Loading...

Follow Crossword Hobbyist Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Here at Crossword Hobbyist, we believe in the importance of education for all students no matter their background. That’s why we’re excited to offer the Crossword Hobbyist Crossword Scholarship.

Eligibility

Crossword Hobbyist is offering a scholarship to a current or incoming undergraduate student who will be enrolled for the Fall 2019 semester.

How to Apply

Most scholarships want you to submit an essay. Essays are great, and we do want to hear a bit about you, but we love crosswords! That’s why we’re asking applicants to create one 15×15 newspaper-style crossword puzzle on Crossword Hobbyist. The theme should focus on a topic that you’re passionate about. It can be anything you want! Animals, music, skateboarding, cupcakes, retro video games – the sky really is the limit.

Warning: don’t create a standard-style puzzle! To avoid this mistake, take the following steps:

  1. Create a free account on Crossword Hobbyist.
  2. Go to the “My Puzzles” page from the navigation bar.
  3. Click the “Newspaper Style” puzzle button.

No matter what theme you choose, the puzzle should meet the standards of professional newspaper-style puzzles as listed here. A submitted puzzle should have a maximum of 78 words. Creators who make puzzles with fewer black squares increase their odds of winning.

Once you’ve learned how to use the crossword puzzle maker at Crossword Hobbyist, follow the steps below to apply to our scholarship:

  1. Create your puzzle.
  2. Email us at scholarship@crosswordhobbyist.com so we can waive the one time publishing fee.
  3. Wait for an email confirming your puzzle has been unlocked. This should take no longer than 24 hours.
  4. Publish your puzzle once it is unlocked.
  5. Fill out the application form below. We will notify winners through the email listed in the form.

Remember, no fees are required of students to apply to this scholarship. You must follow the steps as outlined above. Applications with unpublished or standard-style puzzles will not be considered.

And don’t worry – we will not own the rights to any submitted crossword puzzle. All copyrights remain with the creator.

We strongly encourage all participants to share their crossword puzzles to their websites, blogs, and social media when available. Successfully creating a crossword puzzle is a huge accomplishment! Sharing it with others is a great way to celebrate. Keep in mind that this is not a requirement for entry.

The deadline to apply is April 30th, 2019.

Awards

The winner will receive a $1,000 scholarship and a free lifetime subscription to Crossword Hobbyist and My Word Search.

Up to five finalists will also be awarded a free lifetime subscription to Crossword Hobbyist and My Word Search.

Winner Notification

The selection committee at Crossword Hobbyist will determine the winning crossword puzzle. The committee will make their selection based on the cleverness of the theme, clues, and answers. A well-executed grid design will also be taken into consideration. The selection will be announced by May 31st, 2019.

The scholarship is to be used exclusively for school tuition and related expenses. A check for $1,000 will be made payable to the award recipient’s college, university, or trade school.

Contact

Please email scholarship@crosswordhobbyist.com with any questions pertaining to this scholarship.

Terms and Conditions
  • Any successful applicant may be required to show proof that they are enrolled in, or have been accepted to, an accredited university, commencing studies for the Fall 2019 semester.
  • International students enrolled in an American or Canadian university may apply.
  • Any students who know any of the Crossword Hobbyist committee members personally are not eligible to win.
  • There is no cost to apply for this scholarship. We will not request any monies from you.
  • The winner of the scholarship is chosen at the sole discretion of the Selection Committee. The winner and the finalists will be announced on May 31st, 2019.
  • Please direct all inquiries to scholarship@crosswordhobbyist.com. We will do our best to respond in a timely manner.

The post Announcing the 2019 Crossword Hobbyist Crossword Scholarship! appeared first on A blog about crossword puzzles from a crossword puzzle maker.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

You’ve seen it before: you’re on a business’ website when you stumble upon a crossword puzzle. Tons of professionals use them including accountants, children’s authors, educators, and more.

So why not add a crossword to your business website, too? With our crossword puzzle maker, you can make unique crosswords catered to your business. If you’re unsure whether one would go well on your site, consider these examples of how businesses use crosswords.

When Businesses Use Crosswords

Businesses use crosswords for many reasons, each one unique to the business. Most businesses have at least one of these four goals in mind when they add crosswords to their website.

#1 To condense lots of information.

Businesses that focus on complex topics or that need to share a lot of information will often use crossword puzzles. This will not only help potential clients understand what you do, it’ll give them confidence that you know your business and will help them to understand it, too.

#2 To appeal to families.

Run a business that serves families? Then your website is begging for unique crosswords! Customers and potential customers will appreciate the thoughtful and personal touch. Plus, it can help you build a new generation of clients.

#3 To add to a newsletter.

This is the most popular way for businesses to use crosswords. You can add a standard-style crossword or a newspaper-style crossword to your email or print newsletter.

#4 To promote a new product.

Crosswords are a great way to get the buzz out about your new offerings. It’ll keep potential customers on your sales page longer. This means they’re more likely to read the information in front of them, too. You can even use crosswords as part of the product itself.

When Should Businesses NOT Use Crosswords?

If you’re still not sure if crosswords are right for your business, consider these no-nos. Crosswords are quite flexible and can be used in many situations. However, there are a few examples of when a business might not want to use a crossword.

If your business focuses on a sensitive subject.

This is subjective, but you’ll need to use good judgment when creating crosswords for your business website. Usually, they work best to help a client understand a topic. However, if your business or organization deals with a sensitive topic, crosswords might come off as too light-hearted.

When your website has too many technical problems.

If your business has been having technical difficulties with the website, it might be best to work those out before adding crosswords. Although crossword themselves are well designed for desktop and mobile solving, it’ll frustrate visitors if they go to solve a crossword and it doesn’t work.

And that’s pretty much it! For the most part, all kinds of businesses use crosswords, and not just on their websites. They’ll use them for printed promotional materials, as a waiting room game, and more. Many businesses will use word searches, too, which offer a different kind of fun, educational activity.

The post When Should Businesses Use Crosswords? appeared first on A blog about crossword puzzles from a crossword puzzle maker.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

If you were to walk up to anyone on the street and ask them, “Who is the most famous writer of all time?” many people would most likely name William Shakespeare. He has thirty-seven plays to his name, but none of them are as loved and read as Romeo and Juliet.

While Romeo and Juliet might not be a novel, it certainly is a classic, earning it a place in the “Classic Novels Through Crosswords” series. According to ThoughtCo, it’s also one of the most frequently taught books in high school. See why with these Romeo and Juliet crosswords.

Examples of Romeo and Juliet Crosswords

Crosswords based on this famous play come with unique opportunities. Every crossword about a story can focus on characters and their quotes.

However, with a play, you can take it a step further. You can take quotes from the play, use them as crossword clues, then make the answer whoever said the quote. A crossword like this will help students comprehend the plot and each character’s involvement.

Then, plays also present the opportunity to separate crosswords by acts. Romeo and Juliet has four acts. These crosswords focus on each act individually.

Shakespeare plays also offer a great opportunity to teach vocabulary words. After all, he invented over 1700 words that we still use today. Use this list and the crosswords below as an opportunity to teach new words to your students.

Finally, don’t forget to give students crosswords about the bard behind the story: William Shakespeare. By understanding Shakespeare in his time, students will better understand the concept of Romeo and Juliet and its seemingly farfetched plot.

Making and Sharing Puzzles

Now that you’ve seen some samples of Romeo and Juliet crosswords, it’s time to make your own. Use these as inspiration, then add your own twist. You can add clues based on discussions you had in class. If your students acted out the play in class, match characters with the students who played them. There are many ways to make this older play feel new again.

A reminder to teachers throughout this blog series: you’ll want to make that your crossword can only be solved by reading the book and not through other materials. Add a couple of obscure references not covered by Sparknotes. Or, add staging notes Leonardo DiCaprio didn’t use in his movie adaptation.

As for sharing puzzles, you might want to introduce your crossword puzzle as review for a test or as extra credit. You can use crosswords as a pop quiz, too. If your resources allow it, have students make their own. Then, give them to the rest of the class to solve. You might even give a bonus to the student who makes the most challenging crossword!

The post Classic Novels Through Crossword Puzzles: Romeo and Juliet appeared first on A blog about crossword puzzles from a crossword puzzle maker.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“Want to play a game?” People say yes to this question more often than not. Games entertain us, they challenge us, and they educate us. Some games challenge us more than others, though.

Many people think of crosswords as an “elite” game or a game for academics. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Anyone can enjoy crosswords, and anyone can become better crossword solvers, too. Plus, it doesn’t take a lot of study to improve your crossword game. Instead, you can get better at crosswords by playing more games!

Crossword Solving Skills

Before deciding which games will help you solve crosswords, take note of what skills will make you a good crossword solver. What do you need to know to be good at crossword puzzles?

You’ll need a strong vocabulary and good spelling skills. Knowing a lot of synonyms and familiarizing yourself with the thesaurus will help, too. Often times, crossword clues appear to have more than one answer. By knowing lots of synonyms, you’ll have a better chance of finding a crossword answer quickly.

Then, of course, knowing lots of trivia will help you with crosswords, too. Many crossword clues reference specific people, places, or events. Knowing a little about a lot will make you a better crossword solver.

If spelling, vocabulary, and trivia are key to solving crosswords, then games that will make you better at crosswords will focus on these skills.

7 Games That Will Make You Better at Crosswords

This list includes only a fraction of the games that will make you better at crosswords. Start with the games you’re less familiar with on this list or the ones that are harder for you.

Trivial Pursuit

This classic trivia game will help you learn about those obscure references in crossword clues. If you find that clues from a certain theme or decade give you a hard time, find an edition of Trivial Pursuit to help you out. For example, if you never get 80’s-themed crossword clues, play a Trivial Pursuit for that decade.

The Wiki Game

Do you ever go to Wikipedia to learn something simple like the scientific name of a plant just to discover you’re reading about fashion trends of the 1700’s? There’s a game based on this Wikipedia wormhole called The Wiki Game. It’ll help you draw connections between seemingly unconnected things – like in themed crossword clues – in a short amount of time.

Scrabble or Words With Friends

Both Scrabble and Words With Friends will help you visualize how words fit into a crossword grid better. They’ll also improve your spelling and vocabulary. To add a speed component, try Bananagrams, too.

Word searches

Word searches can help you learn to spell better, especially when there are several “red herring” letters in the word search. (“Red herring” letters look similar to a word on the word list but don’t quite make up the word.) Themed word searches can also develop your vocabulary and knowledge of a certain subject. Solve hundreds of free word searches here.

Riddles and brain teasers

A big part of crosswords is thinking outside of the box. Clues with a question mark at the end, for example, denote a play on words. By enjoying some riddles, you’ll train your brain to think of alternate meanings. Find some great riddles and their answers here.

Scattergories

In Scattegories, players try to come up with the most unique words possible for the definitions on a card. There’s a trick, though; they must all start with the same letter. This game will help you think outside of the box for crossword puzzles.

Word ladders

Similar to Scattergories, this game will help your brain draw connections to words when just one letter is different. Plus, it’ll familiarize you with unique clues. You can find lots of free word ladders here.

At the end of the day, the best game to make you better at crosswords is… crosswords. Solve a bunch of newspaper-style crossword puzzles to improve your crossword skills. And if your goal is to master the New York Times crossword, use this guide to get you started.

The post 7 Games That Will Make You Better at Crosswords appeared first on A blog about crossword puzzles from a crossword puzzle maker.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Whether you’re creating your first themeless crossword or if you’ve created them before, you’ll want to remember these do’s and don’ts. Creating themeless crossword puzzles takes quite a bit of time. But they are worth making. By following these tips, you’ll save yourself a lot of stress down the road.

Why Bother Creating Themeless Crossword Puzzles?

Only a handful of publications accept themeless crosswords, and almost all of them prefer themed crosswords. So why make a themeless crossword at all?

First, they provide an extra challenge to you as the constructor. Without a theme, there’s not much of a guidepost for creating your crossword. This means you’ll have to get creative and be extra clever.

Also, some publications do accept themeless crosswords. Just because publications prefer themed crosswords doesn’t mean they wouldn’t accept a well-constructed themeless one. Make sure to go over their guidelines to see if a publication simply prefers themed puzzles or if they don’t accept themeless at all, though.

Finally, you could sell your themeless crossword puzzles on your own. There is a market for themeless crossword puzzle books. By creating and selling one yourself, you could make a profit.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Creating Themeless Crossword Puzzles

So, you’re interested in creating themeless crosswords. How do you go about it? These do’s and don’ts will get you going.

Do start with a “seed entry.”

Many constructors find themed crosswords easier to create because the theme anchors the puzzle. When creating themeless puzzles, you’ll want to anchor the puzzle in one answer. Your “seed entry,” or starting entry, will often go in the middle of the grid or the upper left-hand corner. It will also be a longer answer.

Don’t start with the grid.

Many novices make the mistake of creating a well-constructed grid first, then filling in the answers. This will lead to trouble! Instead of trying to shove words into the grid, build your grid around your selected words.

Do learn about the different stacks.

In crossword construction, there are several kinds of “stacks” to help build your puzzle at the beginning. These refer to where you place your seed entry and how you build off of it. The two most common ones are the triple-stack (with three answers on top of each other in a row) and the stagger-stack. You can see an example of a stagger-stack here.

Don’t forget to add and mirror the black squares.

Once you add your first few answers to the grid, you’ll need to start adding black squares, too. Otherwise, your answers will get mixed together. Then, once you add the black squares, make sure they mirror each other on the grid. To do this in Crossword Hobbyist, log in, select “Create Newspaper Puzzle,” then turn the grid painter from OFF to ON in the left-hand sidebar. It will automatically create symmetry for you (unless you disable the function).

Do watch for common letter pairings.

Oftentimes, constructors will choose answers based on needed letters rather than the word itself. For example, if you have a U in an answer, it’s a good time to see if you can fit in a Q above it for variety. This will help you build unique and clever answers.

Don’t use consonant-heavy words.

This isn’t required for every single word, but the more vowel-heavy words you have, the easier it’ll be to build other words. Use this list of common crossword answers as a starting point for shorter vowel-heavy answers.

Do watch for duplicate words along the way.

Making crosswords takes some time. If you’re not focused, you may accidentally use the same word twice. Keep checking along the way to keep your puzzle fresh.

Don’t fill in the edges first.

After all the hard work you’ve put in to create an excellent seed entry and stack it, it’ll be tempting to move on to something “easier.” While starting at the edges may help some people solve crosswords, it can land you in a lot of trouble when creating them. Instead, after you’ve done your first stack and have a general grid layout, start in the center or in the least flexible part of your grid.

It’s worth noting that these tips could certainly apply to themed puzzles as well. However, they’re particularly important for creating themeless crossword puzzles. Try them out with our newspaper-style crossword puzzle maker today. Then, once you’ve made a few, have your friends solve your puzzles to give you feedback. After you have a great puzzle, submit it to one of these publications that accept themeless entries.

The post The Do’s and Don’ts of Creating Themeless Crossword Puzzles appeared first on A blog about crossword puzzles from a crossword puzzle maker.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Every living creature needs energy to survive. Whether that energy comes from fish or lettuce, birds or cows, we all need to consume something. But how do we know which organism consumes what? A food chain or a food web maps it out.

Kids learn about food chains as a key part of a science education. By learning about food chains and webs, kids will understand the importance of preserving ecosystems. Sometimes, though, it can be difficult to “digest” the information in multiple food chains. So, supplement the information with food chain crosswords.

Food Chain Crosswords

Before jumping into specific food chains, make sure kids understand key terms for general food chains. For example, kids will need to know what kinds of animals eat other animals versus what kinds of animals eat plants. Introduce these terms, then reinforce them with food chain crosswords like the ones below.

Then, don’t forget to make a distinction between food webs and food chains. A food web intertwines many food chains. After all, most creatures eat more than one kind of plant or animal. A food web will show the various possibilities. These crosswords cover information about food chains and food webs.

Once your kids feel confident with these definitions, they can begin to solve specific food chain crosswords. For this activity, you’ll want to make your own crossword to focus on the food chains taught in class.

Making Your Food Chain Crosswords

To help students fully understand food chains, make food chain crosswords that focus on specific chains. Begin by taking the lowermost creature on the food chain (or close to the lowest). Put the name of that creature in the center of the puzzle.

For example, say you wanted to begin a food chain with a grasshopper. (You could also start with grass, but as you’ll see, it’ll be difficult to build too many words off of a 5-letter word.) Type “GRASSHOPPER” directly into the center of the grid.

Then, add the names of animals that eat grasshoppers off of the original word. This is why you’ll want to start at the bottom of the chain; you’ll have more options to work with. You could also start at the top of the food chain and list all the animals that one animal eats.

Once you’ve made your crossword grid, you’ll add clues for each of the animals that will all lead to the center answer. Your crossword will look something like this.

After you’ve made a few food chain crosswords, try some food web crosswords. You could simply auto-arrange the words and use the clues to draw the connections. Or, connect the animal names on the crossword grid itself.

Your kids will understand food chains and webs inside and out after solving these food chain crosswords. Soon, they’ll look at animals and plants with a brand new appreciation for how everything is connected.

The post Food Chain Crosswords for Your Science Class appeared first on A blog about crossword puzzles from a crossword puzzle maker.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When people think of crossword puzzles, most would think of the New York Times. Or, another newspaper might come to mind. These are not the only places to solve crossword puzzles, though! In fact, there are plenty of websites with crossword puzzles anyone can solve for free.

#1  AARP

Many people know about the AARP and its service to senior citizens. Few people know about their daily free crossword puzzle, though. The AARP website also hosts an easy crossword, an expert crossword, and a 50th-anniversary crossword.

#2  The Smithsonian

The Smithsonian Institution, which runs 19 famous museums in Washington D.C. and the National Zoo, also hosts a print and online magazine. The online edition hosts a universal crossword puzzle. While you don’t need to visit their museums to solve the puzzle, it might help.

#3  Reader’s Digest

Before the days of the internet, Reader’s Digest offered readers skimmable stories they could read quickly. Now, its website is home to many bite-sized articles, games, and even jokes. Besides the card and arcade games, Reader’s Digest has over ten different kinds of daily crosswords for you to choose from. Play one now.

#4  Merriam-Webster

While someone might think to use the dictionary to solve a crossword, not everyone would think to use it to play one. The Merriam-Webster website has several free word games, including both a universal crossword puzzle and the L.A. Times daily crossword.

#5  Dictionary.com

Merriam-Webster isn’t the only dictionary to jump on the crossword bandwagon. Dictionary.com also hosts a daily crossword puzzle. If you’re having trouble solving it, Thesaurus.com can help you out, too. Don’t worry – they won’t consider it cheating.

Bonus: Crossword Hobbyist

Maybe it’s not surprising to solve crosswords at a site called “Crossword Hobbyist.” However, some people only know about the crossword puzzle maker or about the standard puzzles. In fact, there are hundreds of newspaper crosswords anyone can solve for free.

Keep in mind that this list of websites with crossword puzzles focuses on newspaper-style puzzles. Many wonderful sites offer standard crossword puzzles, which are great for kids or casual solvers. Fortunately, Crossword Hobbyist offers both. Play some standard crosswords now.

The post 5 Surprising Websites With Crossword Puzzles appeared first on A blog about crossword puzzles from a crossword puzzle maker.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Most bloggers know about embedding social media posts, videos, and infographics to engage followers. The tools listed here, though, will be new to most of you.

What makes these less-used tools great to embed? Each one goes beyond sharing information to encourage reader interaction. From running a contest with puzzles or quizzes, to creating conversations around music and travel, each type of content listed here will ensure a great visitor experience.

That’s why all of these can serve as valuable tools for bloggers, no matter what your niche may be. Make your posts pop with these seven kinds of unique content to embed into your blog posts.

#1 Crosswords and Word Searches

Any type of game on your website will encourage readers to stay longer and engage with your content more. A crossword puzzle maker or a word search maker, such as those available at Crossword Hobbyist and My Word Search, offers the unique benefit of creating puzzles specific to your content. Plus, you can embed any puzzle onto your blog or website.

Many online businesses use them as a tool to show customers what they offer. They also use them as a tool to promote products and giveaways. Learn how to embed a crossword puzzle here and a word search here.

#2 Chat Boxes

Chat boxes like tlk.io create discussion with your readers in real time. They’re particularly well-suited for live events like webinars and other high-traffic pages. Visitors can chat with each other directly, or you can talk to your visitors one-on-one for a personal feel. Plus, many bloggers find a chat box more personalized and easier to use than a Twitter hashtag. An embeddable chat box will also drive traffic to your site.

#3 eBooks

Embedding an eBook into your blog offers several benefits. If you’ve written a book yourself, it will give your followers a sample of your book before they buy it. You can also easily include your book with an online course you offer. Even if you haven’t written your own book, you can give great book recommendations through embedding. Learn how to embed Kindle eBooks here.

#4 Slideshows and Presentations

Slideshows and presentations allow you to share several photos at once without endless scrolling. These tools will also help you run your online courses, recommend products to your readers, or simply share your information in a new and visual way. Embed a Google presentation with the help of Lifehacker or with a visual guide here.

#5 Panoramic Views of Cities

Want to show off where you’ve been? Where you’re going? A panoramic view of cities will give your readers a greater understanding of your travels or of the world at large. Visit Moscow University in winter, then hop on over to the beaches of Cuba in an instant. Learn how to embed here.

#6 Quizzes

Quizzes are a great way to ensure that visitors are paying attention to your blog post with a fun activity. They also help promote the content on the rest of your website. By embedding a quiz, you’ll encourage visitors to check out other pages and blog posts to correctly answer the questions.

To encourage participation, write a few general-knowledge questions to hook solvers. Then, add more complex questions that will require searching your website. Make and embed a quiz onto your site here.

#7 Music and Playlists

While most visitors don’t want music blasting when they open a website, they can enjoy a well-curated playlist as they read a blog post. And you don’t have to be a musician to benefit from embedding a music playlist onto your blog posts. Simply select music that suits your post – it might set a mood or give some sort of context to the information – and embed it to the top of the post. Embed a Spotify playlist with these easy instructions.

Good bloggers know that content is king. Great bloggers know that great content is not limited to just words or images. By embedding unique content into your blog posts, your site will stand out to your readers and your peers alike. Furthermore, it will help you to build a stronger, more informed community within your niche. Try out a few of these today and take your blog to the next level.

The post 7 Types of Unique Content to Embed Into Your Blog Posts appeared first on A blog about crossword puzzles from a crossword puzzle maker.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

For cruciverbalists – professional or amateur, creators or solvers – there’s nothing more satisfying than coming along a clever crossword. “Clever” can mean a variety of different things. More often than not, however, “cleverness” relates to the theme in some way. While a clever crossword leads solvers to an “Aha!” moment, it can lead creators to publication and fame.

One type of crossword theme is so clever, it has its own name: a Schrödinger puzzle. But what is it, and what does it look like? And how popular are they?

Defining a Schrödinger Puzzle

Many of us have heard of the famous thought experiment devised by Erwin Schrödinger and his theoretical cat. It is used to discuss quantum mechanics, but most people understand it in its simplest terms: if you placed a cat in a box with something deadly, you would have no way of knowing whether it’s alive or dead unless someone opened the box. This means the cat is theoretically both alive and dead.

How does that relate to crosswords? A Schrödinger puzzle, then, is a puzzle with answers that could be one answer or another. In this way, the solver has no way of knowing which answer is “right” until they solved the puzzle. That means an unsolved puzzle has two answers for one clue. Joon Pahk suggested the name. Some people also refer to these as “quantum crosswords.”

Keep in mind that this differs from a rebus. In a rebus, multiple letters appear in a single square, sometimes forming an entire word. These letters are not interchangeable, though. The answer requires all the letters.

Famous Examples of Schrödinger Puzzles

There are several famous Schrödinger puzzles, but none more famous than Will Shortz’ favorite created by Jeremiah Farrell and published on November 5, 1996, or Election Day. The GIF below posted by Reddit user chewpendous and shared by the Daily Dot demonstrates the cleverness.

As you can see, the answer to the themed clue, “Lead story in tomorrow’s newspaper (!), with 43-Across” could have been CLINTON or BOBDOLE. It didn’t matter who actually won the election. In fact, solvers who found the BOBDOLE answer called in a misprint. Some who found CLINTON deemed the New York Times presumptuous.

Almost twenty years later in 2016, Ben Tausing’s puzzle created a similar stir. For the first time in New York Times crossword history, the term “gender fluid” appeared. Not only that, it was the theme of the puzzle.

While many wondered if this puzzle was a social or political statement in some way, Will Shortz reportedly said, “No, this puzzle is not a response to anything. It’s just a good puzzle.”

As of this writing, the New York Times has published twelve Schrödinger puzzles. The first and only Schrödinger puzzle not edited by Will Shortz was published on Sunday, February 2, 1988. Created by Ralph G. Beaman and edited by Eugene T. Maleska, nine different squares have more than one correct answer.

Interestingly, it seems Schrödinger puzzles are rising in popularity. Of the twelve published in the New York Times, eight were published in the last decade. Three were published in 2014, and 2018 has already seen two of them.

Creating a Schrödinger puzzle is no small feat, but if a creator can pull one off, odds are high it could appear in the New York Times. If you plan to attempt one, make sure you have the basics down first. Then, think outside of the box for your clues and answers. Or, maybe you’ll want to stay in the box with your favorite cat.

The post Famous Examples of Schrödinger Puzzles appeared first on A blog about crossword puzzles from a crossword puzzle maker.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“Crossword puzzles help human brain function.” Many people believe this statement, but can’t support it with research and trusted sources; that is, until now! The health benefits of crossword puzzles are not limited to cognitive function, though. Here are the five primary yet surprising health benefits of crossword puzzles.

#1  Crosswords delay memory loss and help alleviate dementia.

When most people ask if crosswords are good for brain health, they’re most likely wondering if crosswords help strengthen memory. As this study found, solving crossword puzzles later in life delayed memory decline by 2.5 years in those who had developed dementia. Previous education of the participants was not a factor in the results.

In similar studies, researchers found that these benefits help those who are already at risk for Alzheimer’s or dementia the most. In other words, if you’re at risk for Alzheimer’s or dementia, you may benefit from regularly enjoying crossword puzzles.

#2  Crosswords preserve memory, cognitive function, and overall brain strength.

In another study, researchers found that those who regularly do crosswords have the brain strength of someone 10 years younger than themselves. Scientists and researchers have also found that solvers will get the most cognitive benefits of crossword puzzles by consistently challenging themselves. You can challenge yourself even more with crosswords by:

#3  You can strengthen your vocabulary and spelling through crosswords.

Crosswords strengthen the vocabulary and spelling of students and adults alike. A larger vocabulary, in turn, can increase your processing speed and your abstract thinking. This kind of mental boost can lead to greater professional success, as well.

And crosswords don’t strengthen vocabulary and spelling alone. Solving crosswords can also boost your knowledge of trivia, which has similar cognitive benefits.

#4  Solving crosswords as a group strengthens social bonds.

By solving crosswords with friends and family, you’ll strengthen your social bonds through fun and conversation. Social connections help you live longer and improve your quality of life. More importantly, a lack of social connection is a greater detriment to health than issues such as obesity and smoking. In other words, inviting your friends over for a crossword-solving party could have just as much of an impact on your health as exercise.

#5  Crosswords alleviate anxiety, which will improve your mood.

There are still ways to achieve emotional health benefits from crosswords as a solo solver. For example, more intellectually stimulating exercises might improve anxiety. A study found that people with anxiety were more successful at tasks requiring concentration – such as crosswords – than activities most people consider more “relaxing.” This finding relates to the idea that stress beats anxiety by redirecting nervous energy to a task that requires problem-solving.

Not all scientists agree on the extent of the health benefits crosswords provide. The research, however, provides plenty of evidence to say that crosswords support human health and brain function to a degree. Plus, even if an apple a day doesn’t necessarily keep the doctor away every day, it also doesn’t hurt. So why not try a crossword a day? Or, even better, make crosswords to amplify these health benefits of crossword puzzles.

The post The 5 Main Health Benefits of Crossword Puzzles appeared first on A blog about crossword puzzles from a crossword puzzle maker.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview