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Complete List of VR Headsets 2019

Updated: 05/2019

Virtual Reality (VR) invites you to explore alternative worlds as if you’re actually there. Simply take your smartphone and a headset and discover virtual spaces, games, and much more. Even though the technology has been around for years, the current generation of products and devices gets closer than ever to the VR’s original promise: getting elsewhere and connecting to whatever matters most to you.

With the technology advancing every year, the hardware is getting cheaper and the software base is growing steadily. In other words, virtual reality becomes affordable and thanks to massive price drops and discounts on hardware and software bundles, now is the perfect time to get your own VR headset and discover what all the hype is about.

Google Cardboard
Field of view 90°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Release date 2014
Price $15
visit website
VeeR Fabric VR
Field of view 95°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Release date 2017
Price $14
visit website
Merge
Field of view 90°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Release date 2017
Price $29
visit website
VeeR OASIS VR
Field of view 112°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller Yes
Release date 2018
Price $29
visit website
VR Shinecon
Field of view 90°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Release date 2018
Price $35
visit website
Zeiss VR One
Field of view 100°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Release date 2015
Price $49
visit website
Sytros Premium VR
Field of view depends on smartphone
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Release date 2017
Price $49
visit website
Bnext VR
Field of view depends on smartphone
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Release date 2017
Price $49
visit website
Google Daydream View
Field of view 90°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller Yes
Release date 2016
Price $79
visit website
Vuzix iWear
Field of view 55°
Max Resolution (combined) 1280×720
Type Tethered
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller Yes
Release date 2016
Price $99
visit website
Google Daydream View 2
Field of view 100°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller Yes
Release date 2017
Price $99
visit website
Samsung Gear VR
Field of view 101°
Max Resolution (combined) 2560×1440
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller Yes
Release date 2017
Price $129
visit website
ImmersiOn-VRelia GO
Field of view 130°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller Yes
Release date 2015
Price $139
visit website
Woxter Neo VR100
Field of view 42°
Max Resolution (combined) 1920×1080
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Release date 2017
Price $199
visit website
Genbasic Quad HD
Field of view 110°
Max Resolution (combined) 2560×1440
Type Standalone
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Release date 2016
Price $199
visit website
Oculus Go
Field of view 100°
Max Resolution (combined) 2560×1440
Type Standalone
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller Yes
Release date 2018
Price $219
visit website
Xiaomi Mi VR
Field of view 100°
Max Resolution (combined) 2560×1440
Type Standalone
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller Yes
Release date 2018
Price $234
visit website
Pico Neo
Field of view 102°
Max Resolution (combined) 2880×1600
Type Standalone
Positional Tracking Yes
Motion Controller Yes
Release date 2018
Price $239
visit website
Pico Goblin
Field of view 90°
Max Resolution (combined) 2560×1440
Type Standalone
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Release date 2017
Price $249
visit website
Playstation VR
Field of view 100°
Max Resolution (combined) 1920×1080
Type Tethered
Positional Tracking Yes
Motion Controller Yes
Release date 2016
Price $269
visit website
Galax Vision
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Complete List of VR Headsets 2019

Updated: 05/2019

Virtual Reality (VR) invites you to explore alternative worlds as if you’re actually there. Simply take your smartphone and a headset and discover virtual spaces, games, and much more. Even though the technology has been around for years, the current generation of products and devices gets closer than ever to the VR’s original promise: getting elsewhere and connecting to whatever matters most to you.

With the technology advancing every year, the hardware is getting cheaper and the software base is growing steadily. In other words, virtual reality becomes affordable and thanks to massive price drops and discounts on hardware and software bundles, now is the perfect time to get your own VR headset and discover what all the hype is about.

Google Cardboard
Field of view 90°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Price $15
visit website
Merge
Field of view 90°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Price $29
visit website
Zeiss VR One
Field of view 100°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller No
Price $49
visit website
Google Daydream
Field of view 100°
Max Resolution (combined) depends on smartphone
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller Yes
Price $99
visit website
Samsung Gear VR
Field of view 101°
Max Resolution (combined) 2560×1440
Type Cardboard
Positional Tracking No
Motion Controller Yes
Price $129
visit website
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Delight VR by Raoul Schäkermann - 4M ago
Virtual Reality is here to stay

Virtual Reality (VR) invites you to explore alternative worlds as if you’re actually there. Simply take your smartphone and a headset and discover virtual spaces, games, and much more. Even though the technology has been around for years, the current generation of products and devices gets closer than ever to the VR’s original promise: getting elsewhere and connecting to whatever matters most to you.

With the technology advancing every year, the hardware is getting cheaper and the software base is growing steadily. In other words, virtual reality becomes affordable and thanks to massive price drops and discounts on hardware and software bundles, now is the perfect time to get your own VR headset and discover what all the hype is about.

Desktop VR versus Mobile VR

When taking a look at the vast variety of devices, you should know there are two main categories: tethered and mobile headsets. The former is connected to either a computer or a gaming console and delivers the most powerful VR experience. External tracking devices, cameras, and advanced controllers allow for high-end experiences and get the most out of what’s currently possible in VR. However, these headsets are pricey, and with all the cables and additional trackers, movement can be inconvenient and some free space is needed. On the other hand, there are mobile headsets, which are basically empty shells with two optical lenses where the smartphone can be plugged in. Motion tracking is either done by the smartphone’s sensors or built-in headset sensors; thus, there are no cables hindering free movement. The great thing is, one can start for as cheap as fifteen bucks with the simplest headset from Google (Cardboard). The flipside, however, is the limited computing power, resulting in a reduced experience in terms of visual quality and VR possibilities. Ultimately, you get what you pay for. Anyway, we sat down and discussed which 2017 device gets the most bang for the buck – this article is intended to make the market a bit more transparent.

Don’t be limited. In 2018, all-new stand-alone devices are coming, and upgrades to the current generation will be released. Check out our article for what comes next.

Click on any VR Headset to learn more
HTC Vive Oculus Rift PSVR Samsung Gear VR Google Daydream View Zeiss VR ONE Plus Google Cardboard
Panel/Display i OLED OLED OLED OLED OLED
Resolution (combined) i 2160×1200 2160×1200 1920×1080 2560×1440 2560×1440 depends on smartphone depends on smartphone
Field of view i 110° 110° 100° 100° 100° 100° 90°
Refresh rate i 90 Hz 90 Hz 90-120 Hz 90 Hz 90 Hz depends on smartphone depends on smartphone
Positional Tracking i yes yes yes Not supported no Not supported Not supported
Motion Controller Vive Controller Oculus Touch PlayStation Move Gear VR Controller Daydream Controller Not supported Not supported
Host device (Gaming) PC (Gaming) PC PlayStation 4 Samsung Smartphone List of supported Android Phones Apple and Samsung Smartphones VR ready smartphones
Software platform SteamVR Oculus Home PlayStation Oculus Home Daydream VR Google Play / iOS Appstore Google Play / iOS Appstore
Release date April 2016 March 2016 October 2016 November 2015 November 2016 June 2016 June 2014
Weight (Headset) 555 gr 470 gr 610 gr 280 gr (without smartphone) 220 gr 350 gr < 90 gr
Price (Updated January 2018) $599.00 $399.00 $330.70 $129.99 $99.00 $49.99 $15.00

Desktop VR Headsets
HTC Vive
Panel/Display OLED
Resolution (combined) 2160×1200
Field of view 110°
Refresh rate 90 Hz
Positional Tracking yes
Motion Controller Vive Controller
Host device (Gaming) PC
Software platform SteamVR
Release date April 2016
Weight (Headset) 555 gr
Price $599.00

The HTC Vive, produced by HTC and developed together with video game industry giant Valve, was released on April 5th, 2016. It comes packed with a pair of motion-tracking controllers and two room-scale sensors. The wireless Base Stations allow creating a 3 x 4 meter dedicated play area where one can physically walk around. Assuming there is enough free space, security features will make sure that the furniture does not get hit. The headset features two AMOLED 3.6” diagonal screens each with 1080×1200 pixel resolution, a 90 Hz refresh rate, and a 110-degree field of view.

While the price tag dropped during the Black Friday sales, it is still at 699€ in Europe (US $600) and requires at least some decent PC hardware to perform smoothly. HTC demands a minimum of an Intel i5-4590 or AMD FX 8350 CPU paired with either an AMD R9 290 or a Nvidia gtx 970 graphics card. These specifications make additional hardware purchases necessary for those who do not own a powerful gaming PC. Fortunately, the PC can be tested for compatibility before the purchase via a SteamVR Performance Test application or HTCs ViveCheck tool.

VR Accessories

Thanks to some great third-party accessories, like the TPCAST wireless adapter, the Vive can now be used without annoying cables. The VR Lens Lab enables the user to install prescription lenses in order to operate the Vive without glasses. Moreover, Leap Motion, a device that can be attached to the Vive’s front, has the ability to accurately track your hands with VR applications. In addition, HTC released the Deluxe Audio Strap and the Tracker, allowing for more wearing comfort and tracking in the room of any device attached to the Tracker (e.g., tennis bat, toy gun). This feature further enhances the entire Vive experience.

With an ever growing software base on Valve’s distribution platform STEAM and HTC’s own Viveport games subscription service (7,99€/month), there is already plenty to explore in VR. Thanks to LibreVR/Revive project, Vive users can also play some of the Oculus Rift exclusive titles. Since the release in 2016, the Vive has matured with all its available add-ons, and it’s for sure one of the best VR experiences consumers can currently get. However, the downside is still the high price, the additional requirement of a powerful PC, and if users aren’t willing to pay extra for the wireless solution, they have to accept less comfortable movement because of the headset’s wiring.

To sum up, the HTC Vive offers the most you can get out of VR at the moment but has a high price tag and needs some of the available add-ons to enjoy the full experience. Buy it if you’re a VR enthusiast for whom price is no object.

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HTC Vive Pro
Panel/Display OLED
Resolution (combined) 2880×1600
Field of view 110°
Refresh rate 90 Hz
Positional Tracking yes
Motion Controller Vive Controller
Host device (Gaming) PC
Software platform SteamVR
Release date April 2018
Weight (Headset) 555 gr
Price $799.00

Visit Website
HMD Odyssey
Panel/Display OLED
Resolution (combined) 2880×1600
Field of view 110°
Refresh rate 90 Hz
Positional Tracking yes
Motion Controller Samsung Odyssey Controller
Host device (Gaming) PC
Software platform Windows
Release date October 2018
Weight (Headset) 645 gr
Price $499.00

Visit Website
Oculus Rift
Panel/Display OLED
Resolution (combined) 2160×1200
Field of view 110°
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Delight VR by Jean Schubert - 4M ago
Complete List of VR Camera Systems 2019

Updated: 01/2019

With VR becoming more and more popular it’s increasingly important for all kinds of camera manufacturers to provide sophisticated optical devices. By Mid 2019 there are already 51 spherical camera systems to buy – ranging from low-end variants such as the Detu Twin for $119 to ultra high-end solutions such as the Lytro immerge light field camera solution for $250.000. Due to the high interest from our customer base, we curated the following list of spherical camera systems to give a broad overview of what’s out there to buy to capture VR video content!

Detu Twin
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 2880 x 1440
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $119
visit website
Insta360 Air
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 2560 x 1280
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $149
visit website
Nico360
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 2560 x 1440
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $150
Visit Website
Insta360 Nano
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 3040x1520
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $199
visit website
Moto 360
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 3840 x1920
FPS 24
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $199
visit website
Giroptic iO
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 2048 x 1024
FPS 25/30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $249
visit website
LG 360
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 2560 x 1280
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $250
visit website
QBIC MS 1
Field of view 185°
Resolution (per lens) 1920 x 1080
FPS 60 - 240
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $260
visit website
Insta360 One
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 3840 x 1920/2560 x 1280
FPS 30/60
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $299
visit website
Xiaomi MiJia 360 Sphere
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 3456 x 1728/2304 x 1152
FPS 30/60
Live Stream Support No
Stereo Support Yes
Price $299
visit website
LUNA Camera
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 3.840 x 2.160
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $299
visit website
Samsung Gear 360
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 3.840 x 1.920
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $360
visit website
Ricoh Theta
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 1920 x 1080
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $399
visit website
BublCam
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 1440 x 1440
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $399
visit website
360Fly
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 1500 x 1500
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $399
visit website
KeyMission 170
Field of view 170°
Resolution (per lens) 3.840 x 2.160
FPS up to 120
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $399
visit website
Yi 360
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lense) 5.760 x 2.880
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $399
visit website
Rylo
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 5824 x 2912/3840 x 2160
FPS 24/30
Live Stream Support No
Stereo Support Yes
Price $449
visit website
Insta360 One X
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 5760 x 2880/3840 x 1920
FPS 30/50
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support Yes
Price $459
visit website
ALLie Cam
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 4096 × 2160
FPS 20
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $499
visit website
Lucid Camera
Field of view 180°
Resolution (per lens) 3.840 x 2.160
FPS 30
Live Stream Support No
Stereo Support Yes
Price $499
visit website
KeyMission 360
Field of view 360°
Resolution (per lens) 3840 x 2160
FPS 30
Live Stream Support Yes
Stereo Support No
Price $499
visit..
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Delight VR by Raoul Schäkermann - 1y ago
Banner Advertisements (Beta)

The Delight VR Advertisement feature allows you to inject display banner ads into advertisement spots within the player’s HTML UI as well as the VR 3D UI of the player. This allows you to display your banners directly within VR. For the first iteration of the feature we support only a select number of spots to not overflow the VR space and player real-estate. The system was kept as extensible as possible and allows you to write a custom JavaScript binding between your ad-network and the player.

Supported Spots

In the HTML portion of the player, only the pause spot is supported at 300x250px. In VR we support four banner placements, alongside the 3D UI (Player Controls). These banners always show when the controls are opened in VR; not only if the video is paused. Keep in mind that if you are using the Delight VR Recommendations feature, the VR_HUD_BOTTOM_BANNER_468X60 spot will be ignored.

HTML UI
  • DESKTOP_PAUSE_CENTRE_RECTANGLE_300X250
  • MOBILE_PAUSE_CENTRE_RECTANGLE_300X250

VR 3D UI
  • VR_HUD_TOP_BANNER_468X60
  • VR_HUD_BOTTOM_BANNER_468X60
  • VR_HUD_LEFT_SKYSCRAPER_160X600
  • VR_HUD_RIGHT_SKYSCRAPER_160X600

Implementation

To implement the feature on your deployment of Delight VR you have to write the declarative markup and a binding function in JavaScript that will get called each time an advertisement spot is possible to be displayed in the player.

HTML

Add the <dl8-advertisement> tag as a child of a <dl8-video> tag.

It requires the attribute on-request-advertisement to be present, which takes a function identifier as a value (see Javascript section for more information about the function implementation).

<dl8-video>
	...
	<dl8-advertisement on-request-advertisement="requestAdvertisement">
</dl8-video>

JavaScript

You can define a custom function which acts as a binding layer between the player and your ad provider. This function is called every time the player can display a certain advertisement spot. Information about the spot is passed in the requirement object, passed as a first parameter. Hints are provided in a second object, for contextualized information that could be used to make better decisions on the ad type that is ultimately requested and finally a callback is passed that needs to be called with the final data of what to display. Note that if you don’t want a certain spot to be filled you should call the callback function with null. Below you will find the details needed to implement each part:

Sample

function requestAdvertisement(requirement, hints, callback) {
   switch (requirement.spot) {
      case 'DESKTOP_PAUSE_CENTRE_RECTANGLE_300X250': {
         ...
         const advertisement = // Fetch your advertisement from ad network
         ...
         // or callback(null) when no ad should be displayed
         return callback({
            type: //advertisement type
            payload: {
               uri: //advertisement source uri
               adLink: // advertisement url link (only for type image)
            }
         })
      }
      ... // Other cases implementation
   }
}

requirement (object)

An object that provides information about what spot should be filled, please refer to it to provide a well defined callback object

Requirement object sample:

{
   spot: 'DESKTOP_PAUSE_CENTRE_RECTANGLE_300X250',
   type: ['image']
}

spot (String)

Spot identifier which can be used, for example, in a switch statement to fetch a different asset for this specific spot

type (Array)

Array of available types for the advertisement asset. Values can be image and/or iframe

hints (Object)

An object that provides hints about the state of the player. Useful for data manipulation upon certain conditions, before firing the callback function

hints = {
   screen: {
      width: Integer (px) // Player width,
      height: Integer (px) // Player height,
      fullscreen: Boolean,
      portrait: Boolean,
      vrActive: Boolean
   },
   device: {
      mobile: Boolean,
      tablet: Boolean,
      android: Boolean,
      ios: Boolean,
      ie: Boolean,
      vr: Boolean
   }
}

callback (Function)

A function that must be called with an object as the first parameter that adheres to the following structure:

{
   type: String,
   payload: {
      uri: String,
      adLink: String			
   }
}

type (String)

Accepted values are “image” or “iframe”. In the case of VR spots the value “iframe” is not supported.

payload (Object)

  • URI (String) The URI that is either the image URL or the iframe URL to be displayed as an advertisement.
  • adLink (String) In case the type of the advertisement is “image” this is the target URI that should be navigated to if the user clicks on the advertisement banner.

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