Loading...

Follow Career Enlightenment | Best Job Search Blog on Feedspot

Continue with Google
Continue with Facebook
or

Valid

Writing or updating your resume can be stressful, especially if you have limited time and aren’t sure what to focus on.

After working with hundreds of job seekers as a Recruiter, I’m going to reveal the first three places I look on your resume, so you can optimize it to grab the attention of recruiters and hiring managers, and get more interviews.

1. Your Recent Work Experience

The first thing employers are thinking when they evaluate your resume is, “does this person have the skills and experience necessary to come in, learn this role successfully, and start contributing to our efforts quickly?”

The best way to decide this is by looking at what you’ve accomplished for other employers, so if you have any work experience at all, it’s the first place a recruiter or hiring manager is going to look.

I’d recommend spending more time on this section than any other when writing your resume.

Also, make sure your employment history is on the top half of the first page so that it can be easily found.

The only sections I’d recommend putting before your work experiences are your name and contact information, and a one-paragraph professional summary statement. After this, jump right into your work experience.

2. Your Career Progression and “Story”

After looking at your most recent work, I’m now scrolling down to the bottom of your resume and reading upward. I’m looking at your educational background and then trying to piece together the moves you’ve made since then.

I’m looking at job titles and responsibilities you’ve held. I’m looking at the dates of employment for previous positions, and how long you’ve been with each employer.

If you have big gaps in employment or an unusual career progression, it’s not a deal breaker; however, I’d recommend addressing it in a cover letter.

As a recruiter, if I spot some concerning moves or gaps, I’d often look for a cover letter to see if there’s an explanation.

Try to make your work history as clear as possible, and be upfront about addressing any “red flags” or unusual moves you’ve made with the recruiter you’re working with, or they won’t feel comfortable forwarding your resume to a hiring manager.

Also, try to show progression whenever you can, within companies and when changing between companies. Even if you received a slight upgrade in job title with a company, make sure to highlight that (for example if you advanced from Sales Associate to Senior Sales Associate).

Want to Read More Articles Like This One?

Sign up here to receive weekly updates from Career Enlightenment, and never miss another powerful job searching tip!

SUBSCRIBE!
You have Successfully Subscribed!

We hate spam too. Unsubscribe any time.

3. Accomplishments, Results, and Metrics

I mentioned earlier that the first thing employers are asking themselves is: Do you have the skills and experience necessary to come in, get up to speed, and start contributing quickly in this role?

Well, one of the best ways to show them you’re up to the challenge is to highlight past results, metrics, and results you’ve achieved.

This isn’t something most job seekers do enough of on their resume (in fact many job seekers don’t do this at all), so it’s a great way to stand out.

Try to be very specific in your resume bullet points. Add numbers and data wherever you can, and phrase things as accomplishments rather than responsibilities.

For example, rather than saying, “responsible for handling 50 customer support requests per day,” you could say, “Handled 50 customer support requests per day, achieving a 98% customer satisfaction rating”.

Now you’re sharing what you actually did and achieved, not just what you were responsible for.

There’s a big difference between an accomplishment and a duty, and you will stand out if you focus on writing about accomplishments.

Here are some specific numbers you can put in your resume bullets as you do this:

  • Percent increases/improvements you achieved for the company’s goals, or your own individual goals
  • Dollar amounts (revenue you brought in, cost savings, etc.)
  • Headcounts (e.g. “managed 20 people across three different groups,” or, “trained seven new team members”)

Then before your interview, review your resume and make sure you’re ready to talk about these accomplishments when they ask.

The “10-Second Rule”

You’ve probably heard the statistic that a recruiter only spends 10 seconds looking at each resume. The truth is we spend that much time scanning and deciding if we should keep reading.

If it looks like a good fit, we’ll continue reading for much longer and then pass your resume on to the hiring manager and recommend they interview you.

The 10-second rule is just an estimate of how long we spend deciding whether to keep reading or not.

Now that you know the first three places we look during this time, you can make sure your resume grabs attention and gets you invited to interview.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

While every job is different and requires a different set of abilities and technical knowledge, there are certain skills that are universally valued by employers regardless of the industry they work in. By working on and honing these essential job skills and competencies, you can help to increase that chances that you will secure that job of your dreams. Here are six skills you should work on developing in order to get the job of your dreams.

1. Communication Skills

Strong communications skills are not just valuable in the workplace but in all aspects of life. In business, communication is a defining feature of a successful company. This means effective communication taking place internally, between employees and employers, and externally, between the business to their clients and customers.

According to the Employer Survey run by the Association of American Colleges and Universities, 75% of employers want more emphasis by applicants on written and oral communication.

Employers want to hire someone who can communicate their ideas, thoughts, and opinions in an articulate, confident manner whether this is verbal or written communication skills. Even if your job does not require writing or the production of written content, strong writing skills are an essential means of communication, especially as people communicate so often over email.

While effectively communicating your own ideas is important, communication is a two-way street and strong communication skills also encompass being able to actively listen to your co-workers and to your clients. To hone your communication skills, make a conscious effort to listen to what people are saying to you and to process that information before responding. Practice writing when you can and make a concerted effort to understand grammar, punctuation, and structure when it comes to writing.

2. Leadership Skills

Whether or not you’re applying for a management or leadership position, leadership skills have an important place in a working environment. Being able to manage teams, guide people and lead a group is a powerful skill and valuable in every type of workplace. By having strong leadership skills you can stand out to hiring managers by demonstrating that you could go far and make a difference in the company.

It shows that you have confidence and a clear vision. It is important to remember that being a leader isn’t just about getting people to do what you want them to do, it’s about being supportive, motivating others, taking on responsibility and ensuring tasks are completed.

3. Interpersonal Skills

No matter what job you have, or are trying to get, the chances are you will have to interact with other people at some point, regardless of whether you work alone or in a team. For this reason, one of the most important skills that you need in a workplace is interpersonal skills so that you can build relationships with those around you, work in a team and deal with customers or clients.

A business’s success rarely comes down to one person doing something by themselves so having strong interpersonal skills allows you to leverage your talents in a team and achieve collective objectives.

Want to Read More Articles Like This One?

Sign up here to receive weekly updates from Career Enlightenment, and never miss another powerful job searching tip!

SUBSCRIBE!
You have Successfully Subscribed!

We hate spam too. Unsubscribe any time.

Interpersonal skills relate to your emotional intelligence, often called EQ. This refers to our ability to understand, interpret and respond to social situations and interactions. In a professional context, it refers to attributes that help us understand what motivates employees and interact with different types of personalities effectively.

Having strong interpersonal skills helps with teamwork, conflict resolution, negotiating and forming relationships in the workplace. To build your interpersonal skills it can help to focus on building your self-confidence. The more confident you are in yourself, the more comfortable you will be in your workplace.

A 2015 study by David Deming shows that the labor market increasingly rewards social skills and that those with better social skills tend to earn more.

4. Analytical And Research Capabilities

Research skills go a long way regardless of your profession. Analytical and research skills are important to employers because it shows that you have initiative and a drive to learn and do better. Research can be either theoretical or practice and in a workplace, it can be as simple as trialing new methods of doing work in order to work more efficiently and effectively.

It means a certain commitment to understanding and striving to improve how you work and what you can achieve for the business that you work for. Studies have shown that over 93% of employers believe that a demonstrated capacity to think critically is more valuable than a candidate’s undergraduate major.

5. Dependability

In the workplace, one of the most important skills to have is to be dependable. Even if you are technically brilliant at what you do, it does not amount to much if you are not reliable in when you’ll execute your tasks. Employers need to be able to depend on their employees and no matter how good you are at what you do, you are not an appealing employee if other people constantly have to step up and do the tasks you should have already done.

Being dependable requires organization and communication skills. Knowing your schedule and letting colleagues and employers know when you’ll finish tasks if you’ll meet deadlines and what they can expect from you are important. You can show dependability by being punctual, meeting deadlines, being detail-oriented and supporting your peers.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Few workers today start at a new company expecting to stay there permanently. No matter how lavish the onboarding experience, it doesn’t change this gnawing sentiment—most companies in this day and age aren’t that loyal to their employees, so why should I be loyal to them?

Corporate ladders have long since disappeared. In their place are flat organizations, offering much fewer opportunities to grow with the company. The only way to advance for many workers is through job hopping. LiveCareer’s recently released 2018 Job-Hopping Report examines the state of job hopping, right here and right now.

But let’s a step back first. There’s an even bigger quandary at hand, something economists call the dual consumer problem. The basic idea is that buyers and sellers each try to get the most value out of transacting with one another, and at the lowest cost. In the case of the job market, workers want the biggest compensation package they can get, while expending as few of their own resources as possible to do so. Likewise, employers want maximum productivity from their employees, while paying them as little as possible for that productivity.

That creates a lot of tension on both sides. Employers want to retain good employees, and good employees want all the rewards of hard work and dedication to the employer. But what’s good for one side often isn’t good for the other. And right now, employers are the ones at a disadvantage. With record low unemployment and dozens of powerful job search apps now available, good employees are more likely than ever to job hop.

Some HR software solutions are now trying to use algorithms to predict employee turnover. But by the time it identifies employees most at risk of leaving it’s probably too late. A savvy recruiter has already connected them with the hiring team of their new employer.

Beginning (a new job) with the end already in mind

If the old saying “people join organizations but leave managers” is at least half-true, then it follows that the stage for leaving their managers is already set by the conditions by which they joined the organization. Put another way, every employee joins already having some propensity to leave, but some are more inclined to job hop than others.

LiveCareer’s report shows that employers and job seekers would do much better to address the likelihood when they first engage on the job market, not when telltale signs start showing up that the honeymoon is over.

LiveCareer took a big data approach to learn more about what job seekers and employers bring to the table that might influence job hopping. We analyzed several thousands of resumes and job ads across 12 separate occupations, altogether making up one-quarter of all occupational categories.

Natural Language Processing was used to analyze the actual language job seekers and employers use as they begin transacting with one another, and to determine whether this language was characterized more by mutual agreement or disagreement.

We then cross-referenced this data against publicly available databases covering the entire workforce to determine whether certain jobseeker characteristics indicated a higher likelihood of job hopping.

We found that the three biggest influences on job hopping were a jobseeker’s education level, age, and occupation. Here’s how it breaks down:

Want to Read More Articles Like This One?

Sign up here to receive weekly updates from Career Enlightenment, and never miss another powerful job searching tip!

SUBSCRIBE!
You have Successfully Subscribed!

We hate spam too. Unsubscribe any time.

1. More highly educated workers tend to job hop more

The study found that job seekers holding only a high school degree stayed with their employers an average of 4.4 years before leaving. That’s almost 25 percent longer than job seekers with an associate’s degree (4.1 years), and 33 percent longer than those with a bachelor’s degree (3.3 years). Interestingly, job seekers who did not provide their education level on their resumes also held their jobs on average of 3.3 years before leaving.

But the effect seems to break down after that, as jobseekers with master’s degrees stayed an average of 3.7 years per job.

2. Older workers tend to job hop less than younger workers, but only up to a point

Overall, Baby Boomer-aged workers stayed with their employers an average of 8 years, followed by Generation X-aged (5.4 years), Millennial-aged (2.4 years), and Gen Z-aged (1.2 years). However, the study also confirmed that when controlling for career stage, the tendency to job hop is approximately equal for all ages of jobseekers.

The researchers emphasized that while job-hopping diminishes with greater age and career maturity, education and certification are more reliable indicators of job-hopping propensity.

3. Occupation matters

The study found that the overall average job duration across all 12 occupations was 3.8 years per job. Software developers and food/beverage servers were the two occupations with the most job hopping (average of only 2.4 and 2.8 years on the job respectively), while store managers and administrative assistants were the two with the least (4.9 and 4.7 years per job respectively).

Overall, the study suggested that workers tend to stay longer in roles requiring more employer-specific knowledge, and where it takes longer time to become proficient.

4. Be cool about your school

The study concluded with some advice for job seekers: be careful about how you present your educational background in situations where it could signal to employers that you won’t stay long.

A solid education buys options and mobility, which if played right can signal that you are very competitive in the job market. But for occupations with high rates of job hopping, it can easily make you look overqualified, or likely to outgrow the role quickly.

For roles where job skills transfer relatively easily, you might not even need the degree or certificate. The study found many employers place far less weight on credentials when hiring for roles where employees don’t stay long. Still, job seekers should do their homework, reviewing job ads carefully to determine which credentials really do matter.

Access additional findings, plus a free PDF download of the full report, via this link: 2018 Job-Hopping Report.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The unemployment rates for millennials are higher than those in other age groups. This up-and-coming generation is shaping how we think about work, and yet they are struggling to find jobs.

The modern workplace needs them to gain experience and take the places of previous generations, and yet they seem to experience many stumbling blocks when trying to enter the job market.

Expectations may be too high

There is an idea that millennials are overconfident about what they can expect. They want the higher pay that comes from more responsibility without first getting the experience they need. This overconfidence could be affecting their potential.

If millennials don’t find a ‘dream job,’ they may get discouraged and stop looking. They may not even think of looking for a job opportunity at a company like Walmart, for example, because they don’t realize how much they can progress and grow once they have a foot in the door.

Work ethic, ability to take responsibility and critical thinking are skills that are likely to draw the attention of employers and create new opportunities. Like many other large companies, Walmart has plenty of opportunities for advancement. It is looking for software engineers, data scientists, entrepreneurs, merchants, and technologists.

Mismatched skills

Millennials are facing a demand for new kinds of skills and education. Many of them are well educated, have skills and are ready to find employment. However, they often lack the most basic workplace skills such as an ability to communicate and organize.

They may have focused on theoretical studies and be highly qualified and yet not have the work skills that come with experience. Employers want to experience and recruiters emphasize that hiring managers usually believe college graduates are not ready for the workplace.

For those who have just graduated, this may make them feel getting a job is impossible. To get that all-important experience, they may have to take on a position that is not ideal, but they should do this at a company where there is potential for growth.

Today many free online courses exist that millennials can take to train themselves in key areas important to employers. Finding a mentor to help teach them the skills they need is another option. The more initiative they show in learning and trying to further their careers, the more likely employers are to be impressed. Mentioning any kind of paid work experience, even if it was freelance, can be helpful.

The wrong focus

Millennials may focus on what they need from the job, rather than on how employers will benefit from employing them. In an interview, they will speak about their education, themselves and what they expect from the job.

It’s better to focus on the benefits they can provide to the employee, such as an ability to solve problems or save money for them. This focus should start with the cover letter and continue in the interviews. In a cover letter, they should introduce themselves and then outline their understanding of the role and the organization. They should make a pitch for their vision of the role and why they would be great at it.

Want to Read More Articles Like This One?

Sign up here to receive weekly updates from Career Enlightenment, and never miss another powerful job searching tip!

SUBSCRIBE!
You have Successfully Subscribed!

We hate spam too. Unsubscribe any time.

A competitive, crowded labor market

Employment opportunities are limited, and most adults agree that it is much harder today for young people to get jobs. This is due to a variety of different factors such as the higher prices of a college education, the economic crash less than a decade ago and a wider skills gap which creates difficulty in finding an entry point.

Millennials need to increase their employability. They have graduated in a difficult economic environment. They need to think about developing skills in new emerging professions in fields like healthcare, IT, finance and energy. It is in these fields that they can build a foundation for a successful career.

Some of them are prepared to go back to graduate school, but trade schools and certificate programs also give the opportunity to retrain and transition into a different field. They are also less time consuming and costly than graduate school.

Negative attitudes

Anxiety, doubt, fear, and frustration are just some of the emotions experienced by millennials who are battling to find jobs. This can prevent them from being open to new possibilities.

If they are positive, engaged and focused, they are more likely to find opportunities to grow, even if they start in a fairly menial position. No-one wants to be an assistant, but at least it’s better than not having a job at all and the way the job is done may just draw the attention of someone in leadership and open up new opportunities.

Student debt

Student debt is often a crushing burden for millennials. This debt puts pressure on them and may keep them stuck in a low-paying job with no prospects where they just survive rather than fulfilling their potential.

Careful planning can help them to take a step forward at a time without losing hope. Staying informed about the job market, keeping tabs on what skills they need to develop and staying positive can help them to make progress.

Activity on social sites

Activity on social sites can work against millennials. Employers may have a very different idea of what’s appropriate on social media to them. It’s a bad idea to post a job interview on social media unless social networking is part of the job description and they have something positive to say.

While most students keep their resume up-to-date when looking for jobs, they may be less careful about taking potentially damaging content from their social media accounts.

However, social media can also be used by millennials to increase their chances of being employed. Employers who see a professional profile on LinkedIn and read great content posted by a potential employee will receive a favorable impression.

Just because everyone agrees that finding a job is difficult for millennials and there are no guarantees, doesn’t mean it isn’t worth the effort. Follow these tactics, keep thinking positively and be open to every possibility.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

While most of us are on social media in one form or another, not all of us take full advantage of its potential – especially when it comes to highlighting our professional life.

Statistics show that 70% of employers are scrawling through social media to find candidates and assess them. This is a huge statistic, too huge to ignore when navigating the online recruitment space.

So, whether you’re trying to catch the eye of an employer, boost the credibility of your small business, show off your skills, or simply connect with the right people in your industry, social media offers an effective (and essential) way of doing so.

To dig deeper, here are five ways to make the most of your online channels.

1. Complete your profiles

Being involved in recruitment, I see daily examples of either under-utilized social profiles or over-used. Nothing screams “unprofessional” more than having sloppily made or forgetful profiles. This is particularly important when it comes to social media sites such as LinkedIn.

Recruiters want to know the best of what you’ve done, and they don’t have the time to sift through your lifestyle. By optimizing your social profile to the middle-ground, recruiters and companies will see the thought you’ve put into it, and you’ll stand out from the rest.

So, it’s important to take time to complete your profiles. For example, if you’re working in the construction industry, make sure you’ve included any building and construction courses you’ve done, such as a diploma of building, but leave out the beginner’s retail position you started at the supermarket when you were 15.

Fill out your employment history and any other relevant sections, and try to keep the writing engaging throughout. If you’re not much of a writer, get a friend or copywriter to help you out. They can make sure your content is SEO-optimized so that Google and other search engines have an easier time finding you.

It’s also important not to go overboard with how many social media platforms you use. Pick the ones you’re able to spend the most time on and that are most relevant to your industry. It’s better to manage fewer platforms really well than overcommit.

2. Stay active

It’s called “social” media for a reason. To highlight your profiles, it’s important to stay active and make an effort to regularly interact, share posts and update your content.

No matter what industry you’re working in, using social media is a simple way to show off your connections. You can build your online presence by joining industry groups and following industry influencers.

If you’re trying to optimize your business’s Facebook page, make your “Likes” public so others can see the circles you’re in and the professional groups and businesses you’re interested in. The same applies to LinkedIn and other social media channels.

3. Keep it professional

Let’s say you’ve just finished a course and you’re looking for a job. If you want to make the right impression on hiring managers and potential employers, take time to clean up your social media profiles.

The truth is, people judge you based on what you post, how you act and who you’re connected with on social media. But there are things you can do right away to clean things up.

Make sure you’re LinkedIn and Twitter profile photo is professional – not an image of you and your friends at a party. While Facebook and Instagram are more personal by nature, it’s still important to get rid of any potentially offensive posts or photos.

Want to Read More Articles Like This One?

Sign up here to receive weekly updates from Career Enlightenment, and never miss another powerful job searching tip!

SUBSCRIBE!
You have Successfully Subscribed!

We hate spam too. Unsubscribe any time.

4. Show off your expertise

When it comes to showcasing your skills on social media, ensure the content you’re posting is relevant and interesting. Here’s what you can do:

  • List your skills, but back them up with a few examples.
  • Post samples and case studies of your work.
  • Include links to other social media channels (e.g. Instagram) where people can see what you’re capable of in more detail.
  • Link to a more detailed resume or personal website.
  • Show off your side projects.

Interestingly, here are some of the key things recruiters look for when they find you online:

  • 61% of recruiters look for qualification verification
  • 50% look to find whether a candidate possesses an online persona
  • 37% look to see what others may be posting about you (friends, connections)

But mostly, they’re looking for a reason not to hire you. Don’t let them find a reason, clean that profile up!

5. Ask for endorsements

Reviews and testimonials matter. People trust friends, family, and other customers more than advertisements. Having positive endorsements on your social media channels is a great way to highlight your skills, experience, and connections.

It might take a while to build up your endorsements, but even one positive review can go a long way. Start off by writing messages to a few of your friends, co-workers or clients, asking them to leave you a comment. Here are a few ways to do this:

  • Use LinkedIn’s endorsements section.
  • Use visitor post section on Facebook page.
  • Pin positive tweets on Twitter.
  • Get people to share posts projects you’ve worked on.

However you go about it, it only takes a couple of minutes to ask someone for positive feedback or a glowing endorsement. It’s a quick action with huge social benefits.

Get more social

It’s never too late to jump on social media and build your profiles. Your online presence can influence an employer’s decision, put you ahead of other job seekers, or find you new clients for your business.

And the thing is, social media isn’t going away any time soon. It’s best to use it to your advantage, highlight your skills and expertise, connect with relevant industry folk, and keep your finger on the pulse.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

When you apply for an internship, job or promotion, it makes sense not just to research industry trends and competitor developments, but also to understand what’s going on in HR, because these are the people that hire and fire staff.

The latest HR trends are all to do with technology, which is a major factor in any good HR team, so your knowledge of the tech they use will help you get ahead.

AI is being used to find the best candidates

Large companies that don’t use AI (Artificial Intelligence) in their recruitment process are at a disadvantage because they can’t maximize efficiency when it comes to scanning all those CVs and cover letters and interviewing a diverse range of candidates.

As Benefit News reported in April, there are now some brilliant digital tools to spot and counteract recruitment biases towards people of a certain sexuality, gender, race or religion. Say goodbye to the pale, male and stale working environment.

To keep on the right side of an automated data checker, when you submit your CV or digital job application form, make doubly sure you’ve filled the right information in the right boxes. Some application forms can pull in data from your uploaded CV or LinkedIn profile, but they can paste it in the wrong order or with formatting issues.

The intranet becomes more valuable

According to Workforce.com, a company’s intranet is ranked just behind email as a way for HR to keep in contact with staff – ahead of social media, apps and physical posters in staff rooms. As workers deal with email overload and endless email threads, the intranet seems like a great alternative way to spread messages, point out internal vacancies and highlight good employees.

Good job signposting is particularly important for retention: the LinkedIn Global Recruiting Trends report 2018 highlighted the case of Nielsen increasing staff retention by better signposting promotions and internal jobs.

If your dream employer has very few vacancies, consider an internship as a way in. As an intern, you’ve taken that valuable step inside the company and you can check the intranet for news of upcoming vacancies or ways to get ahead internally, like finding a mentor.

Want to Read More Articles Like This One?

Sign up here to receive weekly updates from Career Enlightenment, and never miss another powerful job searching tip!

SUBSCRIBE!
You have Successfully Subscribed!

We hate spam too. Unsubscribe any time.

Employees are worried about lack of technology training

According to HR News, 70% of UK employees claim they aren’t getting the technology training they need, and 31% of IT managers are worried about a potential skills shortage affecting digital company initiatives.

This suggests there’s a gap between the technology employees are using and the level of training they’re given. If this happens in your workplace, research one-day courses or workshops that you and your colleagues could complete to get up to (and claim on expenses).

Should an employer not be willing to pay for you to learn new tech skills, consider paying privately if the technology is essential in your industry, because it will be invaluable for future jobs, and not having the skills will put you at a disadvantage when applying for jobs.

The struggle to ‘switch off’ is a concern

In May, the CIPD released the results of its major survey, Health and Wellbeing at Work, which monitored health and absence management in over 1,000 organizations. The technology was a double-edged sword for respondents.

On the plus side, 74% of those surveyed said technology helps with flexible working, which is a big plus point for employees, and 44% said it reduces commuting time and costs for staff. However, 87% reported being unable to switch off outside working hours, and 46% said this technology reliance could affect the quality of their sleep. An over-reliance on technology can also contribute to ‘presenteeism’ (working long hours for the sake of appearances or team pressure but achieving little) or ‘leaveism’ (working whilst technically on annual leave).

When applying for jobs, read up on a company’s culture as much as possible to get a sense of its technology use and its level of interest in staff wellbeing through HR priorities and mission statements. A good employer values employees’ peace of mind and downtime as well as their working time.

Understanding these HR technology trends will keep you up to speed with the latest concerns for hiring managers and HR managers, which is always a bonus for boosting your career prospects.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

The societal and cultural pressures of today’s shifting environments sometimes cause instability even to the most dedicated workers around us. This means that regardless of your skills and work ethics, you will be required, sooner rather than later and probably often enough, to search for a new job.

Therefore, self-presentation skills like polishing your resume and knowing how to sell yourself are just as important as your work skills per se. Indeed, we don’t really like this phrasing either – selling yourself – but the idea that we should be able to make others see why we are a valuable worker does ring true.

To help you on your way to better application emails, we’ve put together this brief guide. The source for all tips and advice presented here is https://jobapplicationworld.com/. When you are looking for a guide to applying for a specific job or company, you can head over to their portal to read more targeted advice.

What Is the Purpose of a Job Application Email?

You may have noticed that nowadays most companies have a dedicated job application portal, where you simply upload your resume and other significant data, answer a few questions and click Apply. Considering this rather automated means of applying to a job, what is then the purpose of a job application email? Do people still send this kind of email anymore?

The answer is that the job application email remains a strong component of every job application, even in perhaps altered forms.

First of all, there are still companies which don’t use a portal for automated applications. For them, sending a job application email is still mandatory.

Second of all, some portals will also ask you to upload a motivation letter or a job application statement. This is the job application email re-hashed. This is where you introduce yourself, where you explain your motivation or weave the separate facts from your resume into a story, your story.

Even where this is optional, you shouldn’t miss out on this opportunity to introduce yourself this way. Therefore, a job application email or cover letter or whatever name your potential employer prefers is always a good idea.

Want to Read More Articles Like This One?

Sign up here to receive weekly updates from Career Enlightenment, and never miss another powerful job searching tip!

SUBSCRIBE!
You have Successfully Subscribed!

We hate spam too. Unsubscribe any time.

What Makes a Good Job Application Email?

Here are just a few characteristics that make a job application email objectively good.

#1. It’s short and to the point: 3-4 paragraphs will do.

#2. It manages to paint an accurate picture on your job experience and education background.

#3. It conveys why you think you would do a good job if hired, what makes you stand out, without being boastful.

#4. It also delivers a statement on your personal motivation, but all the while remaining professional.

#5. Its tone is warm and positive, but not too casual or excessively friendly.

#6. It also demonstrates a bit of knowledge about the company’s activity and where your job could fit in.

Quick Email Checklist

After you’ve written a few paragraphs that manage to comprise the points we presented above, you should also go through this quick checklist. This is to make sure you won’t allow grammar or style mistakes to escape your attention.

Here is the stuff you should double-over on, in a nutshell:

  • Are you using a professional email address, comprised of your name and last name?
  • Are you, at the same time, using a personal email, not one created by the company you are currently working in?
  • Are you using a simple to read, classic font?
  • Are you conveying your purpose for writing the email early on? You should state the position you are applying for and your intention as early in the email as possible.
  • Is the email text easy enough to follow and comprehend? If not, try for shorter sentences and paragraphs.
  • Is all the spelling and grammar neat and correctly used? Make sure you re-read the email at least a couple of times and edit it for better phrasing.
How to Go the Extra Mile with Your Job Application Email

If you manage to follow the tips and tricks above, your job application email is already among the best the recruiters will probably receive. But if you really want to do something special and get noticed right away, try going the extra mile. You will be able to tell what this extra mile is for each individual case, but here are some starting points:

  • Address your job application email to a specific person whenever possible.
  • Try attaching a sample of your previous work or some form of portfolio exhibit, even if you don’t have a full portfolio file to show. Just your resume is the bare requirement, extra proof of skill is always a nice surprise!
  • If you are applying for some kind of creative job, then feel free to go off the beaten path just a little.
  • If you feel confident in your ideas and can also back them up with data and mini-study, you could also come up with a proposal of how you would like to improve the performance of the company or department you are applying to. You must be very careful not to criticize or sound arrogant, though, so tread lightly on this one.
  • Include a nice email signature that recounts your contact details and LinkedIn account (if you have one).
  • Before sending your job application email to its intended recipient, send it to yourself first to see if the format will hold and if everything looks good once received.

If all looks well, feel free to go ahead and send your job application email. Fingers crossed!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Judging by the big numbers, the job market looks astoundingly good. Unemployment remains at its lowest in a generation. Job creation is brisk. And wage growth is starting to pick up.

But underneath all the good news is another big number you don’t see: how long it actually takes to get a job. Unemployment spells are still very high by historical standards. And the actual time spent on job searches is longer than ever.

There are several reasons for this. Mass hiring by big employers is no longer common. Those hundreds of thousands of hires every month are now spread out over more companies. They tend to have smaller total headcounts, hire fewer new employees at a time, and do so with very high candidate-to-recruiter ratios.

Most seek specialized skills and expect new hires to hit the ground running. Consequently, they’ll take extra time to find the right fit, especially for cross-functional roles.

And for all its promises to free up resources so that HR can get strategic about hiring, recruiting technology often does the opposite, feeding HR more candidates and workflows than it can handle.

Direct job apps that are on the job seeker’s side

We’ve studied data on hundreds of thousands of job seekers, and found the majority are experienced tradespersons or professionals. That’s no surprise.

But think about what it means: most job seekers are likely to face a job search that is longer than they expect, perhaps much longer.

Our research also shows very clearly that the longer you’ve been on the job search, the more difficult it is to stay efficient and organized. That can have a seriously negative impact on staying motivated, which in turn drags out your job search.

That doesn’t have to happen. It’s a tight labor market, and so when employers want to talk to a candidate, they mean business. The sooner you can get your resume in front of people who would be thrilled to see it, the sooner they’ll get to meet the person behind the resume . . . and the sooner everyone can start making money!

Below are profiles of direct job apps and tools that can help shorten the job search, and keep you efficient and organized:

  1. LinkUp

Job seekers spend a lot of time online looking for good opportunities. They cannot afford to waste any of it applying to bogus, inaccurate, outdated, or closed positions.

LinkUp lists over three million jobs available exclusively on company websites. It collects only up-to-date, validated job postings, sourced daily and directly from the actual company websites. Many of their listings are not available on job boards, and exist on the hidden job market, where much of the real job market action is.

Want to Read More Articles Like This One?

Sign up here to receive weekly updates from Career Enlightenment, and never miss another powerful job searching tip!

SUBSCRIBE!
You have Successfully Subscribed!

We hate spam too. Unsubscribe any time.

  1. JobScan

Once you find a great opportunity, you need to personalize your resume to show the hiring manager that you are a perfect match. But first, you’ve got to get past the robot that screens your resume for the right keywords.

JobScan helps you find those right keywords quickly and efficiently. Simply paste both your resume and the job description text of the desired opening side by side on their website. This direct job app analyzes how closely the two matched and offers suggestions about what keywords your resume needs in order to get past the ATS, and into the hands of a live human.

  1. LiveCareer Apply Tool

When you find a great opportunity, you want to act fast, while it’s still fresh and before the employer gets flooded with applications. And your application needs to be 100 percent error-free. Even one small mistake can disqualify you instantly.

The LiveCareer Apply Tool helps jobseekers apply both quickly and accurately. It comes in the form of a free Chrome extension and can autofill just about any online job application. Designed to work with nearly every major ATS, it can also autofill non-text elements, such as checkboxes, drop down menus, and radio buttons.

  1. JobHero, JibberJobber, Rake

Being organized is all about knowing what you did last so that you know what to do next, and when to do it. Yet it is easy to lose track of where you applied, whom you spoke with, and what the next steps are.

JobHero is a desktop direct job app that provides a concise dashboard for keeping literally everything about your job search organized. That includes online postings, contacts, submissions application status, resumes, and cover letters. For jobseekers preferring to use mobile devices, JibberJobber and Rake are top direct job apps. All three apps include schedulers to set reminders for follow-ups and deadlines.

  1. TalentWorks

The job search for most everyone is a massive grind. Who hasn’t wished there was some way to offload it all to someone who could help? Or something along those lines.

TalentWorks automates the entire job search process up to the interview, all in a single app. Using AI technology, the app first polishes up your resume to increase its chances of being read by an actual person. It then finds openings that best match your background and qualifications, and emails them to you. For those openings that interest you, the app automatically prepares and submits applications.

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

You hate crowds but here you are, getting ready to take the stage at a public speaking contest. Butterflies in your stomach? More like a ball of fire. The hum of the crowd increases after they announce you are next. Time to take the stage.

Why are you doing this? Because you know the value personal development has in your life. You know discomfort is part of achieving big goals, and you’re facing the best opportunity right now — earning acceptance into your dream college.

Staying in your comfort zone is not the answer. Instead, learn how your personality traits form your comfort zone, then realize that you need to develop self-awareness and determine how to step out of your comfort zone to make your dreams come true.

Follow these steps to get out of your comfort zone and earn acceptance into your dream college:

Step 1: Define Your Comfort Zone

A comfort zone is a psychological state where you feel at ease and in control of your environment. You are familiar with your situation. Naturally, stepping outside of this causes anxiety and generates stress.

The best way to start your personal development journey is by defining your comfort zone based on your personality. For example, if you’re more introverted, activities like public speaking and working in group settings may seem daunting.

Reflect on your past experiences in work and in school. Determine what situations made you feel the least and most comfortable. This will give you a good idea of where fear is holding you back.

Let’s say you felt the most uncomfortable leading a group project. You felt perfectly comfortable doing your part of the project but didn’t like having to delegate tasks to others. This shows you that leadership skills don’t come naturally to you, which is perfectly fine. Now you know what to work toward.

Step 2: Determine What Scares You

Once you know your comfort zone, select activities outside of that. What activities scare you? What activities go against your nature?

It’s important to know this because when you apply to colleges, admissions professionals look for specific traits that may lie outside your comfort zone. My company, KudosWall, conducted a study and found that creativity, which is commonly viewed as an introvert trait, is highly valued in college resumes, online portfolios, online presence, and admission essays.

On the other hand, extroverts prevail by showcasing their outgoing personality, creating large networks, and establishing a personal brand. To put it simply, both extroverts and introverts have advantages in different areas of the application process.

While it’s important to play to your strengths, also find ways to pursue new challenges. Dedicate yourself to personal development by finding those activities that push you beyond your boundaries.

Do you hate leading? Find activities that give you more experience in that role, like being captain of a soccer team. Discomfort is where growth begins.

Want to Read More Articles Like This One?

Sign up here to receive weekly updates from Career Enlightenment, and never miss another powerful job searching tip!

SUBSCRIBE!
You have Successfully Subscribed!

We hate spam too. Unsubscribe any time.

Step 3: Find Your ‘Productive Discomfort’

Expect to face fears, doubts, anxiety, and discomfort. You’re going to want to quit. You may regret signing up for a project or entering a competition.

Whatever causes these feelings, run toward that. That fear and anxiety actually make you more productive and adaptable.

The more you do things outside of your comfort zone, the easier it will be when you face new, unexpected changes. This is called ‘productive discomfort’ — when you reach a state of optimal anxiety that pushes you to perform better.

As you seek new experiences and learn new skills, you will be more creative and see old problems in a new light. This obviously creates many benefits for you moving forward in your academics.

You may suddenly realize when the pressure is on that you are actually great at organizing big projects, delegating to your partners, and following through on the final outcome. This is progress.

Step 4: Share Your Progress

As you seek out ways to push yourself outside of your comfort zone, share your personal development journey publicly. This isn’t just for bragging or gaining attention — it can actually help you get into college.

In fact, our survey found that online presence is one of the most valuable college application factors admissions professionals look at. Your online presence is where you let your character and personality shine. If seeking out growth opportunities is part of your character, be proud of that.

Consider creating a personal website or starting a blog to tell your stories of failure and success. Document what your process looks like and how you manage to accept discomfort and grow.

The ball of fire in your stomach, that tightness in your shoulders, those sweaty palms — these feelings mean you’re growing.

How are you approaching personal development and seeking discomfort? Share in the comments!

Read Full Article
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Many companies don’t have a problem with their employees working from home. Freelancing gives you an opportunity to have a job while enjoying the comfort of working in a corporate environment. It’s important for your resume to show that you’re competent as a remote worker. The ability to telecommute is an important skill that employers are looking for. Displaying a good record of success and remote work experience improves your chance of getting a good job. Here are some tips to help you:

Highlight It in Your Career Objective

From the beginning of the resume, make it clear that you’re applying for a job that will allow you to work from home. Make your employers understand the pros of working from home. Prove to them that working from home does not mean that you’ll only work when you feel like it. There are a few ways of mentioning this, for example:

  • State remote work in place of city or state
  • State the corporate location of the company when using the state format. However, note in the first sentence that the work is done remotely.

State Your Address as a Remote Worker

If you’ve previously worked as a remote worker, make sure that you state some of the things that you’ve achieved while working from home. State these projects in your work experience section. Remember, a good resume should have more of show than tell. Describe in detail how the past job responsibilities were done while working from home. Don’t forget to provide your address.

Describe Your Home Office Setup

In the work experience section, drop subtle hints about your home office setup. This will show how professional you are. It will also remove the stereotype ideology about how remote workers work in their pajamas while lying in bed typing the entire day. For example, you could mention that you organized social media marketing promotions through your CRM software and VOIP phone that’s connected to high-speed internet.

Explain How You Can Work with Other Employees

Despite working from home, your employer needs to know that you’re a team player. They need to know that in the event you’re put in a group, you’ll be able to associate and work together with other employees with no problem. In the work experience section, highlight how you’ve previously accomplished a task that required a group effort. Mentioning that you were working with fellow remote workers will give you an added bonus. It also shows that you can conduct business in a co-working space.

Want to Read More Articles Like This One?

Sign up here to receive weekly updates from Career Enlightenment, and never miss another powerful job searching tip!

SUBSCRIBE!
You have Successfully Subscribed!

We hate spam too. Unsubscribe any time.

Build Up on the Skills Section

Simple skills such as being an excellent communicator or being a good manager are excellent skills for other traditional jobs. However, for remote work, they cannot apply. It’s better to display your prowess in certain areas to increase your chances of getting an interview call instead of landing in the rejection pile.

When stating the skills, mention how they will apply for the job. For example, instead of saying good communication, you could say how comfortable you are in using video conferencing. Mention how you’re conversant with chat platforms and use of social media to stay in touch with others on the remote team that you’re working with.

Ensure that you have good compare and contrast topics in the skills section. This will show the employer that remote working is better than going to an office. For example, topics such as working conditions are applicable. Show how working in a comfortable environment that’s safe and familiar will lead to better quality of work as compared to the usual structured office.

Update Your Online Profile

If the resume is submitted online, make sure that your Linkedin profile is up to date. A Linkedin profile is just like a regular resume but requires more detail.

Just like a regular job, your employer will want to find out your social media life. They will look into social media sites to see if your name appears. Ensure that your life is private and you’re not tagged in unnecessary posts.

Conclusion

Remember that a resume is what will sell you as a good candidate for a remote work position. Reinforce your credentials with a well-written cover letter that will help your employers see that you’re an asset and you should join their company. Technology is continuously growing. It’s allowing people to do their jobs from the comfort of their home. While writing your resume, make sure that you’re highlighting the strengths and the advantages of working from home. Show your potential employer that working from home is just as efficient as the traditional, standard office job and probably even better.

So, do you think that in future we shall all be remote workers? Have you ever worked from home? Let us know in the comments section.

Read Full Article

Read for later

Articles marked as Favorite are saved for later viewing.
close
  • Show original
  • .
  • Share
  • .
  • Favorite
  • .
  • Email
  • .
  • Add Tags 

Separate tags by commas
To access this feature, please upgrade your account.
Start your free month
Free Preview