuss Monet's travels and motifs. Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature opens October 21, 2019. Tickets go on sale June 25, 2019.

European and American art Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature Behind the Scenes
Curators Explain "Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature" - YouTube
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On the last Friday of every month, the Denver Art Museum offers a late-night program that features unconventional experiences developed in collaboration with local creatives and community members. Untitled Final Friday on June 28 will feature two special music performances from the award-winning band Eldren and the audio-visual project Cities of Earth. Untitled is included with general admission, which is free for members.

Cities of Earth

From 6–9 pm Cities of Earth will be DJ-ing leftfield pop, krautrock, and electronic music on the first floor in the DAM’s atrium. Cities of Earth is a musical project of Michael David King the co-founder of Multidim Records. With this performance, the music will be accompanied by a synchronized video program constructed specifically from each track.

Eldren

Denver’s own Eldren, will be performing from 9–10 pm on plaza outside the museum. Eldren’s music can be described as psychedelic-space pop that will grip your eyes and ears. The Denver Post described their music as a mashup of jazz, prog rock, jam, power pop, indie, and rock.

We thank Illegal Pete’s for connecting us with these performers. Keep the party going after Untitled by taking your Untitled sticker or program to Illegal Pete’s for a free draft beer or house margarita with the purchase of an adult entrée. Offer good only on June 28.

See the program of events for June’s Untitled.

Check out our Q&A with Tobias Fike, our featured artist for June’s Untitled.

Colorado artists Light Show Untitled Final Fridays
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Curator’s Choice: Monet-Inspired Instagram Contest

Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature opens at the Denver Art Museum on October 21, 2019. This summer, in anticipation of this exhibition (the largest and most comprehensive Monet presentation in the U.S. in more than two decades) we invite you to participate in an Instagram photo contest for the chance to win a grand Monet exhibition-themed prize!

Claude Monet traveled more extensively than any other impressionist artist in search of new motifs. The places he traveled fueled his continuous interest in capturing the quickly changing atmospheres, the reflective qualities of water and the effects of light in nature.

THE CONTEST

Taking inspiration from Monet’s artistry, snap a photo of a place in nature—a garden or a landscape—and share it on your public Instagram account with #MonetxDAM, along with a caption that describes what inspires you about that particular place. Contest submissions will be accepted June 25 through July 31, 2019. You must be following @denverartmuseum on Instagram and include @denverartmuseum #DenverArtMuseum and #MonetxDAM in your Instagram image caption to be eligible to win.

THE PRIZE

Four (4) VIP (untimed) tickets to Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature at the Denver Art Museum.

One (1) Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature exhibition catalog.

One (1) Monet-themed goodie bag from The Shop at the DAM valued at $100.

OFFICIAL RULES

Contestants must be at least 18 years of age or older on or before July 31, 2019, and have a public Instagram account. There are no residency restrictions, but please note that travel and lodging is not included in contest prize. This contest is in no way sponsored, endorsed, or administered by or associated with Instagram.

HOW THE WINNER IS CHOSEN

DAM curators will choose the winner of this contest. The winning photo will be reposted on the DAM’s Instagram account and the DAM communications department staff will direct message the winner on Instagram and arrange for the pickup of the prize.

Happy posting and good luck!

Claude Monet: The Truth of Nature Behind the Scenes Claude Monet, The Artist's House at Argenteuil, 1873. Oil on canvas; 23-11/16 x 28-7/8 in. (60.2 x 73.3 cm). The Art Institute of Chicago: Mr. and Mrs. Martin A. Ryerson Collection, 1933.1153. Image courtesy The Art Institute of Chicago under CC0 Public Domain Designation
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