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Please see the details below about an open postdoc position, suitable for excellent researchers with interests in VR and modelling multimodal signal processing.

We are looking for a Post Doctoral Research Associate to collaborate at the development of Bayesian (DCM
and Active Inference) computational models of multimodal social interaction taking into account the role of human chemosignals perception. This will involve also the development of robust algorithms for signal processing, statistical
inference and extraction of information from EEG and other physiological signals, as well as the design and implementation of software for the execution of experiments with adaptive VR stimulation.

Application closing date 02/01/2019

Application Links

https://ift.tt/2EAbAyL

https://ift.tt/2EthwIO

Job reference REQ02121

Job Details

The School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering, the Department of Psychology, and the Essex Brain-Computer Interfaces and Neural
Engineering Lab are pleased to announce this postdoctoral position in the Horizon 2020 project “POTION: Promoting social interaction through emotional body odoursâ€. The
project will last five years and start in January 2019 and includes partners from the Universities of Pisa (Italy), Padova (Italy), and Essex (UK),
the Universitat Politecnica De Valencia (Spain), the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven (Belgium), and the Karolinska Institutet (Sweden), and three companies ISPA CRL (Portougal), SRA Instruments (France) and Feel-Ing s.r.l. (Italy). POTION proposes a novel technological
paradigm to delve deeper into understanding meaningful social interaction, combining new knowledge about the chemical composition of human social chemosignals together with a novel olfactory-based technology designed to drive social behaviour.

 

 

Duties of the Role

The Essex team’s work on the project focuses on the development of Bayesian (DCM and Active Inference) computational models of multimodal social interaction.
This models will be applied to evaluate socially relevant variables, such as trust, presence and inclusion as well as to generate optimal stimuli in artificially mediated social interactions. In particular, the models will cover the role of human chemosignal
perception in social interactions. The models will be identified and tested using neurophysiological data (e.g. EEG), peripheral physiological activation (i.e., ECG, RESP, EDA) and behavioural changes (i.e., f-EMG) collected using VR scenarios of increasing
complexity.

 

The successful applicant will research and develop Bayesian (DCM and Active Inference) computational models of multimodal social interaction with
an emphasis on the role of human chemosignals. They will also develop robust algorithms for signal processing, statistical inferenceand extraction of information from EEG and other physiological signals, design and implement software for the
execution of experiments with VR stimulation, and contribute to the reporting and dissemination of the project.

 

 

Skills and qualifications required 

Applicants are expected to hold a PhD (or be close to completion) in Computational Neuroscience, Brain-computer
Interfaces, Neural Engineering, Psychology, Machine Learning, Statistics, Physics, Mathematics, Computer Science or a closely related discipline, or equivalent professional experience or practice. The ideal candidate will have significant experience in computational
modelling of social interaction, signal processing, statistical modelling of neural signals and processes, brain-computer interfaces, and virtual reality interfaces. Applicants are also expected to have a strong publication record (relative to their career
stage) as first author, ideally including publications in 1st quartile journals in relevant areas.

 

We strongly encourage women to apply as they are currently under-represented in the School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering. 

At the University of Essex internationalism is central to who we are and what we do. We are committed to being a cosmopolitan, internationally-oriented
university that is welcoming to staff and students from all countries and a university where you can find the world in one place.

Who we are

University of Essex has just been awarded the prestigious title of  “University
of the Year” by the Times Higher Education for “transforming the lives of a growing student body†and ” putting  both staff and students first”

The School of Computer Science and Electronic Engineering (CSEE) at the University of Essex has an outstanding reputation for teaching and high-quality
research in artificial intelligence, biomedical engineering, brain-computer interfaces, computer games, evolutionary computation, human language technology, robotics, networks and optoelectronics. Particularly relevant to this application is our research in
artificial intelligence and in life and medical sciences applications, which was judged as world-leading in the recent Research Excellence Framework, the system for assessing the quality of research in UK higher education institutions. An important centre
spanning both areas is the Essex Brain-Computer Interface and Neural Engineering (BCI-NE) Laboratory. The BCI lab was founded in 2004 by Dr Citi among others, and is one of the largest and best equipped in Europe. For over a decade, it has produced highly
visible internationally leading research, with international collaborators at MIT, Berkley, the European Space Agency, and many others. Our members have led high-profile externally funded projects in the area of Assisted Living Technologies. Since 2007 our
research has featured prominently in the UKâ€s Department of Healthâ€s annual report on research and development work relating to assistive technology, e.g. see the 2012 report, which was presented to parliament.

 

The successful applicant will work in collaboration with the Department of Psychology at the University of Essex. This department was ranked
13th out of more than 100 in the UK in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF 2014), with 90% of our research rated as world-leading or internationally
excellent. Academic staff in the department have wide-ranging and world-leading expertise in vision, cognition, cognitive neuroscience, health and social psychology. Students and staff make use of facilities in the Centre for Brain Science, a purpose-built
facility dedicated to research and with considerable resources for understanding brain and behaviour.

The research facilities are located on our Colchester Campus, which  is set within 200 acres of beautiful
parkland, located two miles from the historic town centre of Colchester â€“ England’s oldest recorded town. Our Colchester Campus
is also easily reached from London and Stansted Airport in under one hour. Home to over 13,000 students from more than 130 countries, our Colchester Campus is the largest of our three sites, making us one of the most internationally diverse
campuses on the planet – we like to think of ourselves as the world in one place. Colchester has a relatively low cost of living, while being well connected to London, the coast, and areas of natural beauty in East Anglia.

 

Please see the link below for a full job description and person specification which outlines the full duties, skills, qualifications and experience needed
for this role plus more information relating to the post. We recommend you read this information carefully before making an application.  Applications should be made on-line, but if you would like advice or help in making an application, or need information
in a different format, please telephone the Resourcing Team (+44 1206 876559). 

 

Feel free to  contact us (Dr Citi, (CSEE)
lciti@essex.ac.uk (PI), Dr Ognibene (CSEE) dimitri.ognibene@essex.ac.uk,
Dr Foulsham (PSYCH)  foulsham@essex.ac.uk for
an informal discussion about this post.

Job reference REQ02121

Application closing date 02/01/2019

Application Links

https://ift.tt/2EAbAyL

https://ift.tt/2EthwIO

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Dear Vision list members,

there is a job opening at Ulm University for either a PostDoc or
doctoral students in the lab of Prof. Dr. Anke Huckauf
https://ift.tt/2EBYmBh   working on gaze
control and pupillometry, both from an applied (i.e.
Human-Computer-Interaction) as well as from a basic perceptual perspective.

More detailed information about the position can be found here:

https://ift.tt/2EvFVgL

Ulm is located in the south of Germany offering great life quality and
strong scientific opportunities. To apply, please send your application
before January 20th. Feel free to contact me beforehand for any questions.

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At the department of Electrical Engineering research and education are performed in the areas of Communication and Antenna systems, Systems and Control, Computer vision, Signal processing and Biomedical engineering, and Electric Power Engineering. Our knowledge is of use everywhere where there is advanced technology with integrated electronics. We work with challenges for a sustainable future in society of today, for example in the growing demands concerning efficient systems for communications and electrifying.

We offer a dynamic and international work environment with about 200 employees from more than 20 countries, and with extensive national and international research collaborations with academia, industry and society.

The department provides about 100 courses, of which most are included in the Master’s Programs “Biomedical Engineering”, “Electric Power Engineering”, “Systems, Control and Mechatronics” and “Communication Engineering”.

Read more at https://ift.tt/2PLGgyd

Information about the research group

The Computer Vision Group conducts research in the field of automatic image interpretation and perceptual scene understanding. The group targets both medical applications, such as the development of new and more effective methods and systems for analysis, support and diagnostics, as well as general computer vision applications including autonomously guided vehicles (particularly self-driving cars), image-based localization, structure-from-motion and object recognition. The main research problems include mathematical theory, algorithms and machine learning (deep learning) for inverse problems in artifical intelligence.

Project description

We are interested in improving the numerical optimization methods in computer vision and related fields. Numerical optimization is at the core of any computer vision and machine learning problem, and reaching a better numerical solution can make the difference between the desired answer and an unusable result.

One of the areas we are particular interested in is how to reach better local minima when minimizing highly non-convex objective functions. Improving the current state-of-the-art is beneficial for large-scale optimization problems in computer vision (such as bundle adjustment) and in machine learning (such as training a deep neural network). Two ways to reach better minima in practice are lifting (i.e. introducing a suitable over-parametrization of the original problem), and using surrogate objectives to “guide” around poor local minima. The aim of this project is also to explore how to combine numerical optimization and machine learning (“learning to optimize”).

Funding has been obtained from the Wallenberg AI, Autonomous Systems and Software Program (WASP) which is Sweden’s largest ever individual research program, a major national initiative for strategically basic research, education and faculty recruitment. The program is initiated and generously funded by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW) with 2.6 billion SEK. In addition to this, the program receives support from collaborating industry and from participating universities to form a total budget of 3.5 billion SEK. Major goals are more than 50 new professors and more than 300 new PhDs within AI, Autonomous Systems and Software. The vision of WASP is excellent research and competence in artificial intelligence, autonomous systems and software for the benefit of Swedish industry. For more information about the research and other activities conducted within WASP please visit: http://wasp-sweden.org/

Major responsibilities

Your major responsibility as postdoc is to perform your own research in a research group. The position also includes teaching on undergraduate and master’s levels as well as supervising master’s and/or PhD students to a certain extent. Another important aspect involves collaboration within academia and with society at large. The position is meritorious for future research duties within academia as well as industry/the public sector.

Full-time temporary employment. The position is limited to a maximum of two years (1+1).

Qualifications

To qualify for the position of postdoc, you must have a doctoral degree in computer vision, machine learning, applied mathematics or a related field. The degree should generally not be older than three years. You are expected to be somewhat accustomed to teaching, and to demonstrate good potential within research and education.

Chalmers offers a cultivating and inspiring working environment in the dynamic city ofGothenburg.

Read more aboutworking at Chalmersand ourbenefitsfor employees.

Application procedure

The application should be marked with Ref 20180721 and written in English.

CV: (Please name the document as: CV, Surname, Ref.

CV, include complete list of publications

Previous teaching and pedagogical experiences

Two references that we can contact.

Personal letter:(Please name the document as: Personal letter, Family name, Ref.

1-3 pages where you introduce yourselfand present your qualifications.

Previous research fields and main research results.

Future goals and research focus. Are there any specific projects and research issues you are primarily interested in?

Attested copies of completed education, grades and other certificates.

Application deadline: 15 January, 2019

For instructions on how to apply, please refer to: http://bit.ly/2CkeeGn

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The Department of Experimental Psychology at the
Georg-Elias-Mueller-Institute for Psychology at the University of
Goettingen is looking to fill the position of a

Research Assistant (Ph.D. student)

with 50% of the regular working hours (currently 19.90 hours per
week) with a fixed-term contract (3 years). This position should
be filled by April 1st, 2019. Salary: Pay grade 13 TV-L.

In the area of experimental consciousness research, our group
investigates basic processes of visual processing that lead to a
conscious experience and the mechanisms of processing unconscious
visual stimuli. We use psychophysical (RT, eye movements),
physiological (EEG, fMRI) and phenomenological approaches.

Your Duties
The successful candidate will have the opportunity to perform
basic research and will work on a current project on the
processing of rapid motion (Mattler & Fendrich, 2007; 2010).
You will be closely involved in all aspects of experimental
planning, data collection, analysis and publication of the
results. A high degree of independence and the contribution of
ideas is expected.

Your profile

You hold a highly qualified M.S. in Psychology.

Experience in programming (e.g., C, C++, Matlab,
Presentation).

Experience in dealing with statistical software (ideally R).

Knowledge of and interest in the human visual system, visual
cognition, neuroanatomy and statistics.

Proficiency in German.

Proficiency in English.

Excellent skills in analytical thinking, perceptiveness,
commitment, self-organization, teamwork, and communication.

This position provides young researchers and scientists with the
opportunity to obtain a doctoral degree.  The University of
Goettingen is an equal opportunities employer and places
particular emphasis on fostering career opportunities for women.
Qualified women are therefore strongly encouraged to apply in
fields in which they are underrepresented. The university has
committed itself to being a family-friendly institution and
supports their employees in balancing work and family life. The
mission of the University is to employ a greater number of
severely disabled persons. Applications from severely disabled
persons with equivalent qualifications will be given preference.

Please send your application with the usual documents as a single
PDF until January 13th, 2019 to Mrs. Christine John: 
sekretariat.experimentelle.psychologie@uni-goettingen.de,

If you have any questions, please contact Prof. Dr. Mattler,
E-Mail: uwe.mattler@psych.uni-goettingen.de,
Tel. +49 551/3933765

Please note that the submission of the application constitutes a
data protection consent in the processing of your application data
by us. More about the legal basis and data usage can be found
here: Information sheet on the General Data Protection Regulation
(DSGVO) https://ift.tt/2MLwkXT

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Robert
Fox, Professor of Psychology at Vanderbilt University for more than half a
century, died Wednesday, December 12, 2018, after a short illness. He was 86.

A
Cincinnati native, Fox received his PhD from the University of Cincinnati in
1963; his dissertation advisor was William Dember. The summer of that year, Bob
began his long association with Vanderbilt where studied and taught visual
perception for his entire career. He retired in 2012, and in recognition of his
enduring contributions he was awarded the title of professor emeritus. He
maintained an on-campus office and research laboratory until his death. Within
vision science, Bob is recognized for his landmark studies of animal vision and
human vision, both infant and adult. He is perhaps best known for his
foundational work on binocular rivalry, with a series of landmark papers in the
60’s and 70’s that sparked interest in rivalry within our field. Bob enjoyed
decades of continuous grant funding, and his papers were published in the very
best journals in our field including Nature,
Science, Journal of Experimental Psychology, and Vision Research. He was an elected fellow of the American
Psychological Association, a charter fellow of the Association for
Psychological Science, an elected fellow of the American Association for the
Advancement of Science, and a founding member of the Vanderbilt Vision Research
Center. Over the decades he trained a host of graduate students who themselves
went on to enjoy productive careers. Bob also played an essential role in
guiding decades of vibrant growth by the Vanderbilt Psychology Department, and
in 2013 the Department honored his legacy by establishing and endowing an award
in his name given annually to a post-graduate researcher within the Department.

In
addition to his many contributions as a vision scientist, Bob was a loving
father and doting grandfather. He is survived by a daughter, Jenny Wells of
Narberth, PA and a son, Dean of Lebanon, TN, a long-time close friend, Dona
Tapp, of Nashville, and five grandchildren and one great-grandchild.

 

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At the department of Electrical Engineering research and education are performed in the areas of Communication and Antenna systems, Systems and Control, Computer vision, Signal processing and Biomedical engineering, and Electric Power Engineering. Our knowledge is of use everywhere where there is advanced technology with integrated electronics. We work with challenges for a sustainable future in society of today, for example in the growing demands concerning efficient systems for communications and electrifying.

We offer a dynamic and international work environment with about 200 employees from more than 20 countries, and with extensive national and international research collaborations with academia, industry and society.

The department provides about 100 courses, of which most are included in the Master’s Programs “Biomedical Engineering”, “Electric Power Engineering”, “Systems, Control and Mechatronics” and “Communication Engineering”.

Read more at https://ift.tt/2PLGgyd

Information about the research group

The Computer Vision Group conducts research in the field of automatic image interpretation and perceptual scene understanding. The group targets both medical applications, such as the development of new and more effective methods and systems for analysis, support and diagnostics, as well as general computer vision applications including autonomously guided vehicles (particularly self-driving cars), image-based localization, structure-from-motion and object recognition. The main research problems include mathematical theory, algorithms and machine learning (deep learning) for inverse problems in artifical intelligence.

Project description

We are interested in representation learning, especially learning features from images and videos. Representation learning is one important aspect of deep learning and machine learning, and good representations of input data are essential for the generalization ability, interpretability and robustness of machine learning methods.

In this project we consider “meaningful” representations in the broadest sense as good representations. Meaningful representations can be achieved in several ways, and the goal of this project is to investigate in the following directions in particular: first, constraining the neural network architecture to loosely imitate hand-crafted and therefore interpretable methods; and second, extracting features that allow a fine-grained prediction (such as predicting the next frame in a video or how a scene appears at a novel view-point).

The majority of images used in machine learning applications are captured using a pinhole camera, i.e. images are 2D projections of a 3D world. Hence, imaged objects have an apparent size different from their true size, and objects are subject to full or partial occlusions. The overwhelming majority of deep learning approaches processes images solely as 2D array of pixels, and training data has to cover e.g. objects at different apparent sizes and with a variety of realistic occlusion patterns.

One of the main advantages of having a good representation of input data is the ability to train a machine learning method rapidly, i.e. from a small number of training examples, to solve a new task. Contrary to biological learning systems artificial neural networks require large training sets and many rounds of training to achieve satisfactory performance. The aim of this project is to reduce the required training data in two ways: first, insert knowledge about the relationship between 2D images and the 3D world into deep learning architectures; and second, use cheaply available unsupervised and weakly supervised data to teach such 3D “aware” neural networks the specific structure and characteristics of the actual 3D environment. The features extracted from such a trained networks are expected to be versatile in a number of applications related to understanding of natural images.

Funding has been obtained from the Wallenberg AI, Autonomous Systems and Software Program (WASP) which is Sweden’s largest ever individual research program, a major national initiative for strategically basic research, education and faculty recruitment. The program is initiated and generously funded by the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation (KAW) with 2.6 billion SEK. In addition to this, the program receives support from collaborating industry and from participating universities to form a total budget of 3.5 billion SEK. Major goals are more than 50 new professors and more than 300 new PhDs within AI, Autonomous Systems and Software. The vision of WASP is excellent research and competence in artificial intelligence, autonomous systems and software for the benefit of Swedish industry. For more information about the research and other activities conducted within WASP please visit: http://wasp-sweden.org/

Major responsibilities

Your major responsibilities are to pursue your own doctoral studies. You are expected to develop your own scientific concepts and communicate the results of your research verbally and in writing, both in Swedish and in English. The position generally also includes teaching on Chalmers’ undergraduate level or performing other duties corresponding to 20 per cent of working hours.

Full-time temporary employment.The position is limited to a maximum of five years.

Qualifications

To qualify as a PhD student, you must have a master’s level degree corresponding to at least 240 higher education credits in a relevant field (physics, mathematics or computer science).

The position requires sound verbal and written communication skills in Swedish and English. If Swedish is not your native language, you should be able to teach in Swedish after two years. Chalmers offers Swedish courses.

Chalmers offers a cultivating and inspiring working environment in the dynamic city ofGothenburg.

Read more aboutworking at Chalmersand ourbenefitsfor employees.

Application procedure

The application should be marked with Ref 20180717 and written in English.

CV: (Please name the document: CV, Family name, Ref. number)

CV

Other, for example previous employments or leadership qualifications and positions of trust.

Two references that we can contact.

Personal letter: (Please name the document as: Personal letter, Family name, Ref. number)

1-3 pages where you introduce yourself and present your qualifications.

Previous research fields and main research results.

Future goals and research focus.Are there any specific projects and research issues you are primarily interested in?

Copies of bachelor and/or master’s thesis.

Attested copies and transcripts of completed education, grades and other certificates, eg. TOEFL test results.

Application deadline: 15 January, 2019

For instructions on how to apply, please refer to: http://bit.ly/2Cin7Ak

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PostDoc Position in Human Neurophysiology

 

Applications are invited for a postdoctoral scholar position in the Kreiman lab. We are looking for an innovative and enthusiastic researcher with a strong quantitative background and experience in Neuroscience. 

 

The research efforts will involve studying high-level vision and learning using a combination of computational models, neurophysiology and behavioral experiments. For information about the Kreiman lab and recent publications, see: http://klab.tch.harvard.edu/. 

 

The postdoc will be part of an energetic and intellectually vibrant community of researchers including the Center for Brains, Minds and Machines and the Center for Brain Science. The position is funded for 2 years, with an initial one-year appointment and expectation of extension contingent on satisfactory progress. 

To be considered for this position please submit your application to gabriel.kreiman@tch.harvard.edu, including

            •          CV

            •          List of publications

            •          Names of three people that are familiar with your work

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Our laboratory seeks a postdoctoral fellow to be funded by an NEI institutional training grant to Smith-Kettlewell, or through an internal funding mechanism. Current projects involve studying
attentive and subconscious aspects of voluntary oculomotor control. Eye movements are a sensitive assay of neural function and we use them to probe the mechanisms that process what we see in order to interact with the environment. Our lab uses stimuli that
capture the essence of natural objects and produce eye movement signatures that reflect different states of neural function or dysfunction.
Our approach pairs visual psychophysics with eye movement recording to elucidate sensorimotor signal flow, and additional ongoing projects use fMRI to investigate new perspectives on circuitry underlying these processes.

Smith-Kettlewell has a uniquely attractive postdoctoral program in vision research and related fields. Fellows are trained to become independent scientists and are supported and encouraged to
propose and pursue their own research in close collaboration and mentorship with one or more of our principal investigators. The institute is located in San Francisco, a hub of biomedical and biotech research. Our location and reputation in vision science
affords the opportunity for postdocs to collaborate with nearby universities and tech companies.

The fellowship requires a Ph.D. or M.D. and is normally awarded for two years. Successful fellows often continue here as sponsored investigators. Applications from individuals with disabilities
or other underrepresented groups are particularly encouraged. Fellows are funded either by an NEI institutional training grant, or through a Smith-Kettlewell fellowship. The training grant requires that fellows be US citizens or permanent residents, while the
fellowship is open to US citizens and foreign nationals.

Applications are accepted until January 31, 2019. Details of the program and application procedures are at https://ift.tt/1U4Mxk1.
To apply, please contact me to begin the application process at
heinen@ski.org .
For further questions about the program, please email Dr. Preeti Verghese or Beatriz St. John at fellowships@ski.org.

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Post-Doctoral Research Assistant (Computer Vision and Machine/Deep Learning)

The CfACS Human-Centred Computing is looking for a Post-Doctoral Research Assistant to undertake research in the field of computer vision and machine/deep learning to improve our current diabetic foot ulcer detection technology (FootSnap) by re-designing and
further developing a foot care app for people with diabetes.

The Postdoc will re-design the FootSnap app, work with all relevant stakeholders to improve the mobile technology, conduct user acceptance trials, and develop a functional cross platform mobile app. The ideal candidate must have a PhD degree or be about to
obtain a PhD degree in Computer Vision and/or Machine/Deep Learning. Good software development skills are essential, preferably with previous work in Android or iOS development. Experience in developing algorithm based on data-driven (large datasets) approach
with at least one of the deep learning frameworks (e.g. Tensorflow, Caffe).

To apply: https://ift.tt/2SMCBSx

Many thanks

Best regards

Moi Hoon

Dr. Moi Hoon Yap 

Reader in Computer Vision

Lead, Human-Centred Computing

Address:

Manchester Metropolitan University | John Dalton Building (E129) | Chester Street | Manchester | M1 5GD
Telephone: (+44) 0161 247 1503 | Facsimile: (+44) 0161 247 6840
Website: https://ift.tt/2m9yrpl

We welcome your participation:

The Second Facial Micro-Expressions Grand Challenge: https://ift.tt/2DCbyFl

Special Issue “Human Behavioral Analysis for Face and Gesture: Pathways to automation”: https://ift.tt/2Qbbz9Q

We are recruiting:

VC PhD Studentship: https://ift.tt/2DvVftv

PDRA: https://ift.tt/2SMCBSx
“Before acting on this email or opening any attachments you should read the Manchester Metropolitan University email disclaimer available on its website https://ift.tt/1aHKsTh

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