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Scarlet Ruffles was a commission for a client whom I'd painted 3 other flowers for.

 

 

 

Scarlet Ruffles Time Lapse - YouTube
   

 

If you are interested in commissioning your own painting, click here for information.







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Time lapse painting of "Cotswold Charm"

Time Lapse Painting of "A Fragrant Affair"; Through the Eyes of an Artist
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"First Snow" Oil (SOLD) (prints available)

 

This 1950 Chevy ended up on a Christmas popcorn tin at Big Lots...I can't tell you how excited I was!

 

The story about the truck's journey (as far back as I know it), goes like this:

 

My friend Janie acquired this old truck from somewhere out in west Texas several years ago. It was basically a heap of old, rusty metal, sitting at the back of a lot with tree limbs growing through the broken windows.


You may wonder why she would want such a thing...Let me tell you a little something about this spunky red-head; she is one of the most creative, "think outside the box" artists that I know. We met back in the 90's when we were both art teachers in the Grapevine-Colleyville ISD.  I always loved the days when all of the GCISD art teachers got  together to go on field trips or spend the day creating new projects to teach our students. Janie always had wild and fun ideas to share. Currently she owns her own business, "Cavender Creations" with her husband, painting huge murals or sculpting unique artsy installations for companies all over the US.


If you have ever been to Grapevine during the Christmas season, you've probably seen her work. She's the one who makes all of those great giant holiday statues. Last year she made giant snowmen for the Gaylord's famous Winterfest. (You can see the making of these here on her website). 


If you want to see some of her paintings of the truck in it's "BEFORE" state, click here.

In 2009, Janie ended up selling the truck to another  friend of mine, (who was also an amazing art teacher in GCISD), Jeani and her husband, Fred.



 

The incredibly talented Fred took the Chevy from this state (not even running), to the beauty it is today:

 

(Fred and Jeani's son, Chad)

 

I have always been drawn to old cars...and I guess the artist in me really likes the look of the old, rusty, turquoise patinas. (These are finishes I would do for clients on purpose when I did designer finishes back in the day!)

 

(detail stone and rust finish of an archway I did for

a t.v. set)

 

On one of my visits to see Jeani out in Ponder, Tx , I got to see the truck while it was in it's middle stages of being restored.

primed and ready for a shiny coat of candy apple red paint!

 

After Fred did all of his magic,  "Ole Red" provided itself as a prop for some really cool photo shoots.



 

 

The Cruce's also used it as a Christmas decoration, which is where my inspiration for the painting came from!

 

 

One day, I got a call from a lady at a tin can company in Maryland. She said that her client in Wisconsin found my painting "First Snow" on my website, and wanted to license it for Christmas tins.  At the time, I had no idea it was going to be distributed through Big Lots! I didn't even know who the company was that licensed the painting (Mallory's Finest). Once the can company sent me samples of the tins, I asked them if there was a website I could send people to in case they wanted to buy one. That's when she replied casually "It's my understanding they will be distributed through Big Lots".  I'm like "which one?"  So yes, it came as a huge surprise to me when I discovered that they were selling all over the United States, and it was surreal to walk into my local Big Lots store to see them sitting on the shelf!


 

It was even more surreal to see photos of people with the tins from all over the States!

 

 

I'm so appreciative of all the support and those who joined in on getting all the great selfies at Big Lots!...Big Hugs!



 


 

 


 


 





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We had reservations for the high speed train to Florence, where we would change trains and head to Cinque Terre (literally translated "five lands"). I noticed a sign in the station that stated some train times might be modified due to train strikes. I felt relieved when we boarded the train to Florence that out train wasn't affected.

 

 

Well, I spoke too soon!

After we changed trains in Florence, our train stopped in Pisa. Something was spoken over the intercom in Italian, and suddenly everyone got off the train...that is, everyone except those of us that didn't speak Italian! When we realized what was happening, we got off the train, and all the Americans congregated together as we tried to figure out how to get to Cinque Terre. We discovered there were no car rentals or buses going that way.  Imagine a herd of Americans going up and down stairs from platform to platform (5x to be exact), trying to find another train headed to our destination. We'd find one only to discover that it too, was cancelled!

 

 

We finally found one, and about 2 hours later were back "on track".

 

After arriving in Riomaggiore, (one of the "5 lands"), we looked for the elevator. I had heard that the elevator headed up the mountain right to our hotel, but it was hit and miss. You guessed it, that day it was "miss". Up we walked, rolling luggage up steep hills and then 3 flights of stairs. I couldn't breathe by the time we reached the Sol Levante, but who cares, look at the view! The owner, Elisabeth was very friendly and the rooms were cozy and clean.

 

 

My main goal upon arrival was to find a great place to watch the sun set. We headed towards the village and up the hill and found a beautiful church with benches facing the ocean. Amazingly, it was quiet and crowd free!

 

 

 

 

The warm light lit up the village so beautifully, and I was inspired to paint it.

 

"Last Light"

 

(church of San Giovanni Battista)

 

 

Coming up next...our hike to Manorola.






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Traveling with your oil (or acrylic) paints can seem daunting, but if you know how to do it it's really no big deal!

1. Be sure to print out a material safety data sheet and place these sheets in with paints so they will be visible....these can be found on the paint company's websites.

Click on each for example: Rembrandt Oils ; 

Winsor & Newton

Old Holland

 

2.  "Oil Paint" is a security buzz word (or any use of the word paint). Instead, refer to them as “artist colors made with vegetable oil. 

**I always tuck a little note into my paints that explains this.**

3. Keep your paints in a separate plastic bag in case they leak during the flight and pack them in your check-in suitcase. I usually put each tube in a separate zip-lock bag and then place them all together into a larger zip-lock.  It's even a good idea to unscrew the lid, place a piece of plastic wrap over the opening, and screw the lid back on. **DON"T carry the artist colors on board with you!!!

*Stick with the smaller tubes and leave the large ones at home.

4. Do not bring any solvents or thinners. These are not allowed on the plane. (If you are joining me in France in July 2018, I will provide those for you!)

(Most places will have access to purchasing these after arrival anyway.)

5. Pack all brushes and palette knives in the check-in baggage. (To keep brushes from getting damaged, place them in a canvas brush holder that rolls up.) Example:

6. If possible, pack all your supplies in a separate suitcase. If not, pack your supplies so they are on top of your other items in your luggage. This makes it easily accessible for a security check.

7.  Pack your empty pochade box and easel in either your carry on or check-in baggage.

8. Place your painting panels inside your Raymar carrying case and place in either carry on or check in.

9. paper towels will fit into luggage better if they are taken off the roll and folded compactly.


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