Loading...

Follow City Dads Group - Navigating Fatherhood Together on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

There is this ball that I have sitting in my office. To many, it looks like just any other baseball. On most days it just sits there, without someone even looking at it. There is no signature on it, and I have yet to fill out the placard on the baseball stand. But I treasure that ball. I wouldn’t say it’s Babe Ruth-esque special, but I’d still be upset if William took the ball to the sandlot one day.

The story behind that ball dates back to 1996. A good year for me as a young boy. My local high school baseball team won the state baseball championship, and it seems that anytime something good is brought up from the past, 1996 is the year. It was June 30, and we were on our way to Coors Field in Denver. I remember telling my parents, that I was going to catch a foul ball this game. I also mentioned that it was good that the promotion that day was a free hat since I had left my glove back in the hotel room because we weren’t actually sitting in foul ball territory.

I don’t remember the exact inning, but Ellis Burks came to bat. At one point during his at bat, he fouls one off down the third base line. I hear my dad say, “BRANDON, LOOK UP!” because more than likely I munching on a hot dog. Without thinking, I hold out my hat. My dad was standing next to me thinking that he had the ball when suddenly, it lands directly into the hat, pulling it from my hands into the empty seat in front of me.

While my dad was looking around for the ball, I look down to grab my hat because, at the time, I’m more concerned about a free hat than a foul ball I probably didn’t or won’t get. But when I lift the hat up, the ball hit off of Ellis Burks’ bat is sitting inside. I hold the ball up like any fan who catches a foul ball does and remember the fans from our section cheer loudly. This was the moment that I imagined all of the local TV cameras were on me and that I would make it on Sportscenter’s Top 10 plays. I don’t remember if all of that happened, but I remember catching that ball like it was yesterday.

Turn the calendar forward 11 years. My son and I are at a Kansas City T-Bones game (an independent professional baseball team in Kansas City), walking around and taking in the sights and sounds of the game in the 3rd inning when a man walks up to my son and hands him a ball that just landed foul in our area. You could see the excitement in my boy’s eyes as he held that ball. He might not have caught it but it you could see that the ball was going to be just as special to him as my foul ball was to me.

As the game ended, we walked toward to the grass berm to watch the post-game fireworks. The players make their way to the locker room, walking up that same berm, when suddenly former Kansas City Royals (and member of the 1985 World Series team) Frank White walks by us after coaching first base for the T-Bones. After shaking the hands of fans, he stops and starts signing autographs for the kids. Our son was holding his ball in his hand, and I asked if he would like to have his ball signed. He might not know the how important the guy was who was signing autographs, but he walked into the crowd of kids and came walking back out with “Frank White” written on the ball.

Much like my dad did, I made sure that his foul ball was kept securely. His sits next to mine on the shelf in my office, sharing childhood memories of two boys who have a love for baseball. And hoping that someday they don’t fall victim to the sandlot like that Babe Ruth ball.

A version of this first appeared on The Rookie Dad. Photos: Brandon Billinger

The post Foul Ball Memories Shared Between Baseball Loving Fathers, Sons appeared first on City Dads Group.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Cassie Lang (played by actress Abby Ryder Fortson) and her dad, Scott aka Ant-Man (Paul Rudd). Photo: Ben Rothstein. ©Marvel Studios 2018

In discussing “Ant-Man and the Wasp,” I’ve gone to great lengths to avoid spoilers; however, there may be spoilers for “Avengers: Infinity War.” Additionally, this piece is written with the assumption that most readers will have an understanding of the overall Marvel Cinematic Universe storyline. And yes, I know I keep writing about bugs. It’s a summertime thing. — Whit

In 2015 the Marvel Cinematic Universe (MCU) introduced audiences to the superhero Ant-Man (Paul Rudd) in a film by the same name, and in doing so finally laid to rest any argument (or hope) that size doesn’t matter.

It also had an awesome indie soundtrack:

Ant-Man 🐜 Paul Rudd and Michael Douglas 🐜 Promo HD - YouTube

Ant-Man, aka Scott Lang (also Paul Rudd), has the ability to shrink out of sight or grow bigger than the horizon, but what really sets the character apart from the majority of other heroes in the MCU is his being a dad. The relationship he shares with his young daughter Cassie (Abby Ryder Fortson) is the cause and effect of his everything.

In fact, while the relationships between heroes and their fathers have played heavily in other Marvel films, only Ant-Man and Hawkeye have had their respective fatherhood examined (although one could make a case for Rocket’s role as a father-figure to Groot Jr.). Conversely, on the villain side, Thanos has had his parenting skills put under the microscope, which, admittedly, increased his chance for Dad of the Year by about 50 percent, give or take.

Ant-Man and the Wasp

Recently, the sequel Ant-Man and the Wasp opened, and in it we bear witness to the evolution of Lang’s relationship with his daughter. No longer is he an ex-con without visitation rights, but rather a bona fide hero. He’s also under house arrest.

His house arrest was part of a deal made in the aftermath of Ant-Man’s participation in Captain America: Civil War. Apparently the U.S. government didn’t want him in that movie, or Germany, or something. Anyway, he’s spent two years confined to his home, which may seem like a terrible option to most, but for Lang it provided the perfect opportunity to spend tons of quality time with Cassie. Also, it allowed him to create the greatest cardboard fort to ever grace the silver screen.

Scott Lang gets it.

It helps that his ex-wife Maggie (Judy Greer) and her husband Paxton (Bobby Cannavale), who were once (a movie ago) less than helpful in allowing Scott and Cassie time together, are now fully and enthusiastically on board. After all, it takes a colony.

Meanwhile, the Wasp (Evangeline Lilly), aka Hope Pym (also Evangeline Lilly) and her father Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) have made great strides in their own strained relationship, which is nice. Also on the mend: the relationship between Hope and Scott.

Ant-Man and the Wasp (Evangeline Lilly), street clothes edition. Photo: Film Frame

It is that relationship that first casts a shadow of doubt for Cassie, when she begins to comprehend that despite evidence (and a couple of paragraphs) to the contrary, she is not the only one her dad cares about. Luckily, Cassie cares about other people, too, and through her empathy she is able to help her dad make a hard decision: do the right thing, regardless of consequence.

Cassie Lang gets it.

Ant-Man and the Wasp is a family film, for families and about families. The movie is full of love and comedy, action and adventure, scares and worries. It is a film about growth, and lots of it.

And, it is about fatherhood, in an ant suit.

The post ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ Explores Lead’s Growth into Fatherhood appeared first on City Dads Group.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

“Is the circus in town?” Photo with caption enthusiastically shared by the author’s neighbor: Mr. J. Fulcher.

Contrary to popular belief, the circus, flea or otherwise, does not roll into town upon a belt of railroad cars. Rather, it shows up at your house on a flatbed truck sometime between 9 a.m. and noon on a Tuesday. The big top can be seen for blocks, just around every bend, proudly announcing its arrival despite the glaring lack of midway.

I am the clown in this scenario.

So it was that I found myself spending the entire Monday prior going through every shelf, drawer and pantry of our home, double-bagging any edible item — sealed twice with a zip tie — and discarding the expired. In the morning our house would be encased by balloon, and then a constant cloud of poison, the brick Zeppelin of suburbia.

The termites would never know what hit them. Despite ours being a household of vegetarian pacifists, the termites demise was something we could justify. The beacon of our bungalow, however, blaring blue and yellow bloomers for all the world to see, did not. For 48 hours our unsuspecting neighbors would live beneath the shadow of an inflatable IKEA, and then we would emerge from the Lapland, worn and ragged, ready to assemble.

Our family did not run away to join the circus. The circus ran us out. A freak show with small cats and a dog act, taking it on the road. Meanwhile, I was three rings of worry.

First, the adamant and oft-repeated assurance that once the gas dissipated and the tent came down we would be able to use our wares: dinner, glass, flat and under, respectively, without so much as a light rinsing, seemed too good to be true. Surely, science hasn’t come so far that a bowlful of poison leaves nothing but memories where logic insists on residue.

Also, the internet didn’t help. Turns out, there’s a bunch of scary stuff stuck in the web, including the absolute certainty that burglars in gas masks will slice open the skin of your home’s cozy cocoon to take every single thing you own, minus the termites. Best-case scenario, they film an episode of Breaking Bad in your kitchen.

While none of those happened, we did return to a call from the water company. It turns out that one of the workers from the fumigation company used the toilet in the hall bath. The one with the wonky handle that wakes me from a dead sleep whenever the water doesn’t stop running in a timely fashion, causing me to channel every breath of dadness into the trickling night: “Jiggle the damn lever!”

The guy had no idea, but the water company knew. They called to scold me for running an endless stream of water, despite the fact I wasn’t. In a day our bill had doubled.

Fixing the toilet jumped up several spots on the “things I need to do” list. Binge-watching Breaking Bad became a close second.

Atop the list? Washing every inch of everything.

And the boys want to take trapeze lessons.

The post Termites Turn My Home, Our Life into the Family Circus appeared first on City Dads Group.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

School’s out! It’s time to get back to a summer routine.

I’ve set a few rules and routines for the summer while I’m home with my kids full-time, so these summer goals are now ours:

Screen time

Screens and time spent on devices is always a tricky subject around our household. I like the idea of allowing them time to use screens each day for a limited time, but in the past that screen time bleeds into longer and longer periods. Our family usually does better with screens on Friday afternoons and weekends only, which is what we did all school year. We will likely stick to this plan. Although ask me again in a few weeks, things may change.

Bedrooms

If we keep our screen days the same as last school year, it’s easy to make sure the kids have their rooms clean each week before they are allowed use their devices.

Meals

I’m thinking I can get my kids to plan and cook one dinner each week. They could search cookbooks, write out the grocery list, prep the ingredients and cook. It will be fun for them and a break from the usual routine for me.

Laundry

In addition to getting my kids to cook, I’m thinking this might be a good year to get my kids to fold and sort their own laundry. My kids already put their own clothes away, but currently I wash, fold and sort for them. Having them do this work seems like the next logical step, since a major goal my wife and I have for our kids is for them not to live under our roof forever.

Sleep

I cannot force my kids to sleep in, but I can make them stay in their rooms until a reasonable time in the morning. What I don’t want is six bored brown eyes staring at me at 6 a.m. Monday, asking me what the plans are for the day. In the past we’ve also had “quiet time” for 40 minutes after lunch. It’s a good way for my kids to get a break from me and from one another. I just need to once again convince them it’s not a punishment.

Fun

Summer won’t be all work and no play. I plan to go to as many Indy Indians games as time and weather will permit. It’s truly a place where I get as much enjoyment being there as my kids do. We will also swim ourselves exhausted as much as possible. I am hopeful that BB will learn to ride her bike this summer as well. We took the training wheels off a while back, but have yet to get past the “me running holding on to her seat while she keeps her balance for three feet” stage. I hope she gets the concept of bike riding in time for us to go on a family bike ride or two this summer.

As with all goals, I’m sure we will exceed some of these summer goals and fall short on others. What summer goals does your family have for this summer?

A version of this first appeared on Indy’s Child. Photo by Luke Michael on Unsplash.

The post Summer Goals, Routines Make for Kids’ Maximum Enjoyment, Your Sanity appeared first on City Dads Group.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

As our American holidays continue the slow decline into commercial bliss, I try to take the time to consider the message I am conveying to my children.

The Fourth of July is a celebration of a free nation, a place where ideas can be challenged freely and change can be implemented. Does it work perfectly? Of course not, it’s something I constantly take for granted and I want to remind myself why it’s important, so I can pass it along to my children.

Here are five messages you should reinforces with your child this Fourth of July:

1. Be thankful for what you have

Kids don’t know how good they’ve got it. When I was growing up I had to beg to get call waiting and chose poorly in my BETA/VHS gamble. It can always be worse, ask the people who lived through the Great Depression. Be thankful.

2. Nobody is perfect

My son came home from school one day and told me his teacher had said the President was a mean man. I said, “Son, the President has a hard job, I’m glad I don’t have to decide the things he does. The people who run this country are always going to make mistakes. It’s always been that way and always will be. The best thing you can do is figure out how you can make it better. A lot of people talk about the way things should be, but the important ones do something about it.”

3. Freedom isn’t free

The reason we have candy-soaked parades and get to play with explosive items past our bedtime is because many men and women have fought, and some even died, for us to keep us safe. Thousand continue to do so today. They are forced to make decisions we would never even have to consider. Tell a soldier how much you appreciate them today.

4. History keeping repeating

For every young whippersnapper who is making things “worse,” you will find an old coot who can’t stand how things are these days. We cannot change the past with the future, but we can use it to make a better one.

5. Pay it forward

Children are an endless stream of wants and needs who find it inconvenient when the world does not bend to their will. Whenever my son takes out a library book, he never wants to return it. “If you kept all of the books, there would be no library,” I have told him. “Someone built that library, so everyone could learn something. Whatever you take from it, you need to give back.”  Should a country receive anything less from its citizens?

At some point, the American Dream changed from something a person worked to earn to a right that was given and deserved. We get the privilege of living in a country where we can speak our minds and know our rights. Our forefathers worked together, despite their differences, to build something worthwhile to pass on to their children. Parents have a responsibility to teach their children how to acknowledge the past, live in the present, and prepare a future for the generations to come. Every child who understands that this Fourth of July is one more person to keep the real American Dream alive.

Photo: Jason Leung on Unsplash

The post Fourth of July Messages Children Should Hear from You, Take to Heart appeared first on City Dads Group.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When I told one of my older softball teammates so many years ago that I was getting married, he — a veteran of a couple of marriages at that point — offered me this piece of advice: Apologize.

“You’re always going to be wrong, no matter how right you may actually be,” he told me. “No matter how irrational she is being, no matter how crazy she’s acting, just say ‘I’m sorry’ and let it go. You are just never going to win.”

While I don’t follow that advice every time my wife (now of 20 years) and I have a disagreement, there have been many times I think my teammate was on to something.

Clint Edwards apparently thinks so, too.

The author of the dad blog No Idea What I’m Doing and staff writer for the Scary Mommy parenting site joins us on the latest Modern Dads Podcast to talk about his new book, I’m Sorry — Love, Your Husband.

The new book is a collection of humorous and heartfelt apologies written from his viewpoint as husband and father. I’m Sorry—  Love, Your Husband features chapters titled “I Wasn’t Man Enough To Witness Childbirth,” “Maternity Leave Isn’t a Vacation,” “Dad Can Stay Home With the Kids, Too, Ya know,”  and “25 Things People Do Daily That Are More Shameful Than Breastfeeding.” A colleague at Scary Mommy called the new book Clint’s “a funny, heartwarming account of the terrifying yet completely rewarding life of a parent.”

Clint Edwards, a father of three whose family resides in Oregon, has previously noted his parenting and approach to child rearing has been impacted by the absence of his own father. On his blog bio, Edwards writes his dad “left when I was nine, and he was in and out of jail until he died from drug addiction. He was 49. I was 19.”

Clint Edwards previously penned the humor book This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things (Parenting. Marriage. Madness). His work has been featured on TV’s Good Morning America, and he is a parenting contributor to The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Huffington Post and Fast Company among others.

The post Clint Edwards is One ‘Sorry’ Husband in his New Humorous Parenting Book appeared first on City Dads Group.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Looking for ways to keep the kids entertained without breaking the bank or a sweat this summer?

Movies for a buck and free bowling, my fellow dads and moms.

Regal Cinema’s Summer Movie Express

Sure, you can plop the kids in front of an iPad or laptop and let them watch Netflix and YouTube but don’t they already do enough of that?

Nothing beats the experience of actually going out to see a film on a big screen with others and Regal Cinemas’ Summer Movie Express makes it easy on moms and dads. As they’ve done for the past several summers, this movie theater chain hosts matinée screenings of family-friendly movies, classic and recent, under family-friendly conditions.

Admission is only $1 a person. The sound tends to be set a little softer than usually for sensitive little ears. The house lights are keep on dim in some areas of the theater so you can keep on eye on everything. And did we mention admission is only $1 a person.

Dates and show schedules for the Regal’s Summer Movie Express are geographically based, depending on when the school year ends and restarts. Go to the Regal website to find a theater near you and its schedule. Among the movies being shown this summer are: Curious George,Despicable Me (1-3), The Iron Giant,How To Train Your Dragon 2, The Lego Movie, Sing, The Peanuts Movie, Ferdinand, The Lego Batman Movie, Paddington 2, Captain Underpants, The Lorax and Kung Fu Panda 3.

Kids Bowl Free

Most people forget how fun bowling is until they actually get on a lane and knock down a few pins. So why not introduce your child to thrill of a strike and the agony of a gutter ball.

Select bowling centers and schools in the United States are participating in Kids Bowl Free, a program designed to give back to communities while providing a safe, secure and fun way for kids to spend time this summer.

First, find whether you have a bowling center in your area participating. If so, then register your child at the Kids Bowl Free website, and — BAM — tickets will be emailed to you so your child can bowl two free games every day this summer.  You just need to get them there and pay for the shoe rental.

Photo: Fort Meade on Foter.com / CC BY

The post Movies, Bowling Keep You, Kids Cool; Saves Money this Summer appeared first on City Dads Group.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Author’s note: In this article, “queer” is used as an umbrella term for people with a range of genders and sexual orientations who are not cisgender, or cis — a person whose gender identity corresponds with the sex the person had or was identified as having at birth — or straight. In this way, a word that historically was used against LGBTQ people has been reclaimed by us.

Instilling a sense of pride in our children is a responsibility many parents work to fulfill.

For our family, in which my wife and I both identify as queer, that includes our children being proud of their queer trans papa and queer cis mama. Together, we make a proud queer family.

During the month of June, recognized nationally as LGBTQ Pride Month, this means bringing out the box o’ bling so we can put on activist buttons and rainbow flags as we get ready to go to the Boston Pride Parade — a major holiday at our house.

This year it meant not just watching the Pride Parade, but marching in it with the Grand Marshal, whose contingent focused on the intersections of oppression and giving voice to many who were not present.

My children, ages 2.5 years old and 6 months old, are not going to remember marching at this year’s parade. They also have not yet had to answer any intrusive questions about our family and how they came to be born. They haven’t had to defend themselves against transphobia and homophobia regardless of how they end up identifying themselves. I know those days will come and my wife and I are working now to equip our children by raising them culturally queer and proud.

We believe it’s important they be part of a community in which they regularly interact with other children who share some of the joys and challenges of being raised in a queer family. These children, like mine, share the good fortune of being wanted so desperately that their parents were willing to go to great expense and effort to bring them into this world. This is why my wife and I feel so fortunate to have an extended queer family in Boston. These “aunties” have been in my life for over a decade and many of them are now raising children of their own.

Support resources for children of LGBTQ parents

Many LGBTQ people raised children before these more open days. Initially, many of these children were from previous heterosexual marriages, then same-sex adoption became more common. With the advent of in vitro fertilization (IVF) and other forms of artificial insemination, more and more babies are being born directly to LGBTQ parents. For more than a decade now, these children of queer parents have come to identify themselves as “queerspawn.” This unique identity has nothing to do with their own gender or sexuality. It’s an identity based on being raised within a queer culture — the rainbow and glitter-filled Pride days of joy along with the dark ones filled with probing questions and bullying from outsiders.

Our community now has queerspawn and a “second generation” (those children who also identify as queer based on their own sexuality) who are well into their 20s and 30s. Those early pioneers often had to fight for acceptance within the LGBTQ communities on college campuses and, despite generally more accepting attitudes across the nation, many children of queer parents still feel a bit like they live between two worlds.

They also feel forgotten. The LGBTQ community often speaks about and provides resources for the parents of queer children, but rarely does it acknowledge the children of queer parents. Fortunately, children of LGBTQ parents do have ways they can find each other and the unique support they need.

The nonprofit organization COLAGE, according to its website, “unites people with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and/or queer parents into a network of peers and supports them as they nurture and empower each other to be skilled, self-confident, and just leaders in our collective communities.”

Formed in 1990, “COLAGE grew out of a need for a kids-only space, separate from parent-run LGBTQ support groups,” wrote Elizabeth Collins, leader of the Los Angeles chapter, in a VICE article. “Because of the critical fight for gay rights in this country, many queerspawn have felt a burden to be ‘poster children;’ COLAGE provides a space where kids can discuss their families without judgment. It also gives them the opportunity to meet others in similarly unique family structures.”

One such opportunity is Family Week in Provincetown, Massachusetts. For more than 20 years, this week-long event COLAGE does in partnership with the Family Equality Council lets LGBTQ families connect, learn and support each other. With more than 50 events to choose from, there really is something for everyone including lots of programming for children of LGBTQ parents. This year’s event is July 28-August 4.

As an openly trans dad, I’m especially excited COLAGE has developed a Kids of Trans Resource Guide — “the first and only guide written by and for people who have trans parents” — and has a private Facebook group for people with trans parents.

Keshet is another national organization providing events for LGBTQ families.   While their focus is LGBTQ Jewish families, their Parent & Family Connection chapters around the country welcome families of all faiths or even without a faith tradition. If there isn’t a group in your area, you’re encouraged to start your own and Keshet provide the resources and support to make that happen.

If you’re reading this and you’re thinking, “I’m not gay, but I think my child might be” then you should know about PFLAG. This national organization with more than 400 chapters around the country is committed to helping parents of LGBTQ youth become more supportive and accepting because this is critical to a child’s health and well-being.

Thank you for taking the time to learn about the organizations supporting children of LGBTQ parents. Together, we are raising strong and resilient children. That’s something every parent can take pride in.

All photos courtesy of Robbie Samuels.

The post LGBTQ Pride Through Raising Strong, Resilient ‘Queerspawn’ appeared first on City Dads Group.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

CBS Sunday Morning correspondent Mo Rocca talks dad fashion with City Dads Group co-founder Lance Somerfeld in a screenshot for a June 17, 2018, segment.

You know Father’s Day is near when you see members of our City Dads Groups across the nation popping up all over your TV screens and social media feeds. And 2018 was no exception to the rule.

Our biggest appearance came on Father’s Day 2018 itself. City Dads Group co-founder Lance Somerfeld joined CBS Sunday Morning correspondent Mo Rocca on a segment discussing how the “dad look” is fashionably hip (as if we didn’t know).

“I think dads should walk out of their homes every day in what they feel comfortable wearing,” Somerfeld told Rocca. “The dads we’re seeing these days are chaperoning field trips. They’re the ones at the doctor’s office appointments. They’re the ones who are helping their kids with homework.”

He forgot to tell Rocca to — please — don’t believe the fanny pack hype. Or that dads would blow $1,000 on butt-ugly Gucci sneakers. We like our butt-ugly at bargain prices.

Father’s Day 2018 also saw the opening of Incredibles 2, which received some hype for superhero Mr. Incredible becoming a stay-at-home dad. That brought the media to our door. Several of our members, including NYC Dads Group member Andrew Bentley, are quoted in a story on Refinery29 about being real-life superheroes.

“Superheroes represent our aspirations, individually and collectively. They have the abilities we want. They have the ambition. The empathy. All of those things that they’re able to influence the world in ways that we would like,” Bentley says in the story. “So when we see Mr. Incredible take a step back and say, ‘I’m going to take care of this kid and allow my wife to go off and pursue her career,’ if he can do it, anyone can do it.”

A playground play date between two of our Dallas Dad Group members and their children is also used to illustrate the link between being an at-home father and a superhero. Way to save the day, Adam Hill and Trevor Stamp:

The University of Central Florida’s online magazine did an extensive Father’s Day piece on alum Marlon Gutierrez that focused on his work leading our Orlando Dads Group.

“There’s no manual or guide on how to be a parent,” Gutierrez is quoted as saying. “I think [this group] has taught me a lot about myself, and I realized that I had to make a lot of changes. I was very much focused on my career because that’s what society expected me to do. Now, being more open with a community that has supportive fathers and environments like the City Dads’ network, I’ve been able to find other dads out there trying to do the same thing. It’s OK not to be so focused on my career. I can be balanced on my career and family and travels and make my life what I want it to be.”

Brock Lusch, co-organizer of our Cincinnati Dads Group, had the lead quote in the Refinery29 story and then took the spotlight in a local TV news interview to discuss what our social and support network does for fathers.

Brandon Billinger and Tucker Smith of the Kansas City Dads Group did a similar interview for one of their local TV news programs.

Finally, Darrell Humphrey of Charlotte Dads Group dispelled some of the common misconceptions about fathers caring for their kids as well as promoting his chapter in a one-on-one with a local TV news anchor.

The post City Dads Show Off Dad Style, Savvy for Media on Father’s Day 2018 appeared first on City Dads Group.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Keeping your kids away from social media these days is pretty much impossible unless you lock them in a closet. In an Amish community. Somewhere in Antarctica.

If your children are going to be connected, you should want them do so in a positive, creative and self-expressive environment, free from bullying and other negativity. That’s what Catherine Connors, co-founder of the recently released Maverick app, is banking on. She tells us all about the app and her philosophy on the latest Modern Dads Podcast.

Maverick is an online community aimed at tween and teen girls. In addition to interacting on it with other connected friends, old and new, Maverick allows users to browse videos from “inspiring influencers and role models, respond to interesting challenges” and earn badges for their accomplishments.

+ + Listen to Maverick co-founder Catherine Connors + +

In a news release about the app from earlier this year, Connors stated: “The research on girls’ social development has shown us the same thing for decades. During early adolescence, the majority of girls stop raising their hands, participating in sports and extracurricular activities, taking risks, and stepping into leadership roles. In short, they stop believing in themselves. And it’s not because we don’t tell them that they should believe in themselves — it’s that they don’t get enough real opportunity to prove to themselves that they can.”

She later told Variety in an April 27 online article, “It came out of this ongoing observation that although there’s a lot of really great work being done by girl organizations … none of those organizations were really able to meet girls where they are in digital spaces.”

Connors, a former Disney Interactive editor-in-chief, is better known to old-school bloggers as the former editor-in-chief of the parenting website Babble and the writer behind the parenting blog Her Bad Mother, named of one Time magazine’s top 25 blogs of 2012.

The post Maverick App Co-Founder on Providing Girls with Social Positivity appeared first on City Dads Group.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview