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Eliminating physician burnout is a process that begins with understanding its root cause. While every physician is a unique individual, studies have identified a collection of overarching reasons that seem to appear in most burn out situations. The first step in curing physician burnout is to undergo a self-assessment across these primary factors and address any issues that are discovered.

The 4 Top Causes of Physician Burnout
  1. Excessive Workload

A poor work-life balance can create numerous problems for physicians, both personally and professionally. Yet, many still consider this to be a major challenge in the profession.

  • According to the 2018 Medscape National Physician & Depression Report, more than one-third (39%) attributed their burnout to working excessive hours. The reason this is so prevalent among physicians in clinical settings varies, but patient overload seems to be a significant factor. (Peckham)
  • 40% of doctors reported being in charge of more patients than they could safely accommodate each month. Research shows that 15 patients per shift is the maximum number of patients a physician can safely see if their work is solely clinical. (Michtalik)

When addressing workload think about how you assign patients to your physicians. Try to be objective and realistic in this assessment. If you need to restructure your workload, speak with your colleagues about changing the way clinical patient work is distributed. Having a reliable support system can make a big difference in preserving your peace of mind.

  1. High Risk Specialties

Surprisingly a physician’s specialty can directly affect their chances of burnout.   The highest percentages of burnout reportedly occur among specialties with higher risks and lower predictability factors.  This would include specialties that have a large number of incoming patients that are experiencing medical emergencies.

  • Critical care, emergency medicine, and neurology are all within this category.
  • Specialties with higher predictability and arguably less risk reported the lowest rates of burnout. Physicians in plastic surgery, dermatology, and orthopedics all reported less than 35% of burnout while the highest percentages in the former group were over 44%. (Berg)

Understanding the unique stresses of a specialty can help shed more light on specific burnout risks. If you are working within a specialty associated with higher burnout rates, try enforcing breaks on a more regular basis. Consistently being in a highly stressful clinical environment for long periods of time can wreak havoc if you’re not careful.

  1. Hassle Factors

Working with insurance companies to secure pay for patient services creates a bureaucratic nightmare for many physicians. Administrative work is an inevitable part of the business, but when it becomes tedious and unproductive, it can affect the level of care that physicians can provide.

  • According to the 2018 Medscape National Physician & Depression Report, over half (56%) of physicians surveyed chose an excess of bureaucratic tasks as a contributing factor to their burnout, and 16% reported government regulations. This can be a challenging factor for you to attack alone. (Peckham)

Help create organized work patterns and automate as much of the administrative work as you can. Train physicians to rely on administrative workers as much as reasonably possible.

  1. Inadequate Technology

As technology continues to advance and make life easier, it may be surprising that it is also a frustration for many physicians.

  • 24% of physicians report increasing computerization as a major contribution to burnout. Poorly designed technology can create additional work that doesn’t add value to the patient experience. This includes computer systems that don’t blend well with physician processes and are not user-friendly. (Peckham)

To combat this, make a concerted effort to help your healthcare organization purchase technology that improves efficiency and is easy to use. Easy charting, focused content, cloud hosting, and electronic scheduling are all characteristics you should consider when searching for a technology solution to alleviate physicians’ burdens. (Wirbickas)

Don’t let burnout sneak up on you. Take the time now to understand the causes, risk factors, and solutions to get ahead of the problem. If you need help getting started, we’ve got your back. At CTI we are committed to supporting the physician leader with tools for success and wellbeing.

To learn more about how we can help and to access our brochure of offerings, visit us at ctileadership.com or give us a call at (813) 333-1401.

Sources:

  1. Berg, Sara. Physician Burnout: Its Not You, It’s Your Medical Specialty. Accessed from https://www.ama-assn.org/residents-students/specialty-profiles/physician-burnout-its-not-you-its-your-medical-specialty
  2. Peckham, Carol. Medscape National Physician Burnout & Depression Report 2018. January 17, 2018. Accessed fromhttps://www.medscape.com/slideshow/2018-lifestyle-burnout-depression-6009235#1
  3. Michtalik, Henry J., Yeh, Hsin-Chieh, & Pronovost, Peter J. Impact of Attending Physician Workload on Patient Care: A Survey of Hospitalists. March 11, 2013. Accessed from https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/fullarticle/1566604
  4. Wirbickas, Greg. Tackling a Root Cause to Physician Burnout. Accessed from https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/hospital-physician-relationships/tackling-a-root-cause-to-physician-burnout.html

The post 4 Causes of Physician Burnout appeared first on CTI.

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Leadership training and development continues to be a key initiative for many healthcare organizations.  If you Google “Leadership Training Tools” the search engine returns more than 277,000,000 results so we understand that it can be overwhelming to determine where to start.  The good news is that CTI can help!

We offer a variety of  solutions that can meet the unique needs of every physician and organization.  Even if you don’t know exactly what solution you are looking for, we can partner with you to assess your organizations strengths, identify gaps, and recommend training tools that are the right fit for you and your organization.

Fellowships – This year-long program equips participants with a deeper understanding of organizational and healthcare market dynamics, conventional and unconventional strategies, and key levers for leading people effectively.

Coaching – This process provides insight, guidance and accountability which equip participants to execute on his or her personal and organizational goals and strategies with the highest impact.

Boot Camps – In two days or fewer, these highly motivating events can be used to jump start initiatives from strategic projects to long-term cultural change.

Active Learning Projects – Projects serve as opportunities for applied training in hands-on, non-didactic environments. Projects involve collaborative work on strategic initiatives aimed at facilitating improvement or enhancing growth. They serve as vehicles for developing engagement as a muscle for future collaboration. Working in cross-functional teams or in dyads, participants have the opportunity to apply the leadership skills by improving upon strategic, operational or clinical issues, and drive tangible results for a return on investment.

Proprietary Tools – We incorporate tools and maps to enhance the learning and application with the following:

Assessments – We offer a variety of tools to evaluate individual and team leadership competencies and behaviors including: communication styles, transformation and change readiness, emotional intelligence, learning styles, time management, teamwork, performance management, and conflict resolution.

WANT TO KNOW MORE ABOUT OUR LEADERSHIP TRAINING TOOLS AND HOW THEY CAN HELP YOUR ORGANIZATION? Contact us today!  813-333-1401

The post Leadership Training Tools appeared first on CTI.

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CTI was proud to be a part of the 2019 AMGA conference that was held in National Harbor, Maryland, from March 26-28.

CTI led two workshops:

  1. Emerging Leaders and Women in Leadership: Design the Career and Life you Love!
  2. Immersion Workshop: Developing and Engaging Physician Leaders.   

Our team at CTI would like to thank all of our partners who joined us in attending this year’s conference. We look forward to continuing our journey together in transforming healthcare around the world and would like to share with you major takeaways from CTI’s featured sessions:

Design the Career and Life you Love!! Emerging Leaders and Women in Leadership Councils Breakfast and Executive Group Coaching – Mo Kasti and Kimberly Faith

Program Overview

Taking charge of your career involves making a personal investment in designing your future to ensure it involves the work and life you love. During this session, we’ll use Design Thinking principles to help you do just that.

Any effort to envision the future begins with understanding the past and the journey you’ve taken to arrive where you are today. Given this, we’ll begin by looking at the intersection of your past, present and desired future, and using these insights to help you define your career vision.

With a vision of your desired future in mind, we’ll then focus on how you can own, communicate, and live into this vision. We’ll take this into actionable next steps by defining a prototype to  implement and a mechanism for holding yourself accountable.

Key Takeaways:

  • Zoom out to look at your past: Identify key experiences and beliefs from your past to understand how past experiences have shaped our present.
  • By mapping our past and understanding our own journey we can use our story to humanize the leadership conversation, establish trust and engage others.
  • When engaging with others always consider what the other person may or may not have going on in their day/personal life.
  • Remember to refill your own cup, you can’t give what you don’t have.
  • Design a manifesto for the life and career you will love.
  • Use Design thinking principles to create a prototype for what you would like to achieve.
  • Define a mechanism for holding yourself accountable for your goals and vision. Check in with others to stay on target.
Developing and Engaging Physician Leaders – Mo Kasti and Dr. Ben Bache-Wiig

Physician Engagement: A Roadmap to Partner with Physicians to Be ALL IN

Physician engagement is crucial as healthcare systems navigate the multitude of decisions required in moving from volume to value, achieving clinical integration, navigating population health, and improving performance to drive transformational change. In the new and ever-changing healthcare economy, healthcare leadership needs to recognize and champion this importantnew role physicians will play. For their part, physicians need to understand and become more involved in the business of health care in support of the organization’s strategic direction. Physician leadership can be developed to help move an organization toward its strategic goals and to support cultural alignment and administrators. So, how do you develop physician leadership and engagement in this era of transformational change? In this immersion workshop, you’ll hear how CTI, an industry leader, developed the successful Physician Leadership Institute, and from AMGA member Allina Health who will share their experience with physician leadership development within their own organization.

  • Physician Dis-engagement is still a national challenge with only 10% fully engaged
  • Physicians are not the problem, physicians are the solution
  • Not all engagements are created equal- choose where to spend your emotional bandwidth
  • Engagement = one humanized conversation at a time that builds trust
  • 5 key factors that impact physician engagement are leadership, system, culture, self and purpose
  • Use Physician Engagement Framework to design your message including: Situate, Humanize, Co-Create, Converse and Sprint.
  • Dr. Bache-Wiig shared his lessons learned going from clinician to clinician leader.
  • Allina Health focused on co-creating by developing their primary care leaders through multi level approach with boot camps, Academies, Fellowships over multi year plan.
  • Build trust by making sure your deposits (giving) are as common as your withdrawals (asking for)
  • Find the intersection between your goal (what you are asking of them) and their concerns (what they care about)
  • The participants practiced developing their engagement strategy using a CTI proprietary Engagement Roadmap.
  • If you like a copy of the presentation, contact Mo kasti mkasti@ctileadership.com 

At CTI we are committed to supporting healthcare organizations in their engagement efforts with tools for success, strategies and roadmaps, as well as classes and workshops. To learn more about how we can help and to access our brochure of physician leadership training offerings, contact us online or give us a call at (813) 333-1401.

The post Highlights and Takeaways from CTI-led workshops at AMGA 2019 appeared first on CTI.

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AMGA 2019 Key Takeaways

Although Healthcare transformation was the overall arching theme of the 2019 AMGA conference that was held in National Harbor, Maryland, on March 26-28, 2019, each breakout session offered insight into multiple topics such as Leading Leaders, Physician Engagement, Physician Burnout, Opioid Management, Patient Experience, Primary Care Redesign and Developing Culture. These are some major takeaways from some sessions we attended:

Bless This Mess: A Story of Healthcare in America – Stephen Klasko, M.D., M.B.A.
  • Knowing your patient population and how to meet their needs and expectations
  • Understanding how to look to the future of healthcare so we can prepare today
  • Marketing forces impact the face of healthcare today
  • Understanding innovation, thinking like Amazon and Google
  • The change in the care delivery model of today requires us to change
  • Meeting the needs of patients in a flexible manner for better results
  • Technology is changing healthcare, so we need to train, develop and prepare our physicians for what’s next
  • Changing your culture to change the outcome
  • Being consumer-centric to be successful
  • Creating a new educational paradigm to address medical advancements
  • Closing care gaps- How to use technology to improve quality and ease physician burnout
Leading Leaders: Emotional intelligence in Your Organizational Culture – Patrice Weiss, M.D.
  • Emotional intelligence is just as important as IQ in determining which leaders will succeed
  • Emotional intelligence helps solve problems, gain influence, establish organizational culture and impact patient safety and experience
  • Your IQ can get you the opportunity but your emotional intelligence will contribute to how successful you will be in your role
  • EI outweighs IQ in determining who emerges as a leader
  • There are five components of EI- Self awareness, self regulation, motivation, empathy and social skills
  • Create a thriving culture remembering the magic ratio of uplifts to hassles is 3:1
  • Create a culture you can be proud of, people might not remember what you said but they will remember how you made them feel.
We Are Who We Recruit, Nurture, and Develop: Full Cycle Talent Management in a Medical Group – Lee Anne Wong, M.D. and Kristin Hallmark, M.B.A.
  • How you recruit, nurture, and develop your clinicians will determine how long they will stay with the organization
  • Each new clinician should raise the bar and enrich your organizations success and culture
  • Create alignment with the expectation and goals of the organization
  • Involve your other clinicians in onboarding and welcoming recruits
  • Give feedback with support and resources during the onboarding process
  • Ask your clinicians to commit to a mentorship to further develop and nurture new clinicians
  • Build opportunities for growth and development of clinicians in the medical grouo
  • Have flexibility when working with clinicians to prevent burnout

At CTI we are committed to supporting healthcare organizations in their engagement efforts with tools for success, strategies and roadmaps, as well as classes and workshops. To learn more about how we can help and to access our brochure of physician leadership training offerings, contact us online or give us a call at (813) 333-1401.

The post Key Takeaways from AMGA 2019 appeared first on CTI.

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Engagement is a highly personalized process that taps into the individualized needs, values, and goals of each physician in the organization. Utilizing empathy can help you tailor your strategy to your situation. The Oxford Living Dictionary defines empathy as “the ability to understand and share the feelings of another.” This directly corresponds to the tools needed to understand and improve engagement in the healthcare.

  1. Identify the Context – Engagement is contextual so before we begin to practice empathy as a strategy, you will need to determine the context first. Engagement strategies work best when created around a specific goal, project, or metric. Consider the analogy of dietician. They may identify generally healthy foods but identifying a specific patient’s dietary needs will enable them to create a much more effective dietary plan. A diabetic will not have the same dietary needs as a patient recovering from a coronary angioplasty. Likewise, improving your emergency department’s engagement with new clinical practices will not have the same requirements as increasing committee participation.
  2. Identify the Stakeholders – Once you have determined the goal for your current engagement strategy, you can begin to identify the key stakeholders. This is where our concept of empathy is going to begin to take hold. Start by mapping out which individuals will be impacted by the project. This will include physicians, staff, and administrators who will participate in the project or initiative, as well as patients, community members, and third parties who will impact (or be impacted) by the project. Practicing empathy can help you identify key stakeholders. For instance, empathizing with a patient may reveal the impact of office staff on overall satisfaction, or empathizing with physicians may reveal the importance of engaging medical scribes to reduce administration strain.
  3. Humanize the Players – Human Being vs. Human Doing: This step is about translating groups of stakeholders into individuals. Each engagement journey is unique and will play out differently because each player brings their own dynamic to the mix. Consider the human factors behind engagement to find the most meaningful way to encourage change. Has a physician recently experienced a change in their personal life that is impacting engagement level? Do we know their value and what they care about? How might you rephrase the conversation to tap into their individual values and what they care about?
  4. Identify Motivators – More valuable to the engagement journey than the what is the why of an action. Why is a particular physician having trouble engaging with the project? Why should this initiative matter to the stakeholders? What is the ultimate goal of the project and of the individuals in question? That is the essence of improving engagement. It is understanding the motivations behind the actions to better understand how to change those actions. Situate yourself in an empathic mindset to identify the motivators.
  5. Build Relationships One Conversation at a Time – A trusting relationship is the true catalyst for change and alignment. Practicing empathy will enable you and your team to strategically map the terrain of the engagement project, but it will also put you in a valuable position to build relationships throughout your organization’s value chain. Practice open, honest communication and engage with your physicians, staff, partners, and clients to create a positive environment in which engagement can grow and flourish.

Whether you are focused on aligning an individual, project, or team, using empathy along the journey will vastly improve your outcome. Empathy is an important quality in a healthcare professional. We are quite familiar with the concept of empathy as it pertains to the physician/patient relationship. As such, we tend to expect a high level of empathy and emotional intelligence from our physicians. But empathy plays an important role in our working relationships as well. Practicing empathy within the organization can help build engagement by helping identify impediments to change and how to overcome them. Reshaping the conversation.

At CTI we are committed to supporting healthcare organizations in their engagement efforts with tools for success, strategies and roadmaps, as well as classes and workshops. To learn more about how we can help and to access our brochure of offerings, visit us at ctileadership.com or give us a call at (813) 333-1401.

The post Driving Physician Engagement with Empathy appeared first on CTI.

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Engagement is a highly personalized process that taps into the individualized needs, values, and goals of each physician in the organization. Utilizing empathy can help you tailor your strategy to your situation. The Oxford Living Dictionary defines empathy as “the ability to understand and share the feelings of another.” This directly corresponds to the tools needed to understand and improve engagement in the healthcare.

  1. Identify the Context – Engagement is contextual so before we begin to practice empathy as a strategy, you will need to determine the context first. Engagement strategies work best when created around a specific goal, project, or metric. Consider the analogy of dietician. They may identify generally healthy foods but identifying a specific patient’s dietary needs will enable them to create a much more effective dietary plan. A diabetic will not have the same dietary needs as a patient recovering from a coronary angioplasty. Likewise, improving your emergency department’s engagement with new clinical practices will not have the same requirements as increasing committee participation.
  2. Identify the Stakeholders – Once you have determined the goal for your current engagement strategy, you can begin to identify the key stakeholders. This is where our concept of empathy is going to begin to take hold. Start by mapping out which individuals will be impacted by the project. This will include physicians, staff, and administrators who will participate in the project or initiative, as well as patients, community members, and third parties who will impact (or be impacted) by the project. Practicing empathy can help you identify key stakeholders. For instance, empathizing with a patient may reveal the impact of office staff on overall satisfaction, or empathizing with physicians may reveal the importance of engaging medical scribes to reduce administration strain.
  3. Humanize the Players – Human Being vs. Human Doing: This step is about translating groups of stakeholders into individuals. Each engagement journey is unique and will play out differently because each player brings their own dynamic to the mix. Consider the human factors behind engagement to find the most meaningful way to encourage change. Has a physician recently experienced a change in their personal life that is impacting engagement level? Do we know their value and what they care about? How might you rephrase the conversation to tap into their individual values and what they care about?
  4. Identify Motivators – More valuable to the engagement journey than the what is the why of an action. Why is a particular physician having trouble engaging with the project? Why should this initiative matter to the stakeholders? What is the ultimate goal of the project and of the individuals in question? That is the essence of improving engagement. It is understanding the motivations behind the actions to better understand how to change those actions. Situate yourself in an empathic mindset to identify the motivators.
  5. Build Relationships One Conversation at a Time – A trusting relationship is the true catalyst for change and alignment. Practicing empathy will enable you and your team to strategically map the terrain of the engagement project, but it will also put you in a valuable position to build relationships throughout your organization’s value chain. Practice open, honest communication and engage with your physicians, staff, partners, and clients to create a positive environment in which engagement can grow and flourish.

Whether you are focused on aligning an individual, project, or team, using empathy along the journey will vastly improve your outcome. Empathy is an important quality in a healthcare professional. We are quite familiar with the concept of empathy as it pertains to the physician/patient relationship. As such, we tend to expect a high level of empathy and emotional intelligence from our physicians. But empathy plays an important role in our working relationships as well. Practicing empathy within the organization can help build engagement by helping identify impediments to change and how to overcome them. Reshaping the conversation.

At CTI we are committed to supporting healthcare organizations in their engagement efforts with tools for success, strategies and roadmaps, as well as classes and workshops. To learn more about how we can help and to access our brochure of offerings, visit us at ctileadership.com or give us a call at (813) 333-1401.

The post Driving Physician Engagement with Empathy appeared first on CTI.

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Tampa, FL (March 12, 2019)– CTI announced today that its CEO, Mo Kasti, has been selected to facilitate a physician engagement workshop at the American Medical Group Association’s (AMGA) Annual Conference.  The workshop will use design thinking principles to help participants take charge of their future and define their careers.  The conference will be held at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in National Harbor, Maryland on March 27-30, 2019.

Physician engagement and burnout has been identified as a major initiative for healthcare organizations and hospital systems across the United States. Physician engagement can result in enhanced patient care, decreased medical costs, increased efficiency, and improved patient satisfaction. In fact, a recent poll by Gallup found physicians who are actively engaged are 26 percent more productive than those who are not.  The same poll correlated this productivity to an average increase of $460,000 in annual patient revenue per physician.

Mo Kasti is a distinguished author, thinker, speaker, strategy advisor and family man. His passion centers around helping executives and clinical leaders elevate their thinking in times of transformation and capitalize on emerging growth opportunities.  When terrains are shifting, and outcomes are uncertain, Mo is uniquely equipped to help leaders think outside the box. Mo is the Chief Executive Officer of CTI and the author of two books – Physician Leadership, The RX For Healthcare Transformation and Beyond Physician Engagement: A Roadmap to Partner with Physicians to be ALL IN!,

“I am honored to be asked to participate in AMGA’s Annual Conference,” said Mo Kasti, President and CEO of CTI. “The organization shares my vision of helping leaders in the medial industry to deliver the next level of high-performance healthcare.”

The post CTI Chief Executive Officer to Facilitate Design Thinking Based Physician Engagement Workshop at AMGA Annual Conference appeared first on CTI.

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Here at CTI, we believe that attending conferences is a great way to improve both your personal and professional development. Conferences sharpen your skills, allow you to network with other leaders and organization, and increase your knowledge about new trends and innovative practices in the field you are passionate about.

There are plenty of amazing conferences all around the US; so, for your convenience, we have put together a list of upcoming conferences throughout the year. CTI will be attending and participating in several of them so we hope to connect with you at one of these events!

The Physician Summit
Date & Location: February 20th– 22nd| Orlando, FL

The Physician Summit is a unique opportunity for physician leaders to connect with others while hearing from experts who will share leading practice that are evolving the way they provide care. Industry leaders will opportunities to adopt new business models that incorporate telemedicine, wearables and precision medicine, and steps to take to create more personalized patient experience by looking outside of healthcare for innovative practices. We’ll also share successful strategies for reducing burnout and time spent in electronic medical records, so you can increase physician satisfaction while attracting and retaining top talent in the future.

Click here to register

ACHE Congress on Healthcare Leadership               

Date & Location: March 4th– 7th| Chicago, IL

ACHE’s Congress on Healthcare Leadership gathers more than 4,000 members from the healthcare leadership community for this annual premier education and networking event. Congress offers each attendee countless opportunities to innovate, collaborate, grow and transform by having access to top thought leaders on a variety of hot topics and networking events to share perspectives and insights with the diverse array of interprofessional leaders.

Click here to register

2019 Wisconsin Hospital Physician Leadership Development Conference
Date & Location: March 15th– 16th| Kohler, WI

The 2019 event includes a full-day with Stephen Beeson, MD, focusing on strategies that physician leaders in all stages of their careers can use to engage fellow physicians, building trust and confidence to get physician buy-in for change.

Click here to register

Arizona Medical Association: Physician Leadership Conference
Date & Location: March 16th| Phoenix, AZ

This conference is designed to connect passionate healthcare professionals in an environment that facilitates learning, networking, and best practice sharing. Attendees will have the opportunity to hear insights from industry experts and network with peers from healthcare organizations around the state.

Click here to register

AMGA Annual Conference
Date & Location: March 27th– 30th| National Harbor, MD

The AMGA Annual Conference is a three-day, interactive forum that connects you with your true peers—others in your role looking for solutions to challenges related to delivering high-quality, efficient, and affordable patient care. Unlike medical conferences that focus on specialty skill acquisition or bring together all levels of professionals, the AMGA Annual Conference is specifically tailored to medical group and health system executives directly responsible and accountable for the success of their organizations.

Click here to register

Greeley: Physician & Hospital Leader Education Event
Date & Location: March 28th– 30th| New Orleans, LA

Experience new content, exciting exchanges of ideas, strategies, and practical advice for conquering today’s most pressing challenges at Greeley’s Physician and Hospital Leadership Education Events. By attending, you will walk away with the education and skills you need to achieve the goals that are most critical to your organization’s success.

Click here to register

AAPL: 2019 Spring Summit
Date & Location: May 3rd– 5th| Washington, D.C.

Learn to lead yourself and others with courage alongside your physician leader peers this May 3-5 at the J.W. Marriott Hotel, Washington, D.C. Purchase a one-day pass or an all-access pass that will allow you to attend and complete one of the following tracks:

  • The institute track in which you can attend expert-led courses.
  • The wellness journey track designed to increase self-awareness and empower you to create change.
  • The member-driven annual meeting filled with exciting presentations including one on diversity in health care.
  • The exclusive Vanguard meeting track available only to American Association for Physician Leadership Vanguard members.

Click here to register

Optum Health: 13thAnnual Medical Physician Leadership Forum
Date & Location: May 15th| Austin, TX
Developed to provide cutting-edge clinical updates to individuals responsible for managing large patient populations, this accredited medical education event has something for everyone from managed health care medical directors to physician executives working within the managed care framework.

Click here to register

Becker’s ASC 26thAnnual Meeting: The Business Operations of ASCs
Date & Location: October 24th– 26th| Chicago, IL
This exclusive meeting brings together surgeons, physician leaders, administrators and ASC business and clinical leaders to discuss how to improve your ASC and its bottom line, how to manage challenging clinical, business and financial issues and more!

Click here to register

AAPL: 2019 Fall Institute
Date & Location: November 1st– 5th| Scottsdale, AZ

The American Association for Physician Leadership is offering an institute this fall! Choose from live courses led by seasoned faculty and examine the challenges of health care from the perspective of an established or up-and-coming industry leader.

Click here to register

Becker’s 8thAnnual CEO + CFO Roundtables

Date & Location: November 11th– 13th| Chicago, IL

This roundtable has great topics and speakers focused on core Issues, opportunities and strategy for the hospital and health system CEO and CFO audience.1,000+ attendees from hospitals and health systems across the nation at this world-class event focused on taking discussion and thinking to the highest levels.

Click here to register

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Health Care Providers Use Design Thinking to Improve Patient Experiences

The Harvard Business Review recently spoke to a hospital administrator over a reoccurring problem that patients tend to experience –– missing their medical appointments. In this article, Harvard Business Review discusses Design Thinking, how it was used to improve this issue, and how to apply it to the overall patient experience.

Key Takeaways from the article:

  1. “Each Year approximately 2.6 Million people miss or put off medical appointments due to transportation issues, leading to annual costs for health care providers in the billions of dollars.”
  2. “One of the most promising approaches for understanding patients’ experiences has been design thinking, a creative, human-centered problem-solving approach that leverages empathy, collective idea generation, rapid prototyping, and continuous testing to tackle complex challenges. Unlike traditional approaches to problem solving, design thinkers take great efforts to understand patients and their experiences before coming up with solutions.”
  3. “Hospitals versed in design thinking would identify this general challenge and then assign a team or task force (ideally a multidisciplinary one) to spend weeks or even a few months studying the patients it affects.”
  4. “Design thinking can be used to address challenges in a variety of domains related to the patient experience…An approach that starts with investigating the patients’ perspectives, including their greatest pain points, may give administrators ideas for how to make the [experience] more bearable.”

If you would like to view the full article, visit: https://hbr.org/2017/08/health-care-providers-can-use-design-thinking-to-improve-patient-experiences

CTI offers sessions on Design Thinking in Healthcare. If interested, contact us at mkasti@ctileadership.com

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Is the Hassle Factor Draining Your Talent?

Hassle factors in the workplace cause challenges for staff and physicians – eroding engagement and productivity. Identifying the top hassle factors in your organization can help you find ways to streamline processes and take pressure off your physicians. Hassle factors will never go away, but it’s important to identify them and take steps to reduce as much as possible. Read on to learn more about the hassle factor and what may be casing the most challenges in your organization.

  • What Does Hassle Really Mean? – When you think of the word hassle, you may associate it with an irritant or a nuisance. But that is only part of the picture. The dictionary definition of the word reveals its more inimical nature; “a heated often protracted argument; a violent skirmish; a state of confusion; an annoying or troublesome concern” (Merriam-Webster). Hassles are more than mere irritants, they have the potential to cause real conflict in your organization.
  • Defining The Hassle Factors – In the workplace, a hassle factor is anything that gets in the way of performing your job to the best of your abilities. The idea of hassle factors took on a whole new meaning in the medical community when Medicare and insurance paperwork began to pile up and drown physicians in administrative tasks. The Medscape Physician Compensation Report 2018 found that 70% of physicians spend over 10 hours per week on paperwork and administrative tasks. That’s up from last year’s 57%. All of this competes with time spent on patients or home and family life.
  • Top Hassle Factors – At CTI’s Physician Leadership Institute, we recently conducted a study to determine the top hassle factors threatening healthcare organizations today. The 5 top sources of hassle for physicians were:
    1. Electronic Health Records (EHR) Systems and Documentation
    2. Poor or Lacking Communication
    3. Lack of Clinical Representation in Leadership Roles
    4. Prioritization of Financial and Productivity Metrics
    5. Overly Complex Organizational Structure
  • Hassle Factors Contribute to Physician Burnout – Hassle factors have the potential to sap energy and productivity from your team. When examining the relationship between engagement and burnout, it is clear that increased hassle factors play a role in both issues. The Behavioral Sciences Open Access Journal recently published an article examining the factors that contribute to physician burnout. It found that “loss of autonomy at work, decreased control over the work environment, inefficient use of time due to administrative requirements, and loss of support from colleagues to be the central factors.”

Healthcare organizations are particularly susceptible to mounting hassle factors stemming from regulations, complex systems, processes and procedures. There is no way to completely eliminate hassle factors, but it is vital to identify and address those factors you can control. Pay attention to your staff, have conversations about hassle factors, conduct internal surveys and then look for ways to streamline the organizational processes.

To learn more about how we can help reduce hassle factors in your organization or about the Hassle Factor Index, visit us at ctileadership.com or give us a call at (813) 333-1401.

The post Is the Hassle Factor Draining Your Talent? appeared first on CTI.

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