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Here’s my PrettyLitter review:

I think you’ll agree with me when I say that taking care of your cat’s litter box really stinks.

But what can you do about it?

Well, as it turns out, choosing the best cat litter is more than half the battle.

In this PrettyLitter review, I’ll explain why PrettyLitter health-monitoring cat litter will make your litter box chores significantly easier.

Click here to learn more about where to buy PrettyLitter. Use coupon code AFF10 to get $10 off your first order.

Please join my mailing list. I’ll let you know when a new articles and product reviews are posted.

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PrettyLitter Review: Let’s Cut To The Chase

Let’s face it:

There are literally dozens of kitty litter brands on the market. Different types of cat litter include: clumping clay, non-clumping clay, silica gel crystals, recycled paper, pine, corn, wheat, walnut shells, grass…

Whoa!

Where do you even start?

As a long-time cat mom with 5 indoor-only cats, I can say I’ve tried many types of cat litter.

My preference has always been clumping clay litter…

Until now.

PrettyLitter Review: Click here to learn more about where to buy PrettyLitter. Use coupon code AFF10 to get $10 off your first order.

Benefits of PrettyLitter Health Monitoring Cat Litter

I have been using PrettyLitter for almost one month as of the writing of this review. I want to stress that this is a real review by a real cat mom who is really using the product. Click here to read my bio.

PrettyLitter Review: here are the reasons I will continue to use this product:
  • This revolutionary new kitty litter helps you monitor your cat’s health.
  • Superior order control.
  • Super light-weight.
  • Easy to scoop. Small silica gel granules glide through your scoop.
  • Delivered directly to your door.
  • Excellent customer service. Easy to change the amount of product you are receiving or cancel your subscription.

This litter has truly made litter box maintenance less of a chore for me because it’s light and easy to scoop and replace.

I also don’t need to think about going out to get cat litter. PrettyLitter’s subscription service automatically ships the product to my door each month.

Their customer service is excellent. I have already needed to contact them to change the number of bags I will receive each month. Their phone service is fast, courteous, and responsive.

Here’s an overview of PrettyLitter from it’s creators:

PrettyLitter - Our Origin Story - YouTube

As you can see, the people who created this product really know and care about cats.

Co-founder and CEO Daniel Rotman developed PrettyLitter after losing his own cat to a treatable disease that was detected too late. Other members of the founding team include veterinarian Dr. Geoff DeWire, graduate of U.C. Davis School of Veterinary Medicine (the top-rated vet school in the country).

What’s So Great About PrettyLitter?

PrettyLitter works like other kitty litters: you pour it into your litter box and your cats do their business in it.

What is PrettyLitter made of? It’s is a silica gel based litter. It needs to be at least 2 inches deep in the box, and you need to scoop the solid waste at least once per day.

It’s a non-clumping product and the liquid waste stays in the box. After you remove the solid waste, stir the liquid into the litter. It will disappear by being absorbed by the silica gel and by evaporation.

The silica gel granules are tiny and sandlike. PrettyLitter is easy on your cat’s paws, and it glides easily through your scoop. It’s also low-tracking.

Dump the cat litter and replace it once per month.

So, How Does PrettyLitter Monitor Your Cat’s Health?

What’s unique about PrettyLitter is that it changes colors to help you monitor your cat’s health. As your cat urinates in the box, she will leave color patches in the litter. These patches can be indicators of your cat’s health. Here’s what they mean:

  • Dark yellow / olive green is normal urine.
  • Red can indicate the presence of blood in the urine. Some issues that can cause this color change may be: bladder cancer; internal injury; poison ingestion; or a female cat in heat.
  • Orange indicates the presence of bilirubin. High bilirubin can indicate problems with the liver, gall bladder, or pancreas. Click here to read about high bilirubin in cats.
  • Green is a sign of high acidity that can mean FLUTD, calcium crystals, kidney issues, or urinary blockage.
  • Blue shows high alkalinity that can indicated FLUTD, struvite crystal formations, or kidney issues.

Please note that temporary color changes can be the result of a new diet or temporary stresses. PrettyLitter recommends that if a color change is noted, you should monitor your cat for 24 to 48 hours and contact your veterinarian. PrettyLitter is not intended to diagnose diseases in your cat. It is intended to alert you to possible health conditions before they become serious. Always contact your vet if you suspect your cat is ill.

Here’s an informative PrettyLitter review video from Nat Geo’s Pet Talk:

PrettyLitter on Nat Geo's Pet Talk! - YouTube

Click here to learn more about where to buy PrettyLitter. Use coupon code AFF10 to get $10 off your first order.

What’s Important About Using Health-Monitoring Litter?

So, what’s so great about a cat litter that monitors your cat’s health?

You know when your cat is sick, right?

Wrong.

Cats are notorious for hiding illness. This is an instinctual behavior because in the wild, cats are both predators and prey. Learn more about how and why cats hide pain here.

Because cats are so good at hiding their pain and illness, by the time we realize they’re sick it’s often too late. Many treatable illnesses in cats can become fatal if they’re not discovered in time.

Furthermore, vet bills and medical treatment can be quite expensive. Often a disease caught early can be quickly treated with medication. A disease discovered late may require days of hospitalization and expensive treatment.

It just makes sense to have a tool that can help you see that your cat may be ill before any symptoms or behavioral changes are apparent.

Problems With PrettyLitter

Okay, I told you this was a real review by a real product user.

So, yes, there are a few problems with PrettyLitter that I don’t like.

First, it has not been as low-dust as advertised. That being said, I have used many types of litter and most have been significantly worse. I have also realized that the product kicks up more dust when I scoop or stir it vigorously. The product must be stirred daily to absorb the urine, but I have discovered that if I scoop and stir it gently it’s virtually dust-free.

My second issue with PrettyLitter is the cost. I am spending about twice as much on PrettyLitter as I used to spend on clumping clay litter.

However, we live in a world where you get what you pay for. And I truly believe PrettyLitter is worth the price or I wouldn’t continue to purchase it.

All purchases come with a 30-day satisfaction guarantee. If you’re not happy with the product, they will refund your order right away.

Bottom line: PrettyLitter is an innovative product made by a customer-oriented company. It’s worth the price and delivers on its promises.

Please leave your thoughts on this PrettyLitter review in the comments section below. I would love to hear about your experience with this product!

PrettyLitter Review: Click here to learn more about PrettyLitter. Use coupon code AFF10 to get $10 off your first order.

If you’re having issues with your cat not using the litter box, please see this article.

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The post PrettyLitter Review: Best Cat Litter 2018 Monitors Cat Health appeared first on Caroline's Cats Cat Blog.

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Indoor and outdoor cats can both end up with open wounds due to abscesses or accidents.

This article will show you how to treat an open wound on a cat.

The first thing to do is determine whether the injury is severe enough that it requires medical care. In his book “What’s Wrong With My Cat or Kitten?” veterinarian John Rossi says that small wounds under 1 inch long and 1/2 inch wide don’t need veterinary attention. If your cat’s injury can be dealt with at home, you should stop the bleeding, clean the wound and bandage it, if necessary. Your cat should be able to finish the healing process on her own.

What You’ll Need to Treat an Open Wound on a Cat:
  • Clean rags
  • Mild liquid soap
  • Sterile gauze pads
  • Self-adhering elastic bandage
  • Antibiotic ointment or non-medicated petroleum jelly
Stop the Blood Flow
  • Step 1: Apply pressure to your cat’s wound by pressing a clean rag to it with your hand to stop the wound from bleeding.
  • Step 2: Hold the rag in place for 3 to 4 minutes before lifting it to see if the blood flow has slowed down.
  • Step 3: Reapply a clean section of the rag to the wound if the bleeding hasn’t slowed significantly or stopped altogether. When it has slowed or stopped, move on to cleaning the wound.
Cleaning the Wound
  • Step 1: Flood the wound with warm water for 4 to 5 minutes. This may be easier to do if you have a second person hold your cat and help keep her still and calm while you hold her over the sink and either pour the water over the wound or run water from the faucet over it.
  • Step 2: Work some liquid soap into a lather with warm water and clean the wound with it.
  • Step 3: Wash the soap away with more warm water from the tap or by pouring water over the wound until the water runs clear.
  • Step 4: Dry the wound and the area around it off with a clean rag.
Care While Healing
  • Step 1: Apply an over-the-counter antibiotic ointment to the wound to keep any bacteria that is present from causing infection. Spreading the ointment on at least twice a day reduces chances of infection and also keeps the tissue soft and more prone to healing.
  • Step 2: Leave the wound un-bandaged if you can stop the bleeding entirely, and if your cat will be confined to the house while she’s healing. If the wound isn’t subjected to getting dirt or other infect-ants in it, it will heal faster being exposed to the air than bandaged.
  • Step 3: Check your cat’s wound daily to ensure that it is healing and doesn’t become infected. If it appears red, swollen and is seeping pus, take your cat to the vet immediately. The vet may drain the wound and will prescribe an antibiotic to fight the infection.
Tips and Warnings:

You should always consult an experienced veterinarian regarding the health and treatment of your cat when she has a serious cut or gash. Immediately take your cat to the vet if she has a large open wound over 1 inch long and 1/2 inch wide, especially if it is bleeding profusely.

Don’t attempt to apply a tourniquet to your cat when she is bleeding. More harm than good can be done if it’s tied too tightly.

Wounds can be cleaned by flushing them with hydrogen peroxide as an alternative to washing with soap and water.

References:

“What’s Wrong With My Cat or Kitten?”; John Rossi, D.V.M., M.A.

https://books.google.com/books?id=Eu4jrW9Ha8QC&printsec=frontcover&dq=john+rossi&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjepvvRybfbAhUpqlkKHTLABfIQ6AEIVTAH#v=onepage&q=john%20rossi&f=false

“The Doctor’s Book of Home Remedies for Dogs and Cats”; Editors of Prevention Health Books

Click here for more articles about cat health.

The post How to Treat an Open Wound on a Cat appeared first on Caroline's Cats Cat Blog.

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It’s a dark winter morning, and you’re already late getting ready for work. Last night was hectic, and you forgot to fold the laundry. You reach into the basket, expecting to pull out a clean outfit, and instead, you feel something warm and wet. If you have more than one cat, you’ve probably been there. Unfortunately, once a cat starts going outside the box, it’s not long until the other cats do the same, and you are stuck with a smelly, sticky problem. Cleaning up the urine will do little to help. To fix the problem, you must figure out the root cause. So, why is my cat peeing on everything? There are three main causes for inappropriate elimination: health concerns, litter box issues, and behavioral issues.

Health Concerns

Health concerns typically are urinary tract infections, kidney problems or diabetes. If your cat starts going outside of the litter box, the first step should always be to go to the vet to rule out any underlying conditions. If that is not immediately possible, or you feel that the problem is more than likely behavioral, another option is to try a litter additive to test urine pH. These are available online and at almost every pet store.

Litter Box Issues

While this whole article is about litter box problems, this section specifically looks at issues with the litter and the box itself. The most common cause is litter boxes that are not changed to the specification of the cat. There are, of course, cats that are not happy unless you follow them around with a pooper scooper. Not having enough litter boxes is also a common reason. The recommended number of litters is one box per cat plus one. Another possible concern is that the litter box itself might be discouraging proper litter box usage. Some cats do not like covered boxes because they trap smells. Automatic boxes can be frightening for some cats as well.

Some cats prefer certain textures of litters. Cats generally prefer litter that is as fine as possible.  Scented litters can be problematic because some cats interpret the scented litter as another cat, and thus interpret the litter box as belonging to the other cat (even if it doesn’t exist.) For the same reason, some cats may start peeing outside the box if a scented detergent is used in the laundry, or if a member of the household changes perfumes.

Behavioral Issues

Cats are extremely territorial animals. Nearly everything they do while awake, from cleaning another cat to scratching a post, is an attempt to make their claim. As a result, territory is a very important part of feline psychology.

In feral cat colonies, groups of cats stake out a collective territory, which you can think of like a neighborhood. Then, each individual cat stakes a claim for their own parcel of land, which you can think of like houses. Most of the time, cats negotiate territory on their own, but sometimes there are border disputes. You can think of it this way: there are only a limited number of houses in the neighborhood, and someone isn’t getting the house that they wanted or has to agree to a roommate. To claim territory, the cat pees on what they want, and you end up with a smelly mess.

What you must do then is help them reset the boundaries. The easiest way to do this is to lock the offending cat in a room by herself for a little while. Then, she can claim whatever room she’s in as hers, and peacefully deposit her scent. While she’s doing that, the other cats can renegotiate boundaries, and hopefully, in a couple of weeks, things will be better. A bathroom often works best because it is easier to clean. If that doesn’t work, then you might want to consider anti-anxiety meds to make her less concerned about staking her claim.

If you’re proactive and can act before it escalates, most litter box problems are easily addressed. If the above tips don’t work, don’t be afraid to reach out to your vet – they have years of experience in helping people deal with problems exactly like yours.

The post Why is My Cat Peeing on Everything? appeared first on Caroline's Cats Cat Blog.

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Caroline's Cats by Carolinekearns - 1y ago

The physiology of the cat is very like that of other mammals, but its sense organs have evolved specialized modifications as a hunter. One of the most remarkable adaptations seen in cats is in the anatomy and function of its eyes. So, can cats see in the dark?

While the idea that cats can see in the dark isn’t true, they can see with very little light.

Cats’ Eyes Have a Larger Cornea, Pupil, and Lens

Unlike humans, cats’ eyes have evolved to harness all the light available. In proportion to its brain, a cat’s retina is the same size as a human’s. But the cornea, pupil and lens are larger. This means the cat can take in more light. A cat’s cornea and lens lie close to the retina. Their extreme curvature enables the cat to focus more light, and a rounder eyeball increases the angle of vision.

A Cat’s Eye Has a Specialized Reflective Structure

The cat also enjoys a specialized reflective structure which humans lack. Called the tapedum lucidum, it sits behind the retina and comprises 15 layers of reflective cells. These layers act as mirrors concentrating the available light. When cats’ eyes appear to glow green in the dark, it’s because the light shining on them reflects from the tapedum lucidum through the wide-open pupils.

A Cat’s Lens Provides Excellent Focus

Cats’ eyes work in a similar way to a camera. Light enters through the pupil. The pupil is a hole in the iris which, like the aperture on a camera, can enlarge or contract to control the amount of incoming light. A Jell-O-like lens focuses the incoming light onto the retina.  The lens in a camera provides focus by moving forward and back. In mammals, the soft, Jell-O-like lens focuses as it’s squashed or stretched by adjacent muscles. The cat’s lens gives excellent focus equaled only by the human eye.

Cats’ Eyes Have More Light-Sensitive Rods

The retina has two kinds of cells known as rods and cones. Rod cells are light-sensitive and cones deal with image resolution. Cats have a higher proportion of rods to cones. This means cats sacrifice resolving power for the sake of light efficiency. Cats have slit-shaped pupils allowing them greater control over the intensity of light hitting the retina. This helps them to protect their eyes during the day.

Cats Have Binocular Vision

Cats, like humans, enjoy binocular vision. The two eyes have overlapping fields of vision resulting in a stereoscopic effect, enabling the cat to judge depth and distance. This ability is very important for the cat as a hunter as it needs to judge the position and distance of its prey. Cats’ eyes have limited movement compared to a human. That’s why they often move their heads up and down when hunting. It helps them to locate their prey.

All of these specialized adaptations result from the cat’s evolution as an efficient night-time hunter.

So, can cats see in the dark?

Cats cannot see in total darkness. But their ability to see in even the dimmest light is almost unrivaled by any other living mammal.

The post Can Cats See In The Dark? appeared first on Caroline's Cats Cat Blog.

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Has your cat recently stopped using his litter box? Does he sometimes leave surprises on the living room rug or on your bed for no apparent reason? Cats naturally prefer to urinate and defecate in soft soils and sand such as that found in a litter box, so when they start going in other places, there is usually a logical explanation for the behavior. These five factors are the most common reasons why your cat won’t use the litter box.

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1. Medical Problems

This is the first possibility to rule out when your cat starts urinating or defecating outside the litter box. Urinary tract infections can give your cat feelings of urgency, preventing him or her from reaching the litter box in time. These infections are most common in female cats, but can occur in male cats, too. A bowel obstruction, parasitic infection or other digestive ailment may cause a cat to defecate outside the litter box.

If your cat has recently been declawed, residual pain from the surgery may explain his aversion to the litter box. Some cats even have sensitive paws for the rest of their lives after declawing, and this sensitivity makes it uncomfortable for them to dig.

2. Dirty Litter Boxes

Cats are naturally very clean animals, and in nature, they would not urinate or defecate in the same place twice because they would not want to get their paws dirty. A dirty litter box is highly unappealing to your cat and may be the reason your cat won’t use the litter box. Cleaning your litter box twice per day may help encourage him to start using it again. If you have more than one cat, make sure you have one litter box per cat. This not only keeps the litter cleaner, but also allows each cat to adopt his or her own space.

3. Covered or Poorly-Sized Litter Box

Owners love covered litter boxes because they keep the litter spray to a minimum, but these litter boxes are not appealing to most cats. Some are afraid of closed-off spaces, and refuse to go in covered boxes. They know that if a predator were to approach the opening, they would be trapped with nowhere to run. Removing the lid often solves the problem within days. Similarly, cats do not like litter boxes that are too small or cramped. Purchasing a larger litter box, or even using a large tote rather than an item marketed as a litter box, is an easy solution.

4. Poor Location

Cat owners tend to group cats' eating areas their litter boxes together, but this arrangements is unappealing to cats. They prefer to urinate and defecate far from their feeding area. Placing the litter box on one floor and the feeding area on another is a good choice. Also make sure there is enough room around the litter box for your cat to easily jump in and out. If your cat won't use the litter box, place the box in a secluded location so that your cat can use it in peace. If your cat is shy, avoid placing the box in an area that requires him to navigate a room full of people to use it.

5. Acting Out

Many cat owners believe behavioral issues are the reason their cat won't use the litter box. However, this is actually the least common cause of going outside the litter box. Most episodes can be explained by one of the causes listed above. If you find that none of these apply to your cat's situation, it's possible that your cat is "acting out." Has there been recent changes in your home, such as a new baby or a new pet? Have you stopped spending as much time with your cat? Is there a new person in your life that may be mistreating your cat? If the answer to these questions is yes, than modifying the new factor to make your cat more comfortable will likely ease the tension and stop him from acting out.

Cats are one of the easiest animals to litter train because they instinctively prefer to urinate and defecate in sand or soil. However, there are times when even the most trained cat will go outside the litter box. If your cat displays this behavior, start by ruling out medical explanations, and then consider the other factors above. Most situations can be remedied by making simple changes.

Click here for other cat-related articles.

The post Help! My Cat Won’t Use The Litter Box appeared first on Caroline's Cats Cat Blog.

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Some cats will walk with a harness on a leash and some won’t. If you have an indoor cat who is very interested in going outside, walking on a leash is a possible way to satisfy her curiosity. Below are four steps to show you how to walk your cat on a leash.

I’ve personally had two cats that have walked on a leash. The first was Tina who passed in 2016. She used to try to run outside frequently, and when the was diagnosed with cancer, we thought she might like to go outside while she was still well enough to do so.

Our youngest, Munchkin, has also been outside on a leash. She is very smart and we were hoping it would combat her boredom. She enjoyed it until I accidentally set off the car alarm by bending over with the key fob in my pocket. She hasn’t been interested in going outside on the leash since then.

Our youngest cat walking on a leash.

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How To Walk Your Cat On A Leash: 4 Steps

As with so many aspects of pet parenting, the key to getting your cat to accept a harness and lead is lots and lots of patience. It pays to have a sense of humor as well, especially since some of your friends may think you have lost your mind.

Step 1: If Possible, Start Training Young

If you want to learn how to walk your cat on a leash, it’s generally a good idea to start your harness and leash training as early as possible. Young kittens can be much more amenable to leash training than older cats, so it pays to get off to an early start. That does not mean that it will be impossible to leash train an older cat – it simply means that the training is likely to take longer and require even more patience.

Step 2: Purchase A Well-Fitting Cat Harness

No matter how old your cat or kitten is it is vital to invest in a well-fitting and secure harness. As you fit the harness look for spots where it may be pinching your cat – an uncomfortable harness will not be conducive to leash training. Also be sure that the harness is secure – a harness that is too loose could allow your cat to slip out of it if she panics or resists.

Step 3: Get Your Cat Used To The Harness

After you have found the perfect harness you can start the training in earnest. Begin by putting the harness on and allowing your pet to wear it around the house. The more your cat wears the harness the more she should come to accept it. Always give your cat a reward for accepting the harness, and always keep an eye on her while she is wearing it.

Step 4: Introduce Your Cat To The Leash

After your cat has accepted the harness it is time to introduce the leash. It is important to go slowly at first – a few minutes a day is fine. It is important for your cat to see the leash as something positive, so be sure to reward her with praise and treats after each training session. Also keep in mind that this training may take some time, so be sure to bring plenty of patience and good humor to this unique training process.

Read more cat articles here.

The post How To Walk Your Cat On A Leash appeared first on Caroline's Cats Cat Blog.

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I currently have a co-worker who has a cat that has been diagnosed with kidney disease. This article is about recognizing kidney disease in cats. I hope it will help other cat parents recognize the signs of this illness so they can get their cats treated as early as possible.

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Kidney disease is an incurable disease that up to one in every three cats will be diagnosed with in their lifetimes. While there’s still no cure, catching the illness early on is the best way to ensure that your cat lives a long and comfortable life. Unfortunately, many pet parents overlook the key symptoms of kidney disease. This isn’t due to neglect, but simply because the symptoms of kidney disease are often mistaken for signs of other illnesses, or not even recognized as problems at all.

Recognizing these signs can mean the difference between your cat suffering and being supported during its illness. To ensure that your cat receives care as soon as possible if it develops kidney disease, keep an eye out for these three symptoms that may indicate the onset of kidney disease.

Excessive Drinking Can Indicate Kidney Disease in Cats

Cats should drink water regularly to maintain good health, so seeing your kitty drink more may seem like a good thing. Unfortunately, this means that excessive drinking is often overlooked. However, it is in fact one of the first indicators of a kidney problem.

Cats who are experiencing kidney disease will drink more water in an effort to flush their kidneys and bodies of the toxins that are building up in their blood. Since their kidneys are no longer as effective at performing this task as they once were, consuming more water helps, but it’s not a permanent solution.

You should always encourage your cat to drink a healthy amount of fluid, but if you notice that your cat’s bowl is emptying faster than usual, a vet checkup may be a good idea.

Excessive Urination in Cats

Many pet parents don’t notice how often their cat uses the litter box, but you should take notice if your cat is going more often than usual. Some pet parents will ignore this, especially if their cat is drinking more, assuming that the two go hand-in-hand. While this can be true, if your cat is urinating more than usual, it indicates that the kidneys are working harder to try and flush toxins from the body. If your cat is drinking and urinating excessively, this is almost always indicative of a kidney problem.

Nausea in Cats Can Indicate Kidney Disease

Lastly, cats with kidney disease often experience nausea that prevents them from eating or causes vomiting. Nausea from kidney disease is the result of the toxins in the blood building up. As your cat’s blood becomes more toxic, they feel more ill, and may stop eating as a result, or throw up when they try to.

A cat’s nausea or vomiting should never be overlooked, as it can indicate a broad range of problems. Some pet parents may experience difficulty trying to determine if a cat is throwing up due to hairballs or kidney disease. The main way to tell the difference is that cats with kidney disease won’t throw up hair, and they may also only vomit up fluid or foam. Since their body is nauseated but not trying to expel a toxic or poisonous substance, there won’t necessarily be food or hair in the vomit. Keep in mind that if your cat is refusing to eat or regularly vomiting combined with excessive drinking and/or urination, you should seek a veterinarian’s help immediately.

With early detection, a veterinarian can work with you and your cat to help bring down its blood toxicity and to support its kidneys as long as possible. Regular vet checkups will help your cat to feel better and spunkier, so don’t overlook seeing a vet.

The post Recognizing Kidney Disease in Cats appeared first on Caroline's Cats Cat Blog.

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