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CPAP Machines Canada Blog by Bg Marketing Collaborator - 1M ago

ResMed's newest Nasal Pillows CPAP Mask, the AirFit P30i, has raised the bar for CPAP mask comfort and seal. We've tested it out ourselves and spoken with our customers, and the overall consensus is that the AirFit P30i is one heck of a CPAP mask!

FIT

The most important component of any CPAP mask is the Fit. By that we mean, does it seal well? Does it stay securely in place while you move around on your pillow at night?

The AirFit P30i utilizes a patented SpringFit frame that adjusts to the contours of your head and hair, making for a more snug and personalized fit. The dual-wall pillows (similar to the popular AirFit P10) are strong and supportive while still being comfortable. And the top-of-head connection allows for freedom of movement and less bulk in front of the face. And lastly, the P30i comes in a fitpack, meaning you'll get 3 cushions (Small, Medium, Large) from which to choose from, ensuring you'll always have the best fit.

One drawback is that some users have complained of their hair being caught in the SpringFit frame. While this only comes up with about 1 in 20 users, it is something to consider if your particularly sensitive at the top of your head.

FIT GRADE: A

NOISE

Noise, or more accurately lack of noise, is pretty important for a CPAP Mask, given you're trying to sleep while you wear it! The P30i has been measured as 80% quieter than the competing mask in its category. The AirFit P30i also features new QuietAir vent technology, a mask feature designed to break up exhaled air for a quieter and gentler flow.

NOISE GRADE: A+

EASE OF USE

AirFit P30i is designed to slide quickly on and off. In fact, twice as many CPAP users find that AirFit P30i is easier to use than the market-leading mask! The mask features a quick-release elbow which allows you to easily disconnect from therapy without the mask parts getting stuck or lost.

Cleaning is slightly more difficult with the AirFit P30i, due to the hollow frame. Warm water with mild soap should be rinsed through the frame to ensure bacteria does not build up.

EASE OF USE GRADE: B+

OVERALL

Overall, the AirFit P30i is an excellent option for nasal pillows CPAP mask users who want a quiet and comfortable mask. We at CPAP Machines Canada are big fans of this mask. 

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Experienced CPAP users know the struggle of taking their CPAP machine travelling with them. Whether it’s lugging it through airport security, setting it up in an airplane or hotel room, or bringing it along camping, the fact is that traditional CPAP machines are just not optimal for travel. Unfortunately, your Sleep Apnea still exists when you leave your home, and so bringing your CPAP therapy on the road with you is essential to your health. Fortunately recent technological advances have made this easier with Travel CPAP Machines designed for use on the road.

We’re often asked: “What is the best travel CPAP machine?”. The answer to that question depends on how you currently use your regular CPAP Machine. The AirMini from ResMed and the DreamStation Go from Philips Respironics are both fantastic, quality-made devices packed with the latest in CPAP technology. Answering the questions below will help you decide which is right for you.

What mask do you currently use?

The AirMini travel CPAP is ONLY compatible with three (3) masks: the AirFit P10, the AirFit N20, or the AirFit F20, while the DreamStation Go will work with any mask from any manufacturer. If you’re really comfortable with your current mask and it’s not compatible with the AirMini, we’d recommend the DreamStation Go.

How important is humidification for you?

Some people find they need a lot of humidity to breath comfortably with their CPAP, while others may not use humidity at all. Of course, this can depend on the environment and/or time of year (winter will be drier than summer). If you can not imagine using CPAP without your humidifier, the DreamStation Go is your best choice, as there is a fully integrated humidifier as an available option. The AirMini does not have a humidifier, but does offer Humidix filters. Humidix filters work by trapping moisture from your exhaled breath, and adding it back to the air as you inhale. The Humidix system is effective, but will not provide as much humidity as the DreamStaiton Go heated humidifier or your standard stationary device.

Will you have power where you’re travelling?

All travel devices come standard with a wall-outlet power source. But on a plane, camping, or other travelling situations, you may not have access to power. Fortunately, both the AirMini and DreamStation Go have compatible batteries (sold separately) designed with CPAP therapy in mind to ensure you have a good night’s rest. Important to note is that the heated humidifier for the DreamStation GO can not be used on battery power due to the excessive power draw of the humidifier.

How important is size to you?

For size, convenience, and ease-of-use, the AirMini is tough to beat. While the DreamStation Go offers more add-on features (including an integrated Heated Humidifier) and an open-mask system, it is slightly larger than the AirMini. So, if you’re looking for the smallest and lightest CPAP device you can find, the AirMini is likely right for you.

Conclusion

Travel CPAP Machines make it much easier to bring your CPAP Therapy with you on the road. Identifying your personal mask, humidification, and power requirements will help you make the decision that's best suited for how and where you travel.

Still have questions? Reach out to us via email at orders@cpapmachinescanada.net or call our experts at 1-877-820-4878 to learn more.

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March 15th is World Sleep Day - a day to focus on sleep health, and the critical role proper sleep plays in our overall health and quality of life.

We are constantly reminded of the importance of Diet and Exercise in a healthy life; however, when was the last time your doctor asked about your sleep? We believe Sleep, Diet, and Exercise are the three pillars of health. Sleep has the ability to rejuvenate and prevent health problems such as high blood pressure, cardiac events, depression, weight gain, motor vehicle collisions, and more. It’s time to take sleep seriously.

How much sleep do I need?

How much sleep you need differs slightly for all of us, but if you're over the age of 18, you should be aiming for at least 7-8 hours per night. If you're younger, your body needs more sleep. In 2015, the National Sleep Foundation convened a panel of experts to create a consensus recommendation on how much sleep we need at each age. Here were their recommendations:

  • Newborns (0-3 months): 14-17 hours/day
  • Infants (4-11 months): 12-15 hours/day
  • Toddlers (1-2 years): 11-14 hours/day
  • Preschoolers (3-5 years): 10-13 hours/day
  • School age children (6-13 years): 9-11 hours/day
  • Teenagers (14-17 years): 8-10 hours/day
  • Adults (18-64 years): 7-9 hours/day
  • Older adults (65+ years): 7-8 hours/day

Finding out exactly how much sleep your body needs is a bit of an art, but knowing this can be very helpful. For example, for years my wife and I alternated who would get up early to walk our dog before breakfast and work. It wasn't until we discovered that her optimal sleep time was 8 hours vs. my 7.5 hours that we made lifestyle changes that made both of us far better off! I now take the morning shift, she the night shift, and we both get our optimal rest without oversleeping. 

The two-week sleep training challenge

To find your optimal sleep time, commit to going to bed earlier than normal for 2 weeks. Think two weeks is too long? It's certainly not easy, but compare that to the quantity and quality of life years that proper sleep will add to your life, and, well, two weeks is really nothing. Work back 9 hours from the time you need to wake up, and go to bed at that time every night for 14 days. For example, if you need to be up at 7am, be in bed by 10pm. Set your alarm (as a safety net), but the goal is to wake up on your own without an alarm. 

For the first few days, you'll likely have trouble falling asleep. That's normal! Don't worry about it. Half the battle is just being in your bed at the same time every night.

By day four or five, you'll start to notice it's becoming easier to fall asleep. Why? Your body's internal clock is being trained for bedtime. Rather than running around until you're so physically exhausted you HAVE to sleep and then forcing yourself awake with an alarm, you're instead going to sleep when you decide, and sleeping until your body is rejuvenated and ready to start the day. You're fitting your life into your sleep, instead of your sleep into your life.

By the second week, you'll be waking up before your alarm feeling fully refreshed and rejuvenated. This is when you'll start to understand your own personal sleep requirements. For example, you'll notice that you consistently go to bed at 10pm and wake up at 6am (you need 8 hours), or 5:30am (you need 7.5 hours). This is powerful knowledge to have!

Many people reading at this point are thinking, 8 hours?! Must be nice! I have a job and a life and kids and x-y-z. Yes, but the point is that sleeping well doesn't take hours OUT of your day, it ADDS to your day. If you sleep well you will be more efficient in your work, more present with your kids, and have more energy to spend on your relationships. Your physical and mental health will be better. I'd argue that Sleep is the closest thing to a "miracle drug" that we've ever seen, and it costs you nothing!

Resolve to take your sleep health seriously this spring by taking the two-week sleep challenge. Your body, mind, and relationships will thank you for it.

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CPAP Machines Canada Blog by Bg Marketing Collaborator - 4M ago

You’ve heard of it, and likely know people who suffer from it. Untreated, it makes you 2-4x as likely to be involved in a car accident1, 3.7x as likely to suffer a stroke2, and 50% more likely to suffer psychological distress3. Roughly 25% of Canadian adults suffer from some form of Sleep Apnea, and yet only 20% of sufferers have been diagnosed5. So what’s happening with this common but under-recognized condition?

Understanding Sleep Apnea

While awake, our throat muscles act to keep our airway open, making breathing easy and natural. During sleep, our muscles - including those in our throat - relax. In some people, this causes the airway to narrow or close, obstructing air flow. When this happens, our heart rate and blood pressure increase, blood oxygen levels drop, adrenaline surges, and our brain wakes us up to kick-start breathing again. In severe cases, this cycle can happen over 30 times per hour, putting significant strain on our cardiovascular system and preventing the deep, restorative sleep we need to function the next day.

Common Signs and Symptoms
  • Excessive daytime sleepiness
  • Irregular breathing during sleep (gasping, long pauses, shallow breathing)
  • High blood pressure
  • Poor memory / concentration
  • Snoring
Diagnosis

The diagnosis of Sleep Apnea is done by an overnight Sleep Study. There are three common diagnostic test options:

Portable Home Sleep Testing. Your family doctor may provide you with a prescription for an at-home sleep study to diagnose sleep apnea. These tests usually involve oximetry, measurement of airflow and measurement of breathing patterns. These tests are excellent at determining if you have Obstructive Sleep Apnea and can be worn in the comfort of your own bed. Portable testing options are available here, and all include an interpretation and consultation with one of our Registered Respiratory Therapists following your results.

Nocturnal polysomnography. During this test, you're hooked up to equipment that monitors your heart, lung and brain activity, breathing patterns, arm and leg movements, and blood oxygen levels while you sleep. This can help your doctor rule out other conditions — such as periodic limb movements or narcolepsy — that can also cause excessive daytime sleepiness, but require different treatment. These tests must be done in an overnight sleep lab facility.

Oximetry. This screening method involves using a small machine that monitors and records your blood oxygen level while you're asleep. A simple sleeve fits painlessly over one of your fingers to collect the information overnight in a sleep lab. If you have sleep apnea, the results of this test will often show drops in your blood oxygen level during apneas and subsequent rises with awakenings. 

If you think you may suffer from Sleep Apnea, talk to your family doctor about your options for diagnosis.

Therapy

The gold standard for treating Sleep Apnea is PAP Therapy (Positive Airway Pressure). With PAP, a small bedside device delivers positive airway pressure through a mask that you wear while you sleep. The air pressure acts as a splint to keep your airway open, preventing the collapse of the airway and allowing for full and normal breathing during sleep. Other treatment options include weight loss, oral appliances, or surgical procedures.

If you think you might suffer from Sleep Apnea, talk to your doctor today. Beyond the serious health consequences, there are huge productivity and lifestyle benefits from starting treatment. We hear from our patients all the time how much better life is on a good night’s sleep! So don’t wait! Call us today for a free consultation or to learn more about sleep and Sleep Apnea therapy.

 

Sources: 1. New England Journal of Medicine 2. American Academy of Sleep Medicine 3. Bernabe et. Al 2015 4. Young et. Al, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health 5. Peppard et al. J Am Med Assoc 2013
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Regularly cleaning your CPAP equipment - including CPAP Mask, Tubing, and Water Chamber - is absolutely critical to maintaining effective and healthy therapy. CPAP masks and tubing can be a breeding ground for bacteria, and neglecting regular cleaning will lead to sore throats, runny noses, flu-like symptoms, etc. 

The most cost-effective way to clean your CPAP equipment is to wash with pure soap and warm water (do not use soap that contains bleach, chlorine, alcohol, moisturizers, scents or antibacterial agents, as they may damage the mask). Ideally this should be done every day, or every other day at least. However, longtime CPAP users know that disassembling and reassembling your equipment every day can get frustrating. This is where CPAP Sanitizers can be a helpful addition to your CPAP Therapy system.

What they DO

CPAP Sanitizers are designed to SANITIZE your CPAP Mask and Equipment. Different models use different technology to do this (see below), but the end result is that 99.9% of bacteria is killed. They are automated, which means you just put your equipment inside, press a button, and forget about it until bedtime. 

What they DON'T do

CPAP Sanitizers do not use water or liquid, and so they will not remove any buildup that can accumulate and harden on equipment (think mucus, saliva, hair, etc). The sanitizer will kill any bacteria, but you'll still need to wash your equipment with mild soap and water once per week. 

Are they worth it?

The answer is, it really depends! For speed, convenience, and effective cleaning - CPAP Sanitizers are the way to go. The best analogy is that of a dishwasher. Can you clean dishes effectively without a dishwasher? Of course! And some people really enjoy it. But if you're looking for a simple way to maintain clean and effective therapy, either of the sanitizers below can be a great option.

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CPAP Machines Canada Blog by Bg Marketing Collaborator - 6M ago

Most of us intuitively know that sleep is good for us. If you have a night without good rest, you’ll feel lethargic. String a few nights of poor sleep together and you’ll feel down right terrible. Conversely, we know that feeling of waking up refreshed and ready to take on the world!

Although we spend over 25% of our lives doing it, humans are still not entirely sure WHY we sleep. Research over the years has concluded that sleep plays a critical role in many vital functions, including:

Immune Function: It is natural for people to go to bed when sick. Substances produced by the immune system to fight infection also cause fatigue. One theory suggests the immune system evolved "sleepiness inducing factors" because inactivity and sleep provided an advantage: those who slept more when faced with an infection were better able to fight that infection than those who slept less. In fact, research in animals suggests that animals who obtain more deep sleep following microbial infection have a better chance of survival.

Metabolism and Weight Control: During sleep, our bodies secrete hormones that help to control appetite, energy metabolism, and glucose processing. Getting too little sleep upsets the balance of these and other hormones. Poor sleep leads to an increase in cortisol, often referred to as the "stress hormone." It is also associated with increases in the secretion of insulin following a meal. Insulin regulates glucose processing and promotes fat storage. Higher levels of insulin are associated with weight gain, a risk factor for diabetes. Insufficient sleep is also associated with lower levels of leptin, a hormone that alerts the brain that it has enough food, as well as higher levels of ghrelin, a biochemical that stimulates appetite. As a result, poor sleep may result in food cravings even after we have eaten an adequate number of calories.

Memory: Researchers hypothesize that slow-wave sleep (SWS), which is deep, restorative sleep, also plays a significant role in declarative memory by processing and consolidating newly acquired information. Studies of the connection between sleep and declarative memory have had mixed results, so this is an area of continued research.

Learning: When we are sleep deprived, our focus and attention suffer, making it difficult to process new information. If our brains and neurons are not adequately rested, neurological function suffers, and we lose the ability to access previously learned information.

Consequences of Inadequate Sleep

In today’s world, we are constantly trading sleep for just a few more hours of work or play. Science is just starting to understand the importance of sleep on one’s overall health. In the short term, inadequate sleep affects judgement, mood, ability to learn and retain information, and increases the risk of serious accident or injury. In the long term, chronic sleep deprivation can lead to a host of health problems including Obesity, Heart Disease, Diabetes, and Mental Health issues.

Quality sleep is critical to a healthy and happy lifestyle! If you think you might suffer from a sleep disorder, speak with your physician. You do not need to live your life on poor rest! 

Live Life Well Rested

 

 

 

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