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Jason Voorhees made Higgins Haven his new playground in Friday the 13th Part 3, and Mezco Toyz has created a very accurate depiction of Mr. Voorhees (interchangeable faces, hands, and all) from the film as the latest addition to their growing One:12 Collective line. Continue reading for dimensions and details on other accessories!

Friday the 13th Part 3 Figure:" Friday the 13th Part 3 Campers beware! Jason Voorhees from Friday The 13th Part 3 joins the One:12 Collective.

The One:12 Collective Jason Voorhees figure includes two menacingly detailed head portraits and two removable hockey masks. Jason’s axe accessory fits neatly into the gash on his wounded head as well as the crack in his hockey mask, recreating the iconic finale from Friday The 13th Part 3. The infamous Crystal Lake killer is outfitted authentically from the film. Jason comes complete with every weapon he used in the film: an axe, a machete, a cleaver, a wrench, a fireplace poker, a knife, and a spear gun.

Having recovered from the events of Friday The 13th Part 2, Jason Voorhees relocates to the Higgins Haven campsite where a group of unsuspecting teenagers are enjoying an amiable weekend – that is, until Jason shows up and continues his deadly rampage.

THE ONE:12 COLLECTIVE JASON VOORHEES FIGURE FEATURES:

  • One:12 Collective body with over 28 points of articulation
  • Two (2) head portraits
  • Hand painted authentic detailing
  • Approximately 16cm tall
  • Six (6) interchangeable hands
    • One (1) pair of holding hands (L&R)
    • One (1) pair of relaxed hands (L&R)
    • One (1) spear gun holding hand (R)
    • One (1) grabbing hand (R)

COSTUME:

  • Two (2) hockey masks (damaged & undamaged)
  • Button-down workmen’s shirt
  • Workmen’s pants
  • Work boots

ACCESSORIES:

  • One (1) axe (fits into gash on wounded head or can be held)
  • One (1) machete
  • One (1) cleaver
  • One (1) wrench
  • One (1) fireplace poker
  • One (1) knife
  • One (1) spear gun
  • One (1) pitchfork

Each One:12 Collective Jason Voorhees figure is packaged in a collector friendly box, designed with collectors in mind.

PRODUCT DETAILS
EXPECTED TO SHIP: Ships Oct - Dec 2018
PRODUCT SCALE: 1:12
PACKAGING TYPE: Window Box
RECOMMENDED AGES: 18 and up
Price: $80.00"

Photos from Mezco Toyz:

The post Photos of New FRIDAY THE 13TH PART 3 Figure from Mezco Toyz appeared first on Daily Dead.

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In the new trailer released for Michael Pearce's Beast, can you trust something or someone that seems way too good to be true? Starring Jessie Buckley and Johnny Flynn, Beast will come out in theaters on May 11th.

Synopsis: "Moll is 27 and still living at home, stifled by the small island community around her and too beholden to her family to break away. When she meets Pascal, a free-spirited stranger, a whole new world opens up to her and she begins to feel alive for the first time, falling madly in love. Finally breaking free from her family, Moll moves in with Pascal to start a new life. But when he is arrested as the key suspect in a series of brutal murders, she is left isolated and afraid. Choosing to stand with him against the suspicions of the community, Moll finds herself forced to make choices that will impact her life forever."

Written and directed by Michael Pearce, Beast stars Jessie Buckley, Johnny Flynn, Trystan Gravelle, and Geraldine James. Beast will be released in theaters on May 11th from Roadside Attractions and 30West.

BEAST Official Trailer | Roadside Attractions | In select theaters May 11 - YouTube

The post “Be Careful What You Unleash” in the Official Trailer & Poster for BEAST appeared first on Daily Dead.

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Over the years, I’ve been pretty vocal about how much I adore horror comedies, and considering how challenging the world at large has been over the last few years, it’s truly my favorite subsection of the genre to disappear into as of late. There have been numerous brilliant humorous horror movies over the years, but I thought now would be the perfect time to celebrate 10 films from the modern landscape of genre cinema that have not only been largely under-appreciated by fans, but also do a killer job of finding new ways to merge the funnies with the frights.

Just a note before we begin: I purposefully left off films like Behind the Mask: The Rise of Leslie Vernon, What We Do in the Shadows, Cabin in the Woods, Zombieland, Tucker & Dale vs. Evil, The Frighteners and projects of that caliber, because I feel like some of those were sleeper hits that seemed to catch on during their home releases (and some just slayed it with audiences when they initially hit theaters, too), and I stuck to films released after 2000 as well (sorry, Idle Hands and Jawbreaker, I still love you both). While everyone’s taste in comedy can be subjective (much like the horror genre), there’s undoubtedly going to be a little something for everyone on this list, so I hope you enjoy this collection of horror comedies that definitely deserve a little more love.

Hell Baby: This is a quirky comedy about parents (Rob Corddry, Leslie Bibb) who move into a house of ill-fame (in New Orleans of all places, where the spooky seems to be constantly flowing) and give birth to the spawn of Satan, but if you think this is just a riff on The Exorcist, think again. Hell Baby is the co-directorial effort from Robert Ben Garant and Thomas Lennon (Deputy Travis Junior and Lieutenant Jim Dangle, respectively, from Reno! 911 fame), so if that brand of laughs is very much your cup of tea, then Hell Baby is going to be right up your proverbial alley. The comedy also features performances from the likes of Keegan-Michael Key, David Wain, Rob Huebel, Paul Scheer, Michael Ian Black, and Dave Holmes (both Garant and Lennon also have supporting roles), with their loving tributes to evil kids cinema. It’s a film I wish more folks had given a chance when it was released a few years ago, and in fact, I love Hell Baby so much that I probably bring up Key’s “Pizza Salad” at least once a week (don’t knock it ’til you try it!).

Where to Stream It: Amazon Prime Video, Vudu, Shudder

Otis: Released under Warner Bros.’ Raw Feed banner, Tony Krantz’s Otis was one of the first films I ever covered in my professional writing career, and while it has a few rough edges, there’s something slightly charming about this tale of a social outcast (the eponymous character, portrayed by Bostin Christopher) who takes a girl hostage so he can take her to the prom he never got to have when he was in high school. Not only do we get some really solid character moments between the titular madman and his captee, Riley (Ashley Johnson), but both Kevin Pollak and Ileana Douglas steal the whole damn show right from under everyone else in Otis with their performances as Riley’s concerned parents who have a few tricks up their sleeves for anyone who messes with their daughter. For those of you who like your comedy to be the pitch-black variety, Otis could very well be worth your time.

Where to Stream It: Amazon Video, Vudu

Bloodsucking Bastards: Anyone who has ever worked in an office environment knows just how much it can (wait for it) suck, which is precisely why I adore Bloodsucking Bastards as much as I do. Directed by Brian James O’Connell, this vampire-infused workplace comedy follows Evan (Fran Kranz of Cabin in the Woods fame), a generally nice guy who gets passed up for a major promotion and watches in horror as his college nemesis Max (the perfectly casted Pedro Pascal) takes over the coveted position. As if that wasn’t enough, Evan’s on the outs with his girlfriend/HR Manager (Emma Fitzgerald) and he’s convinced that his co-workers are being transformed into creatures of the night, too. While it takes a bit to get the ball rolling, once Bloodsucking Bastards hits its stride, the jokes fly almost as quickly as the gore does, resulting in an anthem for those who loathe their soulless corporate existences.

Where to Stream It: Amazon Video, Vudu

Club Dread: Welcome, weary travelers, to the island of Costa Rica, where you can enjoy all the fun in the sun you can handle at Coconut Pete’s resort... if you survive, that is! For Club Dread, the maniacs over at Broken Lizard lovingly send up slasher movies with Jay Chandrasekhar at the directorial helm (he also plays Putman, the tennis instructor), as a masked killer hunts down and murders various members of the resort staff. There are numerous reasons why Club Dread rules so hard (Bill Paxton’s brilliant turn as washed-up beach-themed crooner Coconut Pete being right on top of that list), but the best part is the fact that none of the film’s offbeat humor ever comes at the expense of the film’s genre elements, and that’s so important when you’re crafting a horror-themed spoof. Plus, the nods to films like Friday the 13th, Child’s Play, A Nightmare on Elm Street, The Burning, and Terror Train (to name a few) certainly don’t hurt the film’s efforts, either. And for as many comedy greats as there are in Club Dread, Kevin Heffernan’s performance as Lars, the masseuse with the golden fingers, is criminally underrated. Namaste.

Where to Stream It: Amazon Video, Vudu

Call Girl of Cthulhu: A wonderfully weird and comedic love letter to the works of H.P. Lovecraft, co-writer/director Chris LaMartina’s Call Girl of Cthulhu is another endlessly charming effort from the team behind the WNUF Halloween Special (both were also co-written by Jimmy George) that is not only boatloads of fun, but is also such an amazingly well-conceived low-budget/high-ambition effort that you can’t help but admire how brazenly LaMartina swings for the fences here, hitting yet another home run. Call Girl follows a virgin named Carter (David Phillip Carollo) who aspires to change his sexual status and ends up falling for his call girl neighbor, Riley (Melissa O’Brien). Unbeknownst to him, Carter’s love interest has unfortunately been chosen to birth the spawn of Cthulhu by a cult, and it’s up to him to save not only Riley, but all of humanity as well (no biggie). Featuring a ton of laughs, a thoughtful script, wonderfully gory effects and an incredible amount of love that’s on display in each and every scene, give Call Girl of Cthulhu your time, and she might end up being the girl of your dreams, too.

Where to Watch It: Available on Disc Only

Jack Brooks: Monster Slayer: If you’ve never watched Jack Brooks: Monster Slayer, then you’ve been missing out on what might be the greatest physical comedy performance we’ve ever been gifted with by horror icon Robert Englund, and that alone makes Jon Knautz’s monster-fueled comedy well worth your time. The film follows the eponymous hero (played by Trevor Matthews), who is a plumber by trade, but finds himself battling monsters after a local professor (Englund) unleashes a demonic force that only he can overcome. Jack Brooks has some truly killer special effects, and Matthews is so great as an unlikely hero who must fight against evil, I’ve always been bummed out by the fact that we never saw a sequel to Jack Brooks: Monster Slayer. If you’ve slept on this one for the last decade, I’d recommend rectifying that immediately.

Where to Stream It: Amazon Video, Vudu

The Revenant (2009): Before you say anything, no, I’m not talking about the Leo versus a bear film here. This Revenant movie made the festival rounds in 2009 (I had the pleasure of first seeing it at Screamfest that year), and finally saw its release in 2012. Directed by D. Kerry Prior, who had previously created special effects for movies like The Lost Boys, The Abyss, Phantasm II, and Dream Warriors, The Revenant centers on two best buddies named Bart (David Anders) and Joey (Chris Wylde) who see their friendship tested in unimaginable ways after Bart is killed in Iraq, and he awakens upon his return to the States as a “revenant”: a zombie/vampire-like creature that must consume blood to survive. While it should be no surprise that Wylde gets quite a few laughs here, Anders ends up being something of a comedic revelation in The Revenant with his tortured soul performance that’s equal parts heart and humor. For those who think there are no new zombie stories to tell, The Revenant might just change your mind.

Where to Stream It: Amazon Video, Vudu

Stitches: If you hate your job (or maybe you just loathe entitled, bratty kids), then you undoubtedly share some interests with the eponymous killer clown (played by Irish comedian Ross Noble) in Conor McMahon’s Stitches. The grumpy and sex-crazed professional jokester ends up meeting his demise after a prank gone wrong, but returns from the grave some six years later to enact his own twisted revenge on the tykes behind his death. McMahon manages to subvert expectations with Stitches, giving viewers something more than yet another “killer clown” movie (there’s some great mythology introduced involving clown rituals that really amped up the story for me), but the demented horror comedy ended up being such a standout to me simply because of Noble’s brilliant performance that provides the movie with an immense amount of infectious, maniacal energy. Stitches also has some really inventive kills that gorehounds will really dig, and it also does a fantastic job of meshing horror and comedy together, giving the film’s title a few different meanings in the end.

Where to Stream It: Netflix, Amazon Video, Vudu

Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse: Last year, director Christopher Landon slashed his way into many genre fans’ hearts with his Groundhog Day-inspired Happy Death Day, and since folks for the most part seem to be on board with his PG-13 whodunit horror comedy, I thought this was the perfect time to once again sing the praises of his much raunchier Scouts Guide to the Zombie Apocalypse, a hilarious, off-color tribute to zombie cinema. It’s up to three scouts (Tye Sheridan, Logan Miller, and Joey Morgan) to stop the living dead apocalypse from destroying their town, and the trio of unlikely heroes have to find innovative ways to outsmart the hordes of zombies roaming everywhere. Scouts Guide also features a great comedic performance from the endlessly funny David Koechner, introduces us to some feisty zombie kitties, and manages to concoct some of the craziest zombie sight gags that I’ve seen in recent history to boot. Plus, it celebrates national treasure Dolly Parton, and it's impossible for me to dislike any movie that references this angelic talent. For a movie that’s so incredibly dirty, there’s no doubt that Scouts Guide's love is so very pure, and it really is worth a watch. Scout's honor.

Where to Stream It: Amazon Video, Vudu

All Cheerleaders Die: Directed by Lucky McKee and Chris Sivertson, All Cheerleaders Must Die savagely examines the high school experience and gender politics (two topics that feel so very timely today), all with a supernatural slant and a pitch-black tongue planted firmly in its cheek. Confidently blending several different horror subgenres with the usual tale of a high school misfit who gets more than they bargained for when they try to teach the popular kids a lesson, All Cheerleaders Die is a perfect successor to films like The Craft, Jawbreakers, and of course, Heathers. Across the board, the cast brings an infectious enthusiasm to the material, which only adds to Cheerleaders' charms, and I’m still wondering if the Lifeforce-esque approach to the various victims' corporeal states were intentional, or if it was just me reading way too into things (wouldn’t be the first time). But in any case, All Cheerleaders Die is a wicked amount of fun and is deserving of all the spirit fingers.

Where to Stream It: Amazon Video, Vudu

The post 10 Modern Horror Comedies That Deserve More Love appeared first on Daily Dead.

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When he's not clouded by rage, Morgan tries to be peaceful, but sometimes the survivors he encounters on his journey elicit a different reaction. Morgan was forced to use his staff for more than just walking during the intense rooftop battle in the season 4 premiere of Fear The Walking Dead, and a new behind-the-scenes video from AMC looks into the making of the staff-centric scene.

Titled "Another Day in the Diamond", the next episode of Fear The Walking Dead premieres on Sunday, April 22nd at 9:00pm ET on AMC.

Keep an eye out for more updates on Fear The Walking Dead, watch the new behind-the-scenes video below (spoiler warning if you haven't watched the season 4 premiere episode), and check here for our previous coverage of the fourth season:

"In Season 4, we will see the world of Madison Clark (Kim Dickens) and her family through new eyes — the eyes of Morgan Jones (Lennie James), who is joining the story from the world of “The Walking Dead.” The characters’ immediate pasts mix with an uncertain present of struggle and discovery as they meet new friends, foes and threats. They fight for each other, against each other and against a legion of the dead to somehow build an existence against the crushing pressure of lives coming apart. There will be darkness and light; terror and grace; and the heroic, mercenary and craven, all crashing together toward a new reality for “Fear the Walking Dead.”

Produced by AMC Studios, “Fear the Walking Dead” is executive produced by Scott M. Gimple, showrunners Andrew Chambliss and Ian Goldberg, as well as Robert Kirkman, David Alpert, Gale Anne Hurd and Greg Nicotero. This season stars Kim Dickens, Frank Dillane, Alycia Debnam-Carey, Colman Domingo and Danay Garcia, along with new series regulars Garret Dillahunt, Jenna Elfman, Maggie Grace and Lennie James."

Note: This embed provided by AMC may be geo-restricted and may not be viewable in all countries. We will add an alternate international embed as soon as one becomes available.

(SPOILERS) ‘Rooftop Fight’ Season Premiere Behind the Scenes | Fear the Walking Dead - YouTube

The post Go Behind the Scenes of Morgan’s Rooftop Fight in the FEAR THE WALKING DEAD Season 4 Premiere Episode appeared first on Daily Dead.

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Even humor can survive in the living dead apocalypse... Since the first panels premiered on Daily Dead during the 2017 San Diego Comic-Con, we've been excited to showcase artist Jeff Fuller's living dead comic strip Zomics, which finds the macabre humor in the everyday horrors of a zombie apocalypse. We release a new installment of Zomics every Thursday, and we're excited to share a new panel with Daily Dead readers today!

This week's Zomics is a reminder that when you're living dead body is decaying in the post-apocalypse, "losing your head" isn't just a figure of speech, it can be a macabre reality... especially if you accidentally kick it after it falls off!

In case you missed Fuller's previous Zomics panels, you can check out all of them in the gallery below, and stay tuned to Daily Dead next Thursday for another installment!

Influenced by Dr. Seuss and The Addams Family creator Charles Addams, Fuller has worked as an award-winning art director for nearly a quarter of a century, garnering multiple Emmy and BDA awards. He turned his artistic talents to zombies when he started thinking about the comedic qualities that would live on in a zombified world:

"The origin of Zomics: While camping with my wife and kids we stared discussing what life would be like if there really were zombies. We decided that it would be a little scary, a little gross and a lot of funny. This was the birth of the single panel zombie comic strip, or ZOMICS for short."

The post A Zombie Loses His Head in New Installment of Jeff Fuller’s Living Dead Comic Strip ZOMICS appeared first on Daily Dead.

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One of my favorite characters in season 1 of Westworld was Clementine Pennyfeather (played by Angela Sarafyan), an android prostitute who works under the supervision of the park’s madam, Maeve (Thandie Newton), who ends up becoming self-aware, throwing the high-tech attraction into a state of chaos.

Season 2 of Westworld kicks off this Sunday, April 22nd at 9:00pm EST on HBO, and in advance of the premiere, Daily Dead attended a recent press day for the series, where we had the opportunity to speak with Sarafyan about the evolution of her character, whether or not we’ll see more of her relationship with Maeve explored in the new season, and more.

[SPOILER WARNING: While nothing too in-depth about season 2 of Westworld is discussed below, some of this interview delves into the events of season 1. So, for those who haven’t watched it, consider this a warning that there might be some items below that could be considered spoilers.]

With season 2 of Westworld, what can you tell us about Clementine's journey? Does she get to just tear shit up?

Angela Sarafyan: I think maybe you might see a little bit of that [laughs]. I know she's not in episode 1, but she will, maybe, make an appearance in episode 2. What was fun about season 2 is that I got to play around with different elements of her. It was interesting to have that opportunity. I think in season 1, the tragedy about her is what brings her strength out. She's framed in a way, and then she's put down. There was innocence to Clementine before all of that happened, a naiveté where she was looking at finding love in every person, every woman and man that she comes across, and now it’s different. She wanted to make that other connection besides sex, and you will see that.

I don't know how much you can say, but how did you get to rethink Clementine in new ways for season 2?

Angela Sarafyan: There are some new elements to her. That's what was fun, is that there were these new challenges and just to find another approach to revealing certain things about her character. It was a different creative approach, and that was really fun for me because you say, "What's really going on and how do I reveal that with this situation?" If I can be as vague as possible [laughs].

When you're playing a character like this, where there's a very subtle physicality to this role, does it change your approach as an actress? Do you have to play certain moments a different way because essentially you’re a host? You have your reveries, but you’re not quite a fully realized human being, which means you have to carry yourself differently.

Angela Sarafyan: Absolutely. And because I used to dance as a child, I found that through the physical movement, you reveal a story. If I'm limited in physicality, I still have the ability to reveal something just by the way that you sit. If I sat hunched over versus completely straight, it's a revelation. There was this thing called "psychological gestures" that Michael Chekhov would talk about. He would say that it's in the way you walk. If you're walking through water versus the air, he'd have these exercises and I started to implement those elements into playing her. It was really fun.

Plus, I watched videos on AIs and how they move and how not human they are. What makes us human is all these little movements that you're doing: the smile and the blinking, the finger movements. These are all the little things that they would implement in the characters in order to make them real. I would also make other choices consciously because I believed Clementine was a sensual woman. I thought she was a dreamer, so I thought there was more grace and fluidity in her than, let's say, if I was playing Armistice or someone else.

There is a really interesting dynamic between Clementine and Maeve for season 1. It was almost very bittersweet at the end when she goes off and she's ready to do her thing and has to say goodbye to Clem. I'm curious now that we know what we know going into season 2, are we going to see that dynamic explored more?

Angela Sarafyan: Possibly. I think that love connects Clementine and Maeve. That bond is ultimately what you're searching for in life, like who are those few people who are dearest to you? I can literally say it's less than five. I think that's their relationship, and that they're connected. You will see elements of that explored in this season, but I don't want to give away anything more.

Is it kind of daunting and thrilling as an actor to work with limited information and have things be big reveals to you when they come along?

Angela Sarafyan: For me it is, because it's that same idea of not having a phone and having information right to you in that moment. I like not knowing and having the daydream happen. I think within the daydream is where creativity lives.

And having that chance to think about Clementine, and just the few thoughts that they've given me, starts to open up other doors, and then makes me think, "Okay, well, if this is what that means ..." and then they add some more information. It's like slowly adding the ingredients to a recipe.

First, you always think, "Okay, if I had known this, maybe I would have done this." But it somehow works, because they're actually directing with giving you a certain amount of information. It's a different kind of direction, and because I trust them, I don't feel that I'll be steered wrong. I really don't. They're incredibly thoughtful creators of the show and directors.

Can you tell us a little bit about your part in the Ted Bundy biopic [Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile]?

Angela Sarafyan: Well, it's not a typical Ted Bundy movie because it's not about the nasty side of killings. It's really about the psychological element of it. It's like having a friend and all of a sudden they're arrested for something. You're like, "Wait, what's going on?" Then you hear all these things start to come out and, "Oh, he might have done this? That's insane. How could this person that I love have done that?"

What was kind of crazy about doing that movie is I actually met the girlfriend, the actual girlfriend to Ted Bundy, on set. She was there. We had dinner together and talked. In the movie, I play her best friend who tries to convince her that, because she has an addiction to alcohol and starts becoming very self-destructive, there's something wrong with Ted and you cannot talk to him or be in touch with him. This happened in real life. I found some articles about her, my character's name is Joanna, telling her best friend that this cannot continue. They actually did call the cops and report Ted.

---------

In case you missed it, check here to read Heather's Westworld Season 2 interview with Luke Hemsworth.

Westworld Season 2 | Official Trailer | HBO - YouTube

The post Interview: Angela Sarafyan on Clementine’s Journey in WESTWORLD Season 2 appeared first on Daily Dead.

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Following the well-received world premiere of What Keeps You Alive at the SXSW Film Festival (read Heather Wixson's review here), IFC Midnight has acquired the latest film from Colin Minihan (It Stains the Sands Red, Grave Encounters) for US distribution.

A release date for What Keeps You Alive has yet to be announced, but in the meantime, here's what Minihan had to say about the acquisition (via Deadline):

“I’m very excited to be working with IFC Midnight on releasing What Keeps You Alive. They are at the top of their game and consistently releasing the best the genre has to offer.”

We'll be sure to keep Daily Dead readers updated on release details for What Keeps You Alive, and we also have a brief description and teaser trailer below:

"The new thriller featuring the stars of the just-released box office champ, Jigsaw, WHAT KEEPS YOU ALIVE is from writer-director Colin Minihan (It Stains the Sands Red, Grave Encounters) and stars Hannah Emily Anderson (Jigsaw, Dark Phoenix) and Brittany Allen (It Stains the Sands Red).

WHAT KEEPS YOU ALIVE pits a female couple against one another during their one-year anniversary. Rounding out the cast are Martha MacIsaac (Superbad, Unicorn Store, Battle of the Sexes) and Joey Klein (TV's 12 Monkeys)."

WHAT KEEPS YOU ALIVE Teaser Trailer - Vimeo

The post Colin Minihan’s WHAT KEEPS YOU ALIVE Acquired for US Distribution by IFC Midnight appeared first on Daily Dead.

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As audience members, we sometimes take for granted what directors can accomplish with proper financial backing for a film. For contemporary studio fare (Andy Muschietti’s IT, for example), having a bigger budget often indicates a studio’s faith in the filmmaker or project, and in the best cases, that confidence translates to the screen, whether in production design, CGI, costuming, or star talent. A bigger budget undoubtedly gives the director more room to groove, allotting him or her more tools to ultimately help manifest their vision into a cinematic reality. And while I surely don’t mean to discredit artists fortunate enough to have millions at their disposal, there’s a certain beauty to the low-budget bravado of movies like Tobe Hooper's The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, Sam Raimi's The Evil Dead and John Carpenter’s Halloween.

If you’re Guillermo del Toro and have over $50 million to create a gorgeously ethereal haunt-scape like Crimson Peak, then more power to you. However, there’s a lot of to be said for films that can pull off a white-knuckled 90 minutes with only shapes, lighting, and bone-chilling scores at their disposal. Horror is, after all, a genre infused with ingenuity, which has challenged many directors to employ cost cutting camera techniques and practical effects that deliver some of the best and most influential work the genre has seen. After all, a dreadful tone and terror that gnaws under the skin aren’t necessarily qualities one can buy.

Here’s a spotlight on a few low-budget beauts that pulled off scares minus the millions:

The Evil Dead: In the early 1980s, Sam Raimi and a group of friends headed to an isolated cabin in Tennessee to film what would eventually become one of the greatest horror and cult films of our time: The Evil Dead. The production had a lot working in its favor: an original script written by Raimi, a self-produced short of his idea that helped raise funds, and a gang of friends stockpiled with heart and motivation for the project. What they didn’t have was a sizable studio-backed budget. So, what’s a filmmaker to do? For Raimi and his team, it was time to get creative.

While Raimi reportedly made his movie for between $350,000–400,000, the charm of his film is its homemade style, which was perhaps less of an artistic approach than a financial one. Tom Sullivan’s special effects on the film were almost entirely sourced from hobby shops, hardware stores, and supermarkets. Sullivan estimated that he spent no more than $400 on makeup supplies. Now that is artsy.

The Films of Herschell Gordon Lewis: Though Lewis’ films aren’t what many would call “great,” they make up a seminal cog in horror history. Often called the “Godfather of Gore,” Lewis was known for his exploitative bloodbaths, including Blood Feast and The Wizard of Gore, the former of which is often considered the genre’s first splatter film. Though his work at times showcases shaky stories and amateurish acting, Lewis pulled off gory triumphs using practical effects and animal organs (gross on screen and off), often for under $100,000, and in some cases, as low as $25,000 per movie. The gore in Lewis' films is shocking, appalling, and cheap enough to make a modern genre buff wonder how he could’ve possibly pulled it off in the ’60s.

The Hills Have Eyes (1977): Wes Craven knew how to stretch a buck. Though one could certainly look to The Last House on the Left as a prime example, Craven’s tale about desert cannibals stalking a suburban family is perhaps more impressive. The film includes loads of fiery goodness (including explosions and a flaming crucifixion), twisted makeup effects for the cannibal gang, and some impressive blood and gore effects. Craven pushes his cast to the brink, with the Carter family struggling to survive as they’re picked off one by one. The movie is bleak and insufferable at times, playing on the fears of watching one’s family die torturous, slow deaths. It’s a disturbing 89-minute affair, produced for a modest estimated sum of $230,000, and yet it works on every level.

Alice, Sweet Alice: Alfred Sole’s slasher entry (released pre-Halloween) is an excellent film produced before the boom that made slashers a dime a dozen. While it may not be chock-full of pricey wizardry, Sole showed that a movie can be captivating, chilling, and mysterious—all without mega dollar signs attached. Utilizing an original script co-written by Sole and Rosemary Ritvo, Alice investigates the murder of nine-year-old Karen, who is strangled by a masked killer in church just as she’s about to receive her first Holy Communion. The movie is a clever whodunnit that twists and turns, bolstered by believable plot development and capable acting. For only an estimated $340,000, Sole’s second feature turned out to be one of the genre’s most distinct and underrated slashers, proving that expensive visuals aren’t necessary to enthrall audiences.

Tobe Hooper’s The Texas Chain Saw Massacre and Eaten Alive: The maestros are maestros for a reason. In 1974, Tobe Hooper pulled off The Texas Chain Saw Massacre for just an estimated $300,000, using real animal blood and carcasses to adorn the grisly home of his main monster, Leatherface. (Picking up road kill—what a way to save!) But making something out of virtually nothing was the name of the game for many of these legends in the making, and Texas Chain Saw remains one of the most terrifying horror movies ever put to film. The sound of the chainsaw, the terror-induced screams, the living hell of that Texas farmhouse: simplicity worked to build and capitalize on the film’s barren anxieties, and Hooper didn’t need much movie magic to heighten them.

In 1977, Hooper had more tricks up his sleeve, this time swapping chainsaws for reptiles. Eaten Alive follows Judd, owner of the Starlight Hotel, and his not-so-friendly pet alligator. Guests check in, but they rarely leave... because they are eaten by a killer gator! While this one’s strange as hell (and that’s an understatement), filming on a soundstage helped shorten the shoot and cut costs, and the production became yet another fine example of Hooper’s hustle.

The Blair Witch Project: Love it or hate it, not only did The Blair Witch Project popularize the found footage filmmaking technique that spawned a gaggle of knock-off wannabes, but in 1999, the film felt like the freshest moviemaking approach that horror had seen in quite a while. Sure, its mastermind marketing paved its path to success, but you have to hand it to directors Daniel Myrick and Eduardo Sánchez, who created a phenomenon for a measly estimated budget of $60,000 that banked a wowing $248.6 million! While not a personal favorite, it was an event at the theater that summer, a feat in low-budget filmmaking that’s impossible to ignore.

There are far too many movies that deserve recognition in this discussion of practical mastery and directing prowess. From cult films (Blood Rage) and other found footage movies (Paranormal Activity) to more contemporary fare like Mike Flanagan’s Absentia, filmmakers from every decade have found ways to get crafty, using practicality and a keen eye for scary storytelling at the forefront of their methodology. No shade to the big dogs and blockbusters, but I’ll always be in awe of—and in line for—the ambition of smaller productions.

The post In Celebration of Low-Budget Horror Movies appeared first on Daily Dead.

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April is the month of national Siblings Day in the US, and Fright Rags celebrated the day of familial ties with a new apparel collection featuring two of the most memorable brothers in the horror genre: Duane and Belial Bradley from Frank Henenlotter's cult 1982 horror movie, Basket Case.

Featuring four shirt designs and a sliding enamel pin of Belial and his wicker basket home, Fright Rags' new Basket Case collection is now up on their website, and you can also view it below. Will you be adding it to your wardrobe?

From Fright Rags: "So, What's in the Basket?!....

NOW AVAILABLE! Officially Licensed BASKET CASE Collection! New tee designs by Ralf Krause & Kyle Crawford available in both Womens (XS-2X) and Mens (S-5X), and the classic posters design on a killer Red/Black Baseball Tee!

PLUS! Real sliding-action BELIAL enamel pin by Nik Holmes! Grab yours now before the first pressing is sold out!

SHOP HERE: https://goo.gl/eodc5C"

The post Frank Henenlotter’s Cult 1982 Horror Movie Celebrated with New BASKET CASE Collection from Fright Rags appeared first on Daily Dead.

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A safe haven for criminals in a brutal near future, the Hotel Artemis isn't supposed to have visiting hours, but some unexpected arrivals show up with violent intentions in the ferociously fun first trailer for the new action thriller from Drew Pearce.

Hotel Artemis will be unleashed in US theaters beginning June 8th from Global Road Entertainment. Stay tuned to Daily Dead for more updates and watch the official trailer below:

"In HOTEL ARTEMIS, set in riot-torn, near-future Los Angeles, Jodie Foster plays The Nurse, who runs a secret, members-only emergency room for criminals. Surrounded by an all-star cast that includes Sterling K. Brown, Sofia Boutella, Jeff Goldblum, Brian Tyree Henry, Jenny Slate, Zachary Quinto, Charlie Day, and Dave Bautista, HOTEL ARTEMIS is a stylish, high-octane action-thriller written and directed by Drew Pearce (writer of IRON MAN 3, MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE – ROGUE NATION, SHERLOCK HOLMES 3)."

Hotel Artemis | Official Trailer [HD] | Global Road - YouTube

The post Watch Criminals Check in at the HOTEL ARTEMIS in the Official Trailer for the New Action Thriller appeared first on Daily Dead.

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