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Don’t you just love quality time with your friends filled with laughter and deep insights? With 15 stops all across the country, Orange Tour is an opportunity you’ll kick yourself if you miss. This one-day event will end with you and your team feeling inspired and equipped to make disciples of the next generation!

At Orange Tour Your Team Will Laugh

It’s so life-giving to relax for a minute and simply laugh with your team. Ministry can be full of deep and difficult conversations and during your programming, it’s hard to step back and just enjoy being present. Take a day to be blessed with shared memories and deeper more personal relationships. 

The Visionary Training Will Stick

You know how you say something a thousand times but it fails to stick until another person says the exact same thing? Well, Orange Tour might be what your team needs to create a common language with intentional vision. With speakers like Reggie Joiner, Kristen Ivey, Jon Acuff, Kara Powell, and Kellen Moore, you know your team will walk away with top-notch training. And don’t forget, with this being a regional event, you will also have access to a network of orange thinkers from your part of the country! 

And Best of All, It’s Affordable

This one-day local event means your conference experience is affordable! You can gather your whole team for an opportunity to experience Orange at just a fraction of the cost. And if sending your team even for the tour is out of your price range, consider doing what I did and invite them if they pay their way. 

An Orange Event is coming to a city near you! Registration is now open, pay only $99!

Originally shared on the Orange Leaders Blog at http://orangeblogs.org/orangeleaders/2019/07/12/will-love-laugh-learn-team/

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Your small group leaders are busy. You’re busy. And the job that God calls us to as leaders in the church requires us to be ready and to lead well. 

It can be difficult to know precisely how to give leaders what they are needing. What if there was an affordable option where you could bring every small group leader in your ministry to a night of fun and training? 

Lead Small Night is where your SGL’s can talk leader-to-leader about the practical ways to impact the lives of kids and students at every phase. 

At Lead Small Night, you’ll learn:
  • How to help every kid and teenager feel known
  • How to lead better conversations with kids and teenagers
  • How to implement the Lead Small Principles that help you become a successful small group leader
  • How to do something small in order to make a big impact

Lead Small Night is a two-hour event that takes place across the country prior to the Orange Tour. 

For only $25 per person, you can help small group leaders do small group better. Sign up now! https://orangetour.org/leadsmallnight/ 

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Are you ready to answer the difficult questions students are asking? 

“What scientific proof do you have that God exists?” 

“Why should I believe in miracles?” 

“If evolution is true, why should I believe in God?” 

“Why should I trust something on ‘faith’ when I could use ‘reason’?” 

“Why should I trust what you or my pastor has to say about Christianity?” 

“How is believing in God any different from believing in Santa Claus or the Easter Bunny?” 

“Why does science seem to contradict the claims of Christianity?” 

“Why would an all-powerful, all-loving God allow so much evil in the world?” 

“How can I be sure Jesus really rose from the grave?” 

“If Christianity is true, why are so many Christians hypocrites?” 

“Why is the history of Christianity filled with so much violence?” 

“Why should I care about any of this to begin with?” 

In the book, “So the Next Generation Will Know” Sean McDowell teaches how to explain what is true to a generation seeking answers. The percentage of teens who identify as atheist is continuing to grow and Sean writes to help parents, youth workers, and Christian educators recognize the challenges students are facing. 

“According to one study at UCLA, 52 percent of college students reported frequent church attendance the year before they entered college, but only 29 percent continued frequent church attendance by their junior year.”

Sean points out how most young people abandon their Christian faith while they are still at home with their parents. We have an opportunity to answer skepticism with intellectual responses but we must be prepared. 

We need to be ready to answer students most difficult questions if we want to help them track down the truth and trust Jesus.

“A problem well defined is half-solved.” – Sean’s Father

For a chance to win this book, click the contest link here: https://kingsumo.com/g/ipbstq/so-the-next-generation-will-know-book-giveaway

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Rock Stars: Inspiring a Team of Unstoppable Volunteers

“There is great power in your words. In over to BE a rock star, you need to FEEL LIKE a rock star. In order to be a rock star, someone else needs to believe you are.” – Tina Houser

“The volunteers God has entrusted you with are not just warm bodies or job titles, they are children of God first.” – Corey Jones

“Would my team say I cared more for them as a person than I do for them in the role they fulfill?” – Corey Jones

“Who on your team would be serving better in a different role?” – Corey Jones

“A healthy family is often growing numerically and their relationships are growing in depth.” – Corey Jones

“Do I know the people on my team better today than I did last week?” – Corey Jones

“Developing a vibrant, life-changing children’s ministry requires a clear picture of where God is calling you to lead your team and how to get there.” – Butch Hunter

“Finally, remember, the temperature of your ministry is always a degree or two below you. When you’re running hot, your team is running warm.” – Butch Hunter

“Take video footage of your leaders in action, splice it together with a narrator who talks about how you’re all moving towards the vision together.” – Butch Hunter

“When you’re preparing to cast vision, think about how you can invite people to join a team working towards a common goal.” – Steven Knight

“Think about what your volunteers want. They want to serve. They want to roll up their sleeves and get to work. They don’t show up to be underutilized. They’re ready to go.” – Steven Knight

“The effectiveness of blanket calls for volunteers always lags behind personal communication.” – Beth Howe

“Volunteering for ministry serving—like tithing or gathering for corporate worship—should be seen as a mark of discipleship. When approaching with a pure motive, serving is a sign of spiritual maturity.” – Beth Howe

“Volunteers will stick when they see their leaders following the example of Jesus as servants.” – Erica Holloway

“Leaders must help their volunteers succeed in the midst of very busy, extremely demanding schedules.” – Erica Holloway

“The ability to be out ‘guilt free’ goes a long way in maintaining glittery volunteers for the long haul.” – Erica Holloway

“To effectively equip believers to utilize their gifts, leaders need to make intentional preparation, invest in relationships, and provide continual evaluation for their teams. Helping volunteers find their best fit in ministry service is crucial for the church community as a whole, but also for each individual’s personal flourishing and long-term spiritual health.” – Dawn Gentry

“Personal relationships establish a foundation of pastoral care for everyone on your team.” – Dawn Gentry

“Be understanding and flexible, recognize the need for them to try a new assignment rather than getting buried indefinitely in the old one.” – Dawn Gentry

“No matter how big or small your ministry is, there are things everyone serving in your ministry area needs to know. So what are those things?” – Shayla Hale

“Orientation lets you begin to equip your team. It establishes you as the shepherd of your leaders. Orientation gets your volunteers ready for a great adventure.” – Shayla Hale

“Your volunteers influence a child’s foundational faith beliefs, and they should understand the gravity and honor of their position.” – Brittany Nelson

“Share stories or specific examples of how God moved in the lives of the children in your ministry over the past year and remind volunteers that they play a part in a child’s story of faith.” – Brittany Nelson

“Shadow leading is a successful training method and can solve more problems than simply a shortness of trained volunteers.” – Susan Magouirk

“Training leaders are your best teachers, but every your best teachers are not all cut out to be training leaders.” – Susan Magouirk

“Creative teachers take what they have and make it the best it can be for their students.” – Susan Magouirk

“Volunteers who feel unnecessary, tend to be short-term volunteers.” – Susan Magouirk

“When using technology, think about users experience and remember, if it’s not easy to use, it’s not going to be used.” – Patrick Miller

“Creating smaller learning objectives leads to higher information retention. This concept of breaking topics down into smaller chunks is called microlearning.” – Patrick Miller

“You have been given the opportunity to train volunteers even when they’re not sitting in from of you.” – Patrick Miller

“Simple truth is that you are just stronger together than you are alone.” – Tammy Jones

“A team will accomplish more together, prevent leader burnout, and multiply the results.” – Tammy Jones

“A good team leader is one who supports, encourages, and equips the other team members. Praise them when they have done a good job and show them grace when things go wrong.” – Tammy Jones

“Vol-Staff (n.), short for Volunteer-Staff. This term is used to identify kidmin volunteers who function at such a high level of buy-in and responsibility, that they are treated as a vital part of the department staff, yet without financial pay.” – Sherry Chester

“Volunteers are assets, totally worth the time and investment; help them become who God has called them to be.” – Sherry Chester

“There is a stark difference between unity and agreement. Agreement is mental acknowledgment of a mutual understanding. Unity goes way beyond mental understanding to a yielding of ones self will.” – Sherry Chester

“Mature Vol-staff believe all authority comes from God. They walk in unity knowing God is in control; therefore, they trust with ease.” – Sherry Chester

“Your choice to appreciate your volunteers reminds them that they are not alone as they serve, that God sees them and you see them, and this provides strength for them to continue to serve.” – Jamie Lane

“When you take the time to give specific feedback and appreciation to your volunteer, you foster growth in them.” – Jamie Lane

“If you say you’re going to be there, be there. Work ahead. Be organized. Be on time. These things seem simple, but when trying to gain respect from an older generation, these things must be done with excellence.” – Stacy Marks

“There is a generation of kids living without grandparents. You must lean into the relationships kids can have with the volunteers in your ministry that they might not have on a regular basis in their nuclear family. It will make the next generation stronger and our churches stronger as the family of God ministers to each other.” – Stacy Marks

“It’s an amazing thing to behold when teenagers are empowered and given the platform to lead other kids.” – Josh Zello

“Let’s envision together a ministry where teenagers can be treasured by kids, tethered to a Gospel community, and taught to discern and live out their own personal callings.” – Josh Zello

“A Gospel community can be life changing (or even life saving) for teenagers. Your kids’ ministry can be a safe place for not only the kids who sit under you, but also the younger leaders who serve beside you.” – Josh Zello

“Trust them beyond what even they think they’re capable of.” – Josh Zello

“Your church is filled with leaders you haven’t found yet. Many of these leaders don’t know that leadership capacity is within them. Many of these leaders don’t know their gifting or how to live it out to build up the Church.” – Josh Zello

“Often, you’re burdened in children’s ministry for workers. But if you train up the kids themselves to have servants’ hearts, then there will be so many fewer needs.” – Rachael Groll

“Consider which kids God might be laying on your heart to serve within your ministry.” – Rachael Groll

“The role of a helper is often marginalized when it should be lifted up in your ministry.” – Joe Mally

“As you recruit for the helping positions remember not to phone it in and just fill the spot. Instead, seek individuals who have the gift of service.” – Joe Mally

“When you ask adults who had the most influence on their life, most of the time it’s the individual who took the time to get to know them. Encourage your volunteers to seek out these connections.” – Joe Mally

“Each person on the team needs to know what’s going on in your ministry so your ‘who will you communicate with’ is very important.” – Rob Livingston

“It’s important to reach your volunteers in a way they understand and in the 21st century you have various avenues you can take.” – Rob Livingston

“You would be crazy (to) not use the technology most are carrying around in their pocket to help you communicate with your volunteers.” – Rob Livingston

“The bottom line when it comes to communication is you must do it in such a way that all your volunteers can understand.” – Rob Livingston

“Cancellations are part of ministry. Even the most committed volunteers get sick, or someone’s plans change and they need to call off. The best thing you can do is remain positive, anticipate cancellations, and build steps into your program that put you in control rather than letting the cancellations control you (and your Saturday night plans).” – Becky Rydman

“The Dream Team is a perfect ‘yes’ for those who have a desire to be on the team, yet need to make a more flexible commitment.” – Becky Rydman

“Leaders who schedule in on-call positions take control of cancellations.” – Becky Rydman

“The consistency for such a long period of time is great for kids.” – Terrie Sitzes

“Yes, pray. You’re not picking out your clothes for the day; you’re investing in volunteers’ time, children’s hearts, and your sanity all together. You need prayer.” – Terrie Sitzes

“Pray that God will send you the workers you need so that your ministry is filled with willing, eager, enthusiastic volunteers and the right scheduling will be possible!” – Terrie Sitzes

“The third grade public school students is the same third grader in your classroom. He has the same needs to be known and to have consistent leadership.” – Joy Canupp

“Rotating volunteers often results in glorified babysitting situations. Weekly volunteers invest on a deeper level and typically get to the heart of why and what they teach the children.” – Joy Canupp

“Knowing these benefits and others will give you the ‘why’ that you need to share as you make the transition and ask people for larger time commitments.” – Joy Canupp

“If you’re going to attempt ‘over appreciation’ efforts, do that with your volunteers who are most invested and on the front lines with your children every single week.” – Joy Canupp

“Start writing a bunch of ‘What if…’ questions. ‘What if we cut Sunday school during the summer?’ ‘What if we combined some age groups?’ ‘What if I used the teens more for volunteers?” – Amber Kreider]

“Temporary change can provide rest for volunteers, excitement for kids, and a new perspective for you. Or maybe you’ll drastically change something in your ministry to accommodate your changing culture in the summer, and find it to be so successful you’ll adapt it all year.” – Amber Kreider

“You have to always be aware of who the Lord brings across your path and why.” – Connie Lackey

“As you journey with your volunteers, you come to know them on a personal level and build relationships.” – Connie Lackey

“You love the Lord with all your heart, minds, and souls, but sometimes you get so busy preparing, scheduling, practicing, doing life, that you put God in your pocket.” – Connie Lackey

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How do you react when your child or friend expresses doubt? Do you see this as a step in the disciple-making process or does your heart sink and fear take over?

During the week after Easter in our elementary and preteen services, we took a look at how Thomas wrestled with doubt. Through this story we can see how asking questions is a great thing. Asking questions can lead to understanding, which can lead to knowledge, which can lead to more questions, understanding, and knowledge. As you are walking someone through the discipleship process remember these truths from Thomas.

Thomas expressed his doubt. When the disciples told Thomas they had seen Jesus, he replied, “I won’t believe it unless I see the nail wounds in his hands, put my fingers into them, and place my hand into the wound in his side” (John 20:25). Thomas had doubts and questions about what the disciples were saying they saw but he didn’t keep those doubts hidden. When someone is open and honest with you, celebrate their honesty and the fact that they are seeking to understand.

Doubt isn’t toxic to faith; unexpressed doubt is. – Kara Powell

Not all questions are answered right away. “Eight days later the disciples were together again, and this time Thomas was with them” (John 20:26). I’m sure Thomas would have loved to see Jesus walk in the room seconds after expressing his doubt, but he wrestled for eight days! Can you imagine being in Thomas’ shoes? Eight days of all your closest friends celebrating while you question. Eight days of wondering if the past couple years were a complete waste. Eight days of wondering if you would be arrested next because you followed some dead guy.

Jesus loves Thomas even in His doubt. Jesus didn’t reply to Thomas with anger, rather He offered proof and answers to his questions.

The doors were locked; but suddenly, as before, Jesus was standing among them. “Peace be with you,” He said. Then he said to Thomas, “Put your finger here, and look at my hands. Put your hand into the wound in my side. Don’t be faithless any longer. Believe!” John 20, 26b-27

Let’s stop viewing doubt or questions as the enemy to disciple-making. Instead, let’s celebrate when someone you love is expressing their doubts and opening themselves up to understanding and knowledge. Above all, let’s respond like Jesus and show love to all people.

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It’s personal when everyone who shows up cares about the faith of every kid.

Everything in your church changes when relationships matter. 

Tom Shefchunas @Coachshef 

#tweetablejustnottrue

His church moves on through broken organizations and people.

Book: When Relationships Matter

If small groups become your primary answer, then that ultimate changes everything you do…eventually

Look at your checkbook and calendar. What does that reflect on your goal? Do you do a full message or set small group leaders up to have relationships. 

“At OC19, a MINISTRY PROOF is an exercise to prove a complex strategic statement by using self-evident, obvious, and “amenable” truths stacked together like Legos.”

My ministry has an effect on a kid who is not involved in ministry. 

One of the worse strategies is losing a kid who is in my ministry. 

I need to PERSONALLY pay attention to who is leaving my ministry. 

Some kids have to leave my ministry. (Move, 

Some kids/students/families choose to leave my ministry. 

As a steward of my ministry, I should find out why. 

It’s harder to leave people than a program. 

The more connected a kid/student is to a person (or people) at church the better chance we have to keep them. 

I personally can’t connect deeply enough to all my kids/students and I need people to help me. 

High-quality Christians make high-quality connections. 

The higher quality connections we make the more we can do for kids as and their faith. 

The best way to communicate and nurture the core aspects of our faith is within the context of a strong relationship. (AKA: Discipleship)

My primary goal needs to be to MAKE RELATIONSHIPS MATTER MORE. 

I need to leverage every resource I have to ensure that kids have quality relationships and that those relationships grow. 

I’ve got some things I need to change. 

If small groups become the primary answer, then that ultimately changes everything you do.

When we go “all in” on quality long-term groups – not only will it change everything you do – groups will become your answer to almost everything. 

I need to PERSONALLY pay attention to who is leaving my ministry. 

People leave ministry not people…harness the power of small groups. 

Text “imin” to 404.445.2198

Do you know my name? 

Crystal Chiang @CrystalcChiang

Knowing someone’s name lets them know that they matter. 

Kids are always in a crowd, they just want to be seen. 

You know what’s it’s like when the barista gets your name right. 

You know what it feels like when a teacher takes the time to learn how to say your name…or when they don’t. 

When you get to know their name, you get the right to know more than their name. 

Who will know their name next? 

After high school, someone needs to know their name. We know what’s next and point them to what’s next. 

If we were honest though, it’s a long way from here to there. It’s a long way from now to what’s next. From high school ministry to college ministry. 

What happens when nobody knows their name? 

There are going to be days where they will wonder if the family of God is still a family for them. 

If stats are true we will lose 7 out of 10 in the transition from here to there. 

You might graduate from this roaster but you can’t graduation from this relationship.

I wonder what would happen if we stopped points towards and started walking with?

Seen People See People

“There is a skill in learning to be present.” -Reggie Joiner

“No one person can no every person’s name in our ministry…Multiply the impact so every person can be seen.” Kara Powell

“What if we could recruit leaders who see the kids sitting on the back row. To see the kids who are so infrequently seen.” Kristen Ivey

Concept: If you give a popular kid 100% attention, he will feel 10% but if you give the unpopular kid that half that they usually feel it 100%

“The church should be different and not reinforcing the hierarchy.” Kara Powell

“Business is the enemy of spirituality.”

Hear the voice of those who are not being heard. 

Danielle Strickland @djstrickland 

The desire in God’s heart is for connection.

There’s a divine strategy called ‘personal.’

What will you do with the king of Israel? Kiss the Son. Psalm 2

What am I going to do with the bigness? The magnitude? What am I going to do? I’m going to send a little baby and this personal shift will change everything. 

God has a name, love has a name. This proximity is a divine strategy. 

The desire in God’s heart is for connection.

He is no longer a slave to you, he is your brother. 

Tackle massive issues with the relationship. 

How do you perpetuate slavery if your brothers with the slave? Proximity changes everything. 

Sometimes you need to know their names. 

Moses and Elijah disappear and there is only Jesus.

Jesus goes down off the mountain of transfiguration and he encounters a father with a son in pain. Jesus said to bring the boy to me. If you had faith the size of the mustard seed tells the mountain to move. 

“You want to move something big, do something small.” Danielle Strickland

You want to actually change sexual slavery, why don’t you admit your porn addiction and get some help.

You want to dismantle slavery, be a brother.

If you want to do these massive things, then make it personal. Mustard seed faith, something small to change something big. 

First, you need to know their name, and then they need to know their names. You’re the one to tell them and it can change everything. 

Flowers were meant to bloom. What are the odds that her street name would

“I’m not a very good singer but I’ve never killed anyone before.”

Stop trying to move the mountain start using the mustard seed. That name, that relationship, that proximity will change everything. 

Helping parents know they measure up

Kara Powell @KPowellFYI

The “Not Enough Monster”

The church tells us that we should be discipling our children, and we agree, but we don’t know how to do that. 

We feel overwhelmed, we don’t know where to start, so we do nothing. 

The not enough monster multiples. We call this shame. 

Guilt is feeling bad about what we do. Shame is about feeling bad about who we are.

This then affects our kids, and they began to not feel enough. Not strong enough, not brave enough, not spiritual enough. 

The rising rates of suicide, anxiety, and depression. Social media and technology show us all the ways we do not measure up. 

Before you would hear about the part you missed after the weekend. Now they see it unfolding in real time on social media without them. 

There is no better place to deflate the Not Enough monster than the church. 

They are enough, you are enough because Jesus makes us enough. Jesus transforms us. 

We are enough because Jesus makes us enough. This is good news. Parents should be flocking to us in the church. They should be hungry for the parent seminars but that’s not your experience. 

How do you reach the other 80%

4 of the ages of phases when parents most need to know they are enough because Jesus is enough: 6, 13, 18, 23 (these are the trapeze ages where they are in the air for the next phase). 

Ages 6: Kindergarten phase. 

New schedule, new school, new social opportunities, new sports. Juggling a lot of balls and feel bad when they drop balls and make mistakes. The church can come alongside them and let them know blowing a scheduled playdate is not a big deal. Even if it was a mistake, Jesus is bigger than our mistakes. 

Age 13

The average parent feels behind their teen when it comes to technology because they are. We can let parents know they are enough. You don’t have to be paranoid but you can be prudent. 

Age 18

As a parent, you see a clock in your mind at all time. Wonder if you’re doing enough to help navigate the new opportunities and new temptations. Wonder if you’ve been enough of a parent since birth to set them up on the best trajectory. Some parents will get smaller and withdraw saying it’s too late now. Other’s get big and try to control. To turn to parent into a project and make a lot of lists. Better laundry skills. Need the church to remind me that I am enough because Jesus makes me enough. 

Age 23

New independence. Vocational, relations and spiritual choices. Parents are proud but some are not so quick to brag. Some drop out of school, get debt, move back home. The relationship they dreamed of is not materializing. They text but don’t hear back. We as the church can come alongside the family and let them know the chapter is choppy but God is not done with the families story yet, you are enough because Jesus makes us enough. 

Youth leaders don’t feel enough. Feel unqualified to offer resources and feel like we are guessing. 

Text “with” to 66866 for free resources for parents. 

Every parent and every person needs from you to remind them you are enough because Jesus makes you enough. 

The really good news is that Jesus is actually more than enough. Kara Powell

Do you know where I live?

Carlos Whittaker @loswhit

Physically: Absolutely but more than that. 

Do you know where I live…

Physically, culturally, socially, emotionally

Jesus never ministered from a distance. 

We get to come around those we are ministering to, step in their homes, and get more personal with them. The more personal it gets the messier it gets. The more personal we get, the more holy it gets. 

It’s okay that you don’t look like everyone else, just hold my hand and everyone will know you belong. 

When we know where they live, they will open their hands. 

When we know their name, it opens their hearts. But when we know where they live, they will open their hands.

When you get personal, it gets risky. It takes a risk in order to rescue.

Knowing me means knowing my context

Karl Vaters @KarlVaters 

Book: The Grasshopper Myth

If I took numbers off the table, would I call my church a healthy church? 

We seem like grasshoppers in our own eyes. 

No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.

Influence is about leveraging small things. Influence is the new attendance.

#1 reason churches are growing, “The paster knows my name.” 

They want to be pastored by their pastor. 

Healthy large churches are pushing small groups and ministry teams because that’s where pastoring will get..

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CoreyRayJones by Corey Jones - 2M ago

For resources and slides check out iamnextgen.com

Maximizing My Time as a NextGen Pastor 

Gina McClain @gina_mcclain
www.ginamcclain.com

Year one it’s new. Year 2 you built some equity. Year 3 some things you can’t get passed but need to deal with. Something in you needs to change. 

Relational challenge and in year 3 you wonder if you’re cut out for the position. Year 4 looking around because you wonder if something else would fit better? 

Tend to redefine ourselves as leaders every 4 years. 

“Your role as NextGen leader has more to do with WHO you are than WHAT you do. And who you are, has to do with what God is doing.”

#1 Know Your First Team

Peers vs. Direct-reports

Your teams need different things from you. You could be booths on the group, leading ministry directly. 

What are you advocating for in the grand scheme of things? When we know our first team it ensures we align with ministry leaders across the church. This brings unity and breaks silos. Understand where your objectives fit with the overall mission of the church. 

You have the ability and authority to bring peace in situations between silos. 

Action Step: 

Schedule consistent time with your First Team. 

#2 Prioritize Objectives

Working On vs. Working In

Working on it is a lot harder but at your seat, you have to spend time working on your ministry. How much of your time on your calendar is spent working ON your ministry?

Set annual, quarterly, and weekly objectives. 

Set weekly objectives every Monday.

Calendar time for evaluation and realignment – out of the office

Track your progress to see your wins. 

Can I schedule afternoons to work on ministry? Change locations to work ON ministry. Coffee shop. Write down specifics so you don’t give that time away to other things. 

Calling the Play vs. Running the Play

Not just what to do, but how to do it. 

How = action that moves toward objectives. 

How can be collaborative? 

Show them how to do it vs. leverage the influence of your team to figure out how. Connect the problem with the right person to help us resolve it. 

Playbooks: A great tool or resource that gives the How, What, and Why to do a job. How to be a coach playbook. You can’t work on the ministry unless you get out of the ministry weeds. 

Action Step: 

Calendar your objectives every Monday. 

Clean it up. Remove meetings not producing what needs to be produced. 

“Alignment is not created by new vision. But by restarting that which you lead toward over and over again.” Sam Roberts, Life Church Directional Leadership Team. 

Champion those you lead around the nextgen ministry. 

Your job is to be the bass drum

#3 Meet with a Purpose

Vision: alignment & setting source

Tactical: event/project drive or ministry-specific

Coaching: leader development & problem-solving.

Know WHO sets the agenda. 

Plan for what decelerates vs accelerates

Purge or repurpose regularly. 

When Coaching…

Let them know they are setting the agenda. 

Start with the question “What’s on your mind?”

What challenges are you facing?
Where are you winning?
What questions do you have?

If you bring answers to these 3 questions then you will maximize our time together. 

Book: The Coaching Habit by David Henzel

Action Step: 

Review your calendar quarterly & purge/change the unproductive. What meetings do not fit in the categories. 

Everything goes on your calendar. You have one life. It can all be tracked in the same place. This also helps with evaluation. 

Structure NextGen Staff to Move Further Faster

Dan Doerksen @DanDoerksen
www.dandoerksen.me/OC19

Churches took their preexisting model of staffing and then called it nextgen. If you do this, you’re just going to be frustrated. Dan restructured and no longer had the traditional roles within his nextgen staff team. 

You don’t have to have a large staff to become innovative in your staffing…you don’t even need to have staff. Hire less on age group and more on their gifting and role. Empower them to do this 90% of their time. 

Gift-based hiring structure. 

You’re here because you have problems to solve. How do you balance the tension and frustration in the nextgen ministry? 

A very expensive nice tool sits in the box if you don’t know how to use it. The structure is this expensive tool. 

If you don’t know what to do with the tool it’s very dangerous to toy with. You need a good deal of wisdom and insight to pull off these staff changes. 

Structure = organizing people (org chart)

The structure is a tool that addresses your most stressful problems; people problems. The structure is personal. 

Every tool has its uses. This tool of structure can address these scenarios: 

You have great people…in the wrong roles.

Your staff coordinates well…but only with their own teams.

You have a highly creative team …but their quality is “meh”

Your team values excellence…but never innovates.

You have a new vision and strategy…but nothing changes. 

Why do you find yourself in a silo? Not silo by nature, but simply doing your job description. This is a structure and culture issue. 

Assumption #1: We need more staff. 

There are so many boxes on the org chart and my name is on all of them. Maybe you do need more staff or maybe it’s a structure issue. 

Book: Mark DeVries. Sustainable Children’s Ministry: From Last-Minute Scrambling to Long-Term Solutions.

1 FTE/50 kids, 1 FTE/75 teens

For every child that shows up, churches spend $1000 per kid per year. Salaries and budget combined. 

Instead of trying to fill all the seats on the bus, maybe you need to rearrange the seats. If your structure is a mess, adding another person will only increase the complexity. 

Assumption #2. We need better staff. 

Is it really a people issue? Maybe it is, but maybe it’s not. Let’s back up and ask, “Is this the person or the structure they are working in?”

Cognitive bias: Inside a situation, you see the factors. Outside looking in, you blame the situation. If your team member is failing, it will be tempting for you on the outside looking in to think it is their failure. We need to own how our staff is performing. We create the context to which they work. We have to look to ourselves first not them. 

Dance floor analogy – DeVries and Safstorm

Dancer rolls her ankle by going through the floor. No one repairs it but simply brings in a backup dancer and keeps going. Maybe your team members aren’t good dancers, but it’s awfully hard to get better when the floor is broken. Fix the floor first and then you’ll know what you’re working with.

Assumption #3. Our church is unique. 

You need to be a big church…small church…new church. The principles of how to structure will scale and transfer. 

Assumption #4. Our church isn’t unique. 

You can earn from others, but you can’t copy and paste. 

Sports analogy: teams don’t structure like different teams because they are playing different games. What is the strategy for your city within your culture? 

All dials and levers need to be adjusted together. When you change your strategy you need to change your structure. 

Assumption #5. We have to staff by age. 

Ex. If you want to reach teens, you hire a youth pastor. 

A “Divisional Structure” GM This is one way to structure your team. It because of the norm but it doesn’t mean it has to be. Maybe you don’t have to staff by age. 

Assumption #6: One person at the top. 

Unity of command; there has to be one person leading. 

It’s not wrong but it is optional.
Jay Galbraith’s Research: “When the challenges a corporation faces are so complex that they require a set of skills too broad to be possessed by any one individual.” Think outside the box. 

Freedom and authority to reach as many folks as possible. 

Core elements of Structure (dials on the tool of structure) 

Job Design: “Who is responsible for what?”

Product based-what is the product the church puts out in programs or services. Program based model. 

Demographic Based or market-based. What are my target market and staff around that market? 

Advantages: you can focus. One person with complete ownership of the process from front to back. The downside, a strong tendency to silos and misalignment. Multiple people doing the planning, marketing, and repletion of work instead of learning from each other. 

Function-Based. What are the same things across the ministry? Create that list and you have the suctions. Teaching, worship, tech, design, recruitment… take that ruction and turn that into a job description for all the miniseries in nextgen. 

Leader development and on-boarding from preschool to college. 

Programming development. Worship, props, teaching. 

Process-Based: step by step processed could be done by staff. Recruitment person, on-boarding person. A person for each of the process steps. Could be a staff member for first-time guests and one for members.

Authority: “Who can make what decision?”

You can give too much or too little authority. 

Don’t handcuff your people so they feel like what they are doing is insignificant. Loads of leadership potential but put into a helper role without authority. 

Span of Control: “How many people do you oversee?”

How wide is the org chart? With 3 people you can do a lot of training and coaching. If you want to grow you need to add layers. How does a person on level 5 talk to a person on level 2? 

A wide structure has less control but more autonomy. The people doing the ministry can make decisions. 

Coordination: “How does everyone communicate?”
How do you tie it all together so silo’s don’t form? 

The structure is all about communication paths. 

Next Steps #1 – Know your current structure. 

Do a task inventory. Do a time inventory. Track hours and know what they do and in how long. Find out what’s working and not working. If you could create your own job description, what would it be? If you could have any job, what would it look like?

Next Steps #2 – Plan for Growth

Stay flexible and figure out what can happen if you grow. How do you widen your span? Don’t get locked into one model. 

Next Steps #3 – Learn how to lead change

If you don’t think the structure is personal, try to change it. If you remove a title, it becomes personal. People don’t like change if they don’t understand it. 

Read: Leading Change Without Losing It – Carey Nieuwhof. 

Read: Leading Change – John Kotter

See the connections behind the connections. Let’s be brave enough and bold enough to look at our structure. 

“Let’s discover the structure for 2025 not maintain the structure of 1985.”

What is the strategy for today’s Church and what structure do we need to meet the needs of today’s world? 

Hiring, Onboard,, and Equip NextGen Staff for Success

Nina Schmidgall
@ninaschmidgall

Building the right team is one of the most important things you do in your role as a nextgen leader. 

Get the right people on the bus and get them situated in the right seat. 

Hiring: Finding the right people

“People are not your most important asset. The right people are.” Jim Collins

“The secret to my success is that we have gone to great lengths to hire the best people in the world.” Steve Jobs

Set 

“Define the position” Some folks get this wrong by listing tasks, instead focus on objectives. What’s the best profile and personality type for the position? Would this person thrive under MY leadership? Sometimes you need someone with a high level of maturity to handle the tough issues of ministry. Do you need someone who is trained in childhood development?  Management, Pastoral, or Education experience. You can’t just borrow a job description from someone down the street, assess what you need. 

Seek

Generate a list of potential candidates. Sit in a quiet room and make a list. Maybe the person is already on your team or in a volunteer role. Who would be ideal in this role? Dream about those who you would love to have do the job. Don’t say someone’s “no” for them. You can also post to job boards. Begin to draw on your network and fish for people. Put the word out there and send some direct emails. I’ve heard about you. I’ve dreamed about someone for this team and you might be the best fit. 

Screen

Step 1: Email initial questions 

Send everyone the initial list of questions. Few key questions that would identify candidates. 

What do you know about NCC? Why dod you want to work here?
What aspects of ministry do you find most fulfilling and meaningful?
Why have you chosen ministry to children and their families? 

What is your philosophy of Family Ministry?

What is one of your most memorable experiences where you saw God move in the life of a young person?
Share with us a difficult experience you have encouraged in ministry and how you navigated it. 

How has your experience prepared you for this position? Why do you feel as though you would be a qualified candidate?

What has been your experience in developing volunteer leaders? What about managing staff?

Do you know anyone that currently attends? Would they recommend you for this position and may we be in touch with them?

Step 2: 15-minute screening interview 

This will feel incomplete. Quickly get to know you. 

What types of ministry do you hope to be doing in the next 5-10 years? 

What are you not good at and don’t enjoy doing professionally?

Tell me about someone you currently disciple. 

Tell me the names of your last three bosses and how would they rate your performance on a scale of 1-5. 

Step 3: In-depth Interview. 

They will send covenant and theological questions. They will be walked through in written and interview. 

View of baptism, women in ministry, spiritual gifts, sexuality, how to handle conversations, are there any parts of the statement of faith that made you uncomfortable? 

Step 4: Group/Panel Interview (zoom call)

Staff unity matters in culture and making sure they fit. 

Capacity

Competent

Culture/Chemistry 

Step 5: Reference Check

People get reference checks wrong. To catch red flags so why give someone who would share that? 

Ask: How can we support this person best?

The person mentioned they struggled with _ will you tell me more about that? Open-ended questions

Step 6: Visit

Pastoral level position. 

Onboarding – Direct their Energy

Discovery (days -30) – commit to a listening and learning posture. 

Learn the system. 

Know the history

Develop (days 31-60) – establish a foundation and start building. Beginning to look at team development. 

Design (days 61-90) – start adjusting and implementing. Establish their own rhythm for the team. Identify systems for improvement. Implement and experiment. 

Culture Sharing

Peter Drucker says, “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.”

A healthy culture will keep your staff around a long time. 

A set of shared values and goals that characterize our organization.

What do you want your staff to know and live out? What shapes our ministry? Are we connecting kids with caring adults?

What will you do to keep your team aligned and healthy? 

Shared Values: 

Values help determine who you are about. 

Keep your people aligned

Communicate 

Influence behavior

Inspire action

We have a big God, we take big risks and we expect big results. 

Attitude – we live on the solution side of every issue. 

We exist for the lost and the least of these. 

Culture is a combination of what you expect and what you allow.” Craig Groeschel 

Ongoing Investment

Vision Cast Continually

“Vision focuses on what does not yet exist, but should.” George Barna

Meet Regularly. 

Get the right people in the right room to solve almost every problem. Get on the same page. 

Develop Consistently

Not training alone.

Evaluate, where are they currently. Where do they need to be going? 

Equip. Create a plan of where you want them to go.

Empower. Give them responsibilities so they can grow in that area. Give authority . 

Encourage Prayerfully

Don’t forget to encourage on an ongoing basis and pray for your team. 

Build A Comprehensive NextGen Strategy For Families

Nick Blevins
@nickblevins

If we started from scratch, knowing what we know now, what would we do?

Think Orange (Soon-sh)
When Parents Win (Fall)

4 Levels of Parent Involvement

Parents who are are searching for an answer.

Outside your church but open to attending 

Interested in becoming better parents. 

Parents who are participating in church

Entry-level experience with your church taking steps to influence kids spiritually.

Parents who are applying a strategy 

Committed to partnering with the church and being responsible for spiritual leadership at home. 

Parents who are leading in ministry

Fully committed families who are leading at home and leading at church

Searching > Participating > Applying > Leading

It’s good having parents at every point on this spectrum. 

“The goal is not to get parents to do everything, but to engage them to do something more.” Reggie

5-Part Strategy for Parting with Parents

#1 Small Group Leaders

Connect kids and students to WHO

“Someone who chooses to invest in the lives of a few to encourage authentic faith.”

Applying and Leading

Leading SGL’s to show up outside the church

Help SLG’s connect with parents

SGL + Parent Open House event (MVP Box)

Small group leader + Parent breakfast/lunch

Small group leaders are your best partnership with parents. The best strategy in the world isn’t worth as much as an invested SGL. 

#2 Communication

Inform parents HOW

Searching & Participating 

Email (Inform Parents) Consider how many emails and if they have more kids.
Text (Remind Parents) 98% read – 1 or 2 a week and a reminder to lead faith at home.

Instagram (Celebrate Experiences) 5x engagement per post compared to FB.

Facebook (Resource Parents) Do it consistently. 

Website (Help Visitors) How do I know where to go? How do I check my kids in?

Apply & Learn

1-on-1 Conversations

Feedback Loops (Surveys, emailed questions, etc.) 

Facebook Groups

#3 Resources

Equip parents with WHAT

Searching & Participating 

Curriculum Resources 

Parent Cue App
Parent Cue Blog

Parent Cue Podcast

Applying & Leading

Bibles / Bible App

Topical Resources

Parenting Books

Phase

#4 Events

Help parents celebrate WHEN

Searching &..

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Jon Acuff @JonAcuff 

“You’re here (Orange) because someone made it personal for you.”

“When it’s personal, people are not an interruption they are the reason we do what do.” 

“When you make it personal, you make a person 3D. The internet makes people 2D. It’s easy to hate an idea, it’s hard to hate an individual.”

“It’s easy to hate an idea, it’s hard to hate an individual.” 

“If your hustle costs you deeply, your hustle is too expensive.” 

“Ask, ‘What do you need?’ Then actually act on it. When you act, they become visible and valuable.” 

Virginia Ward @vawardwow

“The church should be the best place for a kid to find hope.”

“It’s easy to feel invisible as a teenager, especially when you don’t fit into one of the ‘boxes’.” 

“They valued my personal dreams.”

“We are going to take our cues from Jesus when it comes to making it personal.” 

Kristen Ivy @Kristen_Ivy

“What if the opposite of personal is being shallow?”

“We can all be a little shallow sometimes.”

“If there’s pain that we can’t recognize in the church then the hope we offer is shallow.”

“If we can’t feel someone pain the healing we offer is shallow.” 

“No one needs to be seen by everybody but everybody needs somebody who sees them.”

“You can’t stop being shallow unless you learn not just to see someone but to be seen.”

“There’s a generation of too many kids and teenagers who are longing to be seen.” 

Reggie Joiner @reggiejoiner 

“It was clear no one in the crowd saw Zacchaeus the way Jesus did.”

“Everybody needs somebody to see them like Jesus does.”

“Jesus never allowed public opinion change his personal view of people.”

“Maybe Jesus chose to see Zacchaeus in front of everyone that day so Zacchaeus could see himself in a different way.”

“Something remarkable happens when you start seeing people the way Jesus sees them.”

“Don’t get so preoccupied in the busyness of trying to save everyone that you don’t stop to save someone.” 

“Pause long enough to make it personal. You can’t be personal with a crowd, you can only be personal with a person.”

“One of the greatest things that we can do to train leaders and volunteers is to remind each other that everything we do boils down to one-to-one discipleship.”

“Jesus took the time to enter into Zacchaeus’ everyday context.”

“Jesus doesn’t let the crowd determine His love for people.”

“Jesus took the time to understand someone the crowd detested.”

“Jesus believed in Zacchaeus’ potential to be generous. He saw something no one else saw.”

“Jesus had a way of replacing shame with hope.”

“What if we, like Jesus, looked into a generation and helped them believe that their past doesn’t have to identify them.”

“When someone smarter and wiser sees our potential, we start believing in it as well. We all need someone to see us.”

Key questions to lean into a relationship with a kid:
Do you know their name?
Do you know what matters to them?
Do you know where they live?
Do you know what they’ve done?
Do you know what they can do? 

“Like Zacchaeus, WE are short. All have sinned and fall short of the glory of God.” 

“We are so programmed to see the bad in the world that we fail to see the potential of people created in the image of God.”

“Jesus shows up to say, ‘You are worth redeeming.’”

“If we believe in Jesus…We should be the first ones on the front lines to say to people, ‘Yes, you can change.'” 

“What if Jesus hadn’t stopped? What if someone hadn’t stopped in my life?”

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Get Everyone To Pay Attention with Frank Bealer @fbealer

We are going to turn up the dial on “It’s Personal” and this might feel overwhelming at times. It might feel like another thing to do but it’s more than that.  

Who’s going to come alongside you to be the filter to make sure you are doing the right principles. 

How many of you hand out resources to parents?
Social media channels for your church?

How do I convince leaders and parents to pay attention to what matters? We must turn up the dials on Pay Attention and What Matters

“Every time we get a leader or parents attention, we either build or erode trust.” 

It’s that one time at the right time that matter most. 

Attention + Trust = Impact (x repeat)

When we build trust we get influence and we get the opportunity to impact their future. But were are not done there, we must repeat the cycle. It’s a constant cycle for us to not take for granted that we have people’s trust.

Advertisements retarget and follow you. Now when you go to their webpage you are retargeted and followed. The advertisements start popping up everywhere. You can’t keep getting louder and demanding to get people’s attention. 

How do we convince people to pay attention? Error in the question. They are not willing to PAY but they will TRADE attention. Everyone is aware of this cost. 

If your volunteer training doesn’t help them win at home then you’re missing the point. They are looking for something that trades their attention. Something that’s helpful today AND in their future. Word things in a way that helps them see the benefit tomorrow not in the future. 

What if instead of focusing on saving $20 today it was “Hey parents, we have a limited number of spots today and we are going to be focusing on entitlement. We want to let you know this will be a big focus for us this year and we just wanted to come alongside you to help with this issue. We heard you and we want to help you win. (Also helps parents know they are not in this alone or the only one going through it.)

Families are very attentive to making bad trades. How do we know it’s worth our exchange.  Add value to parent’s lives. 

Attention is so extremely valuable, but we didn’t steward it well.

Most are deciding Sunday morning if they are going to attend church or not. They aren’t thinking about hitting snooze but deciding between two good options. We must communicate that we want something for them and not something from them. It’s not about celebrating the numbers there. We want you there because this is what it will create for your family tomorrow. Help them navigate issues for tomorrow. 

We communicate hype in youth ministry. First of all, we can’t fulfill our own hype. “It’s going to be one of the best weeks of…this month.” Instead communicate, “I’m glad you’re here, who’s your small group leader? They are going to be so glad to see you and we are so glad that you are here!” Students are looking for relationships. They are looking for someone who will notice when they are not there. We need to communicate this from the very beginning. It’s not the name of the ministry that is looking for you or the “we” but it’s the person who has a name. Use real-life names and real-life relationships. 

The biggest challenge with a handout is not the handout but the teenagers passing them out. We need someone communicating the value of what we hand them. “We trade efficiency sometimes for effectiveness.” 

We give away some of the best moments we have. Parent pickup. Be intentional and engage parents at this moment. 

“Marketing is the generous act of helping someone solve a problem.” Be empathetic. Come alongside them. Help them. We are just here to serve you. 

Text service where families can ask for prayer for the school year. 26 families signed up. “I didn’t use it but I just love to know my church is in my corner.” 

We say it’s mandatory and so important BUT most of us don’t send an email to those who didn’t show up. This communicates that they should have been there and it shows them it was really worth their time. 

Many of us in this room when we start in ministry we get really excited about the relational side of things, and then you figure out how messy and hard it is to get personal. Our response is to start making changes to our content and programming. We edit more and print more because it makes us feel busy. The reality is it’s personal and it’s going to be messy. We need to actually have relationships with people and followup and care for them. 

Building Your Team For The Future – Jon Birkmire @jon.birkmire

iamnextgen.com 

Treat volunteers like staff. Build a leadership team. 

Doing this helps you do what you do better and gives you more time to do the things that only you can do. 

What can we do when our ministry needs more than WE can give? 

3 Traditional Options: 
Don’t do it
Do it and accept the consequence
Hire more people

We have limited bandwidth. Time is the great equalizer. 

Smart-water Illustration: 

“I’m about to save the world…I need 12 people.” 

Introduce some more water into your life. I’m going to hand you this and this and this. The two of us are going to make this thing work. You can do this and the truth is you need to do this. The average youth pastor burns out in 3 years. Add voices to your team. 

We need to re-think your organizational structure to add new voices. Not just more voices…But the right kind of voices. Add voices that replace yourself. 

Recruit the right voices

On-board 

Build and organizational leadership chart

Start with you

Think transferable models and common language

Create job descriptions. 

Develop an on-boarding 

What am I doing now that I can train and delete to someone else? Where is my water going into what cups that someone else can be filling? 

What language do you use to describe the roles? What are the win statements? 

Coaches, Producers, Directors

Volunteer Coach

Training, evaluating, leadership and care of SGL’s
5-8 hours a week (includes Sunday)
Owns volunteer coordination and on-boarding, caring for leaders mid-week and Sundays.
Leads small group leaders on Sunday
Extend your pastoral influence to someone else who cares for the team on a regular basis. 

Volunteer Producer

Training, evaluation, care, Sunday production efforts.
5-8 hours a week
Owns volunteer coordination and onboarding, caring for leaders mid-week and Sundays.
Lead production leaders on Sunday. 

Volunteer Director

Lead entire team, vision casting, and organizational efforts
8-15 hours a week
Owns the entire ministry responsibility, leads vision casting, evaluation and implementation of ministry model.
Directly leads coaches and producers.
Invite these people into the budget process, the planning of all ministry, the conferences, everything for ministry.
This is about appreciation over compensation. 

Exercise: On the Org Chart – Anything you don’t have someone’s name in, your name is in that box. You might not have this role yet, but you’re doing it. You’re pouring into that cup. 

Exercise: What roles are you currently fulfilling other than your own. Some of you need 40 different name tags because you are currently fulfilling 40 different roles. 

“When you hand over ministry to someone else, people fall in love with ministry.” 

Recruiting the right voices

You have to make friends before you need friends. 

Stop the cattle call at your church. There’s a difference between strategic service push and “we need volunteers”

Methods for recruiting: Observation, Hot List

Look for the people who fit what you are looking for in the positions you need. 

The hot list can be accessed by the team so everyone knows the needs. Constantly updated and reduced. 

Later you create a Warm List and Cold List. Is that a hard no or a warm no? 

Exercise: Recruit!
Write down the names of high capacity people you know in your church. 

On-Boarding New Leaders

You need a clean plan that sets up your leaders to win. 

If you constantly have leaders quitting, that’s not a them thing, that’s a you thing. 

ADAPT

Ask- clarify the role
Download – resource the role
Apprentice – Coach the role
Prepare – Setup the teams
Turn them loose – release the role

SOP – Standard Operating Procedure. 

Apprenticeship:

I do, you watch. We talk
I do, you help. We talk
You do, I help we talk
You do, I watch we talk
You do someone else watches.

People will never innovate if they don’t think they can. Get out of the way. Don’t fix everything for them. 

Exercise: On-boarding

What is missing from your onboarding process?
Job descriptions

Standard operating procedure

Role-specific resources and development

A culture of evaluation

Ministry core documents

Shadowing/apprenticeship system

Release Your Leaders to Lead

Get out of the way

Value who they are over what they do. 

Direct report and evaluation regularly

Resource regularly

Ask: How are you REALLY doing?

Bi-weekly meet with your staff. Staff meeting with direct reports at least once a month. 

When expectations are missed we talk about it. When you don’t talk about it you’ve set a new lower expectation. If volunteers don’t show up, you have to talk about it. 

Repeat the Process

Train your leaders to replace themselves

Practice open handedness

Evaluate yourself regularly (and ask for evaluation) 

Renew your personal vision

Celebrate life change

The way you pay people best is by celebrating wins and life change. Money in their relational bank. Their investment is paying out. 

You can do this. Your family needs you to do this. Your first ministry on this planet is to them. You need this. Some of you are tired. The solution is adding people to your team. 

Create A One Year Ministry Plan – Vince Parker @vincelparker 

Where do you begin? What outcomes do you want to see?

Without a vision the people perish.

How will you measure it?

Where performance is measured, performance improves. 

All great chilis but 5 different ingredients. How you make the worlds best chili you need to measure the ingredients and evaluate. 

Measuring outcomes matters…

Data should have a seat at the table. 

Evaluate.
Evaluate your current situation. 

Where is your starting point?

What do you need to start doing?
What do you need to stop doing?

Write it down so you don’t forget. 

People

Who needs to be involved in the plan?
Who do we need to tell about the plan?
Who are you ministering to?

Place

Environment
What should the space look like?
Does the place support or hinder the plan?

There is a difference between a Starbucks, a home, and an arena. What does this look like?

Programming

How will you get your message out?

What you want to see happen, you need to program in. If we are wanting people in small groups, we need to program it in for people to do and see. 

What do you want them to feel and do? Feelings move to action. Give them every step so they can execute the plan. At the moment, they can text in or sign up to make it happen. 

Process

How does it all work together?

Do your systems help you better love people?
Is it sustainable? 

What happens when a student gives their life to Jesus?

Execute

Time to execute.

Lead with the why

Let them know why we can’t stay where we are at. 

When you lead with the why, people can’t help but join the vision.

Keep it simple

Stay committed. 

Evaluate 

Evaluate again!

Data has a seat t the table. 

What adjustments/tweaks need to be made?
Did you achieve the SMART goals? What milestones did you achieve?

Celebrate the wins. Not take the next day off to recover but to stop and thank God for what He did. 

Pray

What does God say?

Talk with God the whole way. Stay connected to the vine. 

Talk with God during each and every one of these steps. Seek wisdom and hear from Him every step of the way. 

Data may have a seat but God has the biggest seat at the table. 

What do you measure? Rock software.
Who are the leaders who attend?
How many students give life to Christ?
Student attendance and how many times in the moth? 2.3x in a month.

Develop An Effective Coaching System – Frank and Jessica Bealer @fbealer @jessicabealer

Training vs. Coaching

Training is systems, standard boundaries. It’s operational.

Coaching is mission, vision and understanding. It’s purposeful.

Information without intention feels insignificant. 

Familiarity vs safety. It communicates safety when you check the tags. You know them and it matters that you communicate this but it communicates the message that safety comes first and foremost. The new family or the divorce family needs to see safety each and every Sunday. 

Empowerment starts with clarity of vision.

Define the win. 

Most of our team huddles are logistics. Our mission is not to get through the crafts. The win for the day is for you to build relationships. In these VIP meetings, define the win. 

Implementing a coaching model

1. Identify coaches by assessing top leaders in each ministry area. 

They need to be really good at what they are doing. Are they good at communicating with adults? Are they at ease with conflict? Can they have hard conversations? Could you see them firing a volunteer if that was needed? 

2. Remove coaches from your church organizational charts.

Take coaches out of the rotation one step at a time. Don’t start by pulling all of your top leader volunteers. Start with small group coaches and the check-in coaches because these volunteers directly work with students. Don’t set yourself up for failure. 

3. Outline a coach’s responsibilities, timeline, and steps with each new or existing volunteer they are advising. 

Coaches need to fully understand their role. It’s not their responsibility to tell someone they are doing things wrong. It’s support, not critique. Create a role that a coach can not say more than one critique in a week. You should never have a clipboard as a coach. It’s observing and offering feedback at what works. Coaches aren’t going to fix a small group or small group leader in one week. The goal is tiny steps in the right direction. Love and support around one small critique. 

4. Encourage coaches to document the process. 

They need to make notes for you and for themselves. They need to see how far someone grows. If someone is still struggling 3 months later, then you might need to step in. Systemize with something like a google doc. Name, date, comments. Inspect what you expect. Make sure your coaches are doing what you are asking them to do. 

Systematize Care: On Sunday write a card before they leave. Write down what the expectations are for them each week. 

Every coach needs a full roster of who they are coaching. Contact information, Favorites Form, a system for making purchases, budget plan for empowerment. $15/week pre-approved. Give spending permission to volunteers.  

Retention should go up with a coaching model. A greater span of care. Implement a support structure. 

5. Schedule quarterly gatherings with coaches and other insiders. 

When your coaches are in the know they feel more equipped and prepared for what’s coming. Ask what are you seeing? What do we need to do a little different? Help them feel like the insider group that helps the ministry win. 

Go further, faster, and steward well the ministry. Make room for more people to do the ministry. It’s impossible for you to develop everyone on your team. If you worked on developing your coaches, they can develop the team. Lean into and on your coaches. 

Presentation and Family Ministry Coaching Documents: generis.com/orange-jess-bealer-coaching 

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The phrase, “Just because you can, doesn’t mean you should” can be applied to so many areas of life. Just because I can eat ice cream for breakfast, doesn’t mean I should. Just because I can stay up all night watching Netflix, doesn’t mean I should. Just because I can buy that shiny new thing, doesn’t mean I should. We might have the right to do something, but that doesn’t make it right.

If you have attended a Southern Hills service, you have probably heard someone mention Galatians 2:20:

My old self has been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ lives in me. So I live in this earthly body by trusting in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself for me.

As a Christ follower, we are called to crucify ourselves and our desires for the sake of the Gospel. We ought to give up our rights and demonstrate it’s no longer about us and what makes us happy, but it’s about honoring God with our lives. Is there an area in your life where you need to lay down what you believe are your rights for the sake of Christ?

RIGHT TO HAVE MORE. You worked hard, you saved up, and you might have the right to upgrade your TV, but that doesn’t mean you should. The writer of Hebrews challenged us saying, “Don’t be controlled by love for money. Be happy with what you have” (Hebrews 13:5). When spending money, it’s important to check your motive. Are you honoring God with your spending? Do you need to lay down your rights for the sake of something greater?

RIGHT TO BE RIGHT. You know where you stand on the issue, and even have the facts to back it up. You might have the right to try and win the fight or make that post on Facebook, but that doesn’t mean you should.

Don’t do anything only to get ahead. Don’t do it because you are proud. Instead, be humble. Value others more than yourselves. None of you should look out just for your own good. Each of you should also look out for the good of others. – Philippians 2:3-4

There are times where correction or a loving rebuke is necessary but is your heart doing what is best for the other person or are you holding onto your rights? Is it for their good or so you can feel good? Remember Colossians 3:13: “Make allowance for each other’s faults, and forgive anyone who offends you. Remember, the Lord forgave you, so you must forgive others.”

RIGHT TO BE COMFORTABLE. You had a long day and just want to come home to a peaceful house. You might have the right to do what makes you happy, but that doesn’t mean you should. Loving your family often means laying down your right to comfort and showing love through your actions.

We know what love is because Jesus Christ gave his life for us. So we should give our lives for our brothers and sisters. Suppose someone sees a brother or sister in need and is able to help them. And suppose that person doesn’t take pity on these needy people. Then how can the love of God be in that person? Dear children, don’t just talk about love. Put your love into action. Then it will truly be love. – 1 John 3:16-18

If my old self has been crucified with Christ, then I’m a dead man walking and dead men have no rights. What rights do you need to crucify for the sake of Christ? The old hymn says:

I hear the Savior say,
“Thy strength indeed is small.
Child of weakness, watch and pray.
Find in Me thine all in all.”
Jesus paid it all, all to Him I owe;
sin had left a crimson stain,
He washed it white as snow.

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